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Your personal copy to take away

ISSUE 84
May/June 2014

RITZ Pumps South Africa (Pty) Ltd

KANSANSHI MINE ACQUIRES


INNOVATIVE MINE DRAINAGE SYSTEM

KanEquip

Editor
Sean Potter

Advertising: Sean Potter
Helen Walden
George Makulu
Administration:
Val Potter
Distribution:
Helen Walden
George Makulu
Moses Chirwe

Kansanshi Mines blueprint


to better education.

Educating Zambians,
Developing Zambia!

Design & Layouts:

Stan Potter

Contributors:
Anthea Rowan
Anthony Dalton
Cephas Sinyangwe
Chikwe Chiluba
Dan Boylan
Davis Mulenga
Dick Jones
First Quantum Minerals
Gethsemane Mwizabi
George Makulu
Godfrey Msiska
Humphrey Lombe
Humphrey Nkonde
Kansanshi Mining plc
Kate Nivison
Kelvin Mukupa
Konkola Copper Mines
Lechwe School
Mopani Mining
Roy Kausa
Shapi Shachinda
Tom Cockrem
T.W. Jenkins
William Osborn
Zambian Ornithological Society

Republic of South Africa

CONTENTS
May/June 2014
Issue No. 84

Features
4-7

Aviation Pioneer

14

Tea Time

18

Meiringspoort

26

Zambian Safari

36

David Lemon

40

Great Wall of China

42

Statue of Liberty

44

Southern Ground Hornbill

Minewater Drainage Pumps as supplied


to Kansanshi Mine

10-11 Goodman Houshold



South Africas aviation pioneer
12-13 Sentinel forges ahead in mining
engineering
14-15 Tea Time in Sylhet and Srimongal
18-19 Spectacular Meiringspoort links

the Karoo to the sea
20

The Road To Mopani Copper Mines


Zambia open 2014

22-23 Mopani Gives Nkana Golf Club



a new Breath of life
26-31 Zambian Safari
36-39 David Lemon to resume

Zambezi Cowbell Trek
40-41 Great Wall of China
42

Statue of Liberty

Regulars

Sean Potter
38 Mandy Road, Reuven 2091,
Johannesburg, RSA
P.O. Box 82117, Southdale 2135, RSA
Tel: +27 (0) 83 522 0144
Fax: +27 (0) 86 517 5972
e-mail: zamtrav@mweb.co.za

2-3

Map of Zambia

16

Sudoku, Crossword & Quiz

Zambia:
Copperbelt:

47 Recipes

Helen Walden
P.O. Box 22255, Kitwe, Zambia.
Tel: +260 (0) 21 2 226 378
Cell: +260 (0) 977 746 177
E-mail: shark@coppernet.zm

10

44
Birds of Zambia - Southern Ground
Hornbill
46 Finance
48

Crossword & Quiz answers


Kids Corner

Lusaka:

George Makulu
P.O. Box 34537, Lusaka, Zambia.
Cell: +260 (0) 976 949 219
E-mail: makulug@gmail.com

Website:

www.thezambiantraveller.com
The views expressed are not necessarily those of the
publisher, who takes no responsibility for the accuracy
or reliability of the information supplied with particular
reference to financial data, trading prices and advice given.
No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a
retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means,
electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise
without the prior written permission of the Copyright owner.
Published and copyright by Logivest 42 (Pty)Ltd

www.first-quantum.com

Cover

Kansanshi Mine acquires innovative


mine drainage system

Luxury
Accommodation
ZAMBIA

Lake Tanganyika
Kaputa

0km

50km

100km

150km

200km

Buluya

Kamina

Kasaba Bay
Chiengi

Lake
Mweru Wantipa

Lake
Mweru

TANZANIA

Mpulungu

Mbeya
Congo

D.R. OF THE
CONGO

ku
fu
Lu

Mporokoso

Nchelenge

Nakandi

Mbereshi

Cham

Kapatu

besh

Kawombwa

i
Kalangu

Nseluko

ra
Mununga

Mambilima
Falls

Chinsali

Nsambo

Luap
ula

Ikelenge

Mansa

mb

wu

Lu

Mofu

Chilubi

Chama

Mbali

Kalembila

Twingi

Chililabombwe

Mutanda

Mufulira

ny

Livingstone
Memorial

Chingola

gw
an

Mu

ula

ANGOLA

Capital: Lusaka

Lwiwikila

Mukulu

ap

We
s

Lu

Lubambe

Mpika
Lu

ng
tL
u

Chembe

Solwezi

Kanchibya

Luapula

Lumwana

Chambeshi

Samfya

Lubumbashi

Mwinilunga

Ch

Lake
Bangweulu

Lu
a

Kasoba

Likasi

ng

sh

be

am

am

Driving: Left hand side of the road. Legal driving


age is 18 years old. All foreigners and visitors are
required to carry an international drivers licence.

Lundazi

ad

zi

Kapalala Luwombwa

Kalulushi
Chavuma

Chizela

Ndola

Kitwe

Kawana

Mfuwe

Zambezi

Lu

ng

Kanona

Serenje

Luanshya

Kasempo

MALAWI

eb

gu

Lu

Kabompo

fw

un

em

Mpongwe

gw

n
ua

Mkushi

Chipata

Lukanga

fu

Dongwe

ns

Lu

Lilongwe

Kapiri Mposhi
Katete

Lukulu

ez

Lu

Lukanga Swamp
Luena

Za

gu

Kabwe

Kafu

mb

gin

Kaoma

Nyimba

fwa

sem

Lun

MOZAMBIQUE

m
p

Mongu

Lui

LUSAKA

Ka
Namwala
Ngoma

fue

Kafue

Mazabuka

Ka

fue

Kataba

Senanga

Lake Cahora Bassa


Luangwa

zi
be

Zam

Chirundu

Sitoti

Tete

Monze

Sitoti

Shangombo

Siavonga

IBIA

NAM

ke

ulo

hif

La

Kalomo

Sic

Ngweze

Sinazongwe

Mambova

ZIMBABWE

Maamba

Livingstone

BOTSWANA

International dialling code: (+260), Lusaka


21 (0) 1, Ndola and the Copperbelt 21 (0) 2,
Livingstone 21 (0) 3.
Airport Departure Tax: International
ZMW158.40, Internal ZMW58.00 including
Security Tax.

Official Language: English


Harare

The Zambian Traveller is distributed to tourists, business and professional people within Zambia,
surrounding states and from overseas. It is available on board both domestic and international chartered
fl ights from Zambia. Presented to both business and tourist visitors to the Republic of Zambia through
hotels, guest houses, embassies, government departments, major companies, ZNTB offices in Lusaka,
Pretoria, New York and London. Also distributed via tourist shops and outlets, travel agents and tour
operators within the region. Bulk copies are supplied to various mines on the Copperbelt and advertisers
for own circulation. Available on board Luxury coaches to and from Zambia.
2 March/April 2014 Zambian Traveller

Weight and Measures: Metric system.

Population: Zambia has a population of


approximately 13 million (Census 2010)

Katima
Mulilo

Chipepo

ariba

lom

Ngamwe
Falls
Sesheke

Machile

do

Choma

Lomja

on

Mulobezi

zi
be

Kw

m
Za

Ngenye Falls

Pemba

Ko

Voltage: 240 volts (square pin plugs).

Quality
Food
High Places

JBC does CampChingola


Management & runs
3 Camps for
Murray & Roberts
Lubambe Mufulira
Kitwe

Time: Difference 2 hours ahead of GMT.

Petauke

a
Lu

Limulunga

Mumbwa

Kalabo
Skongo

sh
gu
lun
Mu Dam

an

Vaccinations: Yellow Fever (Compulsory)


and Cholera. Anti-malaria precautions are highly
recommended.
Foreign Currency: There are no restrictions
on the importation of foreign currency into
Zambia. The only requirement is that all cash and
travellers cheques should be declared through
customs at point of entry.

Kasama
wa

Lufi

Isoka

Liwingu
Kashiba

Entry Requirements: Foreign Nationals


require entry visas, which are available at the
point of entry.

Currency: Kwacha (ZMW)


Major Traditional Exports: Copper and
cobalt.

Better Rooms.....
Better food.....

Cell: 0977 746177

e-mail: helen@jbc2003.com
For Reservation and enquiries:
call +260-212-311 414, +260-967-651 414
or email:guesthouse@jbc2003.com
or visit us at
31-33 Kitwe Rd, Chingola, between the two round abouts as
you are entering from Kitwe towards Chingola town centre.

Non-Traditional exports: Primary


agricultural and horticultural products, gemstones,
timber, electricity, cement and textiles.
Major Imports: Crude oil, chemicals and
machinery, iron, steel and manufactured goods.
Always
Professional

JBC owns and operates High Places.


Always
JBC
operates Mining camps for Murray
& Roberts at Mopani, Kitwe and
Professional
Lubambe, Zambia.
Enquiries: john@jbc2003.com
Zambian Traveller May/June 2014

Kansanshi Mines acquisition of the state-ofthe-art Ritz pumps adds impetus to Zambias
innovation drive, a key ingredient to sustained
economical growth.
For more than 140 years the name *RITZ
has stood for quality, innovation and
efficient energy utilization. *Andritz
acquired RITZ PumpenFabrik in 2011
renaming the subsidiary Andritz RITZ

Minewater
Drainage
PumpsPumps
Acid Minewater
Drainage
as
to Kansanshi Mine
forsupplied
Central Basin
delivered by RITZ Pumps South Africa
Double-suction submersible motor pumps
Designed for acid mining water
Zero axial thrust

The double-suction design compensates axial thrust, thereby neutralising


the load on the pump, the motor and
its thrust bearing.

Pumping operation

Suction areas

The two suction areas half the suction


velocity and minimise the intake of abrasive solids and silt.

Deviating stage

The deviating stage combines the delivery flows from the two pumps and
directs it via the external casing channels.

Wear parts

Wear parts made of corrosion- and abrasion resistant materials protect all
important components under even the
toughest conditions.

Heavy duty motor

The use of custom heavy duty motors


reduces the cross-section for energy
transmission, as well as transmission
losses. Adapted to the relevant environment, the MC-T Modular Cooling
Technology delivers maximum operational reliability.

PUMP UNIT DELIVERED BY

RITZ Pumps South Africa (Pty) Ltd


5a Patrick Road, Jet Park, Hughes, Boksburg 1459
P.O.
Box 13754,
1467,
South Africa
May/June
2014Witfield
Zambian
Traveller
4
sales@ritzpumps.co.za, www.ritzpumps.co.za

Technical features of the


delivered pump units
Pump type

HDM 6737.3/15

Number of stages

15

Flow capacity

1.500 m/h

Delivery head

430 m

Motor type

6H1178/2400/4

Operating voltage

6.600 volts

Motor power

2.400 kW

Speed

1485

Total unit length

approx. 14,5 meter

Total unit weight

approx. 21 tonns

PUMP UNIT PRODUCED BY

ANDRITZ Ritz GmbH


Gueglingstrasse 50
73529 Schwaebinsch Gmuend, Germany
ritz@andritz.com, www.andritz.com

One of the most important requirements


for trouble-free extraction operations is
pumping the accumulated mine water out
of the working area. Mine operators all over
the world rely on single-suction and doublesuction submersible motor pumps from RITZ
to carry out this important task.
What makes our solutions special is that
every product we build is unique, and
matched precisely to our customers size
and power requirements. Thousands of
HDM pumps have been produced and are
in trouble-free operation around the globe.
Working under even the toughest conditions.
This also includes the biggest submersible
motor pump in the world.
RITZ Pumps South Africa brings to the
market an added dimension of service
offering the client a state of the art
comprehensive package. The way this
is done is by consolidating key Blue chip
suppliers into one package that offer the
client a working solution.
The application is designed encapsulating
the clients needs into a self-maintained
package that not only monitors every aspect
of the installation but also remotely makes
this information available to the client.
With this design concept the intervention
and upkeep of equipment is limited. This
together with other key design features
drastically reduces costs especially in
Dead Mines that must be monitored and
dewatered.

