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level of difficulty
easy medium hard

more creative tips at www.staedtler.com/creative_tips_for_FIMO
Millefiori, the art of a ‘thousand flowers’
Millefiori, an age-old mosaic technique which still thrills us today, dates back to the
antiquity and was rediscovered by Venetians in the 15th century for the art of glass
making. The qualities and wide range of colours offered by FIMO make it easy to
create these enchanting flower patterns. Flowers and leaves play the leading role in
these beautiful creations. Unique patterns can be made with FIMO modelling clay
and used on objects made out of glass, wood and metal as well as on other
surfaces.
You can find our products in
well-stocked sales outlets. Should
you have any queries, please call
our hotline: +49 (0)911 9365-888.
Have fun crafting!
material
You will also require: smooth work surface (glass or ceramic)
You will need these STAEDTLER articles:
product colour art. no. quantity
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FIMO ‘millefiori‘ Workshop Box -- 8003 31 L1 1
FIMO classic alternatively green 8000-57 1
white 8000-0 1
turquoise 8000-32 1
golden yellow 8000-15 1
acrylic roller -- 8700 05 1
blade set -- 8700 04 1
modelling tools -- 8711 1
gloss varnish -- 8703 01 BK 1
shopping / material list
Millefiori, the art of a ‘thousand flowers’
space for your notes
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level of difficulty
easy medium hard

more creative tips at www.staedtler.com/creative_tips_for_FIMO
The grooves on the back of the blocks enable an exact
portioning. Using the acrylic roller or pasta machine,
roll out an approx. 3 mm thick sheet out of three
portions of green FIMO.

Mix half a strip of turquoise with three strips of
yellow. Knead them together until an apple-green
colour is created and then shape into a thick slab.
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Cut the oval down the middle and press along the
outside edges to make the dark green lines slope.
Place both halves next to each other, making sure the
‘veins’ of the leaf are sloping in the same direction
and add another layer of the dark colour between the
two pieces.
This creates the leaf pattern. Join the two halves
together again by pressing carefully around the edge.
Apply slightly more pressure towards the tip to create
a leaf shape.
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Divide the slab into 4 pieces and place a thin layer of
the dark colour between each one. Then join them
together again and form into an oval shape.
Instruction for Millefiori, the art of a ‘thousand flowers‘
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level of difficulty
easy medium hard

more creative tips at www.staedtler.com/creative_tips_for_FIMO
Another strip of the dark green colour is then wrapped
around the outside.
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Here, you can see a smaller version which is created
by a continued pressing and shaping of the pattern
cane.
When the cane is made thinner, the pattern looks
distorted at the ends. The correct pattern can be seen
when the ends are cut off.
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Form the leaf into a tip using your fingers and
continue shaping until the pattern is uniform.
Instruction for Millefiori, the art of a ‘thousand flowers‘
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level of difficulty
easy medium hard

more creative tips at www.staedtler.com/creative_tips_for_FIMO
The grooves on the back of the blocks enable an exact
portioning.

Using the acrylic roller or pasta machine, roll out an
approx. 3 mm thick sheet out of two portions of
yellow FIMO.

Shape three strips of white into a thick roll and do the
same with three strips of turquoise too.
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Wrap strips from the sheets of yellow FIMO around
the four blue pieces and arrange them in a row. Place
three of the white pieces in the spaces in between.
Cut the remaining quarter of white FIMO in half and
use the two halves to finish off the ends.
Carefully press around the edge to join the pattern
together. Apply more pressure at the bottom in the
middle in order to create a flower shape.
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Press the rolls to make them a little flatter and use
the blade to cut them into quarters.
Instruction for Millefiori, the art of a ‘thousand flowers‘
Tip:
Always begin with the lightest, most sensitive
colour.
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level of difficulty
easy medium hard

more creative tips at www.staedtler.com/creative_tips_for_FIMO
Continue to press and shape the pattern until a
triangular shape with three equally sized sides is
created.
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Roll the honeycomb-shaped cane in the palms of your
hands until it is round.
Here you can see the pattern in a smaller version too
– this is created by a continued rolling of the cane.
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You can see here how a small triangle is made out of
the large triangle.

The long cane is now cut into six pieces of equal
length. These are then put together to create a flower
pattern.
Instruction for Millefiori, the art of a ‘thousand flowers‘
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level of difficulty
easy medium hard

more creative tips at www.staedtler.com/creative_tips_for_FIMO
In order to be able to arrange the pattern correctly, it
is important that all slices are equally thick.

The FIMO cutting blade serves as an ideal tool here.
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In order to ensure that the surface is even, the pattern
can be smoothed over again using the acrylic roller.

The finished objects are hardened in the oven for
around 30 minutes at 110 °C. Once cool, a thin coat
of FIMO gloss varnish can be added.
We hope you have fun making, trying out and
creating new ideas.
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Arrange the different FIMO patterns on the glass
frame as required and then press on firmly.
Instruction for Millefiori, the art of a ‘thousand flowers‘