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case study 01
ERSHADNAGAR, gazipur, bangladesh ...............02 - 09
...............10 - 16
...............17 - 21
...............22 - 28
...............29 - 30
case studies 02
BELAPUR, new mumbai, india
case studies 03
KAMPUNG, jakarta, indonesia
site analysis
NISCHINTAPUR, savar, bangladesh
worker profile and space program
NISCHINTAPUR, savar, bangladesh
housing is
a process,
not only
a product
- John F. C. Turner
ERSHAD NAGAR
RESETTLEMENT
Tongi, Dhaka, Bangladesh
ERSHAD NAGAR
RESETTLEMENT
Tongi, Dhaka, Bangladesh
YEAR OF CONSTRUCTION: 1974-75
LOCATION:
Tongi, Dhaka, Bangladesh
OVERVIEW:
Ershad Nagar is one of the three resettlement camps constructed by the former prime
minister Sheikh Mujibur Rahman in Dhaka in 1975. The previous name of this settle-
ment was Dattapara Rehabilitation Centre. The camp was first established on an
agricultural land of 101 acre (40.40 hectre).
In 1984, when the country was under Military regime, President General Ershad first
proposed for the semi pucca (semi permanent) houses and roads and changed the
name Datta para to Ershad Nagar, which means the City of Ershad.
OBJECTIVE:
The intension was to provide housing for low income group people at 101acres of
land.
DENSITY:
For all 3444 families, only 1116 houses were constructed at Ershad Nagar . Only
71% of the families are within the low-income category
ORIENTATION:
developed mainly along the east-west axis.
COMPOSITION ACCOMMODATION:
Each house was constructed for two individual families and each family had
two rooms with a kitchen, pit latrine, tube well and an open veranda. The plot for
each family was 8m X 8m approximately
The other houses in the camp are much smaller in size with bamboo mat and tin at
the roof. The main road of this settlement is 20 feet wide and the sub roads are 10
feet. For planning purposes the whole area has been divided into 8 different sectors
TECHNOLOGY:
external walls in brick, corrugated tin supported with timber posts.
MATERIALS:
brick, plaster of white color, colored fixtures made of wood, outdoor paving stone
blocks.
C BLOCK
A BLOCK
D BLOCK
B BLOCK
E BLOCK
ERSHAD NAGAR
BUS STAND
LOCATION MAP
Ershad Nagar still continue the extended family structure. This also indicate that the second generation who
had born here and also got married did not move to other settlements and most of the cases they extended
their dwelling spaces to accommodate themselves without making an extra burden for the legal authorities.
Ershad Nagar only 71% of the families are within the low-income category
Ershad Nagar camp is the most privileged settlement, since the inhabitants dont pay rent and they hold
larger plots than bustees.
58.20% of the families have two rooms; 16% also have more than two rooms but there is variation in the
room sizes. As the room sizes are not equal in all eight sectors, the sizes of the houses are also different
unlike the bustees.However, the majority has a room size of more than 60m2 and of course they include
other spaces like veranda, inside courtyard and attached bathrooms within the living
spaces Although most of the households have their own toilet facilities, 28% of the families do not have bath-
ing facilities inside the house and 19.6% of them have to bring water from the outside.
Source: S Mahmood, THE INTERACTION BETWEEN PHYSICAL SPACE AND WAY OF LIFE IN LOW-IN-
COME SETTLEMENTS: CASE OF BUSTEES AND RESETTLEMENT CAMPS IN DHAKA
PROJECT BRIEF
LAND USE PATTERN
STRUCTURE TYPE
LEGEND
RESIDENTIAL
COMMERCIAL
MANUFACTURING
COMMUNITY
EDUCATION
RECREATION
LEGEND
KACHA
SEMI PUCCA
PUCCA
C BLOCK
C BLOCK
LOW INCOME
LOW-MIDDLE INCOME
MIDDLE INCOME
2 ROOMS
MORE THAN
TWO ROOMS
1 ROOM
71%
59%
16%
25%
22%
9%
03 | 04