Dewatering Dead Mines

Although some mines are inoperative


(dead) mines, they still need to be
dewatered to avoid contamination of
underground water and keep the water at an
acceptable and safe level. Or to bring this
contaminated water to surface for treatment
i.e. AMD (Acid Mine Dewatering) The

conventional pump stations situated


underground have specific legislative
requirements.
The equipment needs to maintained,
and this means that a dead mine
has to have a supply of fresh cooled
air for people to service and operate
the pumps. In fact, such a dead
mine has to be operative just like
any active mine in terms of power
supply for hoists, ventilation, cooling
and lighting, costing million in annual
operating costs.

Special Pumps

This high expense neednt be


the case. Our core business is
mine dewatering regardless of
water quality i.e. Potable water or
Acid Mine Water (AMD). It is also
applicable whether it is an active or
a dead mine. Our pump application
was developed specifically for this
purpose and has for many years
been used in mining everywhere else
in the world.

Above ground pump


assembly

The beauty of our system is that our


pump is assembled above ground
and then free hung suspended
from surface so you dont need
underground access to get to the
pump station as generally the case
in South Africa. The pump is simply
suspended in the shaft opening
where it can free hang on ZSM
system to 1 200 meter with piping
from 80nb to 600nb and achieve
heads of 1500 meters, or we can
even drill a borehole from the surface
straight down into the water source
suspend and hang pump into the
water and pump out directly without
having to go through the shaft with a
complex piping system as is required
for traditional underground high
pressure pump station setup.
They system isnt only for old mines.

Zambian Traveller May/June 2014

New mines in Australia and up in Africa are now


installing our system from the beginning. Although it
is sometimes challenging to retrofit our system it is
very cost effective to install it on new mines where the
conventional mine dewatering system of building and
underground pump station today literally cost millions
more. One of the greatest advantages is that if we
know where the water is, we simply go straight down
to it through a borehole and dont need a shaft to get
the water out.

The Technology

The use of single-suction submersible motor pumps


for pumping huge quantities or from great depths is
associated with extreme loads on the unit the design
of the HDM (heavy duty mining) pump system that
coms in a wide range of sizes. The high the pump
performance the stronger the axial thrust exerted
on the pump the motor and its thrust bearing. The
consequences of this are overloading and untimely
shutdown. The solution is to double up, meaning
grater durability. This is what our design is all about a
double suction pump that provides full compensation
for axial thrust. In short, the HDM is designed for a
longer life.

How it Works

With the HDM system, two contra-rotating


submersible motor pumps are arranged on top of
each other and driven by a continuous pump shaft
while the suction branches of the two pumps are
located at the end of the HDM module. Each of the
two pumps transports half the capacity to the middle
of the pump at full pressure. There a deviating stage
directs the flow to the pressure line via the external
casing channels.
The double suction design completely compensates
the axial thrust while loads on the unit are kept
to a minimum and the thrust bearing is no longer
subjected to tonnes of thrust. This significantly
reduces wear and tear resulting in the extended
service life were achieving.
Furthermore the division of work between the two
pumps not only achieves complete compensation
for axial thrust our impeller tip speeds are reduced
having less wear and it also halves the suction
velocity outside the pump. This protects the well walls
around the intake openings and minimises the intake
of abrasive solids and silt. Theres an even more
compelling benefit. With half the delivery flow going to
each pump, smaller impeller intake cross sections are
possible and therefore lower circumferential velocity in
the seal gaps. Every HDM pump is a once off as each
one is tailor made from standard modules for each
specific application. Theres the hydraulics module
that utilises the optimum combination of impeller

6 May/June 2014 Zambian Traveller

diffuser and casing, leading to the best possible


adaptation to a desired operating point at extremely
high efficiency. The materials module provides a wide
choice of materials enabling flexile adaptation to suit
all combinations of chemical or abrasive operating
conditions.

ZSM in underground mining


The ZSM Connection excels owing to its cost-effectiveness,
especially when used with high-performance submersible
pumps.
Freely
suspended

The Motor

Partially
suspended

Freely
suspended

Partially
suspended

Finally, even the motor is modular. Each HDM


features a heavy duty motor specially adapted to
power usages of up to 14 000 volts and sizes up to 6
500kW. As unbelievable as it may sound our electric
motor design is unique in that it is filled with water
for cooling. Like many great innovations the principle
behind our MC-T (modular cooling technology) is
amazingly simple. Its all about motion. On the lower
shaft end of the rotor there is a suction and pressure
optimised pump impeller. One of its two main tasks
is to cool and lubricate the nearby axial bearing, but
it also ensures a constant flow of cooling liquid in the
right direction. The liquid moves upwards through
the inside of the motor and here cooling channels,
developed in house by us define the precise rout via
all thermal sources to evacuate that effectively. When
it arrives at the top the heat in the liquid is transmitted
to the outer wall of the motor and there the heat
escapes through the surface to the medium being
pumped. And then the whole procedure jus starts
again. For really high temperature conditions the
cooling performance can be enhanced through the
use of additional heat exchanger modules fitted onto
the unit.

Standing
pipe column

ZSM
Connection
2

The Control

All of the equipment is monitored and controlled by


Variable Speed drives that show immense saving.
Power factor correction and other spread load
characteristics. This is linked to a PLC (Programmable
Logic Controller) that logs all events and is key in
route cause analysis of faults. In fact responsible
persons know of a problem before the site personnel
are aware.

BEE

This technology is not new and is being used


worldwide but has not yet been explored fully by the
South African mining industry. It thus requires us to
be more aggressive in our marketing efforts in this
industry. We support the development of previouslydisadvantaged South African hence our level one
black-owned BEE status.
Our company has been contracted to install various
pumps in a number of countries in Africa but fact
of the matter is anybody who is serious about
dewatering must come and talk to us. We have
purpose-designed systems to solve any dewatering
problems cost-effectively.

1
1 Pump

Here it shows off its system advantages of time-saving assembly


and disassembly. In confined installation situations the low
*OUFSOBUJPOBMNJOJOH
installation
dimensions of the ZSM Technology permit optimised
Major
projects implemented
Year pipeline
Customer/Plant
Dimensions
Totaldisassembly
length
cross-sections. The
uncomplicated
of the
2012
Congo/Kipushi
DN 300
400 m
pipe
section
guarantees
shorter
times
required
to
change
a
2010
Poland/Copper mining
DN 350
2 x 1000 m
pump.
Downtimes
due
to
maintenance
and
repairs
are
reduced
Major projects in the advanced planning phase
Year toCustomer/Plant
Dimensions
Total length
a minimum.
2012

South Africa/Evander 6

DN 200

1300 m

Zambia/Kanshansi

DN 400

400 m

South Africa/Johannesburg
ZSM
Connections DN 400-500 7 x approx. 400 m
The tigh sleeve connection - ZSM - is an axial non-positive and
detachable pipe connection. Used as a pit pipeline in underground mining and deep-well sinking. Our patent-protected
tight sleeve system is a unique alternative to other conventional connection systems thanks to its quick and easy assembly/
disassembly, space-saving design and favourable price.

Coupling has been tested to 1,660 tons


Coupling is done in 16 seconds or less
Pumps can be suspended from surface up to 1,200 meters
Pipe columns can be replaced in shaft in record time.
50 to 900 mm Nominal bore lines

SUPPLIED BY:

2 Intermediate support point

3 To pump station

Installation situations of the Carl Hamm ZSM Connection

Spigot end (male part)


O-ring to protect the
chain grooves
against impurities

Chain entry

7
Shearing elements (chains)
to create the axial non-positive
connection
O-rings to seal against
the internal pressure

Sleeve (female part)

Zambian Traveller
May/June 2014
PUMPS SOUTH AFRICA
(PTY)LTD

PUMPS

MOTORS

SYSTEMS

SERVICE

RITZ PUMPS SOUTH AFRICA (PTY)LTD


Tel: +27 87 805 7267 Fax: + 27 11 397 5620
www.ritzpumps.edx.co.za | www.ritzpumps.co.za | www.ritz.de
PO Box 13754 - Witfield - 1467 | 5a Patrick Road - Jet Park - Hughes - Boksburg - Gauteng 1459

For more than 140 years the pump industry has been associating the name RITZ with
quality and sound workmanship. Experience is the basis on which demanding technological challenges are being
reliably mastered. Technological knowledge and the right products together with flexibility and excellent service
present a new quality to our customers in regard to their relationship to RITZ. It is being completed with a service
deserving the name RITZ. (RITZ joined Andritz Group in 2010 assuming the name Andritz Ritz)
Electronic Catalogue: http://andritz.evolaris.net/publisher/reader/list/andritz/2
Web link: http://spectrum.andritz.com/search.htm?pr=spectrum&search=pumps

Submersible Range

QR code to download
the ANDRITZ pump
app for your iPad

QR code to open the


eReader for tablets
and smartphones

Submersible Pumps MS-T (Modular shaft technology) design: Our pumps


do have not have continuous shaft and are therefore very easily adapted to changing water levels and extremely
easy to maintain. With these pumps we offer a very flexible product for dewatering medium capacities and heads.
The submersible pumps we manufacture range from 30 m/h up to 900 m/h for heads up to 550 m
Submersible Motors MC-T (Modular Cooling Technology): A second
advantage are our submersible mining motors . They are customized for the individual application and therefore
last extremely long. The submersible pumps we manufacture range from 30 m/h up to 900 m/h for heads up to
550 m. The motors are available from 30 kW up to 6500 kW in voltages from 380 V up to 14000 V.
Submersible HDM (Heavy Duty Mining) Pumps: This is our Top of the range
for mine dewatering. Double suction axial thrust free dewatering pumps for capacities between 200 m/h to 6500
m/h and heads up to 1500 meters and motors up to 6.5 MW. With the HDM and the high pressure pumps we are
clearly focussing on high heads and small to very large capacities.

Dry installed Horizontal pumps


Wear Resistant pump for medium slurry
High pressure Horizontal pumps: Our high pressure pumps are all designed for
mine & bulk water transfer applications.
Pulp & Paper, Sugar, Chemical application pumps: Our high pressure pumps
are all designed for mine applications.

Mini Hydro
Mini Hydro Hydrodynamic Screws and Pumps as turbines.

SKILLED
MOTIVATED
AMBITIOUS
Build your future with
new and exciting
career opportunities
provided by Sentinel.
First Quantum is recruiting for our
Sentinel mine located 150km west of
Solwezi. Were looking for motivated
individuals, with mining experience,
who can take advantage of our
industry-leading training and help
us achieve our production target of
300,000 tonnes of copper per year.
We hope to attract the best talent
and will reward employees who take
the initiative and deliver results with
on-going technical training, on-thejob learning opportunities, mentoring
schemes, management training and
career development plans.

As part of our commitment to


Zambia, Sentinel and our employees,
First Quantum has signed a multimillion partnership agreement with
the Ministry of Science, Technology
and Vocational Training. It involves
the creation of a new Technical
Training Facility. This will be used for
training and development of existing
employees and as a source of future
mining talent.
Our ultimate goal for Sentinel is
becoming an industry-leading mine
and a success story in the region.
One that has a lasting positive impact
on Zambians economic growth and
peoples lives.
With the right attitude, commitment
and skills, you can build your career
at Sentinel and play a major part in
its success.

