You are on page 1of 50

Business Plan

Town of Bridgewater & Municipality of the District of Lunenburg

MULTI –PURPOSE COMMUNITY CENTRE
Prepared for the Lunenburg County Lifestyle Centre Society

January 2008

Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update
Executive Summary


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services, January 2008
Page i
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
This report updates the 2005 business plan prepared for the Town of Bridgewater/Municipality of the
District of Lunenburg
1
(MoDL)and is based on the facility components and space program in that study.

The 2005 Needs Assessment and Business Plan included a number of principles and discussions that
provided both a vision and a context for the Centre. The selected paragraphs below have been taken
from the 2005 report and in some cases adapted to reflect the scope of the Business Plan Update. The
earlier report noted that “the Lunenburg Multi-Purpose Centre will be a community focal point. Each
Member of the Community will experience a sense of belonging. The Centre will attract visitors, support
economic initiatives, promotes and encourage healthy active lifestyles. It will be a place of civic pride. Its
planning, building, and operation will embody the following principles”. That vision of the Centre remains
true today.


Principles by Which the Centre will be Planned, Built and Operated
Principle 1 – The Centre will be the Hub of the Communities’ social, recreation, arts and culture
interests. The Multi-Purpose Community Centre should incorporate facilities of interest to all ages,
interests and abilities.

Principle 2 – The Centre will contribute to active healthy lifestyles both within its walls through the mix of
programs and activities it supports, and by the connections and linkages that enable participants to walk
and bike to it.

Principle 3 – The Centre will support inclusiveness through its design and programming. It will be
physically accessible, responsive to all senses, and financially accessible to all residents through
creative partnerships and programming.

Principle 4 – The Centre will be welcoming to all participants and visitors. The design and operation of
the facility will encourage participants to linger and socialize in common areas, to find spaces uniquely
suited to their needs and interests, and to effectively share spaces for a wide range of flexible activities.

Principle 5 – The Centre will contribute to Economic Enhancement of the region through: its ability to
provide spaces for events such as concerts and trade shows, sport events and cultural experiences;
through its spaces that can support business meetings and training events; and through its contribution
to the viability of residential and business attraction.


1
dmA Planning & Management Services (2005), Multi-Purpose Facility Feasibility Study Needs Assessment and Business
Plan

Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update
Executive Summary


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services, January 2008
Page ii
Why the Multi-Purpose Centre is Important to Residents and Businesses
2

Communities that appeal to residents also appeal to businesses. Businesses that are not constrained by
resource and transportation requirements (footloose businesses) look for communities that help to
secure and maintain their workforce. Many businesses require a highly educated workforce that typically
seeks a particular lifestyle along with employment opportunity. That lifestyle involves good schools, a
safe living environment and, second only to education factors for people with families, good recreation
and library services. The Bridgewater/Lunenburg area is fortunate to have some of the ingredients –
pleasant climate, lovely natural environment and interesting heritage -that contribute to its
attractiveness. It will soon provide additional retail opportunities and currently provides residents with a
range of educational opportunities. The addition of an innovative and diverse recreation facility and
expanded library services can only enhance prospects to attract and maintain business to the region,
and attract and maintain a local workforce committed to maintaining and contributing to the community.
There is considerable empirical research to support the economic benefits of these facilities.

“Small business ranked recreation, parks and open space first among quality-of-life elements in
location decisions…”
3

“Recreation, parks and open spaces are important in attracting small businesses, and areas which
fail to recognize this are likely to lose them to cities that emphasize these amenities.”
4

“Cities need to attract business and skilled labour to be globally competitive. Services that enhance
the quality of life of individuals in the community (such as parks, recreation, and cultural activities)
feature prominently among the characteristics that attract the knowledge workers to particular
places...”
5

“Over 90 percent of businesses in America employ 10 or fewer people, and most growth in business
starts with those small companies. Those business owners can live wherever they want to live, and
they will trade off some revenue potential for quality of life opportunities.”
6



2
Multi-Purpose Facility Feasibility Study Needs Assessment and Business Plan; Executive Summary, (2005)
3
Steve Hill, newsteam@agnews.tamu.edu from quoting Dr. J. Crompton, Parks, Recreation Could Help Attract Business
(1995).
4
Florida, Richard, Competing on Creativity; Planning Ontario Cities in the North American Context A report prepared for the
Ontario Ministry of Enterprise, Opportunity and Innovation and the Institute for Competitiveness and Prosperity, p.1
5
Slack, E. (2003). Municipal Funding for Recreation. Prepared for the Laidlaw Foundation
6
Gale Group (2004). Leverage your parks: a quality parks system, which B.R. lacks, can help keep workers and attract new
companies - Community – Interview. Retrieved on December 10, 2004 from: http://www.findarticles.com


Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update
Executive Summary


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services, January 2008
Page iii
Updating the Business Plan
dmA Planning & Management Services Inc., was asked to update the business plan component of the
2005 Report for the multi-purpose facility. The updating process included confirming usage;, revising as
required, revenue and expense projections; and outlining capital cost scenarios for three building
options. The business plan update documented management options for Councils and Staff of the
partner Municipalities and the Lunenburg County Lifestyle Centre Society (LCLCS) to consider.

The scope of the Business Plan Update included:
• Two meetings with the Lunenburg County Lifestyle Centre Society (LCLCS);
• Receipt and review of background information;
• Discussions with the Town’s Director of Parks, Recreation and Culture, other Town staff as well
as consultation with the South Shore Regional Library Chief Librarian, to discuss management,
transfer of existing programs, potential to transfer staff, consideration to close existing facilities
etc., and gather information re salaries, benefits, fees etc.;
• Requests for information to project future use was sent to identified user groups;
• Phone interviews with one of the event promoters contacted in the 2005 study
7
;
• Assessment of implications of regional leisure facility development subsequent to 2005;
• Review and update of operating costs including staffing, administrative, utility, and program
costs;
• Review of current comparables for utility and administrative costs; and
• Review of recent dmA investigations with respect to management options for similar operations.

The Business Plan Update is based on the facilities and space program developed for the 2005 study.
The capital costs were updated in 2007 and are used in this Update.

Summary of Business Plan Update Key Points
Arena
• There is sufficient demand to fully utilize a twin-pad arena if the facility was built today.
• Based on projected operating costs and revenues a twin-pad arena would operate at a small
profit.
• For maximum operating cost benefit to be achieved through the refrigeration/heat pump
technology recommended for the arena, facilities in addition to the arena will need to be part of
the facility.


7
While a number of promoters were contacted in 2005 the 2008 review focused on the promoter currently arranging
events in the South Shore region of NS.

Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update
Executive Summary


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services, January 2008
Page iv
Aquatic Facility
• There is considerable interest in and benefit of an indoor aquatic facility. As there is not
currently an indoor public pool in the area it is more difficult to project use. However, based on
input provided and comparison with other indoor pools this Plan projects moderate to high use
of the facility. Use may not be maximized in the short term. There will be room for program
growth and this should be viewed in a very positive light.
• The usage indicators assume that the Bridgewater outdoor pool remains a summer recreational
facility with all instructional programs and many of the camp programs moved to the indoor
aquatic centre. Should the outdoor pool close in the future this will result in higher use of the
indoor pool.

Library
• The library calculations assume the library space includes both the local and regional library
space requirements. Based on the work of the 2005 study and no subsequent change in
facilities the Business Plan Update supports the development of a library to serve local and
regional needs.

Multi-Purpose and Social Space
• The business plan update confirms the appropriateness of flexible multi-purpose and active
living space as noted in the earlier Report.
• While the space program outlines flexible space for use as community meeting space, program
space, active living space, and social space, none of the spaces specifically support a room that
might be used for training, a larger board meeting function for businesses etc. In the design
stage of the project the project partners may wish to investigate this type of space in greater
detail.

Cost Scenarios
Operating costs and capital requirements were developed for three facility scenarios.

Scenario One includes the entire facility (twin pad arena, aquatic facility, library, multipurpose space,
social and administrative space).

Scenario two includes all facilities but a single rather than a twin pad arena. In this scenario the Town of
Bridgewater would maintain the existing Bridgewater Memorial Arena.

The third scenario includes a twin pad arena, aquatic facility, social, multi-purpose and administrative
space but does not include a library. It is assumed that the Town would continue to support the existing
Bridgewater Library Facility.


Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update
Executive Summary


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services, January 2008
Page v
All scenarios incorporate costs for “LEED Silver Certification”.

Capital costs related to contingency, site development, and equipment allowances for each scenario
have been adjusted to reflect the base construction costs of each scenario. If in the future a second ice
pad is added (if scenario 2) or a library (if scenario 3) new estimates for contingency, equipment
allowance, site development will be made.

Annual Operating Costs of Each Scenario
• Annual operating cost for Scenario #1: the full facility with two ice pads, aquatic centre,
library, multi-purpose and active living space, as well as ancillary and staff space, is projected to
create an annual net increase in current operating costs (new costs) of approximately $76,500.
Existing annual contributions to the library (for building, and insurance, snow clearing etc.) of
approximately $70,000
8
for the library would be transferred and the annual arena deficit
(Bridgewater Memorial Arena) would be eliminated.
• Annual operating cost for Scenario #2: one ice pad, and all other facility components as
noted in Scenario #1 is projected to create an annual net increase in current operating costs
(new costs) of approximately $252,000. While operations staffing for the new centre is reduced
by 1 ½ FTE, it is assumed current staff complement at the Bridgewater Memorial Arena will
remain. Existing annual contributions estimated to be in the order of $70,000 contributed by the
partner Municipalities to the existing local and regional library operations for building related
costs will be transferred to the new facility, and are therefore not considered new costs.
• Annual operating cost for Scenario #3: the full facility with the exception of the library Is
projected to create an annual net increase (new costs) in current operating costs of
approximately $117,000. Staffing has been reduced by 1 FTE for operations. The contribution
of the partner municipalities to the current library operation would not change.
From an operating cost perspective the most viable scenario is scenario # 1. – the full facility.

Capital Investment Requirements of Each Scenario
• For scenario # 1 (full facility) the capital investment will be in the order of $31,500,000.
• For scenario # 2 (one ice pad) the capital investment will be in the order of $25,900,000
• For scenario # 3 (no library/2 ice pads) the capital investment will be in the order of
$24,800,000.


8
This estimate is discussed in the body of the report. It includes the current $37,000 annual contribution from the Town to
the Bridgewater Library as well as an estimated $33,000 currently paid by the Town and MoDL toward regional operations
that would be transferred to the new facility.

Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update
Executive Summary


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services, January 2008
Page vi
Direction was provided by the LCLCS to assume that the capital cost for each scenario would be divided
equally among three capital financing partners – (1)the Town of Bridgewater/MoDL
9
; (2) the Province of
Nova Scotia; and the Government of Canada.

The Table that follows (Table 3.3 in the body of the Report) outlines the potential funding implications of
each scenario.

Annual Funding Requirement
Scenario 1:
Complete
Facility
Scenario 2:
One Ice Pad
Scenario 3:
No Library
Annual Increased Operating Profit/(Deficit) $76,500 $252,500 $117,000
Annual Debt Costs $1,000,000 $800,000 $766,000
Annual Municipal Investment $1,076,500 $1,052,500 $883,000.00
Investment after 20 years $21,530,000 $21,050,000 $17,660,000
Other Costs of Library and Arena $0 $1,600,000 $1,400,000
Estimated Total Costs over 20 years $21,530,000 $22,650,00 $19,060,000

If each scenario was considered a static option (in other words the Bridgewater Arena in Scenario # 2
and the Bridgewater Library in Scenario # 3) for the next 20 years, the cost to the Municipalities of
projected capital and ongoing operating costs would favour Scenario # 3 followed by Scenario # 1. This
is of course only from the perspective of financing. Scenario # 2 does not appear to be a viable option
from the perspective of either ongoing financing or service to the community.

Annual municipal investment will be divided equally between the Town and MoDL for annual investment
of $538,250; $526,250; and $441,500 for scenarios 1, 2 and 3 respectively. In addition the Town would
remain responsible for an additional $80,000 annually for the Bridgewater Arena in Scenario # 2. Both
Municipalities would contribute to the cost of library services in Scenario # 3
10
.


9
Community fundraising is included in the Town/MoDL allocation in this assumption.
10
It is understood that the Town of Bridgewater would continue to pay toward both local and regional library costs and MoDL
to regional library costs until a change is made in current library allocation.

Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update
Executive Summary


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services, January 2008
Page vii
Subsequent to the start of the Business Plan Update process the Town of Bridgewater and the
Municipality of the District of Lunenburg (MoDL) agreed and signed a Memorandum of Understanding
that:
• Agrees to the site for the joint Multi-purpose facility as York Street, in the Town of Bridgewater. The site
will be jointly owned by the Town and the Municipality;
• The Town and the Municipality will jointly fund any operating deficit and capital investment of the facility
• The Town and the Municipality will jointly approve the management and governance structure for the
site and facility.

It was also confirmed just prior to the completion of the Business Plan Update that the Municipalities
would be both the owners and operators of the multi-purpose centre.











Business Plan

Town of Bridgewater & Municipality of the District of Lunenburg

MULTI –PURPOSE COMMUNITY CENTRE
Prepared for the Lunenburg County Lifestyle Centre Society

January 2008





112 Front Street, Unit 219 P.O. Box 2409 Wolfville, NS B4P 2S3 T 902.542.2908 F 902.542.2906 www.dmaconsulting.com





January 28, 2008

The Lunenburg County Lifestyle Centre Society

RE: Business Plan Update for Lunenburg County Lifestyle Centre


Dear LCLCS Members;

Thank you for the opportunity to work with your group and with the Town of Bridgewater and the
Municipality of the District of Lunenburg once again on this important project. It is my pleasure to
provide you with the final copy of the business plan update.

We wish you all the very best with your efforts to move this project forward. If we can be of further
assistance please do not hesitate to contact us.


Sincerely




Wendy Donovan
Principal

Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services

TABLE OF CONTENTS
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ...................................................................................................... I
1.0 STUDY PURPOSE & PROCESS................................................................................1
1.1 ASSUMPTIONS ON FACILITY COMPONENTS ..................................................................4
1.2 ASSUMPTIONS ON USAGE.............................................................................................4
2.0 BUSINESS PLAN.........................................................................................................5
2.1 USAGE ASSUMPTIONS..................................................................................................6
2.2 OPERATING COST ASSUMPTIONS ...............................................................................16
2.4 ANNUAL OPERATING COST PROJECTIONS..................................................................18
2.5 ANNUAL COST PROJECTION SUMMARY .....................................................................25
3.0 FINANCING THE PROJECT..................................................................................26
3.1 CAPITAL FINANCING..................................................................................................27
3.1 FUNDING PROGRAMS .................................................................................................28
4.0 OPERATING MODEL..............................................................................................30
4.1 MANAGEMENT OF THE LUNENBURG COUNTY LIFESTYLE CENTRE ............................32
5.0 IMPLEMENTATION................................................................................................34
5.1 FEASIBILITY ASSESSMENT .........................................................................................34
5.2 PROJECT CONFIRMATION...........................................................................................34
5.3 DEVELOPMENT AND OPERATIONS..............................................................................35
5.4 CONSTRUCTION AND OPENING...................................................................................35
APPENDIX A: PUBLIC CONSULTATION PARTICIPANTS..........................................1

Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 1
1.0 STUDY PURPOSE & PROCESS
This report updates the 2005 business plan prepared for the Town of Bridgewater/Municipality of the
District of Lunenburg
11
. The Business Plan Update is based on:
• Facility components and space program identified in the 2005 study;
• Confirmation of arena, pool, library and common area usage;
• Review and update of operating costs including staffing, administrative, utility, and program
costs;
• Assessment of management and operating options; and
• Review and adjustment of the project implementation plan as outlined in the 2005 report
including: identification of capital investment requirements of three development scenarios and
annual operating cost implications and discussion of a process and schedule for implementing
the project.

Tasks undertaken to update the business plan included:
• Two meetings with the Lunenburg County Lifestyle Centre Society (LCLCS);
• Receipt and review of background information;
• Discussions with the Town’s Director of Parks and Recreation, other staff; Chief Librarian of the
Regional Library; to discuss management, transfer of existing ice usage, potential to transfer
staff, close existing facilities etc., and gather information re salaries, benefits, fees etc.;
• Mailed/e-mailed requests for information to identified user groups;
• Phone interviews with one of the event promoters contacted in the 2005 study
12
;
• Assessment of implications of regional leisure facility development subsequent to 2005;
• Review of current comparables for utility and administrative costs; and
• Review of recent dmA investigations with respect to management options for similar operations.

Subsequent to the start of the Business Plan Update process the Town of Bridgewater and the
Municipality of the District of Lunenburg (MODL) agreed and signed a Memorandum of Understanding
that:
• Agrees to the site for the joint Multi-purpose facility as York Street, in the Town of Bridgewater. The site
will be jointly owned by the Town and the Municipality;
• The Town and the Municipality will jointly fund any operating deficit and capital investment of the facility
• The Town and the Municipality will jointly approve the management and governance structure for the
site and facility.

11
dmA Planning & Management Services (2005), Multi-Purpose Facility Feasibility Study Needs Assessment and Business
Plan
12
While a number of promoters were contacted in 2005 the 2008 review focused on the promoter currently arranging
events in the South Shore region of NS.
Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 2
All discussion of Municipal role and responsibilities in this Business Plan includes both the Town of
Bridgewater and the Municipality of the District of Lunenburg. Together they are referred to as “the
Municipalities”.

The 2005 Study presented a number of building and operating principles to guide development of the
centre. Five of those principles are repeated here as those most relevant to the content of the Business
Plan Update.

Principles by Which the Centre will be Planned, Built and Operated
Principle 1 – The Centre will be the Hub of the Communities’ social, recreation, arts and culture
interests. The Multi-Purpose Community Centre should incorporate facilities of interest to all ages,
interests and abilities.

Principle 2 – The Centre will contribute to active healthy lifestyles both within its walls through the mix
of programs and activities it supports, and by the connections and linkages that enable participants to
walk and bike to it.

Principle 3 – The Centre will support inclusiveness through its design and programming. It will be
physically accessible, responsive to all senses, and financially accessible to all residents through
creative partnerships and programming.

Principle 4 – The Centre will be welcoming to all participants and visitors. The design and operation of
the facility will encourage participants to linger and socialize in common areas, to find spaces uniquely
suited to their needs and interests, and to effectively share spaces for a wide range of flexible activities.

Principle 5 – The Centre will contribute to Economic Enhancement of the region through: its ability to
provide spaces for events such as concerts and trade shows, sport events and cultural experiences;
through its spaces that can support business meetings and training events; and through its contribution
to the viability of residential and business attraction.

The Lunenburg County Lifestyle Centre will be a place for recreation, sport, active living, arts and
cultural experiences and socializing, it will also contribute to the region’s business community and
economic viability. Communities that appeal to residents also appeal to businesses. Businesses that are
not constrained by resource and transportation requirements (footloose businesses) look for
communities that help to secure and maintain their workforce. Many businesses require a highly
educated workforce that typically seeks a particular lifestyle along with employment opportunity. That
lifestyle involves good schools, a safe living environment and, second only to education factors for
people with families, good recreation and library services. The Bridgewater/Lunenburg area is fortunate
to have some of the ingredients – pleasant climate, lovely natural environment and interesting heritage -
that contribute to its attractiveness. It will soon provide additional retail opportunities and currently
provides residents with a range of educational opportunities. The addition of an innovative and diverse
Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 3
recreation facility and expanded library services can only enhance prospects to attract and maintain
business to the region, and attract and maintain a local workforce committed to maintaining and
contributing to the community. There is considerable empirical research to support the economic
benefits of these facilities.

“Small business ranked recreation, parks and open space first among quality-of-life elements in
location decisions…”
13

“Recreation, parks and open spaces are important in attracting small businesses, and areas which
fail to recognize this are likely to lose them to cities that emphasize these amenities.”
14

“Cities need to attract business and skilled labour to be globally competitive. Services that enhance
the quality of life of individuals in the community (such as parks, recreation, and cultural activities)
feature prominently among the characteristics that attract the knowledge workers to particular
places...”
15

“Over 90 percent of businesses in America employ 10 or fewer people, and most growth in business
starts with those small companies. Those business owners can live wherever they want to live, and
they will trade off some revenue potential for quality of life opportunities.”
16


The preceding text, some of it taken from the earlier report, is provided to establish the context and the
purpose for this facility.

In Chapter 2.0 of the Business Plan Update the focus is on three capital investment and operating cost
scenarios. Chapter 3.0 outlines the capital financing and its implications to the local taxpayer. Chapter
4.0 provides several case studies to assist the Town of Bridgewater and the Municipality of the District
of Lunenburg, along with the LCLCS, to determine the most appropriate operating and management
model
17
. Finally, Chapter 5.0 outlines an implementation process.