Case
Study 01
Living Pattern Income Status Housing
Tenancy
Family
Member
Household
Type
Members Occupation Monthly Income
9 Extended
family
Grandparents, 1 family with two
children and other family with one
child
Carpentry 11000/= Owner
Utilities Facilities
Electricity Water supply Energy
consumption
Sanitation Kitchen
Meter connected (legal)
400 tk
Tube well
Submersible
Pump
connected.
Used Lakri (Fire
Woods) 4
mounds/ month
1200 tk
1 Toilet / 3
Families
Clay stove

Case Study 1 Case Study 2

Case
Study 02
Living Pattern Income Status Housing
Tenancy
Family
Member
Household
Type
Members Occupation Monthly Income
4 Nuclear
family
A family with two children Business(Shop
Owner)
15000/= Owner
Utilities Facilities
Electricity Water supply Energy
consumption
Sanitation Kitchen
Meter connected (legal)
500 tk
Tubewell
Submersible
Pump
connected.
Used Lakri (Fire
Woods)
3mounds/ month
1000 tk
1 Toilet / 4
persons
Clay stove

PLAN
PHOTOGRAPHS PLAN PHOTOGRAPHS
Case Study 3

Case
Study 03
Living Pattern Income Status Housing
Tenancy
Cluster
Arrange
ment
Family
Member
Household Type Occupation Monthly
Income
23
Persons
in 6
families
sharing
courtyard
and
utilities in
one
cluster
1
st
Family: 4
2
nd
Family: 6
3
rd
Family: 3
4
th
Family: 2
5
th
Family: 3
6
th
Family: 5
Nuclear
Extended
Nuclear
Nuclear
Nuclear
Extended
1
st
Family: Day labor
2
nd
Family: Day labor
3
rd
Family: Shop owner
4
th
Family: Day labor
5
th
Family: Factory
worker
6
th
Family: Day laborer
7000/
8500/
12000/
8500/
15000/
8500/
Renter
Renter
Owner
Renter
Owner
Renter

Utilities Facilities
Electricity Water supply Energy
consumption
Sanitation Kitchen
Meter connected (legal)
700 tk
Tubewell
Submersible
Pump
connected and
overhead
reservoir Tank
Used Lakri (Fire
Woods)7-8
mounds/ month
2500 tk
Use LP gas
container 1500 tk
2 Toilets/ 7 Families Clay stove/ LP Gas
stove

PLAN
SECTION
PHOTOGRAPHS
05 | 06

Case
Study 04
Living Pattern Income Status Housing
Tenancy
Cluster
Arrangement
Family
Member
Household Type Occupation Monthly
Income
20 Persons in
5 families
sharing
courtyard and
utilities in one
cluster
1
st
Family: 4
2
nd
Family: 6
3
rd
Family: 3
4
th
Family: 2
5
th
Family: 5

Nuclear
Extended
Nuclear
Nuclear
Extended

1
st
Family: Day labor
2
nd
Family: Day labor
3
rd
Family: Shop owner
4
th
Family: Day labor
5
th
Family: Factory worker

8500/=
8500/=
12000/=
8500/=
15000/=

Renter
Renter
Owner
Renter
Owner

Utilities Facilities
Electricity Water
supply
Energy
consumption
Sanitation Kitchen
Some of the family have legal
meters, some of them dont
have any
Tubewell,
Submersible
Pump
connected.
Used Lakri
(Fire Woods)
9-10
mounds/
month 2500-
3000 tk
2 Sanitary latrine for the
cluster.
Clay stove, LP gas stove
and Electric Heater was
present there.


Case
Study 05
Living Pattern Income Status Housing
Tenancy
Cluster
Arrange
ment
Family Member Household Type Occupation Monthly Income
12
Persons
in 3
families
sharing
one
cluster
1
st
Family: 3
2
nd
Family: 6
3
rd
Family: 3
Nuclear
Extended
Nuclear

1
st
Family: Day
labor
2
nd
Family: Shop
owner
3
rd
Family: Shop
owner

7000/=
12000/=
12000/=
Renter
Owner
Owner
Utilities Facilities
Electricity Water supply Energy
consumption
Sanitation Kitchen
Meter connected (legal)
500 tk
Tubewell
Submersible
Pump
connected.
Very poor toilet
condition.
Clay stove, Illegal Electric
heater connection