Right now, there are major opportunities at Sentinel for dedicated


people who want to build something great with their careers and
lives. We are looking for mechanics, electricians, plant operators,
training co-ordinators and engineering supervisors. Find out more
about these roles by visiting our website.

Ritz Pumps South Africa is a Joint Venture partner of:


ANDRITZ Ritz GmbH

IS A 67% BLACK OWNED LEVEL 1 BBBEE CONTRIBUTOR


8 May/June 2014 Zambian Traveller
WITH 135% BBBEE PROCUREMENT LEVEL

www.first-quantum.com/careers
Zambian Traveller May/June 2014

Goodman Houshold South Africas aviation pioneer


by Richard Rhys Jones

ot many people are aware


that a South African farmer
built an aircraft and successfully
flew it when the Wright brothers
were still at school.
His name was John Goodman
Houshold, born on 9 December
1845 in England before
emigrating to South Africa with
his parents to farm at Karkloof,
near Howick, in what was then
the colony of Natal. He was
said to be a dreamer and clever
inventor who wondered, like many
other aviation pioneers, whether
man would ever be capable of
flying safely through the air in a
powered aircraft.
In 1871, at the age of 26,
he envisioned his own flying
machine and began his research
by shooting large birds, weighing
them, measuring their wings and
calculating the area of wingspan
needed to carry his own weight.
Housholds parents encouraged
their inventive son when he
designed and built a mechanical
saw mill on their timber farm
Der Magtenburg, but they were

not so keen about his interest


in flying. His religious mother
believed God did not intend that
humans should fly like a bird but
everyone should rather remain
firmly anchored to terra firma.
Satisfied that his mathematical
calculations were correct,
Goodman Houshold constructed
his craft from oiled silk stretched
over a light bamboo frame. It
had enormous wings with a seat
similar to a swing suspended
below them by four ropes.
Houshold planned to control the
direction of his flight by tilting
the seat left or right, a very
rudimentary steering system.
On the day of the first flight in
1875, his brother Gordon and
a few farm labourers helped
Goodman Houshold carry the
glider to the edge of an 80-metrehigh cliff on Der Magtenberg.
Placing himself on the swinging
seat, Houshold gave the order to
launch - and South Africas first
brief flight was under way.
It is reported that the glider

The only photo in existence of


pioneer aviator John Goodman
Houshold
covered just over one kilometre
above the tall gum trees in
the valley before coming to a
shuddering halt on rising ground.
Encouraged by this success,
Houshold urged his ground
crew to again carry the glider to
the top of the cliff. During the
second flight, the craft soared
for a while before crashing into a
yellowwood tree. Houshold broke
a leg and was carried back to
the farmhouse to face the wrath
of his mother, who made him
promise never to attempt flying
again. She drummed into him
that God punished flyers for their
arrogance in trying to leave the
ground, adding that Goodman
was extremely lucky not to have
been killed.

Wording on the plaque commemorates Housholds flight in the 1870s


the German, Otto Lillienthal, to make the first official glider flight in
1896, and eight years later, in 1904, Orville and Wilbur Wright made the
first powered flight at Kittyhawk.
Goodman Houshold died in Pietermaritzburg in 1906 at the age of
61, two years after the Wright brothers success, and he was no doubt
delighted to read before his death that man had finally conquered the
air.
The Lions River Heritage Society and other donors recognised
Housholds feat in 1995 by erecting a commemorative plaque on the
district road between Karkloof and Currys Post, 23 km from Howick.

What was left of the glider was


packed away in a barn and no
doubt the strange contraption
was inspected by visitors who
helped to spread the story of
South Africas - and arguably the
worlds
This monument to the aviators feat is on a district road near Howick

10 May/June 2014 Zambian Traveller

- first flight. By abandoning his


experiments, Houshold allowed

Illustration of Housholds glider in the Howick Museum

11

Cutting-edge engineering

Sentinel forges ahead


in mining engineering
A world marvel - The sag mills at the $2 billion under-construction
Sentinel Mine will be the largest in operation in the world when the
mine is commissioned in the second quarter of 2014.

By Davis Mulenga

hen the National Academy of Sciences marked its 150th anniversary last year,
United States (US) President Baraka Obama underscored the role of engineers to
the Nations prosperity. For 150 years, youve strived to answer the big questions, solve
tough problems, not for yourselves but for the benefit of the nation, he said.

Obamas sentiments must strike a strong chord


as Zambia marks its Golden Jubilee. No doubt,
Zambian engineers have the potential to change
the fortunes of the Nation for the better.
However, that potential can only be realised if
engineers are abreast of current technology and
industry practices; something the Engineering
Institution of Zambia (EIZ) has recognised by
taking steps to ensure that the profession has
a more positive impact on Zambias quest for
sustained social and economic growth.

12 May/June 2014 Zambian Traveller

We have to continuously adapt to have a


positive impact on social and economic growth,
and we will make every endeavour to ensure
that Zambian engineers gain access to new
technology and industry practices, says Benard
Chiwala, EIZ President.
Therefore, there is little surprise that the theme
for this years EIZ Annual Symposium seeks
to address how engineers can share ideas
and developments in innovation, engineering
practices, infrastructure development and

Sentinel, First Quantum Minerals $2 billion


under-construction copper mine in Zambias
North Western Province, is well poised to meet
the need for engineers to be at the forefront of
engineering innovation and practices. Situated
150 kilometres west of Solwezi, this will be the
largest mine in Africa, putting Zambia at the
forefront of global mining engineering, and in
the same league with Chile and other leading
copper producing nations.
Tristan Pascall, Sentinel Mines Assistant General
Manager enthuses: The engineering feats at
Sentinel are simply staggering. The sag mills will
be the largest operating in the world. In fact,
every aspect of this mine is about scale because
that is the only way to economically mine low
grade copper of about 0.5 percent.
Expected to produce 300,000 mtpa, Sentinel is
the first of the three potential mines at Trident,
FQMs new large-scale mining project. Enterprise,
a nickel deposit is the second while the mineral
resource of the third, Intrepid, is yet to be
determined.
The construction effort, noted for its fast-pace
and ambitious performance goals follows the
template that has come to be expected from
FQM whose success is rooted in Zambia.
Clearly, any mine in Africa that breaks newground technically will instinctively bring about
the need to develop specific engineering skill
sets.

Many of the activities here are those that any


manager gets involved in setting performance
priorities, forming teams and measuring results,
says Randy Findlay, Construction Manager at
Sentinel.

Company News

advances in Information Communication


Technology (ICT) applications in engineering.

He adds: For that reason, it is worthwhile to


mention about how we think and act differently
here and more effectively with a multi-cultural
workforce.
It is an environment that is highly conducive
for continuous learning, and for achieving better
results, elaborates Zambian Anthony Mukutuma
who heads Kevitsa one of the FQM operations in
Finland.
Mukutuma who joined Bwana Mkubwa, FQMs
first operation in Zambia, and went on to do
stints at some of the Companys other operations
across the globe, is the best person to attest to
the benefits of a multi-cultural environment.
Working for FQM has been a great experience
it is a really a great company to work for. Im
always excited by the range of engineering
technologies that I see within the company.
Along with gaining some amazing engineering
experience, one must not understate the personal
growth and development I have gained from
working for a great company.
That is the inheritance FQM wants to bequeath
its employees at Sentinel.
Davis Mulenga is a public relations specialist,
and FQM is one of the clients he serves.

For example maintenance of Sentinels two semi


mobile in-pit crushers that mitigate fuel costs
and increase throughput efficiencies, coupled
with the three gigantic rope shovels, in which
three Land Cruisers can easily be fitted, are areas
where specialist engineering know-how will be
critical. One often hears the chorus among the
2000 Zambians currently employed at Sentinel
that the challenging environment in which they
work has the effect of pushing them to achieve
unimagined performance.
A multi-cultural environment
What are the key drivers in executing such a
major engineering project?

One of the two rope-shovels that can easily fit in two LandCruisers attests to the advanced mining engineering at Sentinel.

Zambian Traveller May/June 2014

13

Tea Time in Sylhet and Srimongal


By: Anthony Dalton

More tea?

Most of the tea pluckers in Bangladesh are women

grew up to the sound of a kettle boiling, tea being


made and that daily question. My mother was
addicted to tea, as were most English people in those
far off days. I suppose I was too because nothing has
really changed for me. I still drink at least four or five
cups of tea each day. So, having had this passion for
the most refreshing hot drink in the world for a lifetime,
an opportunity to visit the tea gardens of Sylhet
and Srimongal in northern Bangladesh could not be
ignored.

production in north-east India and, soon after, in parts


of Bengal much of which is now Bangladesh. It
happened because a Scotsman named Robert Bruce
wandered into a wilderness of overgrown tea plants
in Indias Assam province, due north of Sylhet, in the
1820s. He passed the word on to British business
interests and the first estate in the Sylhet region
opened in 1857. For the next century, and a little
more, the tea estates were all managed by British
men many of them from Scotland. Their names are
listed for all to see on wooden plaques in the various
tea production offices. Since 1971 Bengalis have
dominated the managerial lists, having finally taken
their rightful places as efficient administrators and
professional tea producers.
There are now more than 150 tea estates in northeastern Bangladesh. All are centred around Sylhet
and, a little further south, at Srimongal. On these vast,
beautiful estates, tea plants, which can grow as high

The first time I strolled through a Sylhet tea


producing estate was a bit like coming home to my
mothers kitchen. I could smell tea with every breath.
As I watched the tea pluckers working, I thought
about the long, historical journey tea had made to
reach the shores of my native England.
Tea as a beverage is believed to date back to
2700 BC. If the legend can be believed, a Chinese
emperor, Shen Nung, was the first to try the bitter
leaves with boiling water. Thousands of years later, in
the middle of the 17th century, tea arrived in Europe
and, for Britain, a national drink was born. Less than
100 years later the British had taken control of tea

The Bangladesh Tea Research Institute in Srimongal

as ten metres if left untouched, are carefully cultivated


and pruned to make them grow full and expand
sideways. As a result, none stand much more than
chest high to make collection of the leaves as easy
as possible. Tea is a hardy plant and, if looked after,
can live a productive life for up to 70 years.

spreading the
leaves over large
stone floors.
The leaves are
then dried, or
fired, on grills in
special ovens. At
the end of these
processes, the tea
is then graded for
sale. The biggest
markets, apart
from domestic
The manager of a tea estate checks his crop
sales, are Pakistan,
carry large baskets of tea leaves
Russia and the Middle East.
on their heads to the weighing
Malnicherra was the first tea
stations. Each basket is weighed
estate in the Sylhet area. It
and the workers pay is calculated
opened in 1857. It was quickly
according to the amount of tea
followed by others. The prominent
gathered.
Lackatoorah Tea Gardens nearby
Once the tea has been plucked,
started production in 1877. I
the process to take it to the
had the opportunity of touring
drinkable product follows six
Malnicherra estate on foot and on
important stages: withering, rolling,
the managers motorcycle over a
sifting, fermentation, firing and
few days. The neat, orderly rows
grading. Withering is achieved
of tea bushes marched over the
by driving hot air over the leaves
rolling hills shaded by tall, graceful
until they become limp and pliable,
rain trees. Lines of women wearing
losing up to one third of their
bright, colourful clothes moved
weight in the process. The now
along the rows plucking the
lighter leaves are then rolled to
traditional two leaves and a bud
break the cells and enzymes and
from the bushes and stowing them
free the natural juices for the next
in voluminous linen bags hanging
process. On their journey from the
from their heads or shoulders. They
rolling stage to fermentation, the
worked with a concentration and
leaves are sent through sieves to
a speed of hands that was hard
ensure they are uniform in size.
to believe. I called out to them,
Fermentation, or the oxidisation
complimenting their dexterity.
of the juices, is accomplished by
They laughed and chatted among
themselves, never missing a beat
as they plucked at the bushes.