13
Steve Hill, newsteam@agnews.tamu.edu from quoting Dr. J. Crompton, Parks, Recreation Could Help Attract Business
(1995).
14
Florida, Richard, Competing on Creativity; Planning Ontario Cities in the North American Context A report prepared for the
Ontario Ministry of Enterprise, Opportunity and Innovation and the Institute for Competitiveness and Prosperity, p.1
15
Slack, E. (2003). Municipal Funding for Recreation. Prepared for the Laidlaw Foundation
16
Gale Group (2004). Leverage your parks: a quality parks system, which B.R. lacks, can help keep workers and attract new
companies - Community – Interview. Retrieved on December 10, 2004 from: http://www.findarticles.com

17
Immediately prior to the completion of the Business Plan Update it was determined that the Town and the Municipality
would jointly own and operate the new facility.
Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 4
1.1 Assumptions on Facility Components
The 2005 Needs Assessment and Business Plan recommended the facility components listed below.
Capital costs for these components were updated in 2007.

Recommended Facility Components
• Twin pad arena (includes 12 dressing rooms, 2 referee rooms, 300 and 1,500 seating capacity,
large change room, storage, first aid room, user group offices, maintenance and workshop
space related to ice facility);
• Aquatic facility (includes 6-lane 25M pool, leisure free form pool, therapy pool, equipment,
storage, staff space, change rooms);
• Multi-purpose space (includes dividable multi-purpose space, kitchen/bar, storage, senior
lounge area, and child minding space, unstructured active living area);
• Administration space (includes staff offices, staff lunch room and washroom);
• Public library and library administration space;
• Lobby and concourse, games room, food court area, washrooms, reception/control booth, lunch
room.


1.2 Assumptions on Usage
Members of the LCLCS provided a list of groups
18
who currently use the Town’s arena, outdoor pool,
and multi-purpose space. Groups were sent a brief letter requesting them to update usage should a new
facility be developed in the Town. Groups were given approximately 10 days and sent a follow-up
reminder note. Groups still not responding were called by Members of the LCLCS. The usage
information used for the business plan reflects those groups/organizations who responded.

The Town’s Program Co-ordinator, Ms Sandy Mair-Dodman reviewed the aquatic usage projections
from the 2005 report and revised those figures based on more current information.

The Town’s Facility Manager, Mr. Harold Killam provided input regarding current usage by current users
who did not respond to the survey.


18
Groups included community sport and recreation groups, schools, and in some cases individuals.
Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 5
2.0 BUSINESS PLAN
The business plan projects the amount and type of facility use, associated revenues and costs, for the
Lunenburg County Lifestyle Center (LCLC). Usage reflects input of staff and user groups as noted in the
previous section. Revenues are based on existing fees and charges. A management approach based
on the local environment and comparable models was recommended. Finally, resource requirements
and a financing strategy, based on both the full facility and a phased facility are presented.

As noted in the preceding section the LCLC includes two indoor ice rinks, one with seating for 1,500 and
the other for 300; an indoor aquatic facility with a number of aquatic components; multi-purpose and
active living space; administrative space; a library to provide both local and regional library services; and
common areas such as the lobby, concession area, control desk and public washrooms.

The “products” of this facility include both the programs and spaces it provides e.g., ice rental,
swimming lessons, meeting space, as well as the less tangible but nevertheless important outcomes
including: a healthier, more engaged and active community, and increased community attractiveness to
support retention and attraction of residents and businesses.

This business plan starts with a number of basic assumptions including (1) the facilities are those
confirmed in the 2005 needs assessment (2) the LCLC will be jointly owned by the Town of Bridgewater
and the Municipality of the District of Lunenburg on an equal basis (3) programs will maximize public
responsiveness and benefit (4) the facility will not operate as a for-profit business (5) the target market
includes all residents of the Town of Bridgewater, the Municipality of the District of Lunenburg and
surrounding communities and (6) the facility will be developed with the most up-to-date technology to
minimize future utility and operational costs.

The following sections outline usage, operating cost and revenue assumptions used to prepare the
operating pro forma.

Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 6
2.1 Usage Assumptions
Usage assumptions are based on the best information available within the scope of this study including
input from user groups and comparable models. For some facility components, most notably the arena,
usage assumptions are relatively straight forward and therefore reliable.

Prime-time for single-pad arenas is approximately 65 hours per week per ice pad, 130 for a twin pad.
Economies of scale typically allow a twin pad arena, fully utilized during prime-time hours to operate at a
modest surplus. This of course assumes that hourly rates are reasonably set to reflect costs. While
revenues for a fully scheduled twin pad arena are double that of a single pad facility, staffing, one of the
largest expense factors, is not.

Other facility components, most notably the aquatic facility, may not operate with a surplus. Swim
lessons typically maximize revenues while group rentals are typically subsidized. Table 2.2b illustrates
the revenues and costs associated with an aquatic facility. We note here and later in the Report that the
usage assumptions adopted to prepare this business plan do not reflect maximum use of the aquatic
facility. Unlike the arena use of an indoor pool will need to be developed. The current restriction on
indoor pool space limits development of instructional and community swim programs. There is capacity
in both the space and staff allocation to grow these programs over time, thereby leading to increased
revenue relative to costs.

Other facility components including multi-purpose space (meeting rooms, multi purpose space) as well
as administrative space and common areas, while critical to the overall operation of the facility are also
typically not significant revenue generators. That said access to a large community room is integral to
such activities as a tournament.

No assessment has been made in this business plan for reduction in existing costs of maintaining and
renting other space in the communities that presumably would be moved to the multi-purpose centre. To
the degree other spaces are currently being maintained and/or for which rent is paid there will be
offsetting resources as these activities are transferred.



Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 7
The following points summarize the assumptions used to create the pro forma for this business plan.

Arena Usage
• It is assumed that the smaller
19
(seating = 300) ice pad will begin ice operation in early August
to accommodate an August hockey school, and early try-outs. This rink will close at the end of
the first week of March for a season of approximately 30 weeks.
• The larger pad (seating = 1,500) will have a mid September start and mid-April end to the
accommodate play-off season. This would provide an approximate 32 week season.
• Prime time during the regular ice season (i.e., this does not include the August ice in the smaller
rink) is considered to be from 4:00 PM to 11:00 PM Monday through Friday, and from 8:00 AM
to 11:00 PM on Saturday and Sunday from September 1
st
through mid April or 65 hours per
week/rink or a total of 130 hours weekly in two rinks.
• Groups providing responses to the brief survey, as well as those currently using ice
20
, indicated
they would use approximately 135 hours of prime time ice weekly. This includes 67 hours of
prime-time ice use by community organizations, 31 hours by local schools, and 36.5 hours by
“industrial teams”
21
. Two groups identified a total of 22 hours for one time (tournament) use.
Staff also noted a few groups who use the existing arena occasionally for tournaments. This
figure is consistent with the hours of prime time ice requested in the 2005 study.
• Non-prime time ice is daytime use during the school week. In 2007/08 only 13 hours of non-
prime time use was requested compared to approximately 40 hours of non-prime in 2005. At
the time it was noted that this number (40) seemed high. The hours requested by schools for
the current plan are almost entirely for prime-time. Selected calls were made to responding
schools to confirm that they were indeed interested in time after school hours and they indicated
that this was the case.
• In the 2005 business plan non-ice use of the twin pads included 7 event rentals annually
(consistent with similar arenas and information gathered from event organizers in this Plan). A
follow-up call with a representative of Master Events Promotion indicates that this remains
realistic based on proximity to large event sites in Halifax. Activities included in major event
rental include entertainment/musical concerts, trade shows, dog shows etc. A small amount of
arena floor use by community groups has been included in usage projections. This would be for
activities such as roller hockey. The planned indoor soccer facility will accommodate all soccer
demand.
Table 2.1a illustrates usage and revenue projections for the arena.

19
Both rinks are NHL size ice pads, the term smaller and larger refers to the amount of seating.
20
Staff provided information for some current users.
21
This term is used to describe teams associated with places of work who may book the ice for 2 to 5 hours weekly for
recreational hockey.
Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 8

Table 2.1 Arena Usage and Projected Revenues (With Double Ice Pad)
Facility Component
ARENA
Activity
Number of
Hours per
week
Avg. no.
of
children
Avg. No. of
Adults/ Snr
Adults or
Families
Fee
Weeks/
sessions
Revenue
Minor teams during prime time (Pad 1)
43 N/A
N/A
$125.00
26 $139,750
Minor teams during prime time (Pad 2)
43
N/A N/A
$125.00
26 $139,750
Adult teams during prime time (Pad 1)
22
N/A N/A
$150.00
26 $85,800
Adult teams during prime time (Pad 2)
22
N/A N/A
$150.00
32 $105,600
Adult teams during non-prime time
13
N/A N/A
$115.00
26 $38,870
School Groups during non-prime
5
N/A N/A
$40.00
26 $5,200
Prime time use during regular season
130



Non- prime time use during regular season
18



Hockey School
28
N/A N/A
$125.00
4 $14,000
Hockey Try-outs
20
N/A N/A
$125.00
4 $10,000
Public Skate (Summer) 4 10 5 $3.00 4 $720
Public Skate (Winter) 4 10 5 $3.00 26 $4,680
August – March
Shinny (summer)
6
N/A N/A
$160.00
4 $3,840

Prime time use (day-time) during August –
Single Pad
28




Non-Prime time use (day-time) during August –
Single Pad
34



Summer Floor Rental (non- Ice – one pad for
activities such as roller hockey)
15
N/A N/A
$35.00 15
$5,250
May - August
Floor Rental (non-ice two pads rental for major
events such as concerts, trade shows etc.)
1
N/A N/A
$1,900.00 8
$15,200
Arena Revenue Total $568,660.00

Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 9
Aquatic Facility Usage
Unlike the arena, utilization of the aquatic facility is more difficult to document for several reasons. First,
there is currently no public indoor pool and while staff are of the opinion (and other indoor operations
would certainly support this opinion) that there is considerable unmet demand, programs and use will
need to be developed. Second, unlike an hour of ice time, several activities can occur in the pool
concurrently, making it more difficult to identify usage without considerably more detailed work. Third,
there are outdoor programs that may move indoors depending future decisions related to the outdoor
pool. Finally, no assessment has been made of the proposed indoor pool in Queens County, or
preliminary discussions for an indoor pool in Chester, although we are of the opinion that these will not
have a significant impact due to considerable latent regional demand.

Together, these points make it predicting pool usage more complex. An indoor pool is always one of the
most desired facilities in all similar assessments. An indoor pool serves a broader demographic than
most other recreational facilities, it provides strong support to active living strategies, and is one of the
most useful recreation facilities with respect to therapeutic use. For these reasons it is realistic to
assume that an indoor pool would be well supported and used. As a general rule of thumb communities
with populations of 20,000 to 30,000 are realistic bases to support an indoor aquatic facility.