Case Study 4 Case Study 5
PLAN
PLAN
PHOTOGRAPHS
PHOTOGRAPHS
Case Study 6 Case Study 7

Case
Study 06
Living Pattern Income Status Housing
Tenancy
Cluster
Arrangement
Family
Member
Household Type Occupation Monthly
Income
10 Persons
in 3 families
sharing one
cluster
1
st
Family: 4
2
nd
Family: 3
3
rd
Family: 3
Nuclear
Nuclear
Nuclear

1
st
Family: Day labor
2
nd
Family: Shop
owner
3
rd
Family: Shop
owner

8500/=
12000/=
12000/=
Owner
Owner
Renter
Utilities Facilities
Electricity Water supply Energy
consumption
Sanitation Kitchen
Meter connected (legal)
500-600 tk
Submersible
Pump connected,
Collect drinking
water from Govt.
Water Supply
Taps
Used Lakri(Fire
Woods) 4
mounds/
month 1200
tk,

1 Toilet / 3 Families 2 Clay stove


Case
Study 07
Living Pattern Income Status Housing
Tenancy
Family
Member
Household
Type
Members Occupation Monthly Income
4 Nuclear
family
A family with two children Business(Shop
Owner)
15000/= Owner
Utilities Facilities
Electricity Water supply Energy
consumption
Sanitation Kitchen
Meter connected (legal)
400 tk
Submersible Pump
connected, Collect
drinking water
from Govt. Water
Supply Taps
Used Lakri (Fire
Woods) 6-7
mounds/ month
1500-2000 tk
2 Toilets for 6
Families
Clay stove with smoke disposal
system, Electric Heater

PLAN
PHOTOGRAPHS
PLAN
PHOTOGRAPHS
07 | 08
Case Study 8

Case
Study 08
Living Pattern Income Status Housing
Tenancy
Cluster
Arrangement
Family
Member
Household Type Occupation Monthly
Income
25 Persons
in 6 families
sharing
courtyard
and utilities
in one
cluster
1
st
Family: 4
2
nd
Family: 7
3
rd
Family: 3
4
th
Family: 2
5
th
Family: 3
6
th
Family: 6
Nuclear
Extended
Nuclear
Nuclear
Nuclear
Extended
1
st
Family: Day labor
2
nd
Family: Day labor
3
rd
Family: Shop owner
4
th
Family: Day labor
5
th
Family: Day labor
6
th
Family: Day laborer
7000/=
8500/=
12000/=
8500/=
15000/=
10000/=
Renter
Renter
Owner
Renter
Owner
Renter

Utilities Facilities
Electricity Water supply Energy
consumption
Sanitation Kitchen
Meter connected (legal)
400 tk
Tubewell
Submersible
Pump
connected.
Used
Lakri(wooden
sticks) 4
mounds/
month 1200 tk
1 Toilet / 3 Families Clay stove