An evergreen, with the Latin name of Camellia


sinensis, tea begins life as a small seed. After planting
they are protected from Bangladeshs scorching
sun by trellis-work set low to the ground until they
become miniature tea plants. The resulting fragile
bushes are carefully nurtured for four years before
they are considered old enough to be plucked. An
expert insisted I use the correct word, Tea leaves are
plucked, he said. They are never picked.

The entrance sign for the prominent Lackatoorah Tea Estate


near Sylhet

14 May/June 2014 Zambian Traveller

Tea pluckers are usually women. They work at


high speed and for long hours. Their hands become
blurred as they select the youngest and healthiest
leaves. After a full day in the estates, the women

Young tea plants are shielded from the


hot sun by trellis-work shades

The Bangladesh Tea Research


Institute at Srimongal plays an
important role in the countrys tea
industry. Beyond the main institute,
the BTRI has three substations,
one at Moulvibazar, one in Sylhet,
and a third far to the south at
Fatikchhari, Chittagong. Three
major research departments
oversee six research disciplines.
They are: the Department of
Chemistry, which covers soil
chemistry and biochemistry; the
Department of Crop Production,

A machine for sorting tea leaves

which looks after botany and


agronomy; and the Department
of Pest Management, containing
the Entomology and Plant
Pathology Divisions. Two more
research divisions take care of
tea technology and statistics
and -economics. In addition,
the Bangladesh Tea Research
Institute collaborates on research
programmes with other research
institutes and universities.
For visitors, the Srimongal facility
offers occasional tours to see the
tea production process in action.
There is also the opportunity of
tasting different blends. And that
reminds me, my kettle is not far
away. You know what that means?
Yes, its time for a cup of tea.

Beginning the sorting process at a tea


production company

15

Ndola Airport
P.O. Box 73435
Ndola, Zambia
Tel: +260 212 620172
Fax: +260 212 614216
E-mail: polite@zamtel.zm

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0955 431522
0966 780453
0955 882992
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Tel/Fax: +260 211 221025




16 May/June 2014 Zambian Traveller

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0955 775769
0979 251284

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Answers on Page 48

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How to play Sudoku

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1. Which city is the home of Jazz?


2. What surname means son of Nick?
3. Which 90s medical comedy was written by the author of
The Golden Girls and Soap?
4. Who said, I married beneath me. all women do?
5. Who wrote Bitter Sweet and Private Lives?
6. What musical group had a number one hit with Ice, Ice
Baby?
7. In which European country is the theme park De Efteling?
8. Which US President was inaugurated in 1969?
9. What was Ronald Reagans wifes name?
10. In which city did Princess Diana have her last meeting with
Mother Teresa?
11. Which nation was the first to ratify the United Nations
charter in 1945?
12. Which Martina dominated tennis in the 80s?
13. Whose 70th birthday concert did Whitney Houston sing at in
London in 1988?
14. In 1987 the Russians and the Americans signed the
Washington summit agreement to limit what?
15. Boris Beckers oldest son has what Biblical name?
16. Composer Leonard Bernstein was the musical director of
what from 1958 to 1970?
17. In Mary Poppins, Julie Andrews first film she played the
part of a what?
18. What Frenchman designed the national flag of Italy?

FROM YOUR SUBSTATION

General Knowledge Quiz

STRATEGIC STOCKHOLDINGS
IN AFRICAN COUNTRIES

Where you need it, When you need it

SUppORT

Sudoku & Quiz Page

SPECTACULAR MEIRINGSPOORT LINKS THE KAROO TO THE SEA

by Richard Rhys Jones

over which loomed brilliantlycoloured sandstone precipices.


Bain estimated that if he
designed a road here it would
have to cross the Grootstroom
at least 26 times, otherwise it
was perfect.

All the worlds geraniums were propogated from a plant discovered in


Meiringspoort in 1689

The worlds first geranium was


discovered in this mountainous pass

etween Beaufort West and Oudtshoorn in the


Western Cape of South Africa is the spectacular
Meiringspoort pass where the road criss-crosses the
meandering waters of the Grootstroom 30 times.
The worlds geraniums originated here after botanist
Hendrik Oldenland discovered a wild geranium
(pelarganium zonale) in the mountainous pass and
sent it to Europe in 1689. The plant was eventually
cultivated into the popular geranium garden varieties.
Meiringspoort was named after Petrus Johannes
Meiring who owned the farm De Rust at the
southern entrance to the pass from the Little Karoo.
In 1854, when famous road-builder Andrew Geddes
Bain was looking for a route to link the Little and
Great Karoo, Meiring drew his attention to the ravine
which penetrated the Swartberg range on his farm. At
Meirings invitation, Bain rode through the cathedrallike pass gouged out by the river and found that
it would be ideal for a road. The draining stream
had eroded a ravine littered with huge boulders,

18 May/June 2014 Zambian Traveller

A couple of years went


by while funds were raised
for the new road and work
eventually began on the pass in
August 1856. Labourers were
recruited from nearby farms
and construction began under
the supervision of Thomas
Bain, Andrew Bains son.
During construction, the Bains
cleverly utilised the forces of
nature instead of blasting with
dynamite. Surrounding bushes
were cut down and heaped on
to protruding rocks that had to
be removed. The bushes were
set alight and, when cold water
was poured over the heatedup rocks, they cracked into
smaller pieces that could be
easily transferred to the valley
floor where the road had to be
raised.

Meiringspoort was officially


opened to traffic on 3 March
1858 by the Civil Commissioner of Oudtshoorn, Lt.Col. A.B.Armstrong, who broke a bottle of ale on a
rock at the entrance and named the pass after Piet
Meiring. A group of 300 horsemen, with their ladies
riding on 50 carts, then negotiated the 13-kilometrelong pass before finishing up on Meirings farm for a
celebration that carried on well into the night.
Meiringspoort Pass soon became a great asset to
the Great Karoo farmers, who were able to send their
produce directly through the Swartberg to be shipped
out from Mossel Bay. Toll gates were put up at both
entrances to the pass but the money collected always
fell far short of finances needed for repairs and
maintenance, so the tolls were eventually abandoned.
In the first half of the 20th Century more than

signposted to create interest.


Most of the river crossings have
names which indicate their
origin Spookdrif, where early
travellers often saw a ghostly
light; Skelmkloofdrif, where
perhaps a criminal was captured;
Wasgatdrif, which indicates
that it was used for bathing and
laundering; Opmetings Drif to
honour the quantity surveyers; and
Ontploffingsdrif, where a load of
dynamite ignited and blew up a
mule-drawn wagon.
Three kilometres from the
northern entrance is a pathway
leading to an attractive 55-metrehigh waterfall 300 metres from the
road. An information centre has
been built here where visitors can
learn about the history of the pass.
There are several attractive
picnic spots through Meiringspoort
where motorists can pause to
photograph animal life and the
towering cliffs with their unusual
patterns of warped and twisted
rocks. Through this spectacular
natural gateway the road makes
the transition from the Great Karoo
to the Little Karoo. From the
Beaufort West side of the pass,
travellers leave behind the sheep
and prickly pears of the arid Great
Karoo and enter the intenselycultivated and picturesque ostrichfarming region of the Little Karoo.

The Swartberg mountains often change colour through the spectacular pass
With four types of veld,
the botanical diversity of this
mountainous region is quite
exceptional. Here, botanists have
discovered ferns and tree species
which are generally found in
natural coastal forests,and fynbos
grows alongside aloes, wild olive
and protea nitida (waboom). Other
shrub and tree species have
adapted well and survived the
frequent floods which push the
river over its banks.

Piet Meirings foresight provided


South Africa with one of the
Republics most impressive
mountain passes, and the name of
his farm at the southern entrance
to the pass lives on in the form
of an attractive hamlet, De Rust,
established in 1900.

More than 70 bird species


are attracted to Meiringspoorts
variegated plant life, including
sugarbirds, the Cape
Rock-thrush, Malachite
Kingfishers, the Cape Batis,
Fish Eagles, Verrauxs
Eagle, wagtails and
buntings.

50 000 was spent on diversions and the


construction of 17 causeways to improve the road
and prevent it from being periodically flooded.
Meiringspoort remains one of South Africas starkly
beautiful road passes, with many of its features

dassies, shrews and the Cape


clawless otter.

The towering cliffs of the pass are home to


dassies, baboons and other wildlife

Baboons are often seen


entertaining motorists at
the roadside, while kudu,
grysbok, and jackals
also put in an occasional
appearance. Other
wildlife in the area include
the rarely-seen Cape
Mountain Leopard, caracal,
mongoose, porcupine, rock

Most of the drifts through the gorge


have been given names. This one,
Opmetings Drif, probably honours the
surveyors who worked on the pass
Zambian Traveller May/June 2014

19

AN I
OP

COPPER MIN
ES

ZA

1
IA OP EN 20

MB

The Road To
Mopani CoppeR Mines
ZaMbia open 2014

SINCE its establishment in 1930, Nkana Golf Club in


Kitwe has never been accorded an opportunity to host a
high profile international competition. This factor coupled
with the dwindling fortunes of the club over the years
led the deterioration of the club facilities coupled with a
reduction in membership.
However, with resilience from a few committed members
and renewed interest from Mopani Copper Mines and other
corporate organisations, the club slowly started regaining
its lost status.
The signing of a memorandum of understanding (MoU)
between Mopani Copper Mines Plc and Nkana Golf
Club in March 2013 opened a new chapter for the Club.
Nkana Golf Club would never be the same again. Under
the MoU, Mopani made a commitment to improve the
club infrastructure, upgrade the course and improve
the surroundings with the aim of restoring the club to
international standards. At that time no one knew about
the good things that lay in waiting. In fact there was some
apprehension from the general membership on the future
of the club.
Taking advantage of the commitment by Mopani, Nkana
Golf Club developed confidence to bid for the hosting of
the prestigious Zambia Open Championship. Really?
Everybody must have wondered. But with the personal
interest and pledge by Mopani Copper Mines Plc to sponsor
the title, should the Club be given the chance to host the
tournament, interest from then Kitwe Mayor, Councilor
Chileshe Bweupe, Club Captain, Mr Elario Musonda and
a few others, it became obvious that the bid to host the
tournament had become a serious affair. No one was going
to stop it.
The Zambia Golf Union (ZGU), who have pledged to
accord as many clubs as possible across the nation the
opportunity to host the tournament, were bombarded
right, left and centre at every golf function with requests
to accord Nkana Golf Club the rare chance of hosting the
Zambia Open. Seeing the commitment and dedication from
the team as well as the progress that was being made on

club rehabilitation, ZGU finally announced the good news


and gave Nkana the right to host the 2014 tournament.
Mopani engaged a number of companies to sponsor the
complete overhaul of the Golf Club. Over $2 million has
been invested in the upgrade. Apart from spearheading
massive infrastructure developments at the club, Mopani
also took the huge task of being Title Sponsors of what was
going to be the biggest ever Zambia Open with the largest
prize money of $250,000. This historic opportunity stirred
a lot of interest from many golf enthusiasts as membership
at the club started to increase again.
The Mining Guru, Mr Emmanuel Mutati, who is Mopani
Board Chairman, was accorded the chance to head the 2014
Zambia Open Organising Committee (ZOOC). Mopani
CEO and Nkana Golf Club President, Mr Danny Callow
was appointed the Tournaments Chief Executive with
Club Captain, Mr Elario Musonda and Mr Phil Harrold
being ZOOCs Vice-Chairmen in charge of Sponsorship
and Tournament respectively. Other members were also
chosen to head various sub-committees.
With the prize money already taken care of by Mopani,
ZOOCs task was to ensure other funds for various
projects were organized from other corporate institutions.
In August 2013 the Mutati-led ZOOC came up with a $1
million budget to stage a successful Mopani Zambia Open
2014 Golf Tournament. Who would miss an opportunity
like this one to project their image? Many companies
came on board to support the event. By January 2014, over
$1million had been pledged with rehabilitation works being
accomplished at astronomical speed. By the beginning of
April 2014, almost all the pledges had been received and
rehabilitation works had been completed. Nkana Golf
Club had seen a new light and was shining like a bride. On
7th April 2014 Sunshine Tour declared Nkana Golf Club
ready to host the Zambia Open 2014.
What a journey! Maybe it wont be a bad idea to bid for the
2015 Zambia Open, after all!
Enjoy the games

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20 May/June 2014 Zambian Traveller

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21

Mopani Gives nkana Golf


Club a new bReaTh of life

Nkana Golf Club is glad to welcome all participating golfers to the Mopani Copper Mines Zambia
Open 2014 that runs from 12th to 18th May 2014. The Club has been given a new face after
undergoing massive rehabilitation to bring it to international standards as it plays host to one
of the continents sports showpieces. Tribute to Mopani Copper Mines Plc and its partners for
undertaking the restoration works. The Club is now a marvel to behold.
This is one of the best course layouts I have seen in the last six years. The Zambia Open Organising
Committee has done a great job in terms of all the preparations and I have no doubt that the Mopani Copper Mines Zambia Open
is going to be one of the best tournaments we have ever hosted, said Dan Zwiebel, Sunshine Tour Tournament Director, after
inspecting the Nkana Golf Club in April 2014.