The following points were used to form assumptions regarding indoor aquatic use for the business plan.

• Staff provided considerable input to support future aquatic use.
- Staff note that synchronized swimming is in an early start-up stage in Bridgewater. In the fall
of 2007 Synchro Nova Scotia started a program with 14 participants. Synchro Nova Scotia
anticipates that within a few years they will require 10-15 hours weekly of the entire pool.
- The Bridgewater Triathlon Club anticipates that, with a full time pool facility the club would
use a pool 1-3 times per week for sessions specific to triathletes. Individually, athletes would
also take advantage of Masters Swim and Lane Swim.
- Several contacts from Bridgewater Barracudas provided staff with input. One contact felt that
if the Swim Team stayed as a Summer Team, they would likely extend their season to
commence the first week of June rather than the latter part of June (when the outdoor pool is
available). They would also rent an indoor pool for 2 hours per week, which apparently is the
maximum allowed for a summer time. With sufficient interest available coaching a winter swim
team could be developed, which would result in additional rentals for practices and meets.
Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 10
- For this business plan community use of an indoor pool includes 6 hours weekly for
Synchronized swimming and 2 hours for the Bridgewater Barracudas (8 hours per week,
prime-time youth) and 2 hours for Bridgewater Triathlon and 4 hours for a Masters Swim Club
(6 hours prime-time adult). No hours at this time have been included for a year round swim
club although it is understood this might be developed given coaching availability and interest
on the part of local swimmers.
• The 2005 chart indicated an average of .5 hrs per week for the fall, winter and spring and 10
hours per week in the summer. Parties are generally 1 hour pool time. While staff are of the
opinion that there may be more demand for pool use for parties these figures have only been
adjusted to and average of 2 hours weekly during the school year and 10 per week in the
summer.
• Staff note other areas of potential growth including cross-training and resistance training. This
activity along with training by individual triathletes has been incorporated within the fitness swim
component of use projections.
• Staff reviewed the 2005 projections for lessons, aquafit, public swim, and lane swim and
provided the following estimate for 2007:
- Aquatic Leadership Development (Assistant Water Safety Instructor, Water Safety Instructor,
WSI Re-Certification, Bronze Star, Bronze Medallion, Bronze Cross, National Life Saving,
NLS recertification, Red Cross Instructor Training etc.). Total hours for each class vary
significantly from lows of 6 hours for a recertification course that could be accommodated
over the course of a day to requirements of up to 48 hours that would take place over the
course of 8 – 10 weeks. Without much more detailed assessment of current leadership
development needs and interests related to local requirements this assessment assumes a
total of 250 hours of Leadership Development divided across 15 leadership courses annually
10 in the winter, and 5 in the summer. We have also assumed an average of 6 participants in
each class. This estimate may be quite conservative and staff have noted that classes would
be offered quarterly.
- In 2007/08 the Town of Bridgewater was required to reduce its aquatic program, due to lack
of certified leaders. Staff are working hard to eliminate this problem. A full time facility will
provide more hours for leadership instruction and more hours for instructor positions for those
who have received training.
• Currently the Town of Bridgewater, YMCA Lunenburg County, and Small World Learning Center
use the outdoor pool for 1 hour, 3 times per week for their daycamp/child care programs. This would
likely transfer to an indoor pool facility, i.e., 3 hours per week and may increase to 4 or 5 hours
weekly during the summer due to the likelihood of increased pool availability and close proximity of
these organizations to the proposed site.
• Currently the Bridgewater Parks, Recreation & Culture Department has approximately 200 youth
per session participating in the learn-to-swim program in the fall, winter and spring using the
Wandlyn Inn. The numbers are higher in the spring and usually lower in the winter. In the summer
approximately 300 youth participate in lessons, (75 per 2-week session). Staff are of the opinion
that registration would increase in a full time facility. This opinion is supported by the consultants.
Weather constraints and the ambience of a new public indoor pool would typically reduce and
increase participation respectively.
Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 11
• Staff are of the opinion that up to 25 hours per week would accommodate youth and adult lessons
(this almost triples the existing hours). Based on the high-level assessment undertaken in this
business plan update the 25 hours have been divided 2/3
rds
lower level lessons and 1/3
rd
upper
levels. This would mean approximately 17 hours for introductory level classes which are 30 minute
sessions and about 8 hours of upper level sessions, which are 40 minute sessions. For the purpose
of this plan this has been translated to 30 introductory level classes with an average of 5
participants in each class and 8 classes for more senior (not leadership) instructional classes with
an average of 7 participants per class. With four swim sessions annually this would result in an
annual participation of just over 800 participants annually. This number is considerably lower than
the numbers reflected in the Sackville Sports Stadium Statistics but almost double that currently
experienced in Bridgewater and MODL combined. Without doing much more in depth assessment
this figure could be assumed to be both achievable in the short term and very conservative. Staff
also note that:
The Town of Bridgewater has a total registration of approximately 150 youth during the
summer and 45 in both Fall and Spring aquatic programs.
Bridgewater and The Municipality of the District of Lunenburg currently cannot meet the
demand for the parented pre-school swim classes, due to lack of pool time.
Few adult learn-to-swim classes are offered currently. With the lack of pool time available,
youth lessons are the priority. Bridgewater currently offers summer adult lessons, although
are of the opinion that summer is not the best season for lessons.
The recent announcement that a Seniors Campus will be built in Bridgewater will increase
the current population of older adults resulting in demand for additional therapy rentals or
“range of motion” classes.
Due to lack of pool time in Bridgewater, and lack of qualified and available leadership, only
two aquafit classes are currently offered per week. One, specifically for adults ages 50+
draws a waiting list every session. The other class is an Aquajogging/Spinning class for all
ages.
The Elderfit group in Lunenburg are currently very active, offering 14 - 45 minute classes
per week (12 at the emOcean Spa in Lunenburg and 3 at the Oak Island Inn). Of these
classes, 11 are held during the day time and 3 in the evening. Bridgewater staff note that
the Sackville Sports Stadium, in comparison, offers 21 aquafit classes per week. Town
staff estimate they could offer 15+ classes of an hour in duration each, weekly.
Staff note there is a big demand for parents and tots take lessons and/or free swim, which
would be offered concurrently with aquafit or masters swim.
Scuba diving, water polo, diving, junior/senior lifeguard competition teams are other
potential program areas. (We did have a couple junior lifeguard teams last summer.)
Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 12
• Representatives of the South Shore Regional School Board
22
, anticipate that Lunenburg County
schools will make great use of an indoor pool. There is indication that schools would like to offer
a learn-to-swim program for Grade 4-6. There are approximately 19+ elementary and
junior/senior high schools in Lunenburg County that would potentially access the pool. The
Bridgewater Jr/Sr High School currently uses the Wandlyn Inn 1 hour per week for its adapted
aquatics program. Use is also anticipated by PAL (Physical Active Lifestyle) programs in the
high schools. Schools may also potentially have competitive school swim teams. Board staff
estimates that schools could use up to 15 hours weekly for various day-time activities. This
usage would of course be enhanced if cost to use the pool was minimized or sponsored.

Table 2.2a illustrates hours of use by activity and projects participation in each of these activities. Rates
and fees are consistent with current and/or comparable charges in Bridgewater’s outdoor pool, for
Municipal lessons at the Wandlyn Inn and other facilities in the region. Please note: these usage
estimates reflect input by staff, comparisons with other facilities, and reasonable program directions.
Without considerably more investigation than was within the scope of the business plan update these
estimates can only be considered very high level. However, as comparison, participation for swimming
lessons in the fall, winter and spring is double current levels and only slightly more than summer levels.
Given a new facility, a market that is not as big as HRM we believe this is realistic but conservative for a
start-up year estimate.



22
Comments based on discussions by Town of Bridgewater staff with Karen Geddes-Selig, Sport Animator with the South
Shore Regional School Board.
Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 13

Table 2.2 Aquatic Usage and Projected Revenues
Facility Component
AQUATIC FACILITY
Activity
No. of
classes/hrs/
sessions
Avg. no. of
Participants
Avg. No. of
Adults/ Snr
Adults or
Families
Fee
Weeks/
sessions
Revenue
12 20 $3.50 40 $33,600
12 5 $3.50 40 $8,400
12 5 $5.00 40 $12,000
September - June public swim
12 5 $10.00 40 $24,000
20 20 $3.50 8 $11,200
20 2 $3.50 8 $1,120
20 3 $5.00 8 $2,400
July/August public swim
20 5 $10.00 8 $8,000
15 1 $3.50 40 $2,100
15 3 $3.50 40 $6,300
September - June Lane Swim
15 2 $10.00 40 $12,000
25 2 $4.00 8 $1,600
25 5 $6.00 8 $6,000 July/August Lane Swim
25 3 $4.00 8 $2,400
Public and Lane Swim Revenue Sub-Total $131,120
children 20 7 $55.00 3 $23,100
Youth 10 8 $70.00 3 $16,800
adults 2 5 $60.00 3 $1,8000
leadership 10 6 $110.00 1 $6,600
private/semi-private 4 2 $90.00 3 $2,160.00
aquafit 10 8 $70.00 3 $16,800.00
INSTRUCTIONAL
September - June
parent-tot 6 6 $50.00 3 $5,400




Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 14
Table 2.2 Aquatic Usage and Projected Revenues
Facility Component
AQUATIC FACILITY
Activity
No. of
classes/hrs/
sessions
Avg. no. of
Participants
Avg. No. of
Adults/ Snr
Adults or
Families
Fee
Weeks/
sessions
Revenue
children 20 7 $55.00 4 $30,800
youth 10 8 $70.00 4 $22,400
adults 1 4 $60.00 4 $960
leadership 5 8 $110.00 1 $4,400
private/semi-Private 4 2 $90.00 4 $2,880
aquafit 8 10 $70.00 4 $22,400
July/August
parent-tot 4 6 $50.00 4 $4,800
Instructional Revenue Sub-Total $161,300
minor groups - prime
8 $60.00 40
$19,200
adult groups - prime
6 $70.00 40
$16,800
minor groups - non-prime
10 $50.00 40
$20,000
adult groups - non-prime
1 $60.00 40
$2,400
adult groups - therapy
6 $60.00 40
$14,400
POOL RENTALS
September-June
birthday party
2 $60.00 26
$3,120
minor groups - prime
12 $60.00 8 $5,760
adult groups - prime
6 $70.00 8 $3,360
adult groups - therapy
4 $60.00 8 $1,920
July/August
birthday party
10 $60.00 8 $4,800
Rental Revenue Sub-Total $91,760
Pool Revenue Total
$384,180
Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 15
Multi-Purpose Space Usage
• The 2007/08 update did not investigate, in detail, usage of multi-purpose space. Information
forwarded from Staff in the form of emails from the Fall of 2004 and used in the 2005 study,
note:
- The South Shore District Soccer Association had an interest in an indoor space for soccer.
With the planned development of an indoor soccer facility that need will be addressed.
- The Garden Club, the Kiwanis Club, and Bridgewater Senior’s Club would use multi-purpose
space, and fitness space as replacement for the senior’s area in the existing arena.
- As in the 2005 study it is assumed that general instructional programs (e.g., social dancing,
arts and crafts, baby-sitting courses, etc.) will have fees set that incorporate instructional
costs and a portion of overhead. There are therefore no revenue projections for Town Parks,
Recreation and Culture Department Programs shown here.