GROUND FLOOR PLAN FIRST FLOOR PLAN PHOTOGRAPHS
SECTION
INCREMENTAL
HOUSING
Belapur, New Mumbai, India
Architect: Charles Correa
INCREMENTAL
HOUSING
Belapur, New Mumbai, India
ARCHITECT: Charles Correa
YEAR OF CONSTRUCTION: 1983-1986
LOCATION: Belapur, New Mumbai, India.
ZONE CLIMATE:
The climate is tropical. The average annual temperature is 26.7 C. The tempera-
tures are moderated by the proximity of the sea and do not undergo signicant
changes during the course of the year. The coldest month is January with an average
of 23.9 C to mid-month. The monsoon inuence both the temperature and the
climate. The monsoon season normally runs from the beginning of June to end of
September. The rainfall reached in the course of these months, 95% of the annual
total. The months of October and November are just as hot, though with little rain.
With maximum daytime temperatures of about 28 C, the months from December
to February is dry and slightly cooler than in the period from March to May, when
average maximum temperatures reach up to 33 C. and increases the moisture.
OBJECT:
residential area surrounded by roads and driveways located in a boundary
between the built fabric of the city to the south and large hills that give way to the
north. In the central area is traversed by a stream.
DENSITY:
housing for 550 families spread over six hectares of land.
ORIENTATION:
developed mainly along the north-south axis.
COMPOSITION ACCOMMODATION:
have developed 5 different types all fenced, including independent and closed
spaces (real house), covered areas (verandas) and outdoor spaces (private court-
yard or terraces).
TECHNOLOGY:
external walls in brick, roof structure covered with wooden shingles.
MATERIALS:
brick, plaster of white color, colored xtures made of wood, outdoor paving stone
blocks.
A
B
C
A
B
C
MUMBAI
NEW MUMBAI
SITE SECTIONS
LOCATION MAP
The project is located in Belapur, one of the main hubs of New Bombay, the twin
city of Mumbai, the brainchild of Charles Correa and a group of colleagues in
1960 as a means to reduce the pressure on an old city physically restricted at the
bottom of the peninsula between the harbor and the Indian Ocean (the subject of a
huge and growing inux of people looking for work). Instead of further expansion in
that area, suggested that colonize the undeveloped land on the opposite side of the
large natural bay of the sea and to set up a line of communication between the city
and the mother satellite. In this area, go down the hills forming a series of valleys
characterized by large patches of vegetation. The district designed by the architect
is in one of these valleys.
The sector, which occupies approximately 6 acres of land, trying to demonstrate
how the high-density (550 families and other services) can be achieved even with a
low type of dwelling. His study, based on the observation of traditional Indian settle-
ments, suggested that such intervention should be developed using a spatial hierar-
chy, starting from the private world of the individual dwelling and going through a
series of common areas, came to greater public space, the Maidan. The geometry
Belapur is therefore a direct interpretation of this synthesis.
The project is then generated from a hierarchy of spaces. The rst is the private court-
yard of single dwelling used as a space for outdoor activities during most of the
year. Subsequently, seven units are grouped to form a small courtyard town of about
8m x 8m. Three of these groups form a module from twenty homes that describes the
collective space of the next scale (approx. 12m x 12m). This spatial hierarchy contin-
ues until it reaches the area of greatest neighborhood where the schools are located
and other services. Along a diagonal through the site is located in the bazaar.
HIERARCHY OF SPACES PROJECT BRIEF MASTER PLAN
1. Private Courtyard
A cluster showing individual houses
2. Small courtyard common to 7 houses.
(approximately 8m x 8m)
3. Courtyard common to 21 houses.
(approximately 12m x 12m)
4. Public Space with Services.
(approximately 20m x 20m)
Overlapping
11 | 12
View of common courtyard
EVOLUTION OF SCHEME
BASE MODULES AND THEIR RELATION
Independent Walls
Services Shared
Area of possible expansion
BASE MODULES AND THEIR RELATION
AXONOMETRIC VIEW
CLIMATIC DATA
Private Houses
Services
Private Court
Access
Precipitation (mm)
Precipitation (
0
c)
Common Courtyard
SOLAR RADIATION DIAGRAM
1 January
1 October
1 May
1 January 176
0
48
0
162
0
86
0
182
0
68
0
1 October
1 May