The Course

A brand new 1st Floor VIP Deck has been constructed. The Deck provides an excellent vantage point to watch
the action on the 9th and 18th greens.

The Golf Club kitchen was officially opened in October 2013 after undergoing complete overhaul. It is fully
operational and is attracting a regular clientele. It offers a variety of meals during and outside golf days for both
family and individual visitors.

Following installation of fully automated irrigation system and application of course remedies, the greens, tees,
fairways and the course are growing well and regular mowing is being done with the help of newly acquired course
maintenance equipment. This is providing good definition of the greens, fairways, the short and long roughs. The
bankers are now in an excellent playable status following replacement of tailings sand with good white river sand.

The locker and shower rooms have been upgraded and ready for use.

There are remarkable changes on the course


between July 2013 and April 2014
July 2013

April 2014

New Tee Box Markers have been installed around the course. These have added beauty to the Tees.

The Club House

The driving range is scheduled for


complete overhaul with plans to introduce a junior golf academy. This
will come with construction of such
infrastructure as ablution, kiosk and
ball dispensing and teaching rooms.
A golf course expert has also been
engaged to maintain the course.

The patio has been re-laid with beautifully coloured pavers to provide a uniformly leveled floor space for hosting various
outdoor functions. It is an incredible spot for viewing play onto the 18th hole while enjoying a bite or a drink.

The Club House has been given a complete new look. The VIP, Main and Members Bars have been upgraded.

The road to the Golf Club used to be a source of concern for many visitors. This is no longer the case following
tarring of the road and car park. The massive infrastructure upgrade undertaken at Nkana Golf Club is owed to
the unwavering support of many partners who have generously contributed to the works.
The Club is duly grateful to all the sponsors.
22 May/June 2014 Zambian Traveller

Zambian Traveller May/June 2014

23

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Zambian Safari
By: Anthea Rowan

Flatdogs, Luangwa
dressed in camouflage green tell us everything he knows about Lilac
Breasted Rollers because weve paid fifty bucks a piece and havent
seen anything else. And because he wants to avoid a lilac breasted
roller drone, he tells Douglas, the moment he meets him, a leopard,
thats what we want to see, a leopard.

ur guide Douglas, regarding


husband and son pointedly,
says Hyenas belong to a
matriarchal society, says do
you know what that means?
Before they can pretend not to
hear him, or feign ignorance
(the gender power balance is
a delicate one in my family)
my eldest daughter proffers,
its where, she says, women
are the boss, and she hoots
with delight and high-fives her
younger sister, Yo man! Girl
power.
In that group, continues
Douglas, oblivious of the fact
that this is how fights start in my
family, and indicating the better
behaved family loping slopebacked towards the road, there
are a pair of twins. My teens
attention is recaptured. If they
are male and female, thats fine,
the female will merely assume
superiority. Eldest daughter
sneers down her nose at big

26 May/June 2014 Zambian Traveller

brother.
Douglas continues, if,
however, they are both female,
one sister will be obliged to kill
the other.Now its my sons turn
to laugh, he lets out a bellow
and slaps his thigh, I wish I was
a hyena, Id only have to put up
with one of you! he tells his two
briefly subdued sisters.
We are in the South
Luangwa National
Park, based at
Flatdogs, and we
are on a night drive,
a speciality peculiar
to the park. As such
we have employed
the services of long
suffering Douglas.
Long suffering
because we are
louder than the more
obliging American
tourists in other cars
and long suffering

because, being Africans, we


think we know it all already, so
he may be obliged to talk to
himself. We are going to take
a guide, I insist to husband,
because I am writing this up,
and a guide will tell us things
not even you know. Husband
looks bored. But not as bored
as he fears he might be if we
are forced to listen to somebody

His directive is not the tall order you might at first expect: the
Luangwa is supposed to host one of the continents densest
populations of these illusive cats, one every 2.5 km. And Douglas,
bless him, did find us one. Along with everybody else, when we
saw the young male, chest aquiver with butterflies of anxiety for all
the unwanted attention, we were amongst a dozen vehicles. In the
Luangwa, Douglas told us, we have a rule: only three vehicles per
animal at any one time, do you mind if we dont stay long, I dont
think the leopard is very happy. His sensitivity impressed husband
far more than the sighting.
South Luangwa National Park in eastern Zambia, skims the border
with Malawi and is the southernmost of three national parks in
the valley of the Luangwa River. It supports large populations of
Thornicrofts Giraffe, and herds of elephant and buffalo often several
hundred strong, while the river hosts abundant crocodiles and hippo.
It is one of the best-known national parks in Africa for walking safaris.
Founded as a game reserve in 1938 - it became a national park
in 1972 and covers 9,050 km (we ought surely to have seen more
than a single leopard then, Douglas?) - its name will forever be
synonymous with that of its founder, Norman Carr who was the first
person to recognise the value of shooting game through a lens and
not down a barrel.

The leopard wasnt very happy

After serving as an officer with the Kings African Rifles in North


Africa during the Second World War, African born Carr returned
to what was then Rhodesia with a new idea - perhaps it would be
possible for local people to profit out of protecting, rather than

27

Zambian Safari
from page 27

killing, the game. He realised that to make such a


scheme work, they must benefit directly. He spoke
to Chief Nsefu in the Northern Province, who was
disbelieving that visitors would actually want to pay
to watch animals in the wild but agreed to humour
the experiment all the same.
In 1950, having built six rondevaals, Carr brought
the first visitors in. Despite Chief Nsefus sceptism,
the guests did indeed shoot with cameras instead
of rifles and during the first year paid him and his
community the then substantial sum of 100 pounds
for the privilege. Eco-tourism in Africa was born.
Carrs legacy sustains in the camps he built in the
area and in the night drive were on, it was his
idea and he championed it. Im not sure, though,
that hed have approved. Today there are too
many vehicles toting tourists around in the dark
admittedly only until 8pm, a two hour extension
on the 6pm curfew so that you can see lines
of headlights trailing behind you and brake lights
piercing the night in front. Each car has a coguide with a handheld spotlight and these sear the
darkness and snag on bright, blinded eyes.
We did though, on account of the hour, see the
river exodus of hippo, their fat backs festooned
with water weed. Id wondered why Id seen
mounds of it deposited a long way from the banks.
Yes, says Douglas, its the hippo that transfer it,
it provides a juicy treat for smaller game who would
not dare venture into the water to feed on it.
Zambia, my home for a brief eight months and
described to me by a friend before I moved there

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28 May/June 2014 Zambian Traveller

Gwabi River Lodge, Lower Zambezi


as Kenya in a tupperware, is both tamer and
wilder than my familiar, native east Africa. Tamer
because its quieter, no matatus, no bodabodas,
no tuktuks, there are far fewer people occupying a
much bigger space: 30% of Kenyas population in
a country almost 50% bigger. Wilder because, as a
consequence, theres a great deal of unoccupied,
untapped open space. And there is a huge amount
of water. The Luangwa river, the mighty Zambezi,
the Kafue, Kariba
We managed whilstle-stops to all of them, or
traversed them as we travelled. The vast Luangwa
we cross on a huge suspension bridge midway
between Lusaka and Chipata, the in-the-rains
swollen Kafue a major tributary of the Zambezi, and
the longest 960 km - and largest river lying wholly
within Zambia and just a hour from the capital and
en route to the Falls, and Kariba and the mighty
Zambezi, the fourth longest river in Africa it snakes
its way through Zambia where it begins its 2,574
klms journey through Angola, along the eastern
border of Namibia and the northern border of
Botswana, then along the border
between Zambia and Zimbabwe to
Mozambique, where it makes its
way towards the Indian Ocean.
Aside from its impressive
proportions, the Zambezi is best
known for its staggering tipping
point at Victoria Falls, which are
considered the boundary between
the upper and middle Zambezi.
Below them the river continues to
flow towards Lake Kariba, created
in 1959 following the completion of
the Kariba Dam. The lake is one of
the largest man-made lakes in the
world, and the hydroelectric dam
controls 40% of the run off from
the Zambezi and provides power
to both Zambia and Zimbabwe.
Its one of the largest dams in the
world, standing 128 m tall and
579 m long and was built in the

71715 Multotec Iron Ore-Con ad_ZT.indd 1

2014/03/18 11:23 AM

Zambian Safari
from page 28

late fifties. 86 men lost their lives


during construction. Its name is
thought to be derived from the
corruption of the Shona word for
trap: Kariva.
The lakes blueness reaches
for miles, like an inland sea and
Siavonga, the little town on the
Zambian side of the lake, which
boasts a few hotels and the
opportunity to hire a houseboat,
is sweetly reminiscent of
something faintly Mediterranean.
We sat high up on the deck at
Kariba Inn and drank ice cold
cokes and then we persuaded
the border officials on the dam
wall to let us in just far enough
to see the staggering drop (You
can only go half way, they
sternly instructed, you cannot
enter Zimbabwe, you do not
have passports. Naturally we

heeded them).
Below Kariba, the river spills
into the Lower Zambezi which
snakes at a skinny 200m in
places then bellies to a broad
8 klm wetlands in others,
interlacing between islands
and reed banks. We spent our
final weekend in Zambia here,
in the Lower Zambezi basin,
right on the Zimbabwe border,
near Chirundu at Gwabi River
Lodge. Perched on the Kafue,
the lodge boat took us upstream
to where the river converges with
the Zambezi in a mighty spread
of water and from there we
explored the inlets and circled
islands. We watched hippo snort
indignantly and glower as if to
say, get lost you noisy buggers;
we saw crocs slither quicksilver
quick back into the water at our

approach; we watched the birds


and best of all we witnessed
elephant right on the bank
enjoying sundowners of their
own. At a fraction of the cost
of the night drive in Luangwa,
we agreed it was much better
value and far less invasive of
this spilling wilderness as we
chugged gently along watching
the sun settle and stain the sky
pink and distill the evening light
to the colour of whiskey as it slid
below a far away horizon.
The next morning, before
breakfast, the two keen
fishermen in our family
husband and eldest daughter
headed out for a spot of tiger
fishing. We caught dozens they
told us over excellent omelettes,
but we put them all back.
Pictures then? demanded son.

ShiwaNgandu Old House.


