Peter the Great 
Born 1672, Tsar of Russia from 1682 ‐ 1725 
In the history of Russia there is no name more famous  than  that  of  Peter  the  Great.  Before  his  time  the  Russians  were far behind the other nations of Europe in knowledge of  the arts and the comforts of life. Russia had no navy and its  army was viewed with contempt.  Peter  devoted  a  large  part  of  his  reign  to  improving  the condition of his country and his people. He made Russia  prosperous, powerful, and respected.   He was born in 1672, and was the son of the Tsar Alexis (Tsar is the Russian word  for  Emperor).  His  mother  was  Natalya  Naryshkina,  the  second  wife  of  Tsar  Alexis.  Natalya had an unusual background for a Russian noblewoman. She had been raised as  a ward in the household of Tsar Alexis’ chief minister, Artemon Matveev. Matveev’s wife  was  Mary  Hamilton,  the  daughter  of  a  Scots  nobleman  who  had  fled  Scotland  and  settled in Russia after the overthrow and execution of King Charles I. Artemon and Mary  raised their ward, Natalya, and gave her a western style education – at a time when it  was exceedingly rare for any Russian woman, peasant or noble, to be allowed to learn  to read or write. After Tsar Alexis’s first wife died, the 42‐year‐old widower fell in love  and  married  the  nineteen‐year‐old  ward  of  his  chief  minister.  Fifteen  months  later,  Peter was born. When Peter was three and a half, Tsar Alexis died and was succeeded  by his fifteen year old son, who became Tsar Fedor. Tsar Fedor was a mild, soft‐spoken  young  man,  who  earnestly  wanted  to  rule  well.  Sadly,  he  died  just  after  he  turned  twenty‐one. Next in line for the throne was Fedor’s younger brother Ivan, age 16 and his  ten‐year‐old half‐brother, Peter. Ivan had always been a sickly child. He was half‐blind, 
Page 11 

Famous Men of the 18th Century 

lame, and had difficulty speaking. The champion of Ivan’s right to be Tsar was his older  sister,  Sophia.  The  Russian  nobles  wished  to  name  Peter  as  Tsar.  Sophia  insisted  that  Ivan was the rightful heir. The solution, which pleased neither side, was to proclaim the  two boys joint emperors of Russia. Their older sister, Sophia, was appointed as regent.   Sophia was not content to simply be regent for her two younger brothers. Sophia  determined to  make  herself  empress,  and  conspired  with  Galitzin,  the  prime  minister,  with that end in view.   "Madam," said Galitzin, "we need fear nothing from Ivan, but Peter alarms me.  He has a thirst for knowledge that cannot be quenched. He wishes to know everything."   It  was  as  the  minister  said.  Peter’s  mother  had  sought  out  for  him  tutors  who  could satisfy his thirst for knowledge. Peter asked questions about everything. He was  particularly  interested  in  maps,  boats,  and  in  all  things  military.  In  order  to  keep  him  distracted, Sophia allowed him to form his own military regiment and assigned soldiers  to obey his commands. But Peter did not want to command simply because he was Tsar.  He  joined  the  regiment  with  the  rank  of  a  private  and  insisted  that  the  sergeants and  officers teach him the duties and skills of a soldier.  When  he  was  about  seventeen  years  of  age  Peter  was  informed  that  his  half‐ sister  Sophia  and  Prince  Galitzin  intended  to  murder  him.  Peter,  with  the  help  of  his  mother  and  his  friends  in  “his”  regiment  acted  first.  He  escaped  from  Moscow  to  a  nearby  monastery  where  he  could  defend  himself.  He  made  public  the  details  of  Sophia’s plot and called on the officers of the palace guard in Moscow to abandon their  support  of  her  and  join  him  in  the  country.  The  palace  guard  (called  the  Streltsy)  complied  and  Peter  had  won.  He  banished  Galitzin  to  the  icy  region  of  Archangel  and  confined  his  sister  in  a  convent.  He  thus  became,  at  about  eighteen  years  of  age,  the  active  ruler  of  Russia;  for  Ivan  was  not  healthy  enough  to  take  any  share  in  the  government.  
Page 12 

Peter the Great (1672–1725) 