WIND FLOW DATA
Wind Direction
River
Month
Month
Wind Direction
Wind Direction
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun
Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
TYPE A TYPE B
Indoor Space
Covered Space
Open Space
Area of possible expansion
Future Expansion
Access
Kitchen
Room
Service
Private Court
Verandah
Access
Kitchen
Room
Service
Private Court
Verandah
Indoor Space
Covered Space
Open Space
Area of possible
expansion
Section AA
Section BB
Axonometric View
Section AA
Axonometric View
TYPE C
Indoor Space
Covered Space
Open Space
Area of possible expansion
Access
Kitchen
Room
Service
Private Court
Verandah
TYPE D
Indoor Space
Covered Space
Open Space
Area of possible expansion
Access
Kitchen
Room
Service
Private Court
Verandah
Balcony
Section AA Section AA Section BB
Axonometric View Axonometric View
13 | 14
Views of one and two story house types with adjacent open to sky space for incremental extension
A general view of housing with the low lying hills in the background
TYPE E
Indoor Space
Covered Space
Open Space
Area of possible expansion
Access
Kitchen
Room
Service
Private Court
Verandah
Balcony
Section BB Section AA
Axonometric View
The project achieves a density of approximately 500 people per hectare or
100 families. On a 6 hectares site approximately 600 units are accommodat-
ed. Each cluster permits the emergence of a hyper-local community feeling,
while integrating each house to the whole settlement at different levels; the
hierarchy itself is very organic. The project was produced with the idea that the
residents were going to alter it in various ways, making it truly their own, there-
fore homes are freestanding, so residents can add on to them as their families
grow; and differently priced plans appeal to a wide variety of income levels. In
the process of its incremental nature the project has also produced a fair amount
of jobs in the construction sector with small scale artisans participating in the
process of the construction work.
The most important take away from the project however is twofold. Firstly it
allows for a demographic mix and homes to grow based on income incremen-
tally. A mix such as this make for more sustainable communities and introduces
the social as a critical factor in any determination of what might be a sustaina-
ble city. Secondly, the project shows the rich possibilities for design when there
is a shift in the frame or scale of our gaze and the compact can also nd a
place in the broader regional planning dimension. Here the location and
access to public transportation also demonstrates the crucial role that it can play
in determining urban form. In fact, as illustrated by this project, public transporta-
tion is probably the best form of indirect subsidy on housing. For, it opens up
affordable land in the region and in the process opening up new possibilities
for an array of housing types. Thus resituating and giving architecture agency in
the planning of the city.
View of a typical cluster in 1986 (the year of completion) and 2012
(photo credits Rahul Mehrotra)
View of the common space in a typical cluster. The low rise high density
conguration of this housing type creates a great sense of cooperation
between the residents (photo credit Rahul Mehrotra)
1986 2012 STATUS QUO
15 | 16
17 | 18
KAMPUNG
IMPROVEMENT PROJECT
Jakarta, Indonesia.
YEAR OF CONSTRUCTION: 1969
LOCATION:
Jakarta, Indonesia
OVERVIEW:
EKampung, the world for squatter, has dominated the scene of the city, and the number of people is more
then 60% of the city population, and once considered as the gure of the urban poor. The program was
also selected as one of the rst Aga Khan Awards in 1980.
OBJECTIVE:
Affordable : it is cheap, for the inhabitant do not have to pay anything.
Replicable : it is using appropriate technology, so that easy to be implemented any where.
Sustainable : it is developed by the people, and to keep to be upgraded by the people
Flexible : it is not following formal and rigid standards, and using recycled materials.
In situ : the people are already there and it does not need adaptation
Diverse : Diversity in social and economic struture, and land use as well, create dynamic harmony
ACCOMMODATION:
Many concepts written about poverty, which related to housing Research in 1987, and renewed almost
every year, resulting following ndings:
Open space (including roads, footpath) 7%
Open window 53%
Open Circulation 44%
Open sunshine in house 37%
Stuck ditches, cause of solid waste 76%
Building increase 3,7%/year
LOCATION MAP
In 1969, while the world was still looking for a tool to cope the urban squatter, Jakarta has started a
right and bold step, to introduce Kampung Improvement Program. It is a right step, because the
program is well accepted by all parties, the bureaucrats, the politicians, and most of all the kampung
people. It is bold, because it was out of the approaches which were found in the planning text books.
The program has been adopted by the national government as national policy, and over 500 cities in
Indonesia has been similar program, it has also attracted international Agencies, such as the IBRD,
which started to assist Jakarta government in 1974, to speed up the program.
The consideration was, that the increase of population in Jakarta was so fast and big, due to the
number of migration. In 1950 Jakarta population was 1.600.000 in 1960 was 2.900.000, and by
the end the 60s was nearly 4 millions. The urban population has grown faster than the national