A digital camera was produced
and we bore witness to their
catch on a tiny screen.
Two weeks later and were
on the move, husband and
I driving home to Kenya. I
wanted one final fling, a night
at ShiwaNgandu in Zambias far
north, not far from the border
with Tanzania. Seduced by the
story of eccentric Englishman
Stuart Gore Brown and his
architectural folly as described in
Christina Lambs Africa House, I
had determined to visit long ago.
Shiwa gets its name from
the lake on the estate, fed by
five rivers, lake IshibaNgandu
means lake of the royal crocodile
in local Bemba. The house
itself, Shiwa House, was the
lifelong project of Sir Stuart who
embarked on the build in 1920.
Today his grandsons live on the
estate; one runs the big house
as a sort of seriously upmarket
bush home experience (for
seriously upmarket read too
expensive for us) I had to satisfy
my curiosity with a longing peer
towards the concealed gardens
from the gate house.

30 May/June 2014 Zambian Traveller

Instead though we continued


to the other grandsons lodge,
Kapishya Hot Springs on the
west of the estate is owned
and managed by Mark and Mel
Harvey. On a river that runs the
colour of tea so that you imagine
you might be in Ireland and not
Africa for its peaty colour, is a
small lodge with vast cottages.
Welcomed by Mark in a kikoy we
were advised to grab a couple
of cold beers from the bar and
head off to sit in the springs
and sluice off the days dust.
We did precisely that: in water
the colour of vodka and the
temperature of a good mug of
coffee, we marvelled at bubbling
sands that felt beneath our feet
as if the earth was breathing.
Over a fantastic dinner with a
table groaning under the weight
of home grown salads and
freshly made bread and bottled
homemade preserves, Mark
proved an excellent raconteur.
We were really sad not to have
made this particular trip with
our children; theyd have been
so entranced with the place,
the history, the Hot Springs,
they may even have forgotten to
fight?

31

Letters
PEX HYDRAULICS ZAMBIA

Dear Editor
Contribution of mines to Zambias economy
understated
It might be some combination of error, fluke and
clever selection of data, often published with eyecatching newspaper headlines that the contribution
being made by the mining sector to Zambias
sustained growth is inaccurately understated.
For example, the statistic that mines only pay
8% of all taxes paid in Zambia collapses under the
weight of contradictory data.
A glance at the Extractive Industries Transparency
International (EITI) data on Zambia would have
revealed that in 2010, Kansanshi Mine, a joint
venture between First Quantum Minerals (FQM
and Government of the Republic of Zambia (GRZ)
paid 10% of all taxes in Zambia (that is taxes from
all sectors of the economy, not just taxes from the
mining industry). In 2011, where tax collections
were distorted by the 2008 changes, Kansanshi
paid 22% of all Zambian taxes, representing 60%

Part of the Pex Group

of mining taxes. In 2012, Kansanshi paid 15% of all


Zambian taxes, with the mining industry as a whole
contributing more than 20%.
In 2013, the mines paid 36% of all Zambian
taxes but that excludes the impact of smelting
and refining.
From the foregoing, it is apparent that a
significant number of statements about the
contribution of the mines to Zambias growth are
wrong. Therefore, one would make a passionate
appeal to the local chapter of EITI, Zambia
Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (ZEITI)
to ensure that accurate and reliable data influences
a fact-based debate.

PEX Hydraulics (Z) Ltd was established in 2001 with its head office being based in Cape Town South Africa
and has over seven branches in Southern Africa. Pex hydraulics Zambia enjoys a market share of about
65% having regained its prominence in the last nine years of its existence due to its expansion program
in reaching the other parts of Zambia.
Our prime objective is the local supply and remanufacture of hydraulic equipment according to
international standards for the mining, construction, agricultural and general industries. We have a
comprehensively equipped workshop with a hard chroming plant and the necessary machinery to effect
full overhauls of hydraulic equipment on our premises.
Our core business is the remanufacturing, sourcing and supplying all hydraulic components including
Hoses & Fittings.
We have an in house chroming facility and fully equipped engineering workshop

Curious researcher
UNZA, Lusaka

The views expressed by letter writers is not necessary the view of the editor.

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E: logistics@hdcargo.co.zm

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T: +263-4-757721 / 629 / 860
F: +263-4-757658
E: logistics@hdcargo.co.zw

www.hill-delamain.co.zm

32 May/June 2014 Zambian Traveller

KITWE - WORKSHOP

Stand No. 4668


Independence Avenue
Heavy Industrial Sites
P O Box 21798
Kitwe
Tel:
+260 212 21 0292
+260 212 21 0402
Fax: +260 212 21 0293
E-mail- pexzam@microlink.zm

NDOLA OFFICE

SOLWEZI BRANCH

Tel:

Tel:

Stand No
Vitanda Street
Industrial Area
Ndola

+260 212 61 2942


+260 966 65 2795
Fax: +260 212 61 2942
pexndola@bringcom.zm

Stand No 1836
Chingola Road
Mitec Area
Solwezi

+260 218 82 1377


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Fax: +260 218 82 1744
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HOTEL OVERVIEW

ACCOMODATION

Moba Hotel and Convention Centre is an ecofriendly hotel which is situated at the gateway
to Kitwe City in Copper belt province.
Away from jungle of vertical buildings, at
Moba Hotel you are checking into Nature,
this Haven is surrounded by the lush green
lawns with a nine and a half acre landscaped
under the azure blue sky of Ndola Kitwe
dual carriage highway. It is 5 mins drive from
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on land that slopes gently towards the Kafue
River overlooking the country side.

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ideal for large conferences, annual general
meeting etc.. It offers an array of 50wellappointed guest rooms each equipped with
TV, telephone, internet connectivity, channel
music, mini bar, tea/coffee maker, electronic
safe and individual temperature controls, a
doctor on call, laundry services to ensure that
the guest is comfortable and experiencing
hospitality at best.
The Hotel was officially opened on 27th
January 2011 by the Zambia Republican
President Honourable Rupiah Banda.

Organic African famed restaurant


serves a wide variety of Locale

& international cuisine.
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Whether you choose our Twin room, Deluxe


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Largest Convention facilities in the cop


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Meeting/Board rooms from 10 pax to
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Central relaxing lounge / coffee bar
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All rooms are equipped with Electronic key
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Tel: +260 212 251 135 | +260 965 251 136
Email:
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| info@mobahotel.com | www.mobahotel.com
Zambian
Traveller
34 May/June 2014

35

David Lemon to resume Zambezi Cowbell Trek


By Gethsemane Mwizabi
written for the River People of Zambia, he said.He also written a bit
about his own trials and tribulations along the way, but in general he
has stuck with the people and the countryside he passed through
along the Zambezi.
Food will once again be a big problem as he has not been able
to find a suitable compound to sustain him. He will need to carry
everything on his back, and live off the land where possible, but he
is fairly resigned to losing a lot of weight again. It is a worry, but he
feels strong enough to survive it yet again. I am learning Portuguese
for this one as I dont think too many of the folk I will be walking
along. In some ways, that makes it all the more exciting. I dont know
Mozambique at all, so it will be an exciting challenge, he said.
He is aware that the remaining half of his journey would even be
tougher as the terrain in Mozambique will be rough to any visiting
stranger. During part one of his journey, he did see a few elephants,
and made contact with the people at Lilayi Elephant Orphanage
outside Lusaka, as well as those from Conservation Lower Zambezi.

David Lemons
new book
A valley where David crossed the Zambezi during his first journey

avid Howard Lemon, who many in 2012


referred to as the modern day David
Livingstone (legendary Scottish explorer and
missionary), plans to resume part two of his
famous Zambezi Cowbell Trek on April 18th, 2014.
After 15 months of resting, the British
Zimbabwean, explorer and writer is geared for the
next leg of his journey that would make him walk
the Zambezi River from Siavonga, a resort town
on the banks of Lake Kariba where he left off,
to Chinde, Mozambique, where the famous river
pours into the Indian Ocean.
At the age of 67, adventurer David Lemon
decided to do something which he had never
been done before so he decided to walk the entire
length of the Zambezi River from its source at
Ikelengi, in Zambias North Western Province.
After eight months, 1,838 kilometres walk and
weight loss, he was forced to suspend his mission
and thus, returned to the England break.
At the start of his ambitious trek, a man who was
weighing 93kg he lost 26kg of that weight.Now
he is back to 90 kg and fired-up and ready to go
and make history. I am getting myself geared up
for part two of the trek. I know exactly what I am
letting myself in for this time, so hopefully I will be
in better shape mentally, he said from his base in

36 May/June 2014 Zambian Traveller

England. With 1000km or so to go, it would not be


as far as part one, which covered 1800km but he
still has some fearsome countryside to negotiate.
David Lemon, has always been a busy a man.
It is no surprise that during his break, he has
managed to achieve something incredible. He has
authored a book Cowbells Down the Zambezi,
which has been receiving favourable response
internationally. Several people have been keen to
follow his story, which in itself is breath taking,
as no man in recorded history has walked the
Zambezi River. While not diverting from primary
passion of highlighting the plight of elephants in
Southern Africa, he would like to make history as
well. It took him some six months to write the book
and despite no marketing thus far, early sales have
been very good. His book is about the people that
he met along the way. One such are the people
of the valley, The BaTonga, who are people that
are part of the Buntu ethnic group, related to the
Tokaleya, they call themselves the Bantu Botatwe,
a three tribe people. They are thought to have
lived in the region since at least 1100 AD.

Part two of his journey planned to start from Siavonga on Easter


Saturday and there members of the public would be invited to
accompany him over the first 36 kilometres on condition that they
make a donation to the Elephant orphanage at Lilayi, Lusaka.
Reflecting on his upcoming journey, he said . I will take each day
as it comes and try to enjoy every moment of what might be my last
adventure. The adventure bug still draws me back for one last little
fling. After suspending his journey he remarked I think I would have
died if I had carried on from Siavonga, he said.
True, when, he embarked of historical journey back in April of
2012, he did not foresee some of the challenges faced especially in
the Zambezi escarpment where temperatures sometime reach 44s
Celsius. He could not escape the heat, his shoes got worn, and his
body became weary.

The book, Cowbells Down the Zambezi is


primarily about the people I met along the way and
how they took me into their hearts and homes.
Everyone tried so hard to help and the book is

Zambian Traveller May/June 2014

37

STRATEGIC
PARTNERS

David Lemon to resume Zambezi Cowbell Trek


from page 37

Zambia that we probably would not have seen any other way. We
have watched our adventurer lose a great deal of weight, while
seemingly growing stronger by the day, he said. There is no doubt,
that Davids efforts has and is a huge boost for Zambian tourism.
The wonders of the Victoria Falls are known around the world, but
there remain many hidden gems such as the Mongu River Market
and the Sioma Ngonye Falls that are now featured in this book. He
is very much an Elephant man and it is with pride and excitement
that Cowbell is giving support to his attempts to show the world
what is happening to Africas elephants.

Part two of trek would coincide with a music


festival at Eagles Rest resort, Savionga, which
would lodge him, like before in his previous
leg. Eagle Rest has been very supportive of
Mr Lemon, by offering him accommodation
when he suspended his journey last year. His
sponsors, Promasidor, maker of Cowbell part of
his nutritional diet, are happy that the 68 year old,
has shaped-up for yet another epic journey. Andy
Taylor, Promasidor Zambia managing director
sponsors of his epic journey is right to put it;
probably the best part of the adventure was our
resupply efforts.

Lemon has thought long and hard about part two, but he does
not think there is anything he could do differently. Beside his latest
book, he has also done a bit of publicity about his Zambezi Cowbell
Trek in Britain. Bearing in mind that Britain is home to a number of
far more famous and worthy adventurers than himself, he has not
tried to seek publicity in his country. He had a short piece printed in
The Oldie magazine a publication aimed at the elderly and has
given a couple of radio interviews. I have also given a couple of
talks on the walk and have a Zambezi Evening scheduled locally on
21st February, mainly to raise a bit of money for part two. Perhaps
when it is all over, I will make more of an effort to publicise what
has been accomplished. he said.

This took the team to many wonderful parts of

At the moment, the 68 year old is trying to have a piece accepted


on one particular orphan elephant at Lilayi, in Lusaka. He is proud
and thankful of his wife who has been supportive of what she
deems little adventures. I think she realises that they are just part
of me and how I am. If I didnt go off on these little jaunts, I would
be completely unbearable at home, so she seems quite content to
let me go off and enjoy myself, he said.
No doubt, Mozambique will be very hard and he still has a
problem of carrying food. He will cut down as much as he can
on the weight he would carry. He needs at least ten weeks worth
of food at a time which weighs a lot. Cowbell would not be able
to resupply him in Mozambique, so he is the process of trying to
organise people along the way who might be able to help.

Advert15110114

The author with David at the source of the Zambezi

He had to make a decision suspend the


expedition to save his body, which had become so
tired after walking such a long distance following
the Zambezi. He lost three of his cameras and
had fallen several times in the valley. For a man
like Lemon, these sorts of adventures are very
much off the cuff. The current security situation
in Mozambique is a bit of a worry, to him but he
would look on it as just another hazard to be
negotiated.

Born and bred right here - Bell is


Africas very own global equipment
supplier. With support from our
strategic partners we deliver a full
range of premium machines. All built
tough for our harsh environment.
All supported by Africas most
comprehensive network of people
dedicated to your success.
Best of all, while you are creating
infrastructure and jobs, so are we.
Choose Bell as your equipment
partner and enjoy the pride of
knowing youre not just boosting
your business but helping make
Africa a better place too.
Tel: +27 (0)11 928 9700
E-mail: sales@bell.co.za
www.bellequipment.com

Promasidor Zambia Managing director Andy Taylor


holding Davids new book

38 May/June 2014 Zambian Traveller

David during his last expedition


Zambian Traveller May/June 2014

39

THE GREAT WALL OF CHINA


Dan Boylan explores Chinas vast, ancient and fascinating defense system.

ike some giant meandering serpent,


wending its way 7,300km across the
hills of northern China, The Great Wall
has become one of the worlds greatest
human achievements.

were buried upright in the walls interior... to ward off evil


spirits! Eventually, the wall would be sub-divided into 9
separate zones with its own regional commander and
armed brigade. It is referred to as the eighth wonder of
the world.

A massive defensive work,


constructed from stone, granite, brick,
slate and huge rammed-earth blocks,
the wall still protects Chinas northern
flank. It grew from modest beginnings
into a complex and advanced defense
works which included an arterial
highway, a communications system, a
series of administration centres and a
network of border posts and customs
houses.

History records that insurgents and raiders from


neighbouring states preyed on adjacent, wealthier lands
and that during the 7th century BC, the rulers of the kingstates of northern China ordered a series of defensive
walls to be constructed.
Between the 4th & 6th centuries, the numerous
structures were improved, added to and strengthened. In
221BC the new Emperor Qin Shih huang-ti (who would
be protected in the after-life with a fabulous 6,000 strong
army of terra-cotta warriors) finally unified all the outlying
Chinese provinces and became Emperor of all China.

Constructed to an almost uniform


design, mainly of dressed stone, it is 10m high and
4-5m wide at the base and tapers slightly inwards to be
capped with a flag-stone road. The insides are filled and
strengthened with rubble and sand and the top finished
on both sides with 1 metre high, castellated edges to
protect archers and prevent riders and footmen from
falling over.

torturous 5,000km journey across the Taklimakan desert,


to Samarkand, Kashgar and eventually, the ports of the
eastern Mediterranean.

At strategic points, road sections and trade routes, the


planners built forts 20m high with parapets and overhanging battlements to protect the heavy wooden gates.
On the walls ramparts, were stone niches for defenders
to slip into, then emerge and attack passing invaders
from the rear. Inside were barracks, stables, armouries
and accommodation and offices for military staff, border
officials and passing state dignitaries. The defenders
devised elaborate signalling equipment including
beacons, semaphore, heliograph and smoke signals
to summon archers and cavalry to support attacks on
neighbouring strong holds.

Spread across a huge dusty area, the fortress town


has protected Chinas east flank and guarded the battle
scarred road to Manchuria for centuries. A garrison town,
it once housed small armies and grew into a square
stronghold with four entrance gates at the compass
points and twin, criss-cross thoroughfares running
between them.

At the walls western extent, in a broad pass between


the Qilian and Black mountains, lies the fortified gate of
Jianuguan (impregnable defile under heaven). A stone wall
castle, it was built in 1372 and is 730m in circumference.
At the western (outer and exposed) edge is the Gate
of Conciliation and on the opposite wall the Gate of
Enlightenment. Each gate, 150m apart, is protected by a
tall stone tower, topped with a covered roof with classic
upturned, flying eaves. Between each entrance are horse
ramps leading up to the ramparts, and at each corner, a
blockhouse with watchtowers and turrets for spearmen
and archers. Within the castles confines are a huge
pavilion, an ornate temple and an open air theatre. To its
west lies a vast wilderness and desolation, to the east,
the fertile plains of order and civilisation.
The pass was the last bastion of civilisation that westbound caravanners saw as they embarked on the trek
across the legendary Silk road. Before them lay a

40 May/June 2014 Zambian Traveller

Eastwards, across 5,000km of undulating landscape,


the wall cascades out of the mountains and across
the coastal plain to meet the charming walled city of
Shanhaiguan, and the walls eastern extent.

The city was the scene of numerous bloody battles and


skirmishes and has a colourful and chequered history.
The east gate is a superb stone structure, crowned with
a double storey tower and a pitched, upturned roof. It
was built in 1639 and an inscription on the outer wall
reads, First pass under heaven. It reflected the Chinese
belief that the world was, and is, divided between a
civilised empire and beyond, the disorderly chaos of the
barbarians.
A short walk to the east, where the wall meets the
ocean, is Old Dragons Head, where for centuries, a giant,
dragon head sculpture, looked out to sea and protected
the superstitious soldiers and townsfolk from demons, evil
spirits and attacks from sea-borne enemies.
Such was the builders intention to protect the nation,
that beyond the waters edge, they suspended fine
mesh nets far out to sea. No-one, it seems, human or
otherwise, would enter the empire illegally.
The walls construction required an army of architects
and masons and millions of peasants, soldiers, convicts,
land-workers and serfs to carry the endless materials
over the hill sides and valleys. Those who died on site,

His empire stretched for thousands of kilometres in all


directions and covered an area of 9.5 millions sq km. To
the north west lay Tibet and the Himalayas, to the south
east, the broad Mekong River and to the south and east,
the China Seas.
2,000 years ago, China was already the most advanced
and learned nation in the world. She had a monetary
system, a written script, a national set of weights and
measures and an education structure, which taught
medicine, astronomy, art and science. She had a
diplomatic corps and political and administrative system
which would still be in operation in the early 19th century.
Only her northern borders were exposed to attack from
nomads and barbarians and as the empire developed in
wealth and technology, so she became an even greater
target for brigands and opportunists. Qin (from whom we
get the word China) ordered the removal of all earlier
dividing fortifications and sent General Meng Tien to
arrange an army to guard the northern border. He further
ordered him to link the existing wall segments into a
protective barrier 10,000 Li (2 Li=1km), long, from Shuiteng in the west, to lake Luo-pu in the east. A project
which would last over 20 years. He ordered 25,000 watch
towers and parapets wide enough to allow 5 horsemen to
ride side by side.
Yet the main reason for the construction of the wall,
which has grown in importance to represent a symbol
of Chinese independence, achievement and greatness,
is surrounded in mystery, misconception and intrigue.
Scholars of oriental studies claim the wall was erected
more to keep the border-folk in as it was to keep
undesirables out. It also created a division between
the desert and an ordered civilisation and to provide a
physical barrier separating an advanced society and the
demons who lay beyond. Those within the sheltered
protection felt safe, whilst those outside were exposed to
all manner of dangers, real and imaginary. Subjects who

displeased the emperor were banished, for ever, through


the vast gates and into the fearful wilderness.
The fort at Jiayuguan, (meaning beyond the gates of
heaven), lay on the edge of the great Gobi desert and
became a recognised point of exit. The portals and
wooden gate would be plastered with banishment
orders. The locals called it the Gate of sighs.
Outcasts knew that should they survive the desert and
the fierce Mongol nomads, then they would surely suffer
the torments and haunts of the spirits of a thousand
demons which dwelt outside the holy kingdom. Their
fate would be an eternal journey of evil torments and the
probability of a thousand barbarian reincarnations.
The scattered tribes of northern nomads posed no
major threat to China and were easily controlled by the
establishment of a series of cavalry forts. When Ghengis
Khans hordes descended out of Mongolia in the 13th
century, the wall proved to be an easy obstacle and China
was finally conquered.
Chinese dynasties would come and go over the
following centuries, some strong and durable, others
weak and short lived. Some came from within the empire
and others from foreign lands. Yet, without exception,
they all made some effort to restore and/or rebuild the
wall, which today is protected as a UNESCO Heritage
site.
Perhaps the early Chinese thought its presence made
the nation safe from attack or from the infiltration of
demons, evil spirits or from a great unknown danger. The
fears live on.
And China ... moody, mysterious and magnificent,
colourful, timeless and immense. Land of Emperors,
powerful dynasties, ancient civilisations, learning and the
worlds largest and longest construction project.
Zambian Traveller May/June 2014

41

The Statue of Liberty


A U.S. travelogue by Dan Boylan
Towering majestically above the waves at the entrance to New York Harbour is a world
famous figure which is perhaps the symbol of American freedom.
She was a gift from France to
the United States as a token of
mutual friendship and designed by
Frederic A. Bartholdi (1834-1904)
who conceived the idea as his ship
sailed into New York during a visit.
He had a vision of a woman holding
a torch and welcoming sea-borne
immigrants to a new life in the new
world. When he returned to France,
Bartholdi contacted Gustave Eiffel (of
Eiffel Tower fame) and told him of his
idea. Eiffel designed the structure
and the two submitted the idea and
the plan to the French government.
The scheme was approved and Eiffel
built the statue, dismantled it and
had it shipped to America. The frame
work is made of iron which is covered
in hundreds of copper sheets, except
for the flame of the torch, which
is coated in gold leaf. The statue
measures 151 1 (46.5 m) high, and
stands on a stone foundation, itself
154 feet (46.9 m) tall.

or the millions who arrived in


New York by sea, the magnificent
Statue of Liberty greeted them like
a welcoming Goddess. She depicts
a woman escaping the chains of
tyranny, which lie at her feet. In
her extended right hand she holds
above her head a burning torch
that represents freedom. In her left
hand she holds a tablet inscribed in
Roman numerals with the date July
4 1776 the day the United States
declared its independence. She
wears flowing robes and a spiked
crown which symbolise the seven
seas and continents. She towers 93m
above the waterline at the entrance
to New York harbour and is visible
from far out at sea. By day she is a
breathtaking sight, at night, she is
illuminated, inside and out and is a
stunning display against the glittering
NYC skyline.

