WIITERWAYS

1980 M'A6AZINE SCHEDULE FEBRUARY .

W 0 r k s til 0 p s : N ew Y 0 f k & N· e w J' e r s e y .... 'NY Public Reading

'., '.': APRIL

New Jersey Wa,rkshO,p NVPublic Readings

JUNE

" Poetry from the. PopuHs.t Readi.~g,s .' at South Street Seaport Museum

~ J U L Y -2 - i s su es

Fa,! rat Sa u t h 5t r e e t S e ~ P Of t Mus e u m Fa If leO n e y I s I and B 0, a r d w a I k

.. .. AUG,UST. 4-issU9S

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PAGE 2 3 4 5 '6 7 B 9 ilQ

Poets cont.Eibu;ting t.Q :this issue read their work Juily 216, it980 alE tshe Waiierw,a;y,:s Poetry B0CK Fair ·OIL. Ehe G0ney IsyJland BoardwalR, B'JEeoRly;n NY.

N0 portd.on 0.!li this magazine may be reJ!l~inted (e~ceFt fOil? reiView purposes) without. written pe!lS'mission fIi0m "the pufuLishers.

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iESSN 0197-4977

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Aeknewledgemerlts

rBy ~neSeal by !Doris G0[d, frcom HONEY IN WHE L[0N, Eib~io PLess, NY

I Tfie E>Iream I By Mia Bcarkan, f:r:om The New-Sc:lTiJges, Vol V, Nes 1 & 2, 1980, NY

UO-t=iit]ea Eloem by Jane C:re:ilgh.iEoB, jfl)0m (CERES IN :AN OPEN FIEE.ID, Out. & 0u~ B0eR's, ~

Ij e.a.1t '11 ;.J~!:J u..e.i> a ;[ n:i5 e.1f! v tJJ£:.6 ) •

Ai:tt C!he.C.h..6 .6hou.~d be. made. PClJ!1,iJ:Ke. to Te.H Pe.l1ny PlaYful!.-6, 79 9 B1!.e.e.nw,~Clh S;tlte.e;;f, N~ N'1f 10014.

'2

SA THING A T CONEY

Richard Alan Spiegel

I come to build sand castles,

to romp in and wrestle the tidesi I come to Coney:

the girl and the smile and the beach that is Coney beneath the sun;

I come.

Around, around, around the whirling wheels turn; around,

around the whirling world

of Coney: the fried oyster

out there in the sea.

All this rides me up and throws me down is Coney; I, Coney, come

ride; your fantasy

~lings here to me,

splinters off into me.

This is Coney:

the sand at the beach is this,

and I come here

to look and amuse myself

much among the mass of people, poor people,

middle class people, American people come to Coney, the original dream

is here

here is Coney.

3

MOOD DISCO

Barbara A. Holland

The deep growl of disco underneath the floor,

forever bumping, attacks the glass in all the·windows

but never breaks them.

It is daily at calisthenics inside my head, as you are; always in subliminal thunder

as you are; continually agitating dishes and flower pots

as you are; keeping a steady

tremor among the pans in the kitchen;

as when all the little lamps in hell all light up together as by a master switch

thrown suddenly.

4

\

---,

BY THE S{::A

Doris B. Gold

The shouts of joy are close to cries of fear.

We grasp the t.e t.her' of our strength like seaweed; For some unnamed deed we beg anointment.

The walls of waves rise and liquefy;

The carbonation of the foam swallows our feet.

A bubbling joke of universe on man ,

Spills as out of a vessel on the celebrants.

Unlocked canals of love and thirst flow overi We sail like boats to our divinity; Watermarked we call like cormorants,

Singing in oUr fear and wheeling.

A swimmer calls alarm -

Gulls and people shoreward swoop, Returning to the fire of life;

To boys and men of brick-hued bodies Racing like heroic runners to douse d~nger.

The swimmer, blue and prone, revives. Sunlight in his eye,

He cries, thanking the Guard for life.

Then we return to our blanket world and striped cabahi To the private hug under the umbrella

And the allowed nakedness,

Shared with spinsters and old men eating sandwiches Where all but children sit,

Watching the limbo of their bodies

In the passage to Paradise.

)

5

ii

BOXES

Martin Tucker

!

!

I have become a kind of game boxer since I moved from the old house into the new place.

I open one box a day, or every other day, or sometimes once a month.

Some days I am into jeans, ten of them, two stretching back to the dyes I made.

The next box binds me to old ties--

striped, branded, or of the straitlaced kind.

Ordering life is never easy. but boxes help.

They set borders for homes of habits.

!

, I

)

6

INvASION

louise Jaffe

Once upon Sahara of lost years When I measured time in waitings

Rather than have~to's .

I was ravished by a monster~myth Named Happily Ever After.

He-she was a jigsaw puzzle:

my gynecologist and/or the Tooth Fairy and/or

a shopworn Wizard of Oz and/or Mr. Clean.

Once upon a wonderland of wait-and~see When I didn't triple-lock my heart

Or chastity-belt my dreams

I was octopussed by its patchwork limbs On waterbedded trust.

He-she was kaleidoscope

furry words and/or

cotton candy promises and/or a roadrnap to Lethe and/or

a hammock strung on lies.

Once upon carrousel of hope When I thought the brass ring Was made for me to catch

I was deflowered by second-hand chimeras With penny~arcaded grins.

7

'I..

\LOS TaROS ESTAN MUERTOS/

Stanley H. Barkan

Banderillas are broken banderas Fallen from the fingers of bailerinas At the end of the Dulzaina's trill.

Los taros e s t.an muertos.

La F~e~ta passes and also sets

Paper and Hemingway blow in the streets Where hoofbeats echo the lost corrida.

Los taros estan muertos.

Snapping whispers of Jake and Lady Brett Imprint on the capa of Pamplona

Mythic arena of El Cordobes.

\Ol~! Todos los toros est'n muertos.

,

8

.• ~

THE DREAM

Mia Barkan

I once dreamed

that this big raindrop was coming to get me.

I said, 'No! No! Please don't harm me!

I didn't harm you!' I awoke.

It was morning.

I said to Mother, 'Mother, this time

I won't dream tonight, or I shall be killed by the raindrop.'

9

. "

I •

BLUES AFTER 35~ BEERS IN ST. LOUIS

Elizabeth Marraffino

Frank is probably home in Ottowa It's damn. hot here in Memphis

2 hour bus delay

Air sticks deep

to the soles of my feet-

Elvis Presley postcards glow in the dark gift shop

Omens are less frequent except I wore white again last night

Slept in Jobo's room

surrounded by monster games

HOW TO BE THE INCREDIBLE HULK & lots of Indian history books

\"1as nearly dreamless first time in months·

I'm scared I'm pregnant

Would abortion in this case be murder:

Wayne is in Minnesota with his wife populating his future

A couple of years back

driving home from Great Barrington I got lonely

because I was going extinct

10

Jane Creighton

Naked and rosy light

thought begins by the creek -

water. Marry the facts

not dreams, children. Grey cliffs

shuffled into memory

out stand belief you see

and you say it. You were here you ~ere noe~ it matters

it matters your pictures make good material a lot

of people standing around

joking in their old colors evident

thought and and pretty

white water ways to behave

many many days beached on these rocks enjoying

the sun bodies

no bones about it make waves

1 1

2

MANHA TT AN BRIDGE

Athelantis Perry

I really like that kind of bridge Because the trains go over it. The Dr QBr B, Pr N, RR and

the M trains.

But most of all, it is very high.

13

L

THE ECSTASY AIRPLANE

Salvatore R. Motto

An airplane has gigantic wings.

But not a feather on her breast.

She only mutters for a nest.

I love to see her stop and start . . She has a little motor heart.

That beats and throbs and then is still.

She wears a fan upon her bill.

No eagle flies through sun and rain.

So swiftly as an airplane.

I wish she would come swooping down between the steeple of the town.

And lift me right up off my feet and take me high above the street.

That everybody might see the little speck would be me.

14

THE PIED PIPER

Conciere Taylor

You tease the cat

it into the brown

paper bag curiosity

will .kill it. You tease

coax I

me coax

into your arms you say:

Desdemona I know your secret

as you drop the cat

from the end

of the pier.

15

A BRIVELE FUN RUSLAND

Zalmen Ep$hteyn

di marne voynt in zhmerinke zi shraybt a briv dem zun der zun iz in amerike

vos ken a marne ton?

tsugeshikt a malbeshel mit a sheyner tukh

un er fregt ir memenyu vos zhe darfstu nokh?

oyb du shikst shoyn malbushim un kenst oykh shikn mer

zogn mayne shkheynemlekh

du bist a mi1yoner

zay mayn kind dort forzikhtik vayl bist shoyn a g'vir

me z01 dir nist 'raskolatsheven' un shikn in sibir

me zogt di kapitaiistn dort foyln vi di groz

azoy vi di kartoflkes fun zhmerinkes kolkhoz

zi endikt shoyn ir brivele un lozt aroys a trer

zay gezunt.mayn zindele mayn tayer milyoner

'A Letter From Russia' speaks directly from the experiences of Russian-Jewish inunigrants. A woman living in Zhmerinke in the Ukraine writes to her son in America. She harbors visions of his wealth because of the 'fine' garments he has sent her from his new home.

16

THE CREATURE

Agnes Robertson

Once there was a man No

Once there was a reptile No

Once there was a creature Who was both a man

And a reptile

And he was very sad The man longed

For the love and warmth Of another human

But his reptile blood Froze

The very flesh He held near

The reptile longed to be free To gli t.t.er in the sun

Then hide

In the tall cool grass But his human bonds Held him fast

And so the creature wept Hot, human tears

He brushed away

With cold hands

17

I' I'

Ii

11

II

I

I

I

!l

I

I

_I

I

FROZEN MOMENT

Fanny Gersten

The crowded train Humid, tight and hot My aching limbs Longing to give way There's no escape

I'm rooted to the spot You crowd me close Your eyes upon my face I can't resist

I drown within your gaze An empty seat

You offer it to me I smile my thanks

And you smile back at me Time freezes

Stands still

Ceases to exist

Had just a moment gone Or all eternity? Another stop

Train's doors slide open wide You take one step

You are outside

,

18

l

-

SEl FREE

Ratricia.;: fr:ilHngham

, The_:r;e r s no s,ueh "Ehing

As a fIiee il.Ufl€A:,' he'd s.ay ,

'ABe fthen He'd ]augh in a bibuill0us way. 'No su€h thing

As a free Lunch • r

By this he meant I had to'pay For what he caned. ;to gmve me. ~Hat was lliong ago,

And since then [ have learned That set free

]s not a nuL set.

I.

!in remme.

WILILIE JACKf3QN

A r n bid rv10 0 dlnlilk

]$se>E.

"the saeined ones?

beat. ~he s};iamp

fui1lecl.

ehamp'

And:

PunelliYl - ¥a :K:.now:.P

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ISSN 0197-4777

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