  The  Russia  which  Peter  became  the  ruler  of  was  landlocked  and  ringed  by  enemies. Russia was rural and agricultural, with Moscow the only city of even moderate  size.  Even  in  Moscow,  in  1690,  most  of  the  buildings  were  constructed  of  logs.  In  the  northwest, Sweden controlled both shores of the Baltic and had strong garrisons in all of  the  port  cities.  To  the  west  was  Poland,  ancient  rival  of  Russia.  To  the  south,  the  authority  of  the  Tsar  dwindled  to  nothing  only  a  few  hundred  miles  from  Moscow.  Though they were ethnically Russian, and adhered to the Russian Orthodox Church, the  Cossacks  did  not  recognize  the  Tsar,  but  paid  tribute  to  the  Turkish  Sultan  in  Constantinople. Further to the south, along the northern shores of the Black Sea were  the  Crimea  Tatars.  The  Tatars  were  descendants  of  the  old  Mongol  tribes.  They  had  been  converted  to  Islam.  They  recognized  no  foreign  ruler,  but  like  the  Cossacks  they  paid tribute to the Turkish Sultan and sometimes joined his army. In 1382 and 1571, the  Tatars had sacked and burned Moscow.  Russians  feared  and  disliked  all  foreigners.  At  the  same  time,  the  Tsars  had  recognized  that  military  officers  and  technical  experts  from  other  European  countries  were  desperately  needed  in  Russia  in  order  to  help  her  catch  up.  The  decrees  of  Tsar  Alexis,  Peter’s  father,  illustrated  both  ideas.  On  the  one  hand,  he  ordered  that  foreigners  be  forbidden  to  live  inside  the  walls  of  the  city  of  Moscow.  On  the  other  hand,  he  decreed  that  a  special  city  be  built  a  few  miles  outside  of  Moscow  for  foreigners,  where  they  would  be  permitted  to  own  land  and  construct  their  own  churches.  This  new  city  became  known  as  the  German  suburb.  Russians  called  all  foreigners,  generically,  “Germans”.  Turmoil  in  France,  Germany,  and  England  (along  with  some  discreet  recruiting  by  representatives  of  the  Tsar)  soon  resulted  in  a  significant  population  of  military  officers,  engineers,  artists,  doctors,  merchants,  and  schoolmasters. They came from England and Scotland (mostly Catholics fleeing Puritan  rule  and  the  exclusion  acts.  After  Louis  XIV  revoked  the  edict  of  Nantes,  a  surprising 
Page 13 

Famous Men of the 18th Century 

number  of  French  Huguenots  arrived  seeking  a  new  life  in  Russia.  Some  came  for  the  opportunities. Some came just for the adventure.  Peter, naturally, was attracted to the German suburb. Some of the officers in his  play regiment had come from the German suburb. Two of the foreigners there became  his closest friends. One was General Patrick Gordon, a Scottish catholic who had fought  for both the Swedes and the Poles before accepting a commission as an officer in the  Russian army. The second was Francis Lefort, originally from Geneva, Switzerland who  had left Switzerland seeking adventure. Fighting first with the Dutch against the armies  of  Louis  XIV,  he  eventually  made  his  way  to  Moscow  via  Archangel  and  received  a  commission as an officer in the Russian army at the age of twenty‐one.   Peter  himself  had  served  for  a  few  months  under  the  command  of  Lefort  as  a  common  soldier.  After  he  became  Tsar,  Lefort  advised  Peter  that  the  army  should  be  made  larger,  and  be  better  drilled  and  equipped.  The  young  emperor  accepted  this  advice. He appointed Lefort to be commander of one division of his army, and directed  him to equip and drill it in the very best manner. Under Lefort's direction the army was  made a splendid body of fighting men.   One  day,  in  the  early  part  of  his  reign,  Peter  noticed  on  the  river  which  flows  through Moscow a small boat with a keel. He inquired what the keel was for, and was  greatly interested to learn that it was to enable the boat to sail against the wind. The  boat had been built for Peter's father by a Dutchman named Brandt; and this man was  at  once  instructed  to  put  it  into  first‐rate  order.  This  being  done,  the  Dutchman  gave  Peter some lessons in sailing, so that the young czar became quite an expert sailor.   Russia at that time had only one seaport. It was Archangel on the White Sea. So  to Archangel the tsar went, and made it his home for several months. While there, he  made the acquaintance of a Dutch captain named Musch; and from him he learned all 