Table 2.3: Multi-Purpose Space Usage and Revenue Projections
Facility Component
MULTI-PURPOSE SPACE
Activity

No. Of hours
per week
Fee
Weeks
per Year
Revenue
Meeting Rooms - small 10 $25.00 40 $10,000
Meeting Rooms - medium 5 $60.00 40 $12,000
for community meetings or
events (not municipal
recreation programs)
Meeting Rooms - large 1 $150.00 40 $6,000
Rental from Seniors 6 $25.00 45 $6,750
Rental (Room) Revenue Total $34,750

Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 16
Library Requirements/Usage
Discussion (telephone interview and follow-up written text) with Cheryl Stenstrom, Chief Librarian for the
South Shore Regional Library identified the following relevant usage information:
• The recommendations regarding the library in the 2005 study continue to be supported by the South
Shore Library. In 2007 the Regional Library investigated the potential to convert the Canadian Tire
building in the Town to a local library plus administration headquarters. The consultant working on
that project concluded the building was suitable. The recommendation was for a 26,000 sq. ft.
library and administration centre to serve both. Based on population requirements approximately
20,000 square feet would provide sufficient space for existing population with an additional 5,000
square feet for the Regional Administration Centre. Some growth is built into the 26,000 sq. ft.
number.
• Ms. Stenstrom noted that as the municipality is responsible for providing the facility the Library
would go where the Municipality provided space, but Board preference is for the Multipurpose
Facility rather than the Canadian Tire store.
• Approximately 25% of the annual operating costs for the library are paid by the local
Municipality(ies) based on population. With 2006 populations of 7,944 and 25,164 respectively, the
Town of Bridgewater would be responsible for approximately 6% of annual operating costs and
District of Lunenburg 19%.
• The Board currently pays about $60,000/year for library rental space to serve the regional
headquarters.
• The South Shore Regional Library currently receives approximately $37,000 from the Town of
Bridgewater toward building operation including snow removal, insurance, capital maintenance.
MoDL does not have a library branch and therefore does not contribute to local building costs.
• The South Shore Regional Library currently receives approximately $39,000 annually from the
Town and approximately $138,000 from MoDL toward its regional operations including staffing and
collections.

Assessment of library operating costs have not been included in the operating scenarios. The pro forma
scenarios reflect library costs related to utilities and cleaning (general day-to-day) as well as building
insurance. The “revenue” line related to the library incorporates existing Town contribution as well as a
portion of the Town ($10,000) and MoDL ($30,000) regional contributions. This is a very rough estimate
only and is included as offset to non-staff or collection related operating costs.

2.2 Operating Cost Assumptions
The preceding section outlines usage and revenue projections.

Table 2.4 summarizes staffing allocation and costs for a full facility (Scenario One). Built into the pro
forma outlined in table 2.5, is the incorporation of new technology in arena operation that significantly
reduces the annual utility costs through a process of heat capture and use. LEED Silver Certification
has also been incorporated in the capital costs of the facility.

Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 17
Table 2.5 illustrates major annual operating costs for staff, utilities, and administration for the full facility
(Scenario One) including a twin pad arena, aquatic facility, multi-purpose space, administrative space,
concession and lobby area, and a local library with regional headquarters. Revenues also reflect a full
facility. All costs and revenues have been rounded to the nearest $500.

Typically a square foot multiplier of $3.50 for arenas, $5.50 for multi-purpose space and $7.50 for
aquatic facilities is used to estimate the annual cost of utilities (heat, water, sewer, electricity) for
recreation facilities. Based on previous discussion and review of utility costs for facilities with both older
and newer arena refrigeration technology this Plan uses an averaged calculation of $3.50 per square
foot. This must be understood to be a high-level, although reasonable estimate. It is understood that the
arena heat benefits are only in place when the arena is in operation. Discussions with arena
refrigeration technicians indicates that during ice operation the full cost of heat could be provided by the
arena while during non-ice season no benefit is incurred. If the other facilities are not built with the arena
heat while generated, will be lost (unless some other capture such as home or office heating is built in to
the process
23
).

Table 2.4: Base Staff Costs

Salary
Hourly
Wage
Benefit
Rate
Full Time Staff
Facility Manager $70,000.00 17%
Plant Coordinator $55,000.00
Aquatic Coordinator $35,000.00 17%
Clerk $30,000.00 17%
Arena Attendant - ticketed $17.85 17%
Part Time Staff
aquafit instructor $30.00 11%
instructor guard $12.00 11%
assistant instructor guard $10.00 11%
cashier $7.60 11%
Office assistance $7.60 11%
arena staff - non-ticketed $14.35 11%
arena attendant $10.00 11%

Some preliminary discussion was undertaken with the Town and MoDL insurance broker (Bell and
Grant) to provide an estimate of insurance costs. They in turn consulted with Frank Cowan Company
Limited, who provided an annual premium estimate for building and contents insurance on a
$31,500,000 facility ranging from $35,000 to $50,000. This does not include data processing insurance
or business interruption cover, nor does it include other liability coverage. They note the range is based
on actual construction details, location, choice of deductible etc.

23
This would require a heat sink source. In the Town of Springhill the availability of deep mine shafts partially filled with water
allowed excess heat not used in the arena to be saved with some plans to heat adjacent homes. This is a somewhat
unique geographic situation not necessarily replicable in Bridgewater.
Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 18
For the scenarios annual premiums of $50,000 annually for the “all-in” facility, $40,000 for Scenario 2
(one ice pad) and $35,000 for Scenario 3 “no library” have been used. The rationale for differential
annual costs based on higher costs to replace the library and its contents than an ice pad. These are
very high-level estimates.

Cowan Insurance notes that to provide a ball park quote for liability exposure they would require annual
budget information, annual payroll including benefits, revenue estimates, number of board members and
information regarding profit status of the operation
24
.

It is also assumed that some existing staff will be transferred to this facility and that some existing
insured facilities will be decommissioned. A more realistic estimate of annual insurance increase (over
existing insurance premiums currently paid by the Town and MoDL should be made with this information
confirmed and provided.

2.4 Annual Operating Cost Projections
Net operating cost projections are based on the assumptions noted in preceding sections. The pro
forma does not represent specific programming that will evolve as the centre is built, marketing
initiatives that may be developed, policies that would increase or limit participation, or other directions
not part of this study. These projections represent a reasonable starting point from which to begin the
process of more exact programming, scheduling and budget projections. No revenues (or costs) are
included for interest instructional classes, or other ongoing fundraising activities, all of which can be
anticipated to bring in additional revenues above associated costs.

Staffing for the aquatic operation is based on usage and programs.

Operation staff for the full facility assumes there will be a full time operator whenever the facility is open
(80 hours per week for 52 weeks) as well as two arena operators as noted, resulting in an FTE for full
time operational staff of 5.

The pro forma outlined in Table 2.5 includes utility costs for the library component but no library staffing
costs.


24
Subsequent to the request for an insurance estimate confirmation of municipal operation was provided, although not in
time to obtain an estimate for this business plan.
Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 19
The operating deficit does include a nominal amount ($20,000) contributions to ongoing capital
maintenance (e.g., replacement costs), however does not include debt repayment costs. These costs
will be developed in the financing strategy.

The expenses and revenues in Tables 2.5, 2.6 and 2.7 have been rounded to the nearest $500.00.
Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 20
TABLE 2.5 OPERATING PRO FORMA FULL FACILITY (SCENARIO ONE)
COST ITEM HOURS/YR FTES YEAR ONE TOTAL
STAFF
Facility Manager (FT) 1.0 $82,000
Plant Co-ordinator (FT) 1.0 $64,500
Aquatic Co-ordinator (FT) 1.0 $53,000
Operations Staff (carded) ice and pool (FT) 5.0 $190,000
Clerk/Administrator (FT) 1.0 $35,000
Head Guard (PT) 2,000
1.1
$27,000
Assistant Instructor Guard (PT) 4,000
2.2
$44,500
Instructor (PT) 1,500
0.8
$20,000
Aquafit instructor (PT) 620
0.3
$21,000
Cashier (PT) 1,000
0.5
$8,500
Office Support (PT) 1,820
1.0
$15,500
Operations staff uncarded – ice (PT) 2,000
1.1
$32,000
Rink Attendants - public skating (PT) 1,000
0.5
$11,000
Total Staff Costs 16.66 $604,000
GENERAL OFFICE
Marketing, Promotions $10,000
IT support (chargeback, external support) $7,000
Office Supplies $20,000
Office Equipment $10,000
Telephone $10,000
Postage/Courier (includes annual general mailing) $25,000
Professional Services (accounting, legal) $10,000
Property Insurance $50,000
Staff Education and Training $10,000
Subscriptions/Memberships $3,000
Volunteer Recognition/Recruitment $5,000
Total Office Costs $160,000
MAINTENANCE COSTS
Utilities - pool - $46,000
Utilities - arena - $211,000
Utilities - multi purpose space $19,000
Utilities - administration and ancillary space $32,500
Utilities - library $70,500
Pool Chemicals $7,000
Pool Contract $5,000
Cleaning & Maintenance Supplies $25,000
Small Equip. Repair $10,000
Snow and Garbage Removal $20,000
Minor Building Repair $12,000
Reserve for Future Retrofit $20,000
Ice Start Up/close contract $5,000
Total Maintenance Costs $483,000
Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 21
COST ITEM HOURS/YR FTES YEAR ONE TOTAL
PROGRAM COSTS
Aquatic program supplies $10,000
Medical and Safety Supplies $2,500
Part time staff training $5,000
Total Program Costs $17,500
TOTAL EXPENDITURES $1,264,500
REVENUES
Revenue From Programs & Rentals $988,000
Revenue from Other (Advertising, Concessions) $50,000
TOTAL REVENUES $1,038,000
NET PROFIT (DEFICIT) $(226,500)

A review of two large sport and recreation venues in Halifax Regional Municipality provided only limited
opportunity for comparison, although where reasonable, their unit costs were compared to those noted
above. In both cases (Sackville Sport Stadium and Dartmouth Sportsplex) the nature of these facilities with
respect to size and components makes them quite different than the facility noted here. Both operate with
annual memberships – although one can use facilities without a membership – made reasonable due to
their major fitness facilities. This is not an option for the LCLCS and does limit some revenue generation.

$50,000 has been identified for Revenue from advertising and concessions. This amount is not based on
investigation of other facilities. Such investigation is outside the scope of this study. We are however,
familiar with facilities that do extremely well with respect to advertising and sponsorships and certainly this
revenue should be considered a starting point only. To achieve higher revenue levels than those noted
here for advertising etc., additional staff resources will likely be required.

There is also room for growth in programming and revenue with respect to use of the aquatic facility and
non-prime time ice use.

The Town and MoDL together currently contribute in the order of $150,000 annually to operations that will
be picked up in a full scenario operation. The annual additional operating investment could therefore be
considered to be closer to $76,500.00 annually.

Table 2.6 illustrates the annual operating deficit of a facility with only one ice pad –Scenario Two.
Revenues are reduced (these would still be captured at the current arena) and staffing is reduced
moderately.
Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 22
TABLE 2.6 OPERATING PRO FORMA ONE ICE PAD (SCENARIO TWO)
COST ITEM HOURS/YR FTES YEAR ONE TOTAL
STAFF
Facility Manager (FT) 1.0 $82,000
Plant Co-ordinator (FT) 1.0 $64,500
Aquatic Co-ordinator (FT) 1.0 $53,000
Operations Staff (carded) ice and pool (FT) 3.5 $133,000
Clerk/Administrator (FT) 1.0 $35,000
Head Guard (PT) 2,000
1.1
$27,000
Assistant Instructor Guard (PT) 4,000
2.2
$44,500
Instructor (PT) 1,500
0.8
$20,000
Aquafit instructor (PT) 620
0.3
$21,000
Cashier (PT) 1,000
0.5
$8,500
Office Support (PT) 1,820
1.0
$15,500
Operations staff uncarded – ice (PT) 2,000
1.1
$32,000
Rink Attendants - public skating (PT) 1,000
0.5
$11,000
Total Staff Costs 15.16 $547,000
GENERAL OFFICE
Marketing, Promotions $10,000
IT support (chargeback, external support) $7,000
Office Supplies $20,000
Office Equipment $10,000
Telephone $10,000
Postage/Courier (includes annual general mailing) $25,000
Professional Services (accounting, legal) $10,000
Insurance $40,000
Staff Education and Training $10,000
Subscriptions/Memberships $3,000
Volunteer Recognition/Recruitment $5,000
Total Office Costs $150,000
MAINTENANCE COSTS
Utilities - pool - $46,000
Utilities - arena - $128,000
Utilities - multi purpose space $19,000
Utilities - administration and ancillary space $32,500
Utilities - library $70,500
Pool Chemicals $7,000
Pool Contract $5,000
Cleaning & Maintenance Supplies $25,000
Small Equip. Repair $10,000
Snow and Garbage Removal $20,000
Minor Building Repair $12,000
Reserve for Future Retrofit $20,000
Ice Start Up/close contract $5,000
Total Maintenance Costs $400,000
Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 23
COST ITEM HOURS/YR FTES YEAR ONE TOTAL
Program Costs
Aquatic program supplies $10,000
Medical and Safety Supplies $2,500
Part time staff training $5,000
Total Program Costs $17,500
TOTAL EXPENDITURES $1,114,500
REVENUES
Revenue From Programs $742,000
Revenue from Other (Advertising, Concessions) $50,000
TOTAL REVENUES $792,000
NET PROFIT (DEFICIT) $(322,500)

Scenario #2 projects an annual net operating deficit of approximately $322,500. As noted in the preceding
scenario approximately $70,000 is contributed by the Town and MoDL annually toward library costs that
are included in this pro forma. Not included in this pro forma is the $80,000 that will still be contributed
toward the operation of the Bridgewater Memorial Arena. Incorporation of these two figures would therefore
result in an annual increase to existing operation contributions of approximately $252,500.

Discussion with respect to scenarios regarding potential for additional revenue from advertising and
concessions as well as additional aquatic programming still applies. However, the potential for tournaments
and major rental events will be reduced if both rinks are not in the same facility. The $50,000 illustrated for
revenue from advertising and concessions will therefore be less achievable, certainly there will be less
likelihood of significantly increasing this amount.

Scenario #3 (Table 2.7) includes twin pad arenas, aquatic facility and multi-purpose space but no library.
The projected deficit of $127,000 reflects $47,000 of additional costs (the arena in Bridgewater will be
closed). The Town and MoDL would however retain those costs for the library that were included in the
other scenarios for an annual operating contribution relative to the other scenarios of approximately
$117,000.

Scenario 3 also can’t illustrate the reality that inclusion of a library in the facility will increase participation in
other parts of the centre. Libraries can play a significant role in support of local business. If the partners in
this project wish to do everything they can to attract business to their communities a library strongly
connected to the community and the business community is advisable. This is particularly important is
space will be developed in the centre to support business meetings and training.


Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 24
TABLE 2.7 OPERATING PRO FORMA NO LIBRARY (SCENARIO THREE)
Cost Item Hours/Yr FTE’s Year One Total
Facility Manager (FT) 1.0 $82,000
Plant Co-ordinator (FT) 1.0 $64,500
Aquatic Co-ordinator (FT) 1.0 $53,000
Operations Staff (carded) ice and pool (FT) 4.5 $171,000
Clerk/Administrator (FT) 1.0 $35,000
Head Guard (PT) 2,000
1.1
$27,000
Assistant Instructor Guard (PT) 4,000
2.2
$44,500
Instructor (PT) 1,500
0.8
$20,000
Aquafit instructor (PT) 620
0.3
$21,000
Cashier (PT) 1,000
0.5
$8,500
Office Support (PT) 1,820
1.0
$15,500
Operations staff uncarded – ice (PT) 2,000
1.1
$32,000
Rink Attendants - public skating (PT) 1,000
0.5
$11,000
Total Staff Costs 16.16 $585,000
GENERAL OFFICE
Marketing, Promotions $10,000
IT support (chargeback, external support) $7,000
Office Supplies $20,000
Office Equipment $10,000
Telephone $10,000
Postage/Courier (includes annual general mailing) $25,000
Professional Services (accounting, legal) $10,000
Property Insurance $35,000
Staff Education and Training $10,000
Subscriptions/Memberships $3,000
Volunteer Recognition/Recruitment $5,000
Total Office Costs $145,000
MAINTENANCE COSTS
Utilities - pool - $46,000
Utilities - arena - $211,000
Utilities - multi purpose space $19,000
Utilities - administration and ancillary space $32,500
Pool Chemicals $7,000
Pool Contract $5,000
Cleaning & Maintenance Supplies $25,000
Small Equip. Repair $10,000
Snow and Garbage Removal $20,000
Minor Building Repair $12,000
Reserve for Future Retrofit $20,000
Ice Start Up/close contract $5,000
Total Maintenance Costs $412,500




Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 25
Cost Item Hours/Yr FTE’s Year One Total
PROGRAM COSTS
Aquatic program supplies $10,000
Medical and Safety Supplies $2,500
Part time staff training $5,000
Total Program Costs $17,500
TOTAL EXPENDITURES $1,120,000
REVENUES
Revenue From Programs $988,000
Revenue from Other (Advertising, Concessions) $50,000
TOTAL REVENUES $993,000
NET PROFIT (DEFICIT) $(127,000)

2.5 Annual Cost Projection Summary
When existing operating investments that are retained or that will be eliminated are included the additional
costs to the Town and MoDL in total will be in the order of $76,000
25
, $252,500
26
and $117,000
27
for
scenarios 1, 2 and 3 respectively. We understand these will be divided equally between the Town and the
Municipality.




25
The amount of $76,500 (new costs) reflects projected operating deficit of $226,000 minus existing $70,000 (estimate) currently
provided to the library operation for costs included in this pro forma and $80,000, which is the current arena deficit.
26
The amount of $252,500 (new costs) reflects the projected operating deficit of $322,500 minus the $70,000 currently
contributed to the library (estimate). The annual deficit for the arena of $80,000 will remain.
27
The amount of $117,000 (new costs) reflects the projected operating deficit of $127,000 minus the current $80,000 annual
deficit for the Bridgewater Arena. The annual contribution to the library of $70,000 (estimate) will remain.
Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 26
3.0 FINANCING THE PROJECT
Section 3.0 considers the available capacity to manage the capital and annual operating costs of the
multi-purpose facility.

The annual net operating cost is a starting point only. No estimate has been provided for insurance
other than property insurance. No assessment has been made for transfer of existing costs including but
not limited to: library staffing, rental of other program space by the Town and MoDL that may not be
required with the new facility etc.

There is capacity in both the aquatic and multi purpose and active living spaces of the new centre to
increase programming and therefore revenues. While there would be increased expenses, largely for
staffing, the result will be increased net revenues as much of the overhead is incorporated within the
base operation.

No accommodation for membership fees is included in this business plan. Without a fitness operation
(this was not part of the 2005 needs assessment and was not incorporated in 2007/08) it is less viable
to operate as a membership based facility. Should a change in components incorporate a fitness
operation a membership charge would become a more realistic option. That said this is an issue that will
require further discussion with respect to financial accessibility for community members.

Annual revenues for advertising and concessions have been suggested at a conservative $50,000. This
could be substantially higher. To achieve higher revenues staff resources may need to be increased.
Rink board advertising is an obvious revenue generator, although an assessment of local potential has
not been made. Other forms of advertising including LED message displays and other digital signs are
common in many public centres. Sponsorship and promotion of programs and spaces in perpetuity or
for a specific period of time are other examples of advertising revenue.

Revenue from concessions could also be increased, particularly if the facility operates as a twin pad
arena facility.

These points illustrate a few opportunities to reduce the annual operating cost closer to a break even
operation - over time.

Section 3.0 outlines capital investment requirements of the three scenarios outlined in the preceding
chapter.
Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 27
3.1 Capital Financing
Table 3.1 illustrates three possible building scenarios. Scenario #1 is the complete facility – two ice
pads, the aquatic facility, multi-purpose and active living space, and library. Scenario # 2 includes only
one ice pad and scenario # 3 excludes the library but includes two ice pads. All scenarios include
ancillary space such as lobby and concession area as well as management offices. In scenarios 2 and 3
the fittings and furnishings budgets have been reduced to $1.5M from $2M reflecting lower costs in
these scenarios due to absence of one major facility component. These figures must be understood to
be rough estimates with more detailed estimates of furnishings done in a future phase.


Table 3.1: Capital Cost Scenarios
Scenario 1:
Complete Facility
Scenario 2: One
Ice Pad
Scenario 3: No
Library
Ice Rink # 1 $6,413,000 $6,413,000 $6,413,000
Ice Rink # 2 $3,525,000 $3,525,000
Aquatic Facility $4,760,000 $4,760,000 $4,760,000
Library $4,440,000 $4,440,000
Multi-Purpose Space $900,000 $900,000 $900,000
Active Living Space $500,000 $500,000 $500,000
Lobby/Public Area $1,884,000 $1,884,000 $1,884,000
Management Offices $280,000 $280,000 $280,000
TOTAL Building $22,702,000 $19,177,000 $18,262,000
Site Development @5% $1,135,000 $958,850 $913,100
Fittings/Furnishings $2,000,000 $1,500,000 $1,500,000
Contingency @8% $2,066,000 1,534,160 $1,460,960
Soft Costs @10% $2,790,000 1917700 $1,826,200
LEED Silver Certification $800000 $800000 $800,000
Total Capital Cost by Scenario $31,493,000 $25,887,710 $24,762,260


Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 28
3.1 Funding Programs
A review of current capital funding programs for which this project indicates the most likely funding
source (other than local funding) is the Province of Nova Scotia’s BFIT Capital Grant Program, which
provides potential for funding of 1/3 the capital cost of a project. No maximum has been publicly
identified for this fund although its total funding envelope is currently $50,000,000 over ten years.

ACOA sources typically direct funding toward initiatives that support local business development.
Opportunities to fit within ACOA’s guidelines must therefore be investigated are currently being
investigated.

The Canada Strategic Infrastructure Fund or Municipal Rural Infrastructure Funds may provide some
capital funding opportunities.

The Provincial Community Accessibility Program provides small amounts (up to $10,000) to support
physical accessibility. This fund appears to be related to renovations but may also apply to new
development.

Community Fundraising
RBR Development Associates Limited was hired by the LCLCS to complete a feasibility study assess
local fundraising capacity. This assessment had not been completed when this report was finalized. It is
assumed that opportunities for facility naming rights as well as component naming rights will be
considered in this assessment, along with individual and business donations.

Community Investment
Discussion with the LCLCS provided the consultant with direction to assume that capital funding would
be on a 1/3, 1/3, 1/3 basis with the Municipalities, the Province, and the Federal Government as equal
partners. No assessment has been undertaken within the scope of this review to confirm the
reasonableness of this assumption.

However, on the basis of that assumption the municipal capital investment to each scenario would be:

Table 3.2: Municipal Investment of 1/3
Scenario Municipal Investment
Scenario # 1 – Full Facility $10,500,000
Scenario # 2 – One Ice Pad $8,650,000
Scenario # 3 – Two Ice Pads, no Library $8,300,000

Assuming the Municipality had to finance all of their portion (this assumption will be made for all
scenarios) without consideration to community fundraising a $10,500,000 capital investment, financed at
Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 29
7% for a period of 20 years would require and annual investment of almost $1,000,000. At the end of
the 20 year term (assuming the rate stayed static) the Municipalities would have paid an additional
$8.88M in capital related investment costs.

Using the same assumptions but for scenario # 2 (one ice pad) the Municipal annual debt cost on an
annual basis would be approximately 800,000. At the end of the term $7.3M would have been paid in
interest.

Finally, in scenario # 3 (no library) Municipal annual debt costs would be approximately $766,000 with
approximately $7.1M paid in interest.

Table 3.3 illustrates annual projected operating deficits for each scenario and debt costs.

Table 3.3: Annual Funding Requirement
Scenario 1:
Complete
Facility
Scenario 2:
One Ice Pad
Scenario 3:
No Library
Annual Increased Operating Profit/(Deficit) $76,500 $252,500 $117,000
Annual Debt Costs $1,000,000 $800,000 $766,000
Annual Municipal Investment $1,076,500 $1,052,500 $883,000.00
Investment after 20 years $21,530,000 $21,050,000 $17,660,000
Other Costs of Library and Arena $0 $1,600,000 $1,400,000
Estimated Total Costs over 20 years $21,530,000 $22,650,00 $19,060,000

If each scenario was considered a static options (in other words the Bridgewater Arena in Scenario # 2
and the Bridgewater Library in Scenario # 3) for the next 20 years the cost to the Municipalities of
projected capital and ongoing operating costs would favour Scenario # 3 followed by Scenario # 1. This
is of course only from the perspective of financing. Scenario # 2 does not appear to be a viable option
from the perspective of either ongoing financing or service to the community.

Every $1,000,000 of community fundraising or existing reserves that reduce municipal investment
requirements would reduce municipal costs by approximately $92,300 (using the same interest rate and
term).

Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 30
4.0 OPERATING MODEL
In the 2005 Needs Assessment and Business Plan no final recommendation was made with respect to
preferred operating model. As part of dmA’s ongoing work (not specifically for the business plan update)
a number of operating models have been reviewed. They are presented here for information and
discussion. Commentary is presented at the end of each example (italic text) suggesting how the
specific approach might fit within the LCLC situation.

1. The Mariner Centre in Yarmouth, NS: is jointly owned by the Town and Municipality of
Yarmouth, and managed by a community board of directors composed of members of the
community at large, the CAO’s of both the Town and the Municipality sit on the board as non-
voting members. The Facility Manager is a non-voting member. No local Councillors sit on the
Board. The Board sets policy including usage rates, and oversees the annual budget, and the
manager is responsible for all operational functions. While the Board has recourse to tax
funding should it find itself in a deficit position, this option has never been required.

The Mariner Centre is a twin-pad arena and it is therefore not unexpected that it operates
without tax support for an annual deficit. Its relatively isolated location relative to other large
centres results in less competition for events. The promoter with whom we spoke notes this as
a reason for the Mariner Centre’s somewhat higher event dates than would be likely in
Bridgewater. This model should be considered if both the Town and MODL are capital partners
in this project. Given the greater capital contribution relative to the Mariners Centre, and the
greater complexity with an aquatic facility, the role of each Municipality will need to be very
clearly articulated. This however, would be a reasonable model to consider.

2. The LIFEPLEX Wellness Centre, Cornwallis, NS: With the closure of CFB Cornwallis in 1995
Base recreation facilities were turned over to the community and operated by a not-for-profit
community organization – the Basin Wellness Society. The original (CFB Cornwallis) pool
succumbed to a fire in 1997 and the community began to fundraise for a new complex. The
LIFEplex, which opened in 2007 is owned by the County of Annapolis and managed by The
Basin Wellness Society.

The new facility was built in conjunction with the former Canex Mall associated with CFB
Cornwallis while it was operational. In addition to the new 25M, 4-lane indoor pool with a
waterslide, a separate therapeutic pool, swirlpool and sauna; and fitness studio, the adjoining
(former) mall includes a suite of health related services, grocery store and other commercial
operations. The County receives lease revenue from the commercial properties.

On assuming ownership of the complex Annapolis County Council agreed the Basin Wellness
Society would operate the facility for at least the initial five years. Rationale for this decision
included the existence of an existing organization with a large group of dedicated volunteers;
Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 31
two sizable operating grants (health organizations) totalling approximately $80K annually
directed to the community group; and limited history of municipal staff operating indoor
community recreation facilities.

The County pays approximately $350K annually toward capital principal and interest. The
County receives approximately $120K in annual lease revenue from “mall” tenants.

Unlike the Cornwallis situation the LCLC does not have an existing operating board, and
staffing. There is also some question regarding the long term management of the Cornwallis
facility and over the past year or two the County has actually become more involved in its
operation and funding in particular. Based on this example, it may be appropriate to start with a
more significant role of the Municipality. This situation is not uncommon and we are aware of
several facilities that started as community operated complexes and eventually became more
closely operated by the local Municipality (SSS is a case in point).

3. Dartmouth Sportsplex, Cole Harbour Place, and Sackville Sports Stadium: Each facility is
owned by Halifax Regional Municipality and operated on the principle of financial self
sufficiency
28
. Each facility has an aquatic facility, ice facility (arena and or curling rink), fitness
facility and multi-purpose space. Commercial space is also incorporated to a greater or lesser
extent in these facilities. While facilities may have been operated by community boards at some
time in the past these facilities are now operated directly by staff within a mandate of self-
sufficiency, which differs from the operating mandate of smaller centres. The interesting
element of these operations is the mandate and authority given to staff to operate as a
business.

See commentary above.

4. Clarence Rockland Recreation and Culture Complex, Clarence Rockland ON: The City of
Clarence Rockland is a geographically large urban/rural community on the south eastern edge
of the City of Ottawa. Following a series of plans including a Recreation Master Plan and a
Facility Feasibility Study the City proceeded to develop a recreation and culture facility in
partnership with a local elementary school, and the National Capital District YMCA. The City will
own the centre and will manage a limited amount of common space. The school, community
and YMCA will jointly program a gymnasium. The YMCA will operate the aquatic and fitness
facility, and a day care centre. The City, YMCA, and Board of Education, as well as other orders
of government provided funding toward the capital development of this facility.

This is one of several examples of similar partnerships with YMCA’s across Canada. Typically,
communities that have entered into such arrangements have limited professional recreation
staff, and with to benefit from the YMCA’s fundraising experience and capacity. Where there is

28
This is the operating principle for all major recreation complexes in HRM.
Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 32
municipal ownership, initial capital funding and/or ongoing operating funding for these facilities,
the local municipality has the opportunity to negotiate public access to the facility
commensurate with public funding contributions.

Where there is a strong and interested agency such as the YMCA, and no existing Municipal
structure with experience operating this type of facility, this model makes a great deal of sense.
This is particularly so when the agency brings considerable capital to the table as well as
experience in operating the facility. We do not know if this is the situation with the Bridgewater
YMCA, or if there is an interest in their participation.

4.1 Management of the Lunenburg County Lifestyle Centre
Each of the preceding examples brings slightly different situations to their respective operational
approach. The Mariner Centre is jointly owned by two municipal governments, and is largely focused on
operation of a single facility component. Its mode of operation fits its particular situation and community
culture. The type of facility lends itself to a profitable operation without significant need for ongoing
public funding for annual operations.

The Annapolis County LIFEplex is the end result of a series of developments that began with the
closure of the military base, a fire that destroyed an existing facility, a long-standing not-for-profit
organization, and importantly, an existing cliental for the rebuilt facility. The facility operation has in fact
moved closer to municipal operation than was initially intended based on higher than anticipated need
for public funding and a need for public accountability.

The facilities in HRM generally reflect situations that preceded the amalgamation of HRM and an
operating philosophy based on the principle of operating (financial) self sufficiency for the City’s major
complexes.

In the case of the Clarence-Rockland facility the interest of the YMCA as an operator made third party
contribution to capital and operation possible.

In the process of gathering information for these examples an interesting element emerged common to
each situation with respect to the overall day-to-day management. In the case of the Mariner Center a
nation wide search for a manager was undertaken to find a manager who could operate
entrepreneurially and accountably. Similarly, managers of HRM’s major complexes have been tasked to
be financially sustainable. In support of this principle managers have been made accountable and been
given significant leeway to generate revenue including decisions around facility redevelopment. In the
case of the Clarence-Rockland facility the YMCA will bring its membership based membership model.
The Annapolis County LIFEplex management group similarly has a mandate to reduce reliance on
public funding for operations.

Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 33
Common to all of these operations are two points. First, financial sustainability will be influenced by the
operating principles, conditions and expectations provided to staff. Policies and or environments that tie
the hands of management (e.g., too many approval levels, limitations on staff initiative, policies that limit
revenue generation initiatives) are as restrictive to this goal as inappropriate staff.

Secondly, the skills of staff, particularly the facility manager are critical to an entrepreneurial spirit. The
Board of the Mariner’s Centre looked nationally for a manager. HRM has hired management staff on
contract, made them directly accountable to senior management and provided clear policies for financial
sustainability.

It has now been determined that the Town of Bridgewater and MoDL shall jointly own and operate this
facility.


Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 34
5.0 IMPLEMENTATION
This section provides an overview of the points the Committee must consider in the implementation of
this project. Project implementation typically revolves around six major streams of activity over the
course of four phases: (1) Feasibility Assessment (2) Detailed Project Planning (3) Development and
Operation and (4) Construction and Opening. The major tasks in each phase include:

Site Selection and Development
Facility Concept
Communications, Marketing and Promotion
Market Assessment
Financial Plan
Operational Plan

Figure 5.1, included in the 2005 Needs Assessment and Business Plan, has been adjusted to reflect
developments subsequent to the earlier study although to a considerable extent tasks identified in 2005
remain to be completed.

5.1 Feasibility Assessment
With completion of the earlier needs assessment study and confirmation in the business plan update the
initial phase can be said to be completed.

5.2 Project Confirmation
Most of the major task items in Phase Two have been completed. With the Business Plan Update usage
has been confirmed and is consistent with previous findings. The site has now been confirmed and
communicated to the community. The Municipality of the District of Lunenburg and the Town of
Bridgewater have now signed a Memorandum of Understanding to develop the facility together as equal
partners.

The fundraising assessment is currently underway and anticipated for completion by the end of January.
Grant applications are in the process of being prepared. A decision on phasing is still outstanding
although will be discussed within the next few weeks.

Timeframe for Completion: Winter 2008
Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 35
5.3 Development and Operations
In phase three all decisions regarding whether to build, what to build, where to build, who to own and
operate have been made. The tasks of the development and operations phase are focused on moving
the project from idea to reality.

The site which has been confirmed is put through planning and site approvals in preparation for site
development.

The process of engaging an architect, preparing detailed designs and confirming capital costs,
typically begins with determining how and who will manage that process. Large municipalities and
organizations often have internal project management staff to support these activities. Smaller
organizations are advised to bring in project management support to supervise the many aspects of a
major development such as this. There are a wide variety of tasks involved ranging from preparation of
requests for qualifications and the requests for proposals for architects, managing communication with
the public and partners, managing the fundraising process, developing the staffing plan, and ultimately
managing the architectural and construction process. Some of these tasks can of course be handled by
existing internal staff – particularly some of the earlier tasks to hire architects, initiate fundraising,
communication, and preparing staff operating policies, perhaps with some external assistance.

The 2005 report outlined in detail various construction options. Of these project or construction
management is probably the most appropriate for this project. As a large and complex facility it does not
lend itself to a design build scenario. It provides the owners with support to manage the construction
process that is probably not currently within the staff complement. We strongly recommend discussing
the construction process with municipalities who have been through the process, and with architects
and project managers who may have an interest, to gain their insights before proceeding.

Other activities, including day-to-day management of the construction process, will benefit from an on-
site manager. There are a variety of methods for smaller organizations including hiring a project
management firm/individual, seconding an individual from a larger municipality for a set period of time,
or including that role within the responsibilities of the architect. The pros and cons of each method
should be discussed with others who have previously developed such projects.

5.4 Construction and Opening
While unquestionably the most critical and complex phase once decisions around site, funding, staffing,
ownership, phasing of components, and construction process are complete this phase is about
implementation and day-to-day decisions.

The facility manager should be in place 9 to 12 months in advance of anticipated opening. This person’s
role during that period is to secure other staff, have programs and marketing in place, develop formal
policies and procedures and prepare for the official opening.
Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 36
Site Selection and
Development
Market
Assessment
Facility Concept
Communications,
Marketing and
Promotions
Financial Plan
Operational Plan
Stage One: Feasibility Study
(completed)
Stage Two: Project
Confirmation
Stage Three: Development
and Operations
Stage Four: Construction and
Opening
Investigate Site Options
Site Planning
Site Approvals
Twin Pad Arena, aquatic
facility, multi-purpose space,
library, administrative space
Decision regarding whether
to Phase Construction
Initial consultation and
usage information update in
2007/08
Communicate Decisions on
site, ownership, general
operation, capital cost of
concept.
Investigate Capital Funding,
Grant Applications,
Fundraising Assessment
Needs Assessment
completed in 2005
Confirm Usage
Operating Costs Updated in
2008
Prepare detailed operating
costs based on confirmed
program
Ongoing Communication
with Public
Confirm ownership and
General Operating Model
Investigate Partnerships
Confirm Management and
Staffing Plam
Capital Costs Updated in
2007
Commence Fundraising
Hire Facility Manager and
other Key Staff 9 - 12 months
before scheduled opening
Implement Promotions and
Communication Plan
Prepare for Official Opening
RFQ/RFP Distributed
Architect Engaged
Conceptual Design,
Development Drawings
Detailed Capital Costs
determined
Construction
Site Development
Confirm Financing
Capital Funding In Place
Confirm Site
FIGURE 5.1: PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION



Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services
Page 37
Table 5.1 Next Steps by Timing
Development Task Summary Timing
Approve Needs Assessment and Business Plan in principle
Completed
Confirm Site
Completed
Confirm Capital Funding Capacity including Grant Applications, Partnerships
Winter 2008
Confirm Facility Components and Decision on Phasing
Winter 2008
Confirm Ownership, Management Model
Winter 2008
Communicate Site, Project, Partnerships to Community
Winter 2008
Commence Fundraising
Winter 2008
Initiate Site Planning Approvals
Winter 2008
Prepare RFQ/RFP for Architect
Spring to Summer 2008
Call for architect process
Summer to Fall 2008
Site Development
Summer to Fall 2008
Hire architect/Confirm Project Manager and Relationship
Fall 2008
Detailed Design, Final Capital Costing
Fall 2008/Winter 2009
Construction of Facility
2009/10
Hire Facility Manager
2009
Prepare for official opening
2009 for 2010 opening
Hire or redeploy staff within 2 to 3 months of opening
2009/2010
Facility completion, official opening
2010

Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services, January 2008
Page A: 1
APPENDIX A: PUBLIC CONSULTATION PARTICIPANTS
Key Informant Interview Participants
• Carol Pickings-Anthony Director Parks and Recreation Town of Bridgewater
• Sandy Mair-Dodman, Program Co-ordinator, Town of Bridgewater Parks and Recreation Department
• Cheryl Stenstrom, Chief Librarian South Shore Regional Library
• Wayne Gambel, Gilette Entertainment Group, Halifax, St. John’s, Moncton
• Mr. Michael Bird, Interim Manager, Sackville Sport Stadium

Groups Invited to Complete the Stakeholder Survey - Update
29

Ice Organizations:
• Bridgewater Minor Hockey Association
• Bridgewater Oldtimers Hockey*
• Lunenburg County 4-H
• Centre Communautaire de la Rive Sud
• Bridgewater Skating Club
• Belliveau Veinotte Old Pucks Hockey
• Lunenburg Minor Hockey Association
• Senior Men's Hockey Tournament
• The Sticks
• Bridgewater Elementary School
• Bridgewater High School
• Hebbville Academy
• New Germany Rural High School
• Pentz Elementary
• Parkview Education Centre
• Petite Riviere Elementary School
• Bridgewater Motor Inn Leafs Hockey Team
• Bridgewater United Baptist Church
• New Germany Irving Hockey Team
• Cardinal Fire & Safety
• Exit Realty Kings
• Gow's Home Hardware
• Lohnes Lumbermen Hockey Tournament
• Mahone Insurance Agency
• Dr. Pamela Malik
• Nauss Brothers
• Northfield Capitals Hockey Club
• O’Regans – South Shore Toyota
• Rink Rat Hockey

29
Groups noted in bold text responded, all groups in this list were provided the opportunity to respond.
Multi-Purpose Facility Business Plan Update Report
January 2008


Prepared by: dmA Planning & Management Services, January 2008
Page A: 2
• Rusty Blades Hockey
• Pharmasave Men's Hockey
• Phil Wamboldt Rec Hockey
• South Shore Bantam AAA Hockey
• South Shore Mustangs (Major Midget)
• South Shore Eye Care Centre
• Tim Hortons
• Valley Tire Hockey
• Warren Rowsell

Sport Organizations
• Bridgewater & District Soccer Association
• Bridgewater Oldtimers Soccer Club
• Bridgewater Senior Citizen's Club
• Bridgewater Triathlon Club
• Lunenburg County Y Minor Basketball Association
• South Shore Bantam AAA
• South Shore Amateur Boxing Club
• South Shore Badminton Training Centre
• South Shore Health
• South Shore Minor Lacrosse Association
• South Shore Soccer (indoor)
• South Shore Soccer (outdoor)
• Gow's Home Hardware
• South Shore Eye Care Centre
• Valley Tire Hockey
• Petite Riviere Elementary School
• Centre Communautaire de la Rive Sud

Aquatic Organizations
• Royal Canadian Sea Cadet Corps
• Bridgewater Barracudas’ Swim Team*
• Bridgewater PRC Department
• Bridgewater Triathlon*
• Elderfit Lunenburg