growth, so that the population of Jakarta within 1960-1971, the increase was 50%, comparing the
national growth was only 22% within same period. The population pressure has been affecting the city
fabrics, for Jakarta was planned by Dutch Government for accommodate 600.000 people (Jakarta
Capital City Government, 1976). The ever growing population, was not matched by the human basic
needs, such as shelter, causing problems like dense and low substandard settlements. Most of the
migrants are poor and less educated, and they rely on their muscles. The settlements they build are also
low in quality, occupying vacant lands, without considering land right, topography, and regulation.
They are occupying river banks, railway sides, swamps, and even old cemeteries. It is ironical, that the
poor have to plan and build their shelter by themselves, and Shirvani (1985) wrote, while design by
designer continues to be luxury service, people all over the world have designed and build their own
communities without the assistance of professionals
SITE PLAN
SITE MAP
19 | 20
PROPOSED SITE
FOR HOUSING
Nishchintapur, Yearpur Union, Savar
OF LOW INCOME GROUP
Photograph Taken by Md. Omar Faruk from aeroplane.
PROPOSED SITE
FOR HOUSING
Nischintapur, Yearpur Union, Savar
OF LOW INCOME GROUP
Dhaka
Nischintapur,
Savar
VILLAGE: Nishchintapur
UNION: Yearpur
UPAZILLA: Savar
DISTRICT: Savar
POPULATION CENSUS: 1991 - 14,072
2001 - 22,579
2005 - 27280
2010 - 24556
GROWTH RATE 4.84%
PROJECTED POPULATION: 2015 - 43772
RELIGION: Muslim - 94%
Hindu - 5%
Other - 1%
LITERACY RATE: 84.9% (Male 91.2%, Female 77.7%)
INCOME LEVEL: 6,000 - 9,000 52.5%
9,000 - 12000 25%
12000 - 15000 17.5%
15000 - 18000 5%
EMPLOYMENT STATUS: Employed 95.4%
Unemployed 4.6%
FAMILY SIZE: 1 - 3 64%
4 - 6 27%
7 - 9 8%
Source: Socio-Economic Survey 2006, Detailed Area Plan, Rajuk
CHRONOLOGICAL
DEVELOPEMENT
30-01-2004
Building Blocks Agricultural Land Road Formation of node
7-12-2006 25-1-2010 27-2-2013
In 2004, The ratio of built to unbuilt was very low. Most of the lands
were used for agricultural activities. Built forms housed the supporting
activities. A vast land was forests with dense foliage of trees. Very few
industria buildings could be found at long distances.
Within 2 years the scenario has drastically changed. With the
flourishment of RMG and other industries, Savar has become the
perfect suburban area to house these factories. Industry Building
started to be built on the banks of Dhaka-Ashulia Highway Forming
an industrial belt along the highway. Housing of the workers of these
factories became an issue.
To facilitate the housing need of the workers forestry and agricultural
land now started to turn into housing sites. Land owners build houses
on their lands and rent them to the factory worker. Instead of agricul-
ture, housing became the source of income for local people with
adequate land. The growth of these housing is organic and
incremental.
An overview of the sites chronological development over last 10 years will show us how an almost unbuilt area is about to reach its saturation point within a few years. The
morphological development of this area over last 10 years has been drastic and was driven by the sudden boom of RMG and other industries in Bangladesh. The Diagrams shows
the Street pattern, block pattern and the evolution of the vast green land.
To meet the ever increasing need of housing almost all the agricultural
land turned into human settlements. Due to its organic character of
growth, the lands are soon to be saturated but the housing need is
incremental. Thus it becomes necessary to chalk out a planned
housing scheme for the factory workers of these area ensuring a
minimum quality of living environment and also allowing a controlled
growth ofthe settlements.
In 2004, the settlements were mostly rural residential in type.
Community facilities , like bazaar , mosque, restuarants were fewer
in number. Density was on the lower side due to small population.
In 2 years the scenario has drastically changed. Industry Building
started to be built on the banks of Dhaka-Ashulia Highway Forming
an industrial belt along the highway. Housing nd community facilities
like bazaar, school college, recreational facilities, mosque etc offor
the workers became necessity.
To facilitate these necessity, spontaneous market place or flee market
started to form along the connecting vehicular road around the
nodes. Other facilities like, school, mosque restuarants also built
around the nodes.
In these spontaneuus formation of settlement, a buffer zone is visible
between the industrial belt on the road side and the residential
settlements. On the both side of the a road a visible buffer is
maintained either by low lying farmland or water bodies to keep the
industrial and residential settlements apart.
23 | 24
BUS STOP RESTAURANT EDUCATIONAL MOSQUE HOSPITAL MARKET PLACE
10 minute
20 minute
30 minute
GHOSHBAG
RESIDENTIAL AREA
NISHCHINTAPUR
RESIDENTIAL AREA
LAND PRICE (BDT)
3 - 5 LACS / DECIMAL OR
5 - 8 LACS / KATHA OR
3 - 5 CRORES / ACRE
LAND PRICE (BDT)
3 - 5 LACS / DECIMAL OR
5 - 8 LACS / KATHA OR
3 - 5 CRORES / ACRE
LAND PRICE (BDT)
15 LACS / DECIMAL OR
25 LACS / KATHA OR
15 CRORES / ACRE
TONGI ASHULIA ROADSIDE
INDUSTRIAL AREA
Legend
utilities_point
<all other values>
TYPE
Electric Pole
") Power Station
s t r u ct u r e
<all ot her values >
ST R _USE 1T
Commercial Act ivit y
Communit y Service
E ducation & R es earch
Government al Services
Manufact uring and P roces s ing