Page 14 

Peter the Great (1672–1725) 

about  ships  and  their  management.  He  began  as  a  cabin  boy,  and  worked  up  through  every department of a seafaring life until he was fitted to be a naval commander.   Peter then began to dream of a Russian navy that would sail from a Russian port  and harbor in the south, on the Black Sea. he began the building of the Russian navy in  southern Russia, on the Verona River. The vessels built were small gunboats. While they  were being built, someone said to Peter, "Of what use will your vessels be to you? You  have no good seaport."   "My  vessels  shall  make  ports  for  themselves,"  replied  Peter;  and  before  long  they did so.   The first port captured was Azov at the mouth of the Don. It was taken from the  Turks. The Russian fleet sailed down the river, and made the attack by sea; while twelve  thousand troops attacked by land. Peter himself was sometimes with the army on land,  sometimes on board one of his vessels.   The  success  of  the  Russia  gunboats  against  the  Turks  was  just  the  beginning.  Peter  was  determined  that  the  Russian  navy  must  have  larger  ships,  great  sea‐going  sailing ships with rows of cannon. No one in Russia knew how to build ships like that. He  therefore determined to go to Holland and learn the art of shipbuilding.   Putting the affairs of his empire in charge of three nobles, he left Russia in the  spring of 1697. With Lefort and some other companions, and went first to Amsterdam,  the most important city of the Netherlands. Because he was impatient and frustrated by  the formal protocol required for those who wished to meet with the tsar, he resolved to  travel in disguise. , The Russian delegation would be led by Lefort, as the ambassador of  the  Tsar.  Among  his  company  would  be  a  servant  by  the  name  of  Peter  Mikhailov.  Of  course  the  secret  of  the  servant’s  real  identity  was  impossible  to  keep.  Peter,  now  twenty‐five years old, was six feet eight inches tall and easy to recognize. Nonetheless, 

Page 15 

Famous Men of the 18th Century 

throughout the Great Embassy, Peter refused to respond to anyone who addressed him  as Tsar. 

After  traveling  through  Germany,  the  Russian  embassy  reached  Holland.  After  visiting Amsterdam and examining its shipping and its docks, Peter went to a little town  called Zaandam nearby, and there became a workman in a yard where ships were built  for the famous Dutch East India Company. He lived in a little cottage near the yard and  cooked his own food. After working some time in Zaandam he spent four or five months  as a shipwright near London, at the invitation of King William III. When it came time for  the Russian party to leave England, William ordered the English fleet to divide into two  squadrons and conduct a mock naval battle. Peter was fascinated. He greatly admired  the old, widowed King of England, and spent many hours in conversation with him. For  his  part,  King  William  seemed  grateful  that  the  Russian  Tsar  wanted  to  dispense  with  ceremony and simply sit and talk.   When Peter returned to Russia, he was struck by the vast differences between  Russian dress and court manners and what he had seen in Germany, Holland, and 
Page 16 

Peter the Great (1672–1725) 

England. One of his first decrees was that all members of the court in Moscow must  shave their beards and cease wearing their long‐sleeved Russian robes. He was serious  about the decree, and for some months he carried a razor and a pair of scissors with  him. If any nobleman appeared in his presence with a long robe with long sleeves he  would cut them off with the scissors. If he had a beard, Peter might cut off the beard  and shave him on the spot!  Peter’s decrees were accepted by most of the nobles. Some grumbled. Some  were outraged and plotted a rebellion with the Streltsy palace guard. Peter found out  about the plot and arrested the plotters. Many were tortured and executed. The Streltsy  were ordered out of Moscow and dispersed to garrison duty across Russia.  The capture of Azov had given Russia a port on the Black Sea. But the entrance  to  the  Black  Sea  was  still  closed  to  the  Russians  by  the  Turks  at  Constantinople.  A  greater work was to be done in the north, at the mouth of the Neva River on the Baltic  Sea.  When Peter came to the throne, Sweden was the great military and naval power  of  northern  Europe.  The  Swedes  were  masters  of  the  Baltic  Sea,  and  of  the  Gulf  of  Finland. Peter said that the Swedes were the oppressors of Russia; and that he would  free the land from their presence.   Soon after this began the Great Northern War, which was to last for over twenty  years, from 1700‐1721. Peter had entered into an alliance with the King of Denmark and  the King of Poland in which each ruler agreed to support the others in attacking Sweden.  Each ruler wished to conquer some of the territory ruled by Sweden and add it to their  own kingdoms.   When  in  the  Netherlands,  Peter  had  lived  near  Amsterdam.  It  was  a  great  seaport near the mouth of a river. The land upon which it stood was swampy; and its 