42 May/June 2014 Zambian Traveller

The statue was erected in 1886


on Liberty Island in the mouth of the
Hudson River in New York harbour
and has long been a welcoming sight
to all sea borne visitors, immigrants
and returning Americans.
The statue was formerly known as
Liberty Enlightening the World. Its
construction is said to have taken
hundreds of engineers, metal workers
and copper-beaters 9 years to
complete. In 1884 the 350 parts were
numbered, dismantled, packed into
214 crates and shipped across the
Atlantic to New York. The structure
was reconstructed on Bedloe Island,
later renamed Liberty Island, in New
York harbour. Bartholdi realised this
was where the new arrivals would
crowd the decks of their ships to get
their first view of the New World as
they sailed into the harbour.
The monument is open daily to
visitors and is divided into three
parts: base, pedestal, and statue.
The base, an 11-pointed star, is part
of an old fort and is entered via a

tunnel which connects to the lower


elevator floor. There is an elevator or
stairway option to ascend 10 storeys
to the top of the pedestal. Then, a 12
storey spiral staircase leads from the
top of the pedestal to the head of the
statue. There, they can step onto a
balcony and enjoy the stunning views
of the harbour.
At the top of the stairway is an
observation platform within the
statues head, 260 feet above
sea level and large enough to
accommodate 30 people. Visitors
look through the 25 windows, which
are the jewels of the crown and look
down and see the tablet in Libertys
left hand. Her right arm, which holds
the torch aloft , has been closed to
the public for some years. She is as
splendid and elegant as the day she
was erected and a lasting tribute to
those who conceived, designed and
created her. The Statue is a stopping
off point for visitors and tourists and
she is the subject of a million camera
clicks each year.
Mounted on the base is a bronze
plaque which bears the inscription
written by Emma Lazarus in 1883, an
appropriate welcome to the millions
of ship borne immigrants entering the
new world:
Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to
breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your
teeming shore,
Send these, the homeless, tempesttost to me,
I lift my lamp beside the golden
door.
This is a superb piece of
imagination and sculpture from an
age before computers, power tools
and overhead cranes. An elegant
green giantess standing guard and
bidding welcome to those who arrive
by sea. A gigantic symbol of freedom
and liberty and a fabulous work of
art.
Zambian Traveller May/June 2014

43

Southern Ground Hornbill


(Bucorvus leadbeateri)
Southern ground hornbills are large, with adults
from 90 to 130cm tall and weighing from 2.5 to
4.6 kg. The female has a small violet-blue throat
patch with extensive red neck pouches. Juveniles
are sooty brown with dull yellowish face and
throat.
They require a savanna habitat with large
trees for nesting and dense but short grass for
foraging where they feed on reptiles, frogs,
snails, insects and mammals up to the size of
hares. They live in groups of 5 to 10 individuals
including adults and juveniles. Their range and
numbers have decreased substantially during the
20th century and they are now mainly confined
to large reserves.
Southern Ground Hornbill groups are very
vocal, contact is made by calls in chorus which
can usually be heard at distances of up to
3 kilometres. The calls allow each group to
maintain its territories, which must be as large as
100 square kilometres.
It is an obligate cooperative breeder, with each
breeding pair always assisted by at least two
other birds. The period of parental dependence
following a 40 to 45-day incubation period and
an 85-day fledging period is between one and
two years depending on climatic conditions

before young are independent of parents and


helpers. This is the longest of any bird and
means that ground hornbills can normally breed
successfully only every third year. Triennial
breeding is extremely rare in birds.
In captivity a maximum lifespan of 70 years has
been recorded, and it is generally believed that
the life expectancy of a bird that survives long
enough to fledge is as high as thirty years or
more.

All Rooms Have:


Free Broadband Wi-Fi Internet
Air Conditioning
Digital Satellite TV
CofFee Making Facilities
24 Hour Security
24 Hour Free Guarded Car Park

Obote Avenue PO Box 21800 Kitwe Zambia


Tel: +260 212 222444 e-mail: reservations@edinburgh.co.zm
Fax: +260 212 225036 Website: www.edinburgh.co.zm

44 May/June 2014 Zambian Traveller

Zambian Traveller May/June 2014

45

Sources:
Financial Mail Business Day
Financial Times

Last
Price

52 Week 52 Week
High
Low

Yield

P/E

USA/Canada
Canada (Can $)
Anvil (US$) AVLMF:PNK
EquinoxGold Corp (CA$) ABX:TOR 20.14
Barrick

27.69

14.22

1.11%

France(Euro)
(Euro)
France
Lafarge Cement
CementSA
SA LG:PAR
Total SA
SA FP:PAR

65.06
48.07

67.54
48.83

45.00
35.18

1.52%
4.89%

34.18
12.91

SouthAfrica
Africa
(Rand)
South
(Rand)
ABSA Bank
Barclays
Africa Group BGA:JNB 154.80
A.E.C.I. AFE:JNB
A.E.C.I.
124.30
Afrox AFX:JNB
21.16
Anglogold/Ashanti ANG:JNB 187.37
Anglogold/Ashanti
Barloworld BAW:JNB
Barloworld
113.78
Bell Equipment
Equipment BEL:JNB
18.00
Illovo Sugar
Sugar ILV:JNB
27.70
Metorex Bank Group SBK:JNB 142.14
Standard
Standard
Bank SUI:JNB
Sun
International
99.99

155.34
132.80
26.80
209.52
115.78
28.50
39.52
142.49
114.27

122.07
93.48
17.98
114.01
74.94
17.25
25.00
103.16
86.50

4.56%
2.07%
2.11%
2.19%
2.17%
3.03%
3.24%
2.09%

12.32
15.76
26.04
14.16
9.73
12.69
13.08
14.79

Sweden (Kroner)
Sweden
Atlas
Copco (Kroner)
AB ATCO A:STO
Atlas Copco
Sandvik
AB SAND:STO
Sandvik
SKF
INC SKF B-STO

191.60
91.75
167.40

194.10
99.95
185.50

154.30
78.10
148.40

2.01%
2.68%
2.28%

19.24
22.85
84.12

15.52
8.60
2.37
19.18
4.80
10.74
3.14
28.38
33.61
12.80
9.17
-

17.18
10.60
3.12
20.32
5.10
13.10
3.86
35.80
36.83
17.07
13.52
-

11.95
7.33
2.27
16.44
4.26
8.84
2.26
24.98
25.79
11.76
7.48
-

3.36%
6.40%
2.56%
3.73%
4.71%
0.93%
3.55%
4.03%
3.92%
-

21.10
11.46
6.57
15.43
28.10
12.76
-

Sun International

SKF AB

UK (/pence)
UK (/pence)
Anglo
American AAL:LSE
Anglo American
Antofagasta
ANTO:LSE
Antofagasta
Barclays
Bank BARC:LSE
Barklays
BankBLT:LSE
BHP
Billiton
BHP
Billiton
B.P
. BP:LSE
B.P. Quantum Minerals FQM:LSE
First
First Quantum
Lonmin
LMI:LSE Minerals
Lonmin
Rio Tinto RIO:LSE
Rio Tinto SAB:LSE
SABMiller
SABMillarChartered STAN:LSE
Standard
StandardResources
Chartered Bank
Vedanta
VED:LSE
VedantaXTA:LSE
Resources
Xtrata
Xtrata

COMMODITIES

EQUITIES

AS OF 7 APRIL 2014
Cash

3 Mths

Prev

Copper
US$/ ton

6610

6615

6745

Copper
Rands /ton

69140

69192

72252

Lead
US$/ ton

2020

2040

2052

Nickel
US$/ ton

16460

16500

15735

Zinc
US$/ ton

1985

1992

1852

Gold
US$/ oz

1311

1324

1437

1384

Cobalt Cath. 29200


US$/ ton

29500

29200

Brent Crude 106.35


US$/ Brl

107.80

Platinum
US$/ oz

AS OF 7 APRIL 2014
1Zambian
US Dollar
= 6.15
Kwacha
/ USZambian
Dollar Kwacha
1Zambian
UK Pound
= 10.27
Zambian Kwacha
Kwacha
/ UK Pound
1Zambian
Euro =Kwacha
8.47 Zambian
/ Euro Kwacha

1Zambian
SA RandKwacha
= 0.58
Zambian
Kwacha
SARand
Rand Kwacha
Zambian
/ /SA
1SA
=Dollar
10.46 SA Rand
SAUSRand
R Dollar
and // US
US
Dollar

1SAUKRRand
Pound
17.49 SA Rand
Pound
and
/ UK=Pound
1USUKDollar
Pound
=Pound
1.67 US Dollar
UK
Pound
Dollar
// UK

Information
is is
entirely
at the
riskrisk
of the
reader.
Information on
on this
this page
page isis from
fromsources
sourcesconsidered
consideredtotobe
bereliable.
reliable.The
Thepublishers
publishersdodonot
notguarantee
guaranteeitsitsaccuracy
accuracynornocompleteness
completenessand
andany
anyreliance
relianceplaced
placedononthetheaccuracy
accuracyof ofthisthisinformation
information
entirely
at the
of the
reader

46 May/June 2014 Zambian Traveller

Zambian Traveller May/June 2014

47

CROSSWORD & SUDOKU


SOLUTIONS

from page 16

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General Knowledge
Quiz answers
from page 16
1. New Orleans.
2. Nixon.
3 Nurses.
4. Nancy Astor.
5. Noel Coward.
6. Vanilla Ice.
7. Netherlands.
8. Nixon.
9. Nancy
10. New York.

11. Nicaragua.
12. Navratilova.
13. Nelson Mandela.
14. Nuclear Missiles.
15. Noah.
16. New York
Philharmonic.
17. Nanny.
18. Napoleon.

pictures
Narwhal

The narwhal whale is unique among whale species and has a


long ivory tusk that extends from the upper left side of its jaw.
The tusks measure 2 to 3 metres in length.
The average weight of a narwhal is 1.5 tons and can reach a
ton. They grow from 4 to 6 metres in length. Narwhals use their
forehead to feel sound waves and hear each other.
Their squeals or whistles can make humans deaf.
Narwhals use their tusks jousting weapons when they are
courting and also when they want to display their dominance.
Their lifespan is up to 50 years old.

1.

2.

A NARWHAL


3.
4.


48 May/June 2014 Zambian Traveller

Nkana Golf Club

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Mopani Copper Mines


brings ZAMBIA OPEN 2014 to Kitwe

opani Copper Mines Plc and Nkana Golf Club, in conjunction with other
business partners, are delighted to bring to the Mining City of Kitwe the
Richest-ever Mopani Copper Mines Zambia Open 2014 Golf Tournament.
This is also among the richest tournaments on the Sunshine Tour calendar.
Date

12th to 18th May 2014

Venue

Nkana Golf Club

This is the Biggest event of the century for the City of Kitwe and has already attracted the largest number of Professional Golfers from around the world since
inception of the Zambia Open, with over 156 professionals having entered.
Special offers during the event will include tantalizing world class food and drinks
at fantastic prices from the newly refurbished state-of-the-art Nkana Golf Club
restaurant that is providing a unique dining experience for golfers and non-golfers.
Spectators will be provided with a marvellous viewing experience from strategically positioned terraces around the course with a wide variety of entertainment
including live music from renowned musicians.
Also available will be a Park and Ride service to transport spectators from Diggers
Rugby Club to the Nkana Golf Club at NO charge. A fee of K10 per person will
be charged at the gate.
For business pleasure there will be a Sponsors Expo to give visitors an opportunity
to sample some exceptional products offered by various sponsors of the Mopani
Copper Mines Zambia Open 2014.
The Open will be preceded by two Pro-Ams with more than 160 golfers, including
many on the top 20 order of merit, taking part in the Open Proper.
The event comes with an investment of over $2million in the refurbishment of the
course and club facilities and an events budget of over $1 million which has since
been pledged by various sponsors.
Come and be part of the adventure.

For enquiries call:

+260 962 555 009 or +260 971 255 804


Website: www.zooc2014.co.zm or www.nkanagolfclub.co.zm

M O PA N I