Mis cellaneous
Mixed Us e
No_info
Non Government Services
R es ident ial
Service Act ivit y
SITE OVERVIEW
25 | 26
Nischintapur, Yearpur Union, Savar
Shared Toilet & Shower Shared Kitchen Shared Space for circulation and Kitchen
Rented Room Rented Room Setback Shared Space Shared Space Internal Courtyard
LOCAL SETTLEMENT
PATTERN
During survey, a pattern in the growth of the settlement is found in Nishchintapur area. Almost all the housing are
built on an individual property by the owners themselves. In this case study, A land of 5 kathas, owned by Mr
Haoladar is taken into consideration. The land owner, himself built a housing of 45 rentable rooms along with his
own residence on this land. The rent of the room ranges from BDT 2000 to 2800 per room. Three or more rooms
share services like kitchen, bath and toilet. Each room has approximately 120 sft and rented to 2 to 3 persons.
The construction cost of a 3 room module is approximately BDT 100,000. A plan of the total area and a section
of a three room module is shown in diagrams.
TYPICAL SECTION PLAN OF A TYPICAL HOUSE ON A LAND OF 5 KATHAS BUILT AND RENTED BY LAND OWNER
Land
Owners
Residence
Each room is
usually of
10x10 or
10x12 size;
rented to 2 or 3
persons. Rent
ranges from BDT
2000 to BDT
2800. Each of
three rooms is
entered from a
shared space on
plinth.
Each room is
usually of
10x10 or
10x12 size;
rented to 2 or 3
persons. Rent
ranges from BDT
2000 to BDT
2800. Each of
three rooms is
entered from a
shared space on
plinth.
Each of the three
rooms in a
module and the
toilet and
bathroom are
entered from a
shared space on
the plinth. This
space also serves
as the kitchen -
with a stove
placed against a
wall.
The courtyard serves as
the in between place for
the houses. It is also used
for access, household
chores, playing. Trees are
planted in these spaces
for shade and seasonal
fruits.
Each of the three
rooms in a
module and the
toilet and
bathroom are
entered from a
shared space on
the plinth. This
space also serves
as the kitchen -
with a stove
placed against a
wall.
A marginal
setback is
kept from the
road but in
rder to mark
the property
line, a low
height wall is
const r uct ed
which also
serves as a
sitting by the
road.
1 2
3 4 5
1.
A marginal setback is kept
from the road but in rder to
mark the property line, a low
height wall is constructed
which also serves as a sitting
by the road. Extensions of the
plinth also serve as sitting
place in a more intimate level.
2.
This place was built as a
common kitchen for all the
households when there was no
Gas line in the houses. After
connection of gas lines, stoves
are set in houses and this place
was not used for cooking
anymore. Currently the land
owner uses this place as a
shade for his cattles.
3.
View of the courtyard in front
of the land owners house.
There are trees of seasonal
fruits and open area for social-
izing, playing and doing
household activities. The
common kitchen was placed
on this large court.
4.
View of the common plinth
space shared by three house-
holds. Each of the three rooms
in a module and the toilet and
bathroom are entered from this
shared space on the plinth.
