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Indonesia

Solid Waste Management Improvement Project for Regional and Metropolitan Cities
(P127134)
English Summary Sheet for the Bahasa Indonesia Environmental Impact Assessment
Report
City of Tangerang Landfill - TPA Rawa Kucing
Background
1. The attached report is the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) for the City of Tangerangs
Landfill. The landfill known as TPA Rawa Kucing is the citys only landfill, which is simply a
dumpsite, inappropriately lies approximately less than 2km from one of the runaways at Soekarno-
Hatta International Airport. The site started operation in 1993, and has a total surface area of 34.8
hectares

2. The EIA report was prepared by the City of Tangerang in 2012 and approved by the national
environmental agency in November 7, 2013.

3. TPA Rawa Kucing is one of the project sites for the Indonesia Solid Waste Management
Improvement Project for Regional and Metropolitan Cities (the project, P127134) and the attached EIA
Report provides initial baseline and critical design information for this site. Therefore, the attached EIA
report is one of the documents in a package of safeguards documents, used to appraise the project.

4. The attached EIA report covers the environmental impacts and the intended management practice
at the time the City was planning to rehabilitate TPA Rawa Kucing.

5. The main environmental concerns on TPA Rawa Kucing are: (i) levels of leachate treatment at
the landfills and the effluent is in non-compliance with the Indonesian wastewater discharge standards for
their respective receiving waters; (ii) possible groundwater pollution due to poor facilities design and
inadequate/lack of equipment (aerators, insufficient filter capacity, leaking pipes that discharge near a
stream at the landfill boundary rather than into the treatment works), improper solid waste and leachate
containment (e.g. no liner and drainage system), having poor site protection and achieving limited
treatment; and (iii) air pollution due to odor and to lack of proper landfill gas management system, thus,
enhancing GHGs generation during the decomposition of waste, which are released to the atmosphere.
Further, there are overall EH&S concerns at the transfer stations and intermediate treatment facilities for
operators, waste pickers and other citizens living in the vicinity, as there is lack of standard operating
procedures for the entire SWM system and no public awareness on EHS aspects (e.g., staff are not
wearing safety gear).

6. An Environmental Audit is being prepared to review the current status of TPA Rawa Kucing.

7. An Addendum to the attached EIA is also being prepared that will specifically address the project
related impacts and management plans.

8. A project wide Resettlement Policy Framework (RPF), site specific Social Assessments and site
specific Resettlement Action Plans (RAPs) are also being prepared also to specifically address the project
needs.
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E4365 V6

9. The full lists of documents in the safeguards package for the project are listed here in Table 1.0


Table 1 Summary of Safeguards Package of Documents

1
Attached to this summary sheet
Safeguards
Document

Balikpapan


Manado

Sekber
Kartamantul

Tangerang

1
Original Andal
(EA) produced
when landfill sites
were first developed
and the Revised
Andal



Addendum to EA
Report above



Environment Audit
Report






Revised and
Updated RKL and
RPL



Social Assessment
(SA)



Resettlement Policy
Framework
(RPF)



Livelihood
Restoration Plan
(LRP)



Livestock
Management Plan
(LMP)

- - -
Project Information

10. The Project Development Objective (PDO) is to support improvements to solid waste
management systems and services to residents, in the participating cities through selective interventions in
waste minimization, separation, treatment and disposal.

11. The direct beneficiaries would be the governments of the four cities, Balikpapan, Manado,
Tangerang and Sekber Kartamantul
2
that are participating in the project, particularly the agencies
responsible for solid waste management in each city

12. More broadly, the ultimate beneficiaries would be the residents of these cities who will receive
much improved solid waste services. These include the poor, in whose communities these facilities are
mostly hosted and who are often the ones working and earning a living from this sector.

13. The PDO will be achieved through the implementation of the following project components.

14. Component A: Improvements in Solid Waste Management Systems ($110m), these funds
would be on-granted to the participating municipalities and would finance the following sub-component
activities:

15. Sub-Component A1 - Landfill Sites - the re-engineering to optimize disposal and/or
rehabilitation and/or closure of existing landfill/disposal sites, construction of new state of the art sanitary
landfill cells within the existing landfill area (equipped with leachate treatment plants, heavy equipment
such as compactors and bulldozers, facilities for staff/operator).

16. Sub-Component A2 - Intermediate Treatment Facilities these could be on landfill sites or at
intermediate/transfer sites. Financing would be for waste treatment systems (such as Material Recovery
Facilities (MRF), composting plants, anaerobic digesters, landfill gas to energy/flaring plants, refuse
derived fuels (RDF) and or other treatment systems as appropriate) and transfer stations.

17. Sub-Component A3 - 3Rs Systems - The 3R approach (reduce, reuse, recycle) will be
incorporated in the design and infrastructure works to minimize waste generation rates at the household
level and local markets, and subsequently lowering collection, transfer and disposal costs, and extending
the life of the landfills. The 3Rs approach is based on a Waste Bank ( Bank Sampah) methodology
providing direct services to the poor This sub-component will finance activities to further strengthen and
increase coverage of this approach in participating local governments, particularly in the poor areas of the
participating cities. A Results-Based Financing (RBF) mechanism is also being designed and integrated
into this sub-component to incentivize achievement for higher performance of this 3Rs approach. The
RBF scheme will provide incentive payments retroactively to encourage waste diversion from landfills,
and so will extend the life of the landfill, and will encourage recycling and reuse of waste.

18. Component B: Implementation Support and Advisory Services ($30m). This component is
expected to be co-financed by donor grants. The GoI has agreed to request support from SECO
3
to
finance this component.


2
Sekber Kartamantul - is the joint administration for the regional facility, shared by the City of Yogyakarta, and the
Regencies of Sleman and Bantul.
.
19. Sub-Component B1 Implementation Support ($27.5m) - will (i) finance detailed
Engineering Designs (DEDs) as needed, the technical assistance and support required to implement the
project, and to put in place a strengthened institutional framework required for a more sustainable
operations and maintenance system going forward, (ii) provide support to establish a country-wide
carbon/climate finance activity for the solid waste management sector as a whole to coordinate market-
based carbon revenue generation opportunities, and (iii) include funding for setting up a publically
accessible information based National Solid Waste Benchmarking System (NSWBS).

20. Sub-Component B2 Management Systems ($2.5m) will finance information based
management systems in each participating city.

21. Component C: Social Development Component ($5m). This component will address the social
needs of waste pickers and affected host community members, including owners of livestock. Challenges
related to resettlement/land acquisition and the potential loss of livelihood for waste pickers and livestock
owners will be comprehensively addressed to help improve their social development outcomes. This
component will not finance any physical investments or works associated with landfill workers or
livestock, as these need to be integrated into the landfill operations as a whole and are thus included in
Component A. This component will finance training, continuous consultations with affected households,
participatory activities and potentially a fund to address major social concerns during project
implementation. As with Component B, this component is also expected to be co-financed by the same
donor grants.

22. Project Costs and Financing


Project
Component


Preliminary Cost Estimates

Source of Financing
(US$ millions)

IDR trillions US$ millions GoI IBRD Source TBC
by Appraisal

A

0.9900 110.00 10.00 95.00 -

B

0.270 30.00 25.00 - 10.00

C

0.045 5.00 - 5.00
Total 1.305 145.00 35.00 100.00 10.00


23. Project Specific Environmental and Social Safeguards Issues The project triggers the
following World Bank safeguards policies;

Environmental Assessment OP4.01
Involuntary Resettlement OP4.12.

24. Consistent with the requirements of OP4.01, the project has been assigned an EA Category A

25. The project is expected to have important significant positive environmental impacts in
the participating cities as investments to improve waste collection, transportation and disposal
infrastructure are made, as the institutions that provide and regulate this service are reformed and
the quality of this service begins to improve overtime. These positive impacts will gradually
begin to occur as coverage and collection rates increase, improvements to landfill operations are
realized especially from the introduction of sanitary conditions and better functioning leachate
treatment systems that comply with best practice effluent standards, and larger waste volumes
are treated through appropriate technological solutions.

26. These improvements in the service and the associated positive impacts will ultimately
lower the public health risk profile of the cities and may possibly begin to halt and even begin to
reverse the environmental damage that has been the legacy of the sector for too long in these
participating cities. Public awareness among city residents about the importance of proper waste
separation, recycling and disposal will be required for these benefits to be realized.

27. Notwithstanding, the proposed project will have adverse environmental impacts arising
primarily during the construction stage (Component A) when activities such as, (i) upgrading
existing sanitary landfills through rehabilitation of leachate treatment systems and waste
treatment plants (e.g., anaerobic digesters, RDF) and (ii) excavations of old waste and
construction of new sanitary cells including installation of landfill gas collection within the same
premises are going on. These construction activities may led to the temporary air, land and water
(surface and ground) pollution as potentially harmful substances are moved around and released,
especially as most of these landfill sites have suffered years of environmental pollution.

28. Environmental concerns will also arise during the operations and maintenance stage,
albeit far less severe that during the construction stage. While most of these impacts are expected
to be contained within and around the sites where they occur, some impacts, such as air pollution
impacts could be more widespread.

29. Involuntary Resettlement: Land acquisition and/or physical resettlement may be
necessary for some investments related to the expansion of collection sites. Also, waste pickers
who live on the landfill are being relocated to safe house outside the landfill boundaries.

30. Impacts on Livelihoods: Project interventions including landfill engineering, expansion
and intermediate treatment facilities (ITF) will potentially have negative livelihood implications
for waste pickers, small-scale buyers and host communities.