Page 17 

Famous Men of the 18th Century 

dwellings, its warehouses, and its magnificent churches and public buildings rested on  piles.   Peter  determined  to  build  a  Russian  Amsterdam  on  the  swampy  banks  of  the  River Neva which flows into the Gulf of Finland. The king of Sweden, the famous Charles  XII, claimed the province at the mouth of the River Neva. In spite of this Peter laid the  foundations of his new city and called it St. Petersburg.   When  the  king  of  Sweden  heard  what  was  going  on  he  said,  "I  shall  soon  put  those houses into a blaze." The Swedish king was astonished soon after hearing that the  foundations  of  St.  Petersburg  had  been  laid,  to  learn  that  Peter's  new  army  and  navy  had captured his two fortresses, and that the province at the mount of the Neva was in  Peter's hands.   The  King  of  Sweden,  Charles  XII,  went  to  war  with  all  three  of  his  enemies  at  once, but he devoted his attention to defeating them one at a time. He quickly defeated  the  King  of  Denmark  and  forced  him  to  sue  for  peace.  The  next  year  Swedish  troops  marched  along  the  southern  cost  of  the  Baltic  towards  the  port  city  of  Narva  (in  modern‐day Estonia) which had been seized by the Russian. In late November of 1700,  about 8,000 Swedish troops reached the walls of the city. The Russian army numbered  35,000. Believing that the Russian troops in Narva would be besieged for many months,  Tsar Peter left and returned to Russia to organize an additional army. But the day after  his  departure,  in  a  blinding  snowstorm,  King  Charles  of  Sweden  suddenly  ordered  an  attack. Within just a few hours, the Swedish army had broken through the Russian lines  and forced their surrender. Peter was stunned when he received the news. King Charles  and  the  Swedes  made  the  most  of  his  departure  from  Narva  in  their  accounts  to  the  other European capitals. The Russian army was widely held to be incompetent.  King Charles of Sweden devoted the next seven years to defeating Augustus of  Saxony, who was also King of Poland. Peter returned to Russia determined to raise and 
Page 18 

Peter the Great (1672–1725) 

new army and to equip it and train it so that he would be able to defeat the Swedes. He  also used the respite to build and expand the city of St. Petersburg.  In 1708, Charles XII was ready to deal with Russia and its upstart Tsar, Peter. King  Charles had 70,000 men ready for invasion. He intended to occupy Moscow and force  Peter to surrender and sue for peace. By mid‐summer, the Swedish army had reached  the Dneiper River, several hundred miles south of Moscow. But, although King Charles  did  not  lack  for  courage,  he  had  seriously  miscalculated  the  costs  of  the  invasion  of  Russia. The distances were immense, and his army had exhausted its supplies. A relief  column, bringing supplies from the Baltic ports was intercepted, defeated, and captured  by  the  Russians.  And  then  it  began  to  snow.  The  winter  of  1708‐1709  was  one  of  the  coldest  ever  recorded  in  Europe.  The  Baltic  froze  solid.  The  Thames  in  London  froze.  Even the canals in Venice froze. In Russia, the soldiers of the Swedish army starved and  froze.  Over 3,000 Swedish soldiers froze to death in Russia in the winter of 1708. In the  spring there was no more talk of marching on Moscow. But Charles refused to retreat  back  towards  the  west,  to  Poland  and  Saxony.  Instead  he  slid  his  army  to  the  south  towards  the  grassy  plains  of  the  Ukraine,  home  of  the  Cossacks  where  he  hoped  his  army  could  find  food  for  both  men  and  horses.  Peter’s  army  got  there  first.  They  destroyed  the  Cossack  capital  and  burned  all  the  boats  which  had  been  assembled  to  ferry  the  Swedish  army  across  the  Dnieper  River.  Finally,  Peter  and  the  Russian  army  cornered the Swedes near the town of Poltava.   A  tremendous  battle  was  fought  and  the  Russian  army  defeated  the  Swedes  decisively. Peter commanded from near the front lines. His clothes were shot through  with holes and one musket ball had made a hole in his hat. He felt he had redeemed his  military  reputation.  King  Charles  of  Sweden  fled  the  battlefield  with  fewer  than  1,500 