This space also serves as the
kitchen - with a stove placed
against a wall.
5.
Photo of the internal courtyard.
The courtyard serves as the in
between place for the houses.
It is used for access, household
chores like washing, drying
clothes, cattle bearing.
Children play and the elders
gather in these places. Trees
are planted in these spaces for
shade and seasonal fruits.
27 | 28
WORKERS
PROFILE
Based on Demography Study & Questionnaire Survey
1. Age Group
<20 16.67%
16.67%
8.33%
0%
8.33%
8.33%
8.33%
8.33%
16.67%
16.67%
0%
33.33%
25%
25%
25%
18.75%
18.75%
6.25%
6.25%
16.67%
16.67%
8.33%
33.33%
16.67%
33.33%
33.33%
8.33%
8.33%
8.33%
50%
58.33%
66.67%
50%
25%
25%
50%
100%
41.67%
21 - 30
31 - 40
>40
4. Monthly Income
<6000
6000 - 8000
8000 - 10000
>1000
2. Number of Family Members Living in House
1
2
3 - 4
>5
3. Transport to the Factory
Walk
Bicycle
Rickshaw
Bus
7. Leisure Activity
Games & Sports
Watching TV
Going to Cinema
Hanging Out
Studying
5. Monthly Savings
<1000
1001 - 1500
1501 - 2000
>2000
6. House Rent
1000 - 1500
1501 - 2000
2001 - 2500
2500 - 3000
8. Defciencies at Home
Gas
Electricity
Water Supply
Toilets
Living Space
Open Space
9. Future Plan
Work in RMG
Go Abroad
Buisness in Country Home
Buisness in Dhaka
Better Job
Not Sure
Male
Female
65%
35%
Married
58%
Single
42%
Assuming Space requirement for per person = 65 sft
SPACE
PROGRAM
Total Occupancy = 5500 persons
30%
70%
open space
built area = 2.1 acres
10%
15%
14%
21%
35%
5%
Road and Pavement
Soft Pavement
Green Area
Buiding Type 3
Built Area: 1700 sq m (18300 sq ft)
Area: 1215 sq m (13100 sq ft)
Area: 608 sq m (6550 sq ft)
Area: 1825 sq m (19650 sq ft)
Number of Floors: 5
Occupancy: 1410 persons
BuildingType 2
Built Area: 2550 sq m (27450 sq ft)
Number of Floors: 4
Occupancy: 1800 persons
Buiding Type 1
Built Area: 4250 sq m (45750 sq ft)
Number of Floors: 3
Occupancy: 2250 persons
200 sft 150 sft
A B
Occupancy Type A : Dorm for Bachelors
Household Size : 3 Roommates
Unit Size : 200 sft
Nmber of Units : 600
Total Occupancy : 1800
Occupancy Type B : Single Family
Household Size : 2 (Husband - Wife)
Unit Size : 150 sft
Nmber of Units : 500
Total Occupancy : 1000
250 sft
C
Occupancy Type B : Small Family
Household Size : 3 - 4
Unit Size : 250 sft
Nmber of Units : 500
Total Occupancy : Max. 2000
350 sft
D
Occupancy Type B : Large Family
Household Size : 5-6
Unit Size : 350 sft
Nmber of Units : 150
Total Occupancy : Max. 900
Total Site Area : 3 Acres (12145 sq m or 130680 sft)
Buildable Area : 70% = 2,1 Acres (8500 sq m or 91476 sft)
Uncovered Area : 30% = 0.9 Acres (3645 sq m or 39204 sft)
Building types will not be directly derived from occupancy types. Rather every Building will have a combination of these units. This will create a harmony and balance in both the
physical and social form of the housing project. However, a variation in the height and bulk of the building is required for better environmental performance and a hierarchy, The
required density will be achieved by Buildings of three, four and ve stories stated respectively as Building Type 1, 2 and 3.
1
2
3
1
2
3
4
1
2
3
4
5
Built to Open Ratio
29 | 30