Page 19 

Famous Men of the 18th Century 

men  towards  the  south  and  took  refuge  just  across  the  border  of  the  Turkish  Empire.  King Charles was to spend five years in exile, under house arrest by the Turks.  The  victory  at  Poltava  was  followed  by  naval  successes  in  the  Gulf  of  Finland.  Abo, then the capital of Finland, and Helsingfors, which is the present capital, were both  captured, and the Russians became masters of the gulf.   Peter now determined that his people should become a commercial nation. He  urged  them  to  engage  in  foreign  trade  and  encouraged  foreigners  to  bring  their  merchandise  to  Russia's  new  ports.  Less  than  six  months  after  the  first  stone  of  St.  Petersburg was laid, a large ship under Dutch colors ascended the Neva and anchored  off the city site.   Peter himself went on board to welcome the strangers. The skipper was invited  to dine at the house of one of the nobles. Peter and several officers of his government  bought  the  entire  cargo;  and  when  the  ship  sailed  from  St.  Petersburg  the  captain  received a present of about two hundred dollars, and each of his crew a smaller sum of  money, as a premium for having brought the first foreign vessel into the new port.   Peter  encouraged  his  people  in  the  different  parts  of  Russia  to  carry  on  commerce with one another, and he made it easy for them to do so. He improved the  roads,  aided  in  providing  boats  for  navigating  the  rivers,  and  undertook  the  gigantic  work of uniting the great seas, the Baltic, the Black and the Caspian Seas by canals.   Toward  the  close  of  his  reign,  in  1716,  Peter  made  another  trip  abroad.  He  visited the town of Zaandam in Holland where he had learned the trade of shipbuilding.  There he found some of his old companions, and was delighted to hear them salute him  as Peter Bass, the name by which they had known him nearly twenty years before.   He went to the little cottage in which he had lived. It is still carefully preserved.  In one room are to be seen the little oak table and three chairs which were there when  Peter  occupied  it.  Over  the  chimney‐piece  is  an  inscription  which  every  boy  who  is 
Page 20 

Peter the Great (1672–1725) 

making his way up in the world might well take for his motto, "To a great man nothing is  little."   Peter  went  to  see  an  old  friend,  Kist  the  blacksmith,  who  was  at  work  in  his  smithy. The czar took the job from him. He blew the bellows, heated the piece of iron  and beat it out with the great hammer into the required shape. Though he was the ruler  of millions of people he was proud of being a workman and of being able to do things  for himself.   From Holland, Peter went to Paris, where he met the young King Louis XVI. But  most of all, he enjoyed traveling unannounced through the countryside and stopping to  inspect anything that caught his fancy – a windmill, a canal, or a country church.  Peter returned to St. Petersburg in 1717, to face the final crisis of his reign. While  he had been in Amsterdam, his oldest son and heir, Alexei had foolishly run away from  home and sought refuge first in Austria and then in Italy. Alexis was then 26, and he and  Peter had been at odds for years. Peter had ordered Alexei to join the Russian army in  the field and serve as a soldier. Alexei refused. Peter had arranged a marriage for Alexei  when he was 21, but Alexei declared that he hated his wife. He lived in a separate wing  of  their  home  with  his  mistress,  a  Finnish  serf  named  Alfonsina.  When  he  ran  away,  Alfonsina went with him. 

Page 21 

Famous Men of the 18th Century 

 

  Peter  was  embarrassed  by  his  son’s  escapade.  He  demanded  that  he  return  to  Russia,  to  the  court  at  St.  Petersburg.  Alexei  finally  agreed  to  return,  only  on  the  condition  that  his  father  agree  that  he  would  not  be  punished,  but  allowed  to  live  quietly in the country and to marry Alfonsina. Peter agreed, but once Alexei returned,  he had him arrested and demanded that he name all those who had conspired with him,  either to flee or to overthrow the Tsar. Several dozen accomplices were identified and  executed. The Tsarevich Alexei continued to be held in prison. Twice he was ordered to  be  flogged.  A  special  court  considered  the  evidence  against  him  and  pronounced  him  guilty of treason for wishing for the death of his father. Before this sentence could be  carried out, it was announced that he had died of a seizure in prison. Peter pardoned  Alfonsina and later allowed her to marry an army officer. 
Page 22 

Peter the Great (1672–1725) 

Peter spent the last years of his reign devoted to the building of St. Petersburg  and further reforms of the government. When he died in 1725, he was succeeded by his  wife, who ruled as the Empress Catherine for two years before she died. In 1727, Peter’s  grandson, Peter (the son of Alexei) became Tsar Peter II.      In many ways, Peter truly deserved the title "Great." He found his empire feeble  and left it with a well‐drilled army and a large navy. He found it without commerce. He  secured for it ports to which foreign ships might bring merchandise; and he dug canals  so that the different parts of the country might easily carry on trade with one another.   He  won  great  victories  on  the  battlefield  (after  an  embarrassment  or  two),  against  both  Turkey  and  Sweden  and  expanded  the  territory  of  Russia.  He  made  his  country great; and improved the lot of his people.   

Page 23 

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful