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Create

digital art
today!
Understand Painters tools
Learn to draw from scratch
Quick start guide on the CD
55 LIFE DRAWING FILES | 20 PHOTOS | SOURCE IMAGES
ISSUE EIGHTEEN
ISSN 1753-3155
9 771753 315000
1 8
www.paintermagazine.com
6.00
Brush primer
Use the Felt Pens for instant
graphic effects on your images
Art tips
We solve your common Painter
queries in our Art Class
PC and Mac
FREE CD
INSIDE
Paint like
We show how to re-create the
distinctive style of Hockney
Art theory
Create with
perspective
Use aerial perspective for
better landscape paintings
Work with custom brushes to
turn a photo into a masterpiece!
AutoPaint art
Merge auto tools with
freehand strokes for
stunning images
Colour control
We reveal the options
available for applying
and editing colour
Tool guide
Paint skills
pages of
tutorials
Over
50
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Get creative
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Official Magazine
Cover_OPM18.indd 1 28/5/08 15:52:01

3
Jo Cole, Editor in Chief
jo.cole@imagine-publishing.co.uk
Welcome
Sometimes its easy to forget
that with the right tools,
even mundane scenes can
be transformed into works
of wonder. Our cover image
this issue is a perfect case in
point. By combining a simple
photo taken at home with some custom Painter
brushes, Marcelo Chiarella has managed to
create a stunning piece of art that anyone can
do. See how he did it on page 58 and then have a
go yourself.
Elsewhere, we reveal how to paint using the
rules of linear and aerial perspective (page 36).
If youve ever wondered how the theory applies
to a real painting, heres your chance to ind
out! Our Paint Like this issue is David Hockney,
and we show how to re-create his colourful
style using the Oil brushes. See how we did
on page 46. The Art Study looks at painting
boats (pg 52) while our Drawing 101 looks at
how traditional watercolours work (pg 66),
and we have an excellent feature this issue on
controlling colour in Painter (pg 20).
Enjoy your painting!
This is THE magazine for anyone wanting to further their
Corel Painter skills or learn how to become a better artist
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Visit our website!
If you find that the magazine isnt enough to satisfy your Corel
Painter appetite, you can always visit our website. Pop on over to
www.paintermagazine.com and register as a user. Once this is out
of the way, explore the pages and enjoy great content such as:
Downloadable resources
Online galleries to share your work
Special forum for meeting other Corel Painter users
Paint your own
rustic scene
Pg 28
Capture the feeling of
an age gone by, using a
combination of photos
Create with
perspective
Pg 36
Drawing 101:
Watercolours
Pg 66
Discover how traditional
watercolours work and
what they can do
Adapt the rules of
perspective for stunning
city scenes
003_OPM_18_welcome.indd 5 29/5/08 19:15:57
websites
get the best out of each six-week course.
Your coursework is uploaded for advice
and critique to a student upload area
or free web host made available for LVS
students. An instructor is on hand to
review your work and answer questions
or concerns. You can also chat with other
students on dedicated class discussion
boards. Students enjoy a true world
community in LVS classrooms, meeting
people of all ages, from many different
countries and all walks of life, adds Long.
Classes are affordable, ranging from
$20 for returning students to $25 for new
students. LVS students are eligible for
special offers from many famous software
developers. Instructor-led sessions begin
ive times a year. Registration opens one
month in advance of each session, so
register early to avoid missing out.
If you want to expand your Painter
knowledge, LVS has generously offered a
$5 discount for new students. Offer is valid
until 19 June 2009.
10
ow in its ninth successful year,
LVS Online (www.lvsonline.
com) has built a reputation for
informative, affordable and
fun online learning. The range of courses
offered includes something for just about
anyone, including aspiring Corel Painter
users. Current courses include a general
RESOURCES
LVS Online offers affordable and fun Corel learning anywhere
intro to Painter, understanding layers,
autopainting, collage and watercolour.
LVS instructors have a high level of
dedication, explains LVSs Vikki Long.
By mentoring students from all over the
globe, they are giving back to the world
community. While we strive to keep the
cost of our classes low, the quality is on
a par with, or surpasses, many more
expensive courses offered elsewhere.
Other offerings range from building
your own website, blogging and writing,
to learning popular software programs
and taking better photographs. Each
course is detailed on the LVS website with
information on basic requirements such
as minimum software specs and how long
youll need to dedicate to each lesson and
assignment each week. LVS takes a relaxed
view to classroom attendance. Youre
encouraged to work at your own speed
and at a time that best suits you. However,
keep in mind that learning from home still
requires dedication and commitment to
LVS Online offers
students a chance to
learn a range of skills
in their own time and
at home over a six-
week course
Perfecting Painter
Where Learning Is Fun. LVS Online offers friendly but
informative ways of learning, covering many aspects of Corel
Painter from basics to more advanced features
Tutorial xxxx
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NEWS EVENTS
RESOURCES
LETTERS WEBSITES
INFO FORUM
Use coupon code lvsmag during the
checkout process to receive $5 off your first registration for an LVS class.
New student discount!
010-011_OPM_18_News.indd 10 29/5/08 10:33:01
websites
11
Books for all
ith a selection of book formats
currently available, creative
publishing service Blurb (www.
blurb.com) has announced a new range of
professional services. The recent Webby
Awards-winning website gives artists,
illustrators, photographers and writers a
platform to have their work reproduced in
lush professional-looking books that can be
printed individually to order. Once you install
the free PC- and Mac-compatible software,
simply drag and drop your work into a ready-
made template for uploading and printing
at Blurbs European base. The results are
simply stunning and are a perfect platform
for showcasing your Corel Painter creations.
Prices start from $12.95.
Webby Awards-winning website
expands self-publishing services
amed Corel Painter Master Marilyn Sholin
has launched a new Flickr group to help
promote her forthcoming book, The
Art of Digital Photo Painting: Using Popular
Software to Create Masterpieces (Lark Books).
Because the book is distributed internationally,
I was looking for a public site that people join
for free, which would allow them to learn more
about digital art, post their artwork and be
able to have discussions about them and other
subjects, explains Sholin. It was a pretty tall
order because I also wanted to be able to post
videos and be sure that everyone beneted from
Googling for their art in order for it to be seen
by as many people as possible. Sholin will be
posting short tutorials, ideas and educational
materials on the Flickr site that relate to the
projects in the book. See more at www.ickr.
com/groups/digitalphotopainting.
New Flickr group by
Corel Painter Master
hybrid art gallery, photo-
sharing service and a print-on-
demand service with currently
over 50,000 artists, Imagekind (www.
imagekind.com) claims to be the
worlds fastest-growing art site, offering
over 750,000 images. Imagekind is
creating a new democracy that allows
little-known artists to share the
landscape with established masters,
explains chief executive oficer Kevin
Saliba. Imagekind allows artists to
create their own galleries where they
can connect with art lovers looking
for unique pieces that can be custom-
framed and delivered within days.
Manage your work
with Imagekind
Marilyn Sholin promotes new book
with fun, informative participation
WEBSITE
RESOURCES
Marilyn Sholins
latest book The Art
of Digital Photo
Painting: Using
Popular Software to
Create Masterpieces
is available from
Amazon and other
leading book retailers
Blurb offers a
range of ideas
and formats
on their site to
get you started
including
photo, blog,
wedding and
business ideas
WEBSITE
Imagekind gives consumers limitless options to
purchase museum-quality framed and poster art
from over 50,000 artists
Turn your Corel Painter creations
into high-quality fine art images
JULY
In short
Creative happenings from
around the world
Rodny Mella tutorials
Among the many treats found on
professional product designer Rodny
Mellas site is a range of excellent
tutorials. These include Mellas very first
Painter experiment, an accomplished
portrait of a bear and fish. With over
20 screenshots, its a detailed step-
by-step guide from sketch to finished
painting. See www.rodnymella.com.
Corel Painter blog
Blogs can be a great source for useful
information, inspiration and creative
tips and tricks. The aptly named Corel
Painter Resource blog (http://corel-
painter.blogspot.com) covers a
range of topics to suit everyone from
beginners to those looking for fresh
motivation, and some great links offer
further insight. A useful RSS feed is
included so you can be the first to
know when the blog is updated.
17
Issue 19 of
OPM on sale!
Get your creative self ready for the
next issue. Artistic gems planned so far
include a Gainsborough Paint Like, a
look at coloured pencils and more tips
and tricks than you can shake a paint
brush at!
McKissicks masterly
Factory blog
Corel Painter community site
PainterFactory.com includes blogs
from many renowned Corel Painter
Masters. Stewart McKissicks blog
(http://painterfactory.com/blogs/
Bloggers.aspx) includes some
excellent examples of his stylish
illustration work. Unusually, McKissick
explains in detail how to draw and
import vector shapes in Corel Painter.
010-011_OPM_18_News.indd 11 29/5/08 10:36:54
12
resources
Wacom worry (update)
Thank you for publishing my problem in
the Oficial Corel Painter Magazine issue
17. The nonfunctioning of the stylus
buttons on the Wacom Intuos3 tablet only
happens when the mouse buttons are set
for left-handed use in Vista. I dug deeper
and found a solution. Each time I wanted
to draw in Painter X or Photoshop, I had to
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Welcome to the part of the magazine where you can come
and share your thoughts on anything you fancy!
Featured gallery
Our favourite readers gallery this month
Simon Duckworth
www.paintermagazine.co.uk/
user/envisionart
Simon is a pretty new entry to the
Featured Gallery area, but his use of
colour and light has greatly impressed
us. We also enjoy how he takes an
image that you wouldnt necessarily
think would make a great painting, and
sets about creating exactly that! The
cherry images here show his mastery
of light, and the ower painting is just
exquisite. He has a very good handle
on incorporating texture as well, so go
to his gallery today and soak in some
more work!
Ofcial Corel Painter
Magazine, Imagine
Publishing, Richmond
House, 33 Richmond
Hill, Bournemouth,
Dorset BH2 6EZ, UK
If youd prefer to contact
us via email, send your
message to opm@
imagine-publishing.
co.uk
Send your
letters to...
Anyone who has set their
Intuos up to work with
left-handed controls might
experience problems with
Vista. But one reader has
a solution!
Simon Duckworth
Cherries
Softer
Rooster
Simon Duckworth
3) For each application where the stylus
buttons dont function, customise the
button settings. Launch the applications, in
my case Painter X and Photoshop.
4) Select the relevant icon in the Application
ield. Customise the Tip button and change
it from Click to Right Click. The lower shaft
button now ought to be changed from Right
Click to Click.
5) Close the Wacom Tablet Properties and
start your program and you will see that
the stylus buttons will function properly.
Ive attached a picture of my stylus button
settings for Painter X.
At last I can use Painter X and my tablet
with Windows Vista!
Johs de Hoo
change the mouse buttons from left-handed
use to right-handed, and then the stylus
functioned like normal.
If any readers have the same problem,
heres how to alter the settings.
1) Open the Wacom Tablet Properties.
2) In the Tablet Properties, leave the Grip
Pen buttons unchanged for All Other.
012-013_OPM_018_letters.indd 12 30/5/08 14:03:20
13
Come and join our
forum and website
resources
Copyright query
The Readers Challenge in issue 17, page
21 of the Oficial Corel Painter Magazine
was really impressive. Your excellent
magazine tutorials has to make your
readership the most competent of any
magazine of its type.
This leads me to ask whether there is
any limitation on the use of work that
readers produce from your tutorials?
Clearly the copyright belongs to the author,
but when the original subject material
(sketch or photo, etc) is by others, does this
limit the readers freedom of use?
John Winchcomb
You raise a good point there, John. The
copyright of images generally belongs to us
if a tutorial or feature is commissioned, it is
our copyright. Therefore the source les are
also our copyright, or if not ours, the original
author. We are more than happy for you to use
anything on the disc for your own projects,
but you cant use the content for commercial
reasons. So, lets say you use the photo from
this issues cover image to have a go at the
tutorial. You are more than welcome to do that
and to also show the results on your website
or online gallery. In fact, we encourage that
(especially if you mention the magazine!). But
you couldnt then take the image you created
using the source photo and sell it. Although
you have done the actual painting, the fact
that you have used a copyright image as the
start point causes the issue! The same goes
for Readers Challenge images. By all means,
use them in your own work, but please dont
distribute them for prot.
Hopefully this hasnt put anyone off! We
want you to get the most out of the tutorials
and source les, but we do have to protect
our copyright, as well as that of the authors.
You are free to take the techniques and apply
to your own images, but please dont use any
source les in commercial projects. Thats it,
sermon over!
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Not only do we deliver inspirational and practical
tutorials on your favourite program every month,
we also have a dedicated Corel Painter website
that you can visit to get your artistic ix while you
wait for the next issue. From here you can join up
for a free account, then create your own gallery for
the world to see! You can explain the process or
inspiration behind each of your images, comment
on other members artwork, share your wisdom
and take part in regular challenges. Theres also
an area to download tutorial iles from previous
issues in case your CD has gone missing. If you
feel like a bit of creative interaction, we also have
a forum for you to come and leave your thoughts
about the magazine. You can ask Corel Painter
questions and pass the time with other digital
artists. So what are you waiting for? Visit www.
paintermagazine.com today!
Make yourself known!
www.paintermagazine.com
Dont be shy everyones
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agazine.
co.uk/com
petitions.php
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Our feature last issue has sparked an interesting debate, and weve also had lots of feedback about how much
some of you enjoyed it. If its something youd like to see done on a regular basis, let us know and well schedule
something like it in the forward planner
Simon Duckworth
Walk in the Woods
Simon Duckworth
012-013_OPM_018_letters.indd 13 30/5/08 14:03:52
Interview Denise Laurent
14
aving originally studied
photography at The Arts
Institute at Bournemouth ,
Denise Laurent worked as a
graphic designer before rediscovering
her irst love of painting. Although her
subject matter is varied, a love for cats has
led her to specialise in feline portraiture.
A member of SOFA, the Society of Feline
Artists, Laurent lives and works in
London and is currently owned by ive
cats that regularly feature in her work.
Working mainly in oils and acrylics, she is
a fan of Corel Painter and also contributed
to Jeremy Suttons recent training DVD.
Youre best known for your paintings of
dogs and specically cats. Which came
rst then, a love of animals or a love of art
and painting?
Im not sure which came irst, Ive always
loved animals and always enjoyed
painting so they seem to go together, but I
also love landscape painting too.
Professional artist and cat lover Denise Laurent has built a thriving career
on combining two of her great loves. Nick Spence meets her
Denise Laurent
What unique challenges do you face with
feline portraiture?
I am interested in the private life of
animals. I want to capture their unique
personalities and that can be a big
challenge. I need to try and get under
their skin so I can bring them to life on
the canvas. After all, if you live with a
feline daredevil then the last thing you
want is a portrait of him curled up asleep
on the sofa.
Your online gallery includes work done in
traditional acrylic and digitally. How do
the two compare?
They are both equally exciting
and satisfying. Im something of a
perfectionist so painting digitally allows
me to get very obsessive about the way a
line curves or how a composition works;
you can do a hundred different versions
if you are so inclined. Thats something
you just cant do in wet work without
overworking a painting, but working in
An interview with
WEBSITE www.deniselaurent.co.uk
JOB TITLE Artist
CLIENTS Corel, Feline Advisory Bureau,
Environmental Investigation Agency
[FAR TOP]
Laurents work
includes galleries
devoted to felines
in general, and
Bengal and Siamese
cats specifically,
and is available
for commissions
paint on canvas is just so tactile! Theres
nothing like the feeling of paint moving
over the canvas, or the way two colours
blend together to give you something
much more complex than simply a third
colour. Thats something you still cant
do digitally. But I do miss Ctrl-Z when
painting in acrylics!
What do you think Corel Painter brings to
your work?
Ive used Corel Painter since the early
days of Fractal Design Painter. I fell in
love with it as soon as I tried it; it was
like having your whole art studio on your
computer! Wonderful. Painter allowed
me to create natural-media paintings
for corporate clients as high-resolution
digital iles that were print-ready
and could be easily modiied to suit a
changing brief. It was much faster and
more lexible than using traditional
media, so I became a digital painter and
moved away from the wet stuff for a
014-018_OPM_18_interview.indd 14 29/5/08 10:39:18
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Grazing by the
River. Laurent gets
commissions from
many different
countries, so
working from
photos plays quite
a large part in the
creative process
014-018_OPM_18_interview.indd 15 29/5/08 10:39:39
Interview Denise Laurent
16
while. But in recent years I have gone
back to using oils and acrylics alongside
digital painting.
Do you have a typical digital workow?
Regardless of whether the inished
painting will be acrylics, digital or oils,
I start my work the same way, with a
series of quick sketches in Corel Painter,
usually with Pencils or Pen and Ink. Im
looking for both good composition and
something that expresses the personality
of the sitter. Then I work on more detailed
sketches that look at tonal range and
colour, usually with chalks, pastels and
oil brushes. When I have something
Im happy with, Ill develop the sketch
into a basic idea for the painting. One
of the things I love about Painter is the
ability to combine different media and
textures in one painting, so I might end
up with soft oil passages with textured
chalk over the top. Of course, this can be
challenging when you start painting in
real paint on canvas, but that can lead you
An original acrylic-on-board painting of Billy
by Laurent, who regularly takes commissions
to paint portraits of animals
Basset on the Beach, digital oil painting by Laurent, who works both
traditionally and digitally with Corel Painter, producing a number of
limited-edition prints available from her website
014-018_OPM_18_interview.indd 16 29/5/08 10:40:14
17
to ind unexpected solutions. I ind that
this alone makes life, and painting, much
more interesting!
When I had the idea for Lick Me!, I was
watching my cat enjoying some cream.
His expression of total delight was so full
of character; I wanted to capture that in a
painting. I took lots of photos of him and
developed a series of sketches in Painter
using Pencils and Ink Pens. I played
with different tonal values and inally,
I used my oil brushes to create a more
detailed colour version of the inal idea
for the painting. I printed out the colour
sketch, the tonal sketch and the two
closest photos, and had them next to the
easel to refer to as I worked on the inal
acrylic painting. At a point about halfway
through the painting, the reference
material becomes redundant and its just
you and the canvas from then on.
What would you say are your favourite
Corel Painter brushes and tools?
I like the Messy Oil and Hairy Acrylic
brushes because they look a lot like the
marks I make with my real brushes. I also
love liquid ink, Jeremy Suttons Sumi-e
and Sketching brushes and Marilyn
Sholins wonderful Hair and Skin brushes.
But the best tool in Corel Painter is the
Brush Creator. You can have hours of
endless fun exploring Painters brushes
and you learn so much about mark-
making in the process. Its a great way
of developing brushes that suit the exact
way you work.
By necessity, you need to work from
photographs, so how do you ensure your
work doesnt look like you have run a
lter over a photo?
I rarely work from just one photo;
usually I have several different photos to
use as references. And photos are only
references, they show you the visual
information you need to construct a
picture but at some point a painting has
to take off from its starting point and
become something unique to itself. It
needs to explore more than just the visual
data from a series of images; it needs to
have something new to say.
For example, The Rose Fairy started
life as a photo of Riley on the beach. As
I looked at her pose I could see her with
a pair of golden wings, she was at just
the right angle to show them off nicely.
Bite Me!, a popular painting that reflects a love
for animals and particularly cats. Charlie, my
brown-spotted Bengal, is a particularly good
model, but his brother Ming is much more of a
four-footed hazard. He loves to steal my paint
brushes, complete with paint too
The Boss, painted for the
Feline Advisory Boards new
book Essential Cattitude: An
Insight Into The Feline World
Its like having your
whole art studio on
your computer
014-018_OPM_18_interview.indd 17 29/5/08 10:40:52
Interview Denise Laurent
18
Although cats and dog are a speciality, Laurent
loves to paint all animals, including this striking
acrylic-on-canvas portrait of a bathing tiger
There are so many useful things
you can do with Painter to
enhance your working practice,
even if you never produce a
digital painting
So that gave me the idea to turn her into
a fairy princess; little girls love dressing
up! The painting became The Rose Fairy
and while it started life as a photo of a
girl on the beach, it became something
completely different. In Corel Painter,
I was able to bring the painting in my
imagination to life rather than just copy
a photograph.
You provided resources for the latest
Jeremy Sutton tutorial DVD How to Paint
from Photographs Using Corel Painter X.
How did that come about?
Ive known Jeremy for a few years now.
Hes a great guy and an inspirational
teacher. So when he asked me to
contribute to his CDs, of course I said yes!
Finally, what advice would you give to
artists working traditionally who are just
starting to use Corel Painter?
Dont be afraid to try digital painting, its
a lot of fun. Use Painter to develop ideas
for paintings, to try out new tools and
materials before buying them or even to
take a few risks. There are so many useful
things you can do with Painter to enhance
your working practice, even if you never
produce a digital painting.
Jasper by Laurent, who sells
prints and cards from her
dedicated website as well as
via a store on eBay
014-018_OPM_18_interview.indd 18 29/5/08 10:41:58
Feature Control colour in Painter
20
020-26_OPM18_feature.indd 20 30/5/08 09:26:08
By selecting colours from other images, unifying lights
and darks and changing the mood, you can create a more
dynamic picture. Brad Sutton shows how its done
olour is a very exciting element to a work of art.
It can be a good thing in helping the eye travel
through the composition, and you can direct the
viewers eye to look where you want them to look
by your use of colour. In the succeeding pages, we will see
how to control this use through Painters tools. We will see
aspects including changing paper colour, sampling colours
from an image and using the colour palettes.
A good way to actually see what colour things are is to
properly look at them. Almost become obsessed with the
colour of things and how light affects those objects around
you. There may be a plain white circular building that you
see on a regular basis. In the course of a normal sunny day,
that building will turn light blue, yellow and then lavender,
all in one day. When you start to look at things in this way,
the world starts to look almost psychedelic. Also, the time
of the year will change the way things look, because the
location of the sun will be in a different position in the sky.
This is all very exciting because you will look at the world
and its colours in a whole different way.
American scene painter Edward Hopper used to draw
and take notes in ledger books. In these books, he would
take extensive notes on the colours of things, how strong
the light is on objects. That way, he could refer back and
remember that, for example, the wall was a pale yellow or
cerulean. This is another great way to view and remember
life. Photographs help but they focus everything and
the colour in the image changes. The eye sees at 80mm
whereas a camera lens usually sees at 50mm. The spherical
irregularities and colours are changed in photos so be wary
of using a photo for exact reference. Now lets see some of
these aspects of colour control in Corel Painter
21
control
Colour
020-26_OPM18_feature.indd 21 30/5/08 09:26:25
Feature Control colour in Painter
22
Using colour effectively
Kicking off with a few tips on changing the
colour of your paper, we also take an in-depth
look into undertaking a value study in order to
maximise the effect of the colours in our
painting. This is useful on many levels, one of
the advantages being that it is clearer to see
which details need highlighting and where the
use of colour is most effective.
01
Starting out blank First off, open
the sketch that you are ready to begin
your illustration with. Have the canvas blank and
the sketch on a separate layer (you will drop that
layer later). If the drawing is on the canvas layer,
duplicate it and erase what is on the canvas layer.
02
Adding colour Make sure you are
on the canvas layer and select the Paint
Bucket from the Toolbox. Select a colour from the
Color Wheel that you want to use and just click on
the canvas. This should lay in a at colour and your
sketch should still show through.
03
Just a little too light At this point,
we know that the setting is going to be in
the captains quarters, so this colour is too light. Go
to the Color Wheel, shift the wheel towards red
and make the value darker. Then click on the image
again and the colour will shift darker as well.
One of the main
things that is most
frustrating in painting
both digitally and
traditionally is starting
with a blank white
canvas. Starting with
a toned paper surface
can help to set the
mood of your painting,
and also get the colour
in the direction you
want it to proceed.
Changing paper colour Set your paintings mood
020-26_OPM18_feature.indd 22 30/5/08 09:27:01
23
05
Pulling out detail In this step, start
to carve out the lighting by shifting the
value by means of tinting and shading the colour.
You will see that the underlying colour that we
initially started with is showing through. You can
also drop the sketch layer at the beginning or end
of this step.
04
Changing it again Now that was
a little too warm for the inside of a
captains quarters. So select the Brush tool from
the Toolbox, then select the New Simple Water
brush under Digital Watercolor. Use a low opacity
for this step because you will begin to set the
lighting and mood.
Cool and unify
After a value study is completed, use the New Simple Water brush and lay
in all your colour. When the colour is where you like it, use the Dry Digital
Watercolor command. Then apply another cool tone with Digital Watercolor
over that. Start to pull detail out by changing the value on the Color Wheel.
This will unify the shadows and the picture. You can even be more direct and
just add the cool tone to all the shadows and a warm tone to the light side.
Use the whole spectrum
After a value study is completed, use this time to decide what details need to pop more. Where do you
want your audience to look, what are the important details and what is less significant? All the little
details and nuisances, this is where you have to be direct and you can muck around and have fun.
02
Darkening areas Next, use the
Digital Watercolors to make areas fall
back in space. This is where a hot key for the Dry
Digital Watercolor will come in handy. Just like
traditional watercolour, you can build up the
layers, and you dont even need a hairdryer!
01
Value done, squint your eyes After
you have done your value study and you
think you have gone through the whole value
scale, squint your eyes. This is a good way to see if
everything is working, or if there are areas that are
way too light or just get lost in the dark.
Extra details
Now you have most of your colour working and in place. Next, you need
to get an opaque brush. We used the Gouache>Wet Gouache Round.
At this point, you need to go over all the spots that need to be popped,
adding a brighter colour to the highlights.
La y in basic colours
So now the value study is done, select Dry Digital Watercolor again.
Continue to use Digital Watercolors at a low opacity, and start to build up
colour in the piece. This is where you can see if the harmony of colours is
working or not. You may think that it will work but it might not.
When you are doing a
black-and-white value
study of an image, you
need to decide where
you want your lights
and darks. You are just
working with value at
this point and it will
make it easier to add
colour to later. Use the
Digital Watercolor>New
Simple Water brush,
at an Opacity of 25
per cent. After the
value study is done,
perform the Dry Digital
Watercolor function.
Start with a value study
020-26_OPM18_feature.indd 23 30/5/08 09:43:35
Feature Control colour in Painter
24
Sampling colours
from an image
One of the most helpful things while creating
an image is using photographs to aid you.
However, do not use the photos as your
exact template. Photos are a good method of
observation, so use them as references. Try
changing colours and values while adding
your own variations
02
Enhance the colours When you
click on the photo with the dropper, you
can see that the Color Wheel starts to bounce all
over the place. For the clouds, there is a nice pink
colour, though dont just use that. Adjust the Color
Wheel to give you a slightly different colour.
03
Start to colour Now that you have
chosen the colour with the dropper, start
to apply it to the painting. Experiment around with
the vast arsenal of brushes that you have at your
disposal. You may nd as you go along that the
colour may need to be adjusted.
01
Using your photos Have your photo
and sketch open next to each other so
you can easily see both images. Start by clicking on
the photo with the dropper.
04
Colour swatches When sampling
a colour from a painting, you may pick
up the underlying sketch; this will make the colour
darker than you wanted. Make swatches of the
colours that you will use often on a separate layer.
When the painting is coming together, delete the
layer with the swatches. At this point your sketch
should be covered and you can set about sampling
from your painting.
020-26_OPM18_feature.indd 24 30/5/08 09:28:23
25
Canvas mixing
These pages will show you the ways to mix colours in the Color Sets palette, the
Color Mixer and colour palettes. Another way is by mixing the colour directly
on the canvas. It is a lot faster to make just a mark at a low opacity and then
select the colour. Simply select the colour you like, press Ctrl/Cmd+Z and then
erase that mark.
01
Paint
mixing
Start with your
image and make a
mark with a colour
you think is going
to work. Then make
a mark and decide
what colour you really
need, and select that
with the dropper. Try
to select from the
edges of the mark
because it picks up
the colour beneath.
02
Select
and
create Now pick
the colour and
see if that is good;
you might have to
change the value.
Then undo the
brushstrokes and
use the colour you
have just made.
Using the Color Sets
The Color Sets have two exciting features to help finding a colour:
By Name and Closest To Current Color. This is nice because if you
want to find a certain colour that you want to use, like Alizarin
crimson, you can type it in under By Name, click Begin and OK,
then the Color Wheel will go exactly to that colour.
Color Sets
Click through the selection of presets. This can
be helpful if you need to do an illustration in a
specic range of colours. You can choose from
the standard ones to Pantone and Hexadecimal.
This is also helpful in doing your value studies.
Using the Color Mixer can be a helpful tool. In this picture, we wanted
to take the colour of her dress and see how the light falls onto it. What
you need to do is sample the basic colour of her dress and paint that
colour into the Mixer palette. Then sample the colour of the lights and
mix that colour on the Mixer palette with the other colour of her dress
that was applied first. As the two colours mix, you can sample from
any of the colours that are blended together.
Usin g the
Color Mixer
Libra r Access
One of the vast reservoirs of information is found
in the Library Access in the Color Sets. Click on
Library Access and then go to Open Color Set. A
new window will open and click Load.
020-26_OPM18_feature.indd 25 30/5/08 09:28:55
Feature Control colour in Painter
26
Using shadows is a good way to help the viewer look where you want them to look. Just the opposite applies
also; you can use shadows to make the viewer look at something more important. Use colour in your
shadows also. In Edward Hoppers Room in Brooklyn, there is a small corner of the windowsill that is in
shadow, and it is a rich, vibrant blue.
Connecting shadows
Let them help you
Create a highlight with colour
Shiny objects have hard highlights. There are easy tools to help make the
highlights on chrome, lights and cars work for you. First, you need to find
where your light is coming from, and what colour the object is that the light
is falling on. This will determine the colour of your highlight.
01
Making
highlights
Take a look and nd
out where on the
rear fender you are
going to place your
highlight. We used
the F-X>Glow brush
to create this. Use a
yellow fairly low in
the spectrum, with
Opacity at 25 per
cent. Gently colour
the highlights in.
02
Highlighting the
highlight Make
the size of your Glow
brush small and make
are marks around
the highlight to give
it that extra shine.
Shift the colour to
white in the Color
Wheel and add the
additional highlight
to the centre of the
original highlight.
01
Connecting shadows Connecting
shadows helps to create the illusion of
a path. In this piece, we connected the shadows
of the car, the driver and the shadow coming
from off-screen. Also, make the shadow a colour.
Lavender appears in nature more than you think.
02
Unifying shadows Using a Digital
Watercolor, glaze a cool colour over
all the shadows to unify them. Select Dry Digital
Watercolor. Make that colour darker and glaze over
the middle ground. This makes the foreground
pop, and allows the background to recede.
The mystery of colour
Finding out little things that help to add details and depth is
a great addition to the creative process, and helps to engage
your viewer. Instead of just glancing at your piece, they will
look at it in-depth and study your piece. They will
ask you questions on how you did it, and
you may tell them With blood and
sweat, you may say that you have
cramps in your hand from holding
your stylus so tight, but maybe,
just maybe, you might tell them.
Another aspect to
creating a visually
appealing image
is a good use of
lights and darks and
the connecting of
shadows. American
illustrator Frank
Schoonover would
use lights and darks
to direct the viewers
eye. Using lights
against darks and
shadows against
sunlit areas make for
an engaging image.
Having knowledge of
composition is helpful
to make aspects work
in the final piece, like
when you use some
other programs to add
text and design work.
Composition
020-26_OPM18_feature.indd 26 30/5/08 09:38:08
Tutorial Rustic scenes
28
028-032-OPM_18 Goose.indd 28 29/5/08 10:47:05
ave you ever wondered why is it that when we
see countryside scenes of dilapidated buildings,
a rusty bucket, an old rocking chair or a broken
plough, we have this overwhelming urge to grab
our brushes and begin painting? Its probably because these
scenes hark back to a simpler time, but the notion that old and
creaky things are worth painting is a fairly recent concept
in art history and didnt become acceptable until the early
Nineteenth Century. Painters such as John Constable faced
great resistance to the notion that such nostalgic scenes were
morally uplifting and worth considering; this romantic artistic
view of where we come from and who we are as a result of it
though few of us today have a personal involvement with
farm equipment or rural life we owe to them.
In this tutorial, we will combine photos to create a satisfying
composition and then we will use both direct painting and
cloning techniques to achieve a look thats painterly, slightly
uninished, yet immensely satisfying. We borrowed the digital
images from Stock.XCHNG, and weve supplied links so that
you can download them and follow along, but the choices along
the way are many, including brushes, colours, cropping and
detail, so we wont end up with the same painting; in addition
to our shared art history, we each bring to the canvas our
own personal history. This piece went through numerous
incarnations before it inally felt inished. You may always
know the feeling that you want from a painting and have some
vision of the inished piece, but be willing to follow new ideas
as they occur along the way.
Rustic scenes
Artist
Time needed
Skill level
On the CD
Cat Bounds
Two hours
Intermediate
Final image
Tutorial info
29
Let your imagination flow with rural ideas
Set the scene
01
Select the elements The creative process starts here as we
browse our own photo les or those offered online. Heres where
youll nd the images we used in this painting www.sxc.hu/browse.phtml?f
=download&id=854092, www.sxc.hu/browse.phtml?f=download&id=84
9154, www.sxc.hu/browse.phtml?f=download&id=640105 and www.sxc.
hu/browse.phtml?f=download&id=960018.
this rickety old cabin, and the possibilities 02
Initial crop As a base image, we loved
for cropping are endless. Well discuss cropping
in more depth later on. For now, we zoomed into
the image, losing all of the countryside because
we wanted only the cabin itself as a background
for the geese we intended to have living there.
Sit back and relax while we explore a rustic painting
and maybe learn a thing or two along the way
and some other elements, like a wagon 03
Combine We found several geese
wheel, a rusty pump, etc, and then began
auditioning them for the story we had in mind,
selecting and pasting them into the background
image, moving them around to nd where they
belonged. We have to stay objective and not get
too attached to any of the elements.
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Sit back and relax while we explore a rustic painting
and maybe learn a thing or two along the way
028-032-OPM_18 Goose.indd 29 29/5/08 10:47:54
30
Get technical and tweak the settings to make the image your own
Get creative with the countryside
Tutorial Rustic scenes
Cloning
Some of this painting
was cloned, but we
didnt use any of the
brushes specifically
in the Cloner library.
The Clone Color control
directs a brush to
pick up colour from
a source image.
Clone Color takes
averaged samples of
colour from the clone
source, resulting in
an approximation
of the original. So
expand your cloning
by exploring Painters
many other brushes
that do the job as
well. Additionally, you
can also use cloning
in order to combine
images by selecting
from one document
and adding them to
the other image. This
can springboard you
into some very
creative images.
Get into a
saving habit
We talk a lot about
saving your work,
and if you are one of
those digital painters
who have never lost
your work because of
some computer glitch,
count yourself among
the blessed. Saving
often and methodically
can spare you untold
frustration. You can
save a layered Corel
Painter document in
the RIFF format, which
continues to function
when reopened in
Painter. This is the only
format that preserves
the layers in their
original state. If were
not saving in layers, we
most often save in the
TIFF format because
this one facilitates the
exchange between
applications and
computer platforms.
04
Simplify and justify We loved that old stove but it just didnt
read right in our story so it had to go, and a door made more sense
than another window, so we cloned in the indication of a door. Look around
your image thats coming together and think it through; which elements
further the composition, and which ones detract from it?
05
Overall
size Now
make the decision
as to the nal size
of your painting.
We left room in
the initial crop for
changes. Working at
300dpi is a popular
size, but if the nal
image is going to
be really large, drop
back to 180dpi and
then increase it at
the end. This will
lower the demand
on your computers
resources, in turn
making it easier for
you to work.
end up with a border, its not great to 06
Add a border Even though we wont
paint in a conned space, so try adding a two-
inch white border around the image. This allows
for more painterly strokes and gives you more
positioning options when you do your nal crop.
07
Choose
some
brushes Finally, we
get to the real fun of
painting: the brushes!
Because of the magic
of Corel Painter, you
can have a watercolour
effect in mind and
choose brushes from just
about any of the brush
libraries. We created a
cloned image and saved
so that we could play
with possible brushes
and then revert to the
original state as often as
we wanted.
08
Choose a Color Palette The colours
here work pretty well for the painting
we have in mind, so for now well create a Color
Palette from the image, then click on the arrow at
the upper right of our palette and choose Swatch
Size. Here, set the size of your colour swatches to
16 x 16 pixels.
09
Rough strokes We begin with a large
Thick Bristle Acrylic brush, mindful at this
point of painterly strokes throughout the image
but not worrying about losing the detail that
will come later. With this brush set to Clone in the
Color Palette, we get some blending of colours as
we paint.
10
Cloning through We can either use
the same brush set to a smaller size or
change to a different one like Captured Bristle
because now we want to bring back some of the
detail, but not all. Dont hurry. Most people who
say they dont have the talent to paint really just
dont have the patience to see it through.
028-032-OPM_18 Goose.indd 30 29/5/08 10:48:56
31
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12
Highlights and shadows A major part of composition is the
arrangement of highlight and shadow. With digital art as with
traditional painting, it helps to walk away and look out the window to rest
your vision and then look back at the image from a distance, and you can see
if theres a pleasing pattern of lights and darks.
seeing how a painting is progressing is to 13
No colour One excellent ways of
desaturate it. Go to Effects>Tonal Control>Adjust
Colors and move the Saturation slider to the right.
Now you have a black-and-white image. Have a
look at the tones is there a pleasing amount of
shadow, highlight and midtones?
considering composition. Look at the 11
Composition Its not too late to be
ow of paint strokes and images youve created
and determine whether theyre working well.
Do we need a bush over here? More dramatic
colour over there? How about that wagon wheel
propped against the wall? There are still lots of
compositional decisions to be made.
14
New brush
palette If
this painting is going
well for you, you may
want to create an
entire brush palette for
this style of painting
so that the brushes
youve chosen are
ready for the next
piece. Just drag the
brush icon from the
Brush Selector bar at
the top and it appears
within a new palette,
which you can name
and continue to ll
with brushes.
addition to saving frequently, you may want to work in layers by 15
Layers Layers always add creative possibilities to our work. In
clicking on the New Layer icon in the Layers palette. If youre trying out a new
brush, you can turn the layer on and off, play with blending modes or move it
around the canvas.
Some of the best for this scene Useful brushes
OPAQUE ACRYLIC 30
This brush, set to a large size and cloned
colour, produces some very nice painterly
strokes, complete with bristle marks. For the
look of paint build-up, choose Color and Depth
in the Impasto tab. Select Color only and lower
the Opacity for a more watery appearance.
THICK ACRYLIC BRISTLE
We like the way this brush applies and pushes
the paint around. Acrylic is a water-based
medium, and the results can either be of
thickly applied paint or watery and thin.
Rather than cloning the colour, we selected
colours as we went and painted them on.
JUST ADD WATER
This brush does a beautiful job of softening
and blending the paint weve laid down. Try it
for some of those lost edges we talked about
earlier. A little goes a long way, so save often,
and if you see youve lost too much detail, you
can go back to a previous stage.
OILY COLORED PENCIL 3
This is the Pencil we used for the scribbles.
Choose colours from the image as you go, do
the whole thing with one colour or set it to
Clone. The latter technique gives us some very
interesting and artsy effects.
028-032-OPM_18 Goose.indd 31 29/5/08 10:50:19
32
Add some interest until youre happy with your finished rustic scene
All roads end here
Tutorial Rustic scenes
may decide the colours we began with dont quite have the oomph to 17
Colour boost As were about midway through the painting, we
carry the painting. One way to boost those colours is to make a screen capture
of the colour palette we created, save it, open it up and then heighten the
saturation. Now create a new colour palette from these exciting colours.
18
Redening with lines We chose the
Oily Colored Pencil 3 and began making
random, happy scribbles throughout our painting.
This gives a look similar to paintings done with
watercolour pencils where the artist works with
both wet and dry media.
16
Lost and found This concept adds
immensely to the ebb and ow within
the canvas. We want some edges sharp and
dened while others are soft and painterly, so we
cant really tell where they begin or end, leaving
something to the viewers imagination. Its always
a good idea to let them in on the fun, too.
19
Splashes of colour Sometimes less is
more, but here were practising the theory
that more is more, so when you think its pretty
much nished, save and then go a step further and
splash on more colour.
20
Final crop
This time
were doing our nal
crop, and because we
added a border earlier,
we should have room to
move the crop window
around a bit in order
to get the best view.
You may want to make
copies of the painting
and compare different
crops, side by side.
during the painting process or at the end 21
Texture We can choose to add texture
by selecting any of the textures in the Papers
palette; which one depends on the type of
painting weve done. If were printing it, we may
not want any texture at all.
Perspective preferences Crops that work
CROP SQUARES
This crop leaves us
with a square, which
isnt a preferred shape,
but it does zoom into
the scene, eliminating
extraneous elements.
Here, we decide just how
important those other
elements are and how
much they contribute to
or detract from the story.
No matter how good the photographer, most photos can benefit from cropping because thats a part of how we make
it our own. Cropping gives us a plethora of possibilities within a single photo because theres no right or wrong, just
preferences. It might be fun to take a single photo like this lonely little cabin, and see just how many paintings we could
find within it.
CENTRE STAGE
The three geese are denitely front and
centre in this crop. We like the size and
shape, and it would be quick work to
paint out that sitting goose in the upper
right-hand corner. When you nish a
painting and its just not quite right,
play with cropping to see if some part
of it is salvageable.
028-032-OPM_18 Goose.indd 32 29/5/08 10:51:16
34
hen it comes to sketching with
felt pens and markers, one word
springs to mind above all others:
spontaneity! Felt pens are ideally
suited to a super-fast technique, if for no other
reason that if the pen is left static for too long on
the paper, the ink will be absorbed and bleed into
the surrounding areas. But the possibilities that
come with using felt pens in art is endless. Corel
Painter excels when it comes to the realism of
the Felt Pen variants, and after a moment or
two sketching away, youll almost be able
to smell the solvent from these super-
slick variants.
Just as in the real world, the Felt Pen
brushes in Painter range from small,
sharp varieties, right the way through
to almost worn-out dirty tipped markers
that can be used for scrubbing in rough
areas of shadow and tone. Youll even have
access to chisel-tipped markers, which are
broad when used one way, but can also produce
very ine, sharp lines when used in the opposite
direction, for an accurate real-life experience.
Remember, the key to using these variants to
their top potential is fast and loose, to produce
fast, dynamic sketches that have a vigour and
intensity that cant be matched with any other
drawing medium.
Youll notice that when you start
working with one of the Felt Pen
variants, the composite mode for that
particular layer changes from Default
to Gel. This is important so the colour
from the pen is applied, and builds
up, in the correct way. Because of
this composite mode, youll often see
slightly different colours appearing
when you use the pens at low opacity,
but it is all part of the charm of this
particular medium.
Felt Pens
Gel mode
Pen angle
With Felt Pens, especially the chisel-type thick and thin
variants, the Angle factor is very important. You can
change the angle of the tip in the Brush Controls. Just hit
Window>Brush Controls>Show Angle. Now use the Angle
slider to adjust the tip so that the thick side of the pen is
exactly where you want it within the stroke. Also make sure
that you take notice of the Minimum Size for these variants
in the Size category of the Brush Controls. Because these
chisel-tipped markers generally have a very hard tip, the
size is therefore fixed, so you need to set the Minimum
Size factor to somewhere near the maximum for the most
realistic results.
Primer Felt Pens
BRUSH CATEGORY
PRIMER
FINE TIPS
The Fine Tip variants can be used for
adding touches of detail and a few
ne lines to your sketch. Youre best
adding this kind of detail towards
the end of a drawing session, just to
draw attention to particular areas
DESIGN MARKER
The Design Marker is a very intense
variant and can be used to add some
real darks to your sketch. Again, its
best to use this variant with quick,
staccato strokes to add a lively,
spontaneous feel to your work
If your drawing technique is fast and loose, the
Felt Pen variants in Painter are made for you.
Here, well take a look at the power of the pens!
DRAWING SHORTHAND
The key to felt pen drawings is to indicate rather
than draw precisely. Although there may be lots
of detail in the scene before you, its necessary to
indicate this with a kind of sketching shorthand
to keep your sketch nice and lively, and allow the
viewer to interpret the marks you make
034-35_OPM_18_brushes.indd 34 29/5/08 10:56:43
35
F
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P
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Paper choice
Traditionally, felt pens are used on very
smooth and thin paper, so for best results
you need to mimic this in Painter. One of
the best surfaces to use for these variants
is the Hot Press paper. Choose this from the
Papers selector before you start drawing.
Obviously if you want to try out different
effects, experiment with the other papers
available. The Felt Pens also work quite well
on rough paper, especially when coupled
with watercolour effects. You can build up
stunning art this way.
Choose the one that suits you best
Felt Pen brushes
DIRTY MARKER
The Dirty Marker is great for establishing large,
scribbled areas of overall tone, and is a great
tool to help establish the tonal masses at the
beginning of the sketching process. Make sure
to use this variant at a large size, and use plenty
of movement in your strokes
Build up the effect
This in progress shot of our main image
shows how the Felt Pens can be used to
gradually build up data. Here the opacity
has meant that the early application of
colour looks a lot like a felt tip that is drying
up a lot of paper can be seen underneath
it. But by applying more and more strokes,
you can start to cover this paper and build
up colour. With these sorts of pens, though,
its nice to leave bits of colour showing
through and play up to the sketchy, graphic
nature the brushes allow.
Art Marker
Blunt Tip
Design Marker
Dirty Marker
Felt Marker
Fine Point Marker
Fine Tip
Medium Tip Felt Pens
Thick n Thin Marker
034-35_OPM_18_brushes.indd 35 29/5/08 10:58:03
Tutorial Create with perspective
36
Use the rules of linear and aerial perspective to help your landscape paintings
Create with perspective
036-41_OPM_18 Aerial.indd 36 29/5/08 11:00:42
37
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Artist
Time needed
Skill level
On the CD
Celia Yost
4 hours
Intermediate
Layered files
Tutorial info
inear and aerial perspective are very
useful tools for an artist to have in their
arsenal. Linear perspective is a system
used for creating a sense of depth in
a painting or drawing, with the desired effect
being that of looking through a window, instead
of at a wall. The idea thats the basis for linear
perspective is that as objects approach the
horizon line, parallel lines appear to converge
at the same point. There are three basic types:
one point, two point and three point, which refer
to the number of vanishing points used in the
image, and the angle at which you are drawing
determines which one youll use. If youre looking
at an object straight on, youd use one point, if
youre viewing the object on edge youd use two
point and if youre looking either up or down on
it, youd use three point (three point is the only
one that has a special vanishing point
thats not on the horizon, and is used for showing
either extreme height or extreme depth. Youll
see it used a lot on comic books.) Most of the time
when drawing, you will ind yourself using two
point, however, in reality you can have as many
vanishing points as there are objects in an image,
as unless its a city, things are rarely situated on
a perfect grid. Conveniently then, were going
to draw a city in order to demonstrate two-
point perspective and then show how aerial
perspective can give the feeling of distance.
This is achieved by altering the colours in
the background and also
cutting down on the
amount of visible
detail used.
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Its all boxes
Linear perspective
is all about boxes.
What we mean by that
is were sure youve
noticed that while its
pretty easy to draw
a box in perspective,
things suddenly get a
lot more difficult when
you try to draw just
about anything else.
The trick is to turn
everything into a box.
You figure out how
whatever youre trying
to draw would fit into
box straight on, draw
that box in perspective
and then align the
object to its box. This
is also easier said than
done, but it still works
as a good place to
start with more
complicated geometric
or organic objects.
Import a sketch into Painter or do it in the program
Scenic skyline
scanned in. You could also do this step in Painter, but it all comes 01
Getting started We started out with a rough sketch that we
down to whether you feel more comfortable doing the initial drawing
traditionally. Set the layer to Multiply and added a ll colour to the canvas
using the Bucket tool to help you visually as you work. Either create your own
or use the sketch on the layered le on the disc.
start rendering some basic lighting and colour. Were using the Fine 02
Initial colour Add a layer between the canvas and the sketch, and
Feathering Oils brush and an Artists Oils brush that has been modied so that
it lacks a trail-off point, but still blends very smoothly.
04
Introducing the grid Now its time to start working with
linear perspective. Our sketch is really rough and we didnt bother
calculating out where the vanishing point where, and while it looks all right
now, we need to adjust things. One of the main tools well be using in this
tutorial is the Perspective grid. Go to Canvas>Perspective Grid>Show Grid.
some colour in the sky to help remind us of what well be doing with 03
Initial lighting Using mostly the Wet Acrylic brushes, we threw
lighting later on. As an aside, working back to front when using the blending
brushes on different layers is a good idea, though its not the end of the world
by any means if you move around the canvas as you work.
Tutorial Create with perspective
If nothing
else,
remember
where your
horizon is
Another important
thing to remember
when using
perspective is that
no matter how many
vanishing points you
have, there will be
only one horizon line.
Now, we say that and
immediately think of
some exceptions (like
free-falling objects),
but the main point
is that the horizon
line is actually the
viewers eye level,
and regardless of
what kind of crazy
things are going on
with space and the
ten billion things that
arent parallel with
each other, you only
have one set of eyes to
look at it with.
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Perspective
and realism
Despite initial
appearances, linear
perspective generally
doesnt create a
completely realistic
portrayal of reality.
This is easy enough
to test for yourself.
Look at a 3D model
of a street thats
computer rendered,
and thus by definition
has mathematically
perfect perspective.
Look at the edges,
and notice how
distorted things look.
Thats where linear
perspective starts
to break down. This
happens for a couple
of reasons. First of all,
in reality the apparent
vanishing points are
miles away, and this
is rarely practical to
measure out. Also,
we see in 3D and
the picture plane is
2D, so because we
have two eyes were
always seeing two
slightly different
perspectives. Were
constantly glancing
around, and rarely will
you be looking fixedly
at one spot, whereas
an image forces just
that, so it can never be
completely realistic.
07
Colour and
adjustment
Add another layer
above all the others
and start working on
the buildings, using the
Perspective grid as a
guide. Throughout the
entire process, you will
be making constant
small adjustments to the
original orientation and
position of the buildings
this way.
Utilise grids to make your life easier
Building work
a few different ways. Grabbing the horizon line will move the grid 06
Altering the grid The perspective grid can be manipulated in
back and forth, while grabbing the far edge will move it from side to side. The
vanishing point is a bit difcult to see. Its just a small notch on the horizon line,
and will shift the entire grid if its moved.
09
Tweaking the settings We worked using the Wet Acrylics,
Detail Oils, Conte, but use whatever you feel like using as the
brushes in Painter are very much a personal choice. Slowly work in and adjust
what you have drawn to the grid.
allows you to turn the image to an angle thats more comfortable 10
Rotate canvas Another useful function is Rotate Canvas. This
to draw, like you would your paper in real life. Its located under the Grabber
tool, or a hot key of E.
we need a second grid. Use the exact 08
Save the grid Since this is two point,
same process to place it as you did with the rst
one. So youre not having to constantly redo
this, its helpful to save them. Just click on the +
grid next to the pull-down menu, and name it
something descriptive.
drawing. We only want the vertical grid at the moment, so uncheck 05
Using the grid To make use of the grid, we need to align it to our
the horizontal box and move the horizon line so that its on the same level as
the horizon in the drawing. Then adjust the grid, moving the vanishing point
and the far edge so that it more or less is at the same angle as the buildings.
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Custom gridding and more tricks of the trade
Staying on the straight and narrow
handy when youre drawing something like 11
Straight lines The Straight Line tool is
buildings. Its hot key V, or can be accessed on the
left side of the Property bar. Use it to dene edges,
lines of windows, etc, and then go back in with a
regular brush so that it looks more organic.
on the far right of your image, but as your vanishing point is just off the 12
Custom grids Now we have a bit of a problem. You need to work
edge, theres an area where the grid doesnt cover. So to compensate, add a
new layer above the others, title it grid and, using the Straight Line tool and
an obvious colour, build your own.
so far on the foreground. Sometimes it 16
Progress so far This is our progress
helps to jump around a bit when painting, so even
though this section clearly isnt nished, were now
going to work on another part of the image.
13
Other grids Its
helpful to have a grid
layer to make other notations
as well. Here, we added some
guidelines for the windows
on the Empire State Building.
We also turned on the regular
grid (Canvas>Grid>Show
Grid). Being able to adjust the
transparency of your notes
is handy, and using the Layer
palette is easier than having
billions of perspective grids for
one image.
Tutorial Create with perspective
15
Spacing There is a trick for evenly spacing objects in perspective.
This works best if the number is something like two, four or eight;
three and six are possible, its just more complicated. After a certain point,
youre better off eyeballing it. See the side tip for more information on this.
14
The longest step Now that weve
made the rst pass, its time to go back
in, add details and generally tighten up the image.
This is a lot of slog work, and theres really no short
cut for it.
How to evenly space
receding objects
Windows made easy
This is most practical for things that are
box-like, such as windows. First, determine
where you want the top and bottom of the
nearest object to the viewer to be. Draw
two lines to the relevant vanishing point,
and divide off the front and back so that you
have a rectangle in perspective. Now draw
lines connecting the opposite corners. The
centre of the resulting cross is the midline.
Draw a vertical line through this, and you
will now have two boxes. Continue dividing
boxes until you have your desired number.
If you want three windows, follow the same
steps, but instead of subdividing at the
centre of the crosses, your dividing lines will
be where the secondary crosses intersect
with the original one.
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17
Rendering the background Here, we start to go into the far
background and try to make it look more like buildings and less like an
amorphous blobby mist. This has far more to do with atmospheric perspective
(see the Atmospheric Perspective side tip) than linear perspective.
convincing, deep space. In some ways, its trickier than linear to 18
Atmosphere Atmospheric perspective is very helpful for creating
manage because its more subjective and variable. In general, as things recede
their colours become duller, theres less contrast between the darkest dark
and lightest light, and edges become softer.
Lighten up a bit with highlights
Finishing touches
19
Rendering
the sky
Start to go back into
the sky and make it a
bit more interesting
now, perhaps using
the Wet Acrylic and
Fine Feathering Oils
brushes. Gentle,
circular strokes work
especially well for
rendering clouds.
end now, so were at the point of ddly 20
Detail work Were getting close to the
detail work. Go through the image and tighten up
the buildings, x little things and add more detail
to the background.
21
Endless detail work More of the same here, this stage could
potentially last indenitely and theres a danger of overworking the
image. Dont overdo it and make the buildings in the background as detailed as
those in the foreground, as that will atten out the apparent space.
22
Final lightening adjustment The last thing to do is add another
layer for lighting. Use the Soft Airbrush to just gently soften some
of the background a bit more, adding in general highlights and shadows in a
couple of places.
Working
from
reference
We worked with a
couple of reference
images of New York
for this image, but
while we tried to stay
reasonably accurate,
we were not married
to the photos. There
were several areas
where the way
buildings lined up
with each other that
made it unclear as to
what was going on,
due to unfortunate
tangents or lighting.
So its a good idea to
be working from more
than one photo of the
same area, preferably
ones that are taken
from slightly different
angles. Also, having a
readable image and
composition is more
important than being
accurate to the photo.
Atmospheric
perspective
conditions
This tutorial focuses
on linear perspective,
but keep in mind that
when youre dealing
with a landscape,
atmospheric
perspective is almost
as important in
creating the illusion
of depth. We went
over this a little in
one of the steps,
but in general your
background should be
have colours that are
closer to being neutral,
have less contrast
between highlights
and shadows and be
softer-edged than your
foreground. These are
all effects that a lot
of air or atmosphere
has on things, and
encourages the idea
that youre looking
at a large amount of
distance in one shot.
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42
dmit it, you have sat in front of your computer
struggling with a painting and wished that
the machine would take over and ix things
with the push of a button. Well, Painter is a
pretty impressive tool, but there is still need for a pilot
to ly it. Still, there are a number of fantastic new tools in
the Painter toolbox that can get you surprisingly close to
that fond wish, and they reside in the Autopainting and
Underpainting palettes.
Combined with the Autoclone function, these exciting
features enable you to take any image and repaint it
with a whole host of brush styles and sizes, all very
easily altered to it your needs and preferences. With
a handy set of sliding controls, you can instantly alter
the originals value, hue, tone, contrast and brightness
before you begin. In fact, there are so many ways
and combinations of ways to spruce up a piece
you will without a doubt spend hours and hours
discovering your favourites before you even get
to the Autopainting function, and you will be the
better for it! To help you along in your voyage
of discovery, we have provided the following
pages, which offer a tidy overview of the various
functions of these new tools. By irst setting up a
simple piece for Painter to tackle solo, and then
applying what we have learned to a work begun
with Autopaint and inished the old-fashioned way
(hand-painted, of course!), we will become familiar
with the possibilities that these useful tools present.
Well begin with a look at some general tips for using
the automatic options, before moving on to some of
the different style settings and take a look at how they
change an image. So take it easy for a while and let
Painter do the work!
Let Painter take over as we explore the
Underpainting and Autopainting palettes
Well have a look at some of the colour control the Underpainting
palette affords over the page, but we should point out that its a
very handy one-stop shopping place for many of the best editing
tools Painter has for adjusting colour and tone. Quick where
is the contrast slider? How can we lighten the picture a bit? We
wish there was an easy way to boost the colour intensity a bit.
Which menu was that tonal option under? All these functions
and many more are now at your fingertips in the Underpainting
palette. They wont look particularly good on some of your
treasured and delicate photos, but for those times when all you
want is a quick spruce of a finished image, they are a great place
to start. The Increase Contrast is especially good.
Quick colour control
Underpainting asap
Bring back the detail
Back to reality
Although its great to sit back and watch as Painter
happily turns your photo into a piece of art, dont expect
it to do a perfect job. There are bound to be areas where
you need a touch more detail or things are a little too
arty for your liking. You can easily bring detail back to
the image thanks to the Restoration options. This palette
provides you with a soft- and hard-edges cloner, so you
can get to work on bringing back some of the photos
definition. You can control the brush size from within
the palette, and then its just a case of working the
cursor over the areas you want to bring back. With detail
restored, use a different brush to paint over the area.
Feature focus Working with Autopaint
FEA
TU
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FO
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Working
with Autopaint
MORE LIGHT, PLEASE The face of the
building is in the strongest light, but the original
source photo was very low contrast. A simple
solution was to lighten the original and, using a
Camel Cloner, paint in the facade by hand, with
supreme control over the process!
GRASSY The grass was
achieved via a nifty method.
After a few passes with
gestural autopaint, leaving
things fairly jumbled up and
still nondescript, the Camel Oil
Cloner brush was used with
directional strokes. Talk about
control! The cloner picks up
local colour and melts the
mess into a nice, painterly sea
of tall grass.
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Go wild and free
Stroke options
If you dont select the Smart Stroke option in the Autopainting
palette, you get access to a wide and delicious array of brushstrokes
that can be used for your painting. These cover a huge range of
styles, from short strokes to circles, hatch, splats, squares, curves
and single lines. Combine your choice with the other options such
as Size and Pressure, otherwise you could be waiting a while for
your image to emerge some are rather small! In addition to using
these to paint an entire image, they are quite handy for adding a
few random strokes on top of a painted image or even for creating
a textured background. Splodge a few colours onto a document and
then pick one of these options. The marks they make are great for
paper textures once converted to black and white.
DONT STOP THERE Once the image
is fully painted, you still has a boatload of
effects at your disposal to get things just
right. Here, three different lighting effects
were (subtly) employed to enhance the
lighting scheme and improve the drama.
MORE COLOUR Colour variation was
achieved by altering the original during
various stages of the autopainting process.
It is easy to turn a drab source image into a
much more dynamic and colour-rich nal
image this way, leaving painterly colour
variation throughout and eliminating at,
uninteresting areas altogether.
Lets do a little three-step transformation of a fairly unexceptional
snapshot using the Impressionist Cloner brush and a couple of deft moves
with the Underpainting palette. Well stay strictly within the preset brush
sizes and perform minimal adjustments, just to see how effective this
method is out of the box, so to speak. You need not have a high-resolution
photo for this, in fact, a smaller one is just fine. Watch the program
perform its magic and take notes, as what works for it will do just fine
when you are behind the brush as well!
Finished in three clicks
Bish, bash, bosh
depth, and a few more darks would suit things nicely. Activate 03
A bit of contrast Everything needs a bit more substance and
the original canvas again. Go back to the Underpainting palette and
choose Classical Scheme. Select the new painting, choose Autoclone and
let it run for another three passes.
add a little colour variation, activate the canvas and change the 02
Mix things up Now for a visit to the Underpainting palette. To
colour scheme at the top of the palette to Impressionist. Activate the new
painting and select Autoclone again, this time for three passes only. This
adds a nice controlled amount of brighter colours.
select the Impressionist Cloner. Turn Tracing Paper off and go to 01
Quick, clone First, make a quick clone of the original and then
Effects>Esoterica>Autoclone. About 20 passes will do, establishing some
nice rhythmic brushstrokes, and leaving us with a nice facsimile of a loosely
rendered study.
FRONT AND CENTRE
Most of the painting was
done by Painter, leaving
the choice parts for the
artist to hone in on. A
little handiwork on areas
of interest like the facade
of the schoolhouse, the
post and the wire fence
are all that is needed to
bring the level of detail
up to our satisfaction
and nished.
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Now weve seen how to merge the automatic options with
some freehand strokes, lets have a look at some of the best
underpainting options. These alter the colour of an image
to make it more suitable for emulating a certain style of
painting. The Impressionist Scheme does crazy things with an
image boosting the colours significantly and also altering
the hues in some instances. Although it look horrendous on
a photo, have a look at the Impressionist paintings. They all
exhibited interesting colours, and so this edit becomes more
understandable. When used on image with strong shapes,
it defines them even more, but also try it on more abstract
forms. Some of the colour combinations are exquisite.
Unusual colours for great results
Impressionist Scheme
The darker side of Painter
Classical Scheme
The Classical Scheme is perfect for when you want
to experiment with thick and dirty oils. It darkens
and enriches colours of an image, making the
shadows more prominent. It also gives a warm cast
over the entire image, which again helps give the
impression of an old oil masterpiece. Remember
our still-life tutorial in issue 11? That emulated the
look of the Dutch masters and we could have easily
run the start photo through this colour scheme
first to get the right base to paint onto. Although
it works well on landscapes, try it out on portraits
as well.
Feature focus Working with Autopaint
Man and machine in Painter harmony
Leading Autopainting by the hand
The lovely sketchy
product of a Painter
autopainting can
be brought to a
real inish with a
little deftly applied
hand-painting.
Simply choose
brushes and strokes
that it the feel of
the autopainting,
and add points
of interest that
strengthen the
impact of the piece.
FEATURE
FOCUS
02
The setup Our rst task is to ip the
picture, accomplished easily by choosing
Effects>Orientation>Flip Horizontal. Using a
small Digital Airbrush and the Eyedropper tool,
sample the colours of the sky, building and grass
and roughly paint over the sign. Now resize the
painting to a respectable size of 18 x 24cm via
Canvas>Resize.
again, and this time bump up the 06
More saturation Select the original
Saturation to 60. Repeat the Autopaint process
to the same degree as before. Bump up the
Brightness of the source image by 20 and repeat
the process.
reference and choose File>Revert. With 05
More paint Select the original
Bristle Oils 15 chosen, start up Autopaint again. Let
Painter ll in about the same amount of the canvas
with this layer. The idea is to leave a bit of each
successive layer showing through. Click to stop.
the Smart Stroke Painting box in the Autopaint palette. Painter will 04
Smart strokes With the Bristle Brush Cloner 12 chosen, check
now follow the basic contours and outlines of the image as it autopaints. Push
the Play button at the bottom right corner of the Autopaint palette. Let Painter
do its magic until about 90 per cent of the canvas is lled. Click anywhere on
the desktop and Painter will halt the painting.
01
Choosing a path The reference
image has strengths we will exploit
and weaknesses we will improve. The overall
composition is nice but the colours are dull and
the lighting is weak. The big blue sign must go
and the rhythms already in the painting should be
enhanced by focusing more attention on the post
in front, the facade of the schoolhouse and the
wire fence. Also, the image reads better ipped.
03
One more thing We are going to
build up our autopaint base in a few
steps, so lets get a head start adding more colour.
First off, go to the Underpainting palette and
choose Intense Color from the Photo Enhance
drop-down menu. Now make a quick clone as
before and toggle Tracing Paper off. We are now
ready to go.
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For a lighter touch
Watercolor Scheme
For a more organic feel
Sketchbook Scheme
The Watercolor choice does as youd expect.
Traditional watercolours are typified by their
translucent nature. Although some watercolour
paintings are packed with strong colours and bold
strokes, the image that comes to mind when thinking
about watercolour is an image that is soft, serene and
subtle. The Watercolor Scheme in the Underpainting
palette emulates this. It basically lightens the entire
image, placing an almost misty effect over the scene.
This is perfect for the Watercolor brushes, as it
controls the opacity and doesnt allow them to build
up colour too soon.
Painting,
clone thyself
Ever wish you could get
a bit more control over
the finishing details?
Try making a copy of
your nearly completed
piece and work your
details with Cloner
brushes. Brushes like
the Smeary Camel
and the Camel Oil
are especially useful.
They allow you to
make fine painterly
alterations while acting
like training wheels!
You literally cant get
too far astray, and
you still get to subtly
alter minor details
while keeping your
brushwork consistent.
FEATURE
FOCUS
Add light and detail until youre satisfied
The final flourish
When artists make sketches in their books, often they rely
on earthy tones. Have a look in your local art store youll
find packs of pens or pencils in sepia colours. The Sketchbook
Scheme helps to emulate this by turning your source image
into a subtle affair, giving it an almost creamy colouration.
You still have a good distribution of tones in this scheme,
and the eyes are allowed to travel quite nicely over the
whole view. Try this scheme on scenes that would make good
sketches architecture instantly springs to mind, as well as
objects such as statues. This scheme really comes to life if
you grab one of the Pen variants and pick a darker tone to
add contour lines freehand.
12
Last bits
Time for the
nishing touches and
a nal ourish. Do a
once-over of the entire
picture, cleaning up any
troublesome areas with
an Oily Blender brush,
a Detail Oil brush and a
Fine Feathering Oil brush
as needed. Make sure
the main areas of interest
are the post, the tower
and the left edge of the
building (including the
small post). One more
time to the Lighting
Effects palette. This time,
use Slide Lighting with
these settings, and via
Edit>Fade, reduce the
effect about 35 per cent.
until the canvas is almost completely 07
Final gloss Lets keep adding variation
covered. This time, bump up the Saturation and
Value by 17 and autopaint again. Select the
source again and revert to the original. Open up
a separate layer on our painting, set its Opacity to
50 per cent, choose the Soft Clone brush, and run
the program. Drop the layer and save.
wonderfully varied and active surface 08
Work it in Well, now we have a
with plenty of colour variation. The next step is
to bring everything together a bit with a little
handiwork. Grab the Oily Blender 40 from the
Blender brush palette and, using directional
strokes, work the entire canvas until all the white is
gone and the strokes are smoothed out a bit.
to the Photo Enhance palette. Click on 09
Sharpen up Select the source and go
Saturate, lighten and then Saturate again. Choose
the Camel Oil cloner and lighten up the facade a
bit, varying up the size as needed. Since a cloner
is being used, it is a snap to sharpen edges and
details a bit. Use directional strokes on the grass to
enhance the rhythms and add more variation.
10
Adding detail Open up a separate
layer and set the Opacity to 60. Using
a Detail Oil brush and a dark sampled from the
painting, add the wire fence and clean up details.
Add a few highlights to the post and wire by
sampling appropriate hues and values. Smooth
things out with the Fine Feathering Oil brush and
the Oily Blender brush. Flatten and save.
11
More lighting Choose Effects>Apply
Lighting, and, using the gradual diagonal
effect with these custom settings, apply lighting.
We want more light in the foreground, so copy
the image onto itself and make that layer a lighten
layer. Go back to the Lighting palette and apply
the gradual warm effect with the presets shown.
042-45_OPM_18_featurefocus.indd 45 30/5/08 09:21:55
Tutorial Paint like David Hockney
46
avid Hockney originally hailed
from England, but is now
based in Los Angeles. A key
contributor to the British pop
art movement in the Sixties, his body of
work since then has seen him become
one of the most signiicant artists of the
Twentieth Century.
In 1953, Hockney enrolled in the Royal
College of Art and began painting with
oils, his medium of choice for most of his
life. Hockney initially took to an abstract
style, using personal experiences as
the inspiration. He was keen to avoid
imitating anyone before him and so
began to forge his own style and place in
the art world.
In the summer of 1957, Hockney took
his National Diploma in Design exam,
graduated with honours and then
enrolled in the Painting School of the
Royal College in London two years later.
It is while studying here that he irst
gained attention as an artist with a lot
to offer the art world. After inishing his
studies, Hockney enjoyed praise from the
art critics and set out for New York. While
Artist
Time needed
Skill level
On the CD
May Yeoshen
5 hours
Intermediate
Sketch
Tutorial info
Using oil brushes, the preferred medium of David Hockney, we will introduce you in the ways of
creating a bright pop art painting bathed in sunlight
David Hockney
Paint like
:
here he met up with other artists who
were exploring the Pop Art style, such as
Andy Warhol. Instead of staying in New
York and enjoying the bohemian lifestyle,
he kept with his original plan of traveling
on to California.
While visiting Santa Monica, he fell in
love with the city and moved out there.
Hockney embraced his new environment
fully, soaking in the new culture and
translating it into his artwork. In his
California paintings, Hockney focused on
the colourful architecture that typiies
southern California, injecting lots of
colour and vibrancy into his work. The
relaxed culture also inluenced him,
resulting in a naturalistic style that most
people know him for.
Most of his paintings from the late
Sixties and early Seventies, particularly
Mr and Mrs Clark and Percy (1970-1971),
followed this naturalistic style, where his
earlier experiments in abstract gave way
to more recognisable forms. An interest
in photography also blossomed, pushing
his new realistic vision of the world as
well as giving him a way of studying light
in nature.
In the Nineties, Hockney continued to
experiment with the technologies of the
time. Traditional paint became coupled
with colour copiers, which he used to
reproduce some of his work. The vibrancy
of colour produced from such a technique
boosted his work even more, and its said
that he was delighted by fax machines,
especially using them to send drawings
through to friends.
We are picking one of the beautifully-
coloured California paintings for this
Paint Like, where we can really have fun
with the Color palette. Oils are our chosen
medium and well show how to layer up
detail to emulate this iconic artist.
David Hockneys body of work has seen him become
one of the most significant artists of the last century
Close colours
Two colours juxtaposed, slightly overlapping or very close
together, would have the effect of another colour when
seen from a distance. This pointillist technique is used here
by David Hockney to give life to the distant mountains.
Bright light
When Hockney saw the city of California, he was
amazed by the and bright colours offered by the
beach and southern architecture. In this image it is
noticeably one of the main features of his works.
Aquamarine art
Another recognisable feature is the depiction of the swimming
pool, with its bright aquamarine colours and almost abstract
lines suggesting waves and underwater effects, creating a
dreamlike outcome.
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Make a big impression with a pop-ular painting
The colours and the shapes
a sketch that is based on the original 01
The sketch First off, we start with
painting, since we are going to focus more on
the painting itself than the drawing. The sketch is
included on the CD.
02
Setting the colour palette This is
a representative painting from Hockey,
from the age where he was inspired by the vivid
colours in California. The colour palette is a
splash of bright and saturated colours, from the
aquamarine water to the carmine red coat.
03
Blocking in the main colours
Using the colour palette as reference
and the help of the Lasso and Bucket tool, ll in
the main shapes. For nishing touches, you can
use a high opacity covering brush, such as the Flat
Color Pen and the Eraser. We created layers for the
background (the sky, mountains and plants) and
for the midground (the oor, pool and the gures).
05
Shading the
background
With your oils, start
from the far areas and
then come to the closest
ones. Start with the sky,
a very pale blue. To shade
the mountains and the
vegetation, we used
the Round Camelhair
with around 40 per cent
Opacity and variable size,
depending on the area
you are shading. Be a bit
careless being messy
here is part of the style
and blend as many
colours as possible on
the light bushes.
06
The edge of the mountains As you have noticed, the contour
of the mountains touching the sky and the other mountains far
away have a light blue hue on them. Pick up a light cyan and emerald and with
the same brush, try to blend the mountain with the background, giving this a
hint of being far away, so they wont look so at.
different from the rest. To give more details to it, choose the Opaque 07
Rening the plants Theres this algae-shaped bush that is
Round, Size around ten per cent and Opacity at around 60 per cent. Give a
proper shape to the branches and leaves, and add some light here and there.
Tutorial Paint like David Hockney
Composite
method
A composite method
is a mathematical
formula that dictates
how the pixels of a
layer will combine with
the pixels on the layers
and canvas beneath
it. For example,
composite methods
can be applied to a
layer to darken or
lighten, increase or
decrease contrast or
adjust the colour of
the imagery beneath
it. A powerful feature
of composite methods
is that they do not
permanently alter
the image only the
visual display of the
combined pixels is
altered. When used in
different situations
can also create
interesting results.
Seurat
pointillism
The Seurat brush,
found under the Artist
category, is perfect
to add pointillism to a
painting. Generating
random colours akin
to the one you have
chosen as the main
one, when seen from
afar it will create a
nice effect close to the
Neoimpressionist one
that Georges Seurat
himself used.
brushes we are going to use the most 04
Short cut Its a good idea to take the
and separate them from the rest, so it will take less
time than browsing in the Brushes category. The
main brushes to be used are the Round Camelhair,
the Details Oil, Seurat and some blenders.
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Texturing the bushes You can use
the same brush to add the same effect
on the bushes on a separate layer. However, you
might want to change its setting a little bit. With
Spacing around 40 per cent and Damping around
25 per cent, paint on the bushes, picking up the
underlaying colour using the short cut Alt-click.
Go the extra tile with your painting
The floor space
08
Adding some details In those parts
where most of the brushes are too
big to add details, the Details Oil brush comes in
handy. To add cracks to the rocks or highlight the
cypresses, use the 15px size.
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The green mountains The green
mountains happen to have this same
effect, but as theyre bigger, use the Seurat brush
with a Size of 16px. Repeat steps ten and eleven,
and dont forget to do it on a separate layer.
13
Finish the background Once you are
satised with the background, collapse
all of those layers. Zoom out and take a look at it,
and add several nishing touches with the Round
Camelhair brush.
11
Blend the texture The Seurat brush
is excellent at creating random colours
and texture, however, in the bushes there are
too many dots. Using Blenders>Smudge, a high
opacity and Size around 30 per cent, blend and
give the nal touches to the texturing. Make sure
youve checked the Pick up underlaying color box.
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Shade the oor Keep on shading
from the background to the midground.
Make your sketch visible and, using the Round
Camelhair, colour several tiles on the oor, leaving
the left area almost white and untouched. The
tiles are a gentle blend of pale pinks and greys.
Blending
brushes
When the brush you
are using doesnt
blend enough with the
colours underneath,
you can choose from
a variety of brushes
under the Blender
category. They come
in different sizes and
shapes, and some
add nice textures, like
the Smudge brush. If
you want to go for a
smoother digital look,
the Just Add Water
is the one to go for.
There are some that
act like oils as well.
Try them to see the
difference and see
which one suits your
needs more.
them evenly spaced. Pick different earthy tones. At the end, draw a 15
Pool tiles On a separate layer, paint the pool tiles and try to make
dark line above so it will make them look like 3D objects, using the Straight
Line tool and an opaque brush like the Opaque Bristle Spray.
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Neoimpressionism
To add that
impressionism effect on the
mountains and brushes, there
are the Seurat brushes under the
Artists category. Open the Brush
Creator and change the Spacing
to around 70 per cent. Pick up
a low saturated blue hue, in the
case of the blue mountains, and
with a low Opacity (30 per cent)
and a Size around 10px, apply the
brush, following the ow of the
mountain. Do it on a separate layer
so you can erase the extra bits.
Incidentally, we happened to do
it twice. The rst time, we set the
layer to Overlay, and painted on
top of it again, whereas the second
layer had a normal blending mode.
046-051_OPM_18 Hockney.indd 49 30/5/08 10:02:03
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Make a splash with colours and shading
The swimming pool
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Erase the extra bits With the Eraser tool set on straight line
mode, erase the extra bits in the pool tiles, and then using the sketch
as a guide, paint straight lines to give shape to the oor tiles using an opaque
brush, with Size about 13px. Then on a new layer on top, draw the shadow left
by the standing man, using desaturated hues. Finally, collapse all the layers.
this piece. First off, lets start with the upper part, the darker one. 17
The swimming pool The swimming pool is the eye candy of
Pick a pure blue and paint the upper half of it. Then take an aquamarine blue
and paint elongated and rounded shapes. Use the Round Camelhair for its
blending properties, around 20 per cent Opacity and a large brush (23px).
and paint the shadows on the water. 18
Rening it Pick up a slight darker tone
Also pick a lighter tone, like the one located in
the lower half of the swimming pool, and paint
some highlights here and there. For the nishing
touches, pick up the Fine Camel to add some
details, like the tiles seen underwater.
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The other
half The most
distinguishing feature of
the pool are the white
lines simulating waves.
Following the shading
pattern, pick up a darker
aquamarine blue, like the
one used in the upper
half, and shade from the
outside to the centre of
each piece of the mosaic.
Make sure to shade
under the bodys torso.
After youve done that,
with an opaque brush
like the Fine Camel 10,
draw the lines using an
almost white colour.
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The standing man The main issue
with this gure is that the light is so bright
that where it hits, it makes it appear white, making
the band look more obvious. The band is that zone
between the light and the shadow that appears to
be slightly darker than the shadow area. It is very
noticeable on his face and hair.
Tutorial Paint like David Hockney
Saturated
and
desaturated
colours
Saturation is the
amount of grey in
a particular colour.
A colour with more
grey is considered
less saturated, while
a bright colour (one
with very little grey in
it) is considered highly
saturated. The amount
of saturation does not
affect the basic hue of
a colour and it also is
unrelated to the value
(amount of light or
darkness in a colour).
For example, if we take
away the colours in an
image, the tonal values
will remain. However,
taking away the colours
themselves will make
the image completely
unsaturated. A more
saturated colour is
also called a more pure
colour because it is
undisturbed by grey.
In the Color Wheel, the
low saturated colours
are located on the left
side of the triangle,
while the purest ones
are located near the
opposite vertex.
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The swimming man The swimmer
casts onto the colours of the water,
so the shading has to be done with the same
aquamarine blue used before. Every colour on his
body can be used on other parts: the colour of
his hair can be used to shade the body, and the
swimsuit can be the highlight colour of the esh.
21
Water effect Create a new layer
and with the Fine Camel 10, draw lines
simulating the water effect on the body. Then
erase the ends using an Eraser at low Opacity (30
per cent), so it will blend more with the gure,
lower the layers Opacity (around 70 per cent) and
nally, use the Soften lter under Effects>Focus.
The band
Try to identify the edge
of a cast shadow and
the edge of shade,
when the form turns
from light. Notice the
various edge qualities
along the boundary
between shade and
light sometimes soft,
sometimes crisp. The
area where the form
turns from the light
source is what is known
as the band, almost
appearing like a soft
dark border dividing
the light source from
the cast shadow. In
this painting, it can be
easily noticed on the
trousers and the face of
the standing man.
046-051_OPM_18 Hockney.indd 50 30/5/08 10:02:27
While working on traditional media, David Hockney preferred oils over every other media. Corel Painters Oil brushes simulate really well the traditional feel of real oils,
and with a broad variety we can find such looks as impasto, to fine detailing brushes to texturing looks.
Oils the preferred media of David Hockney
Where Painters Oil brushes work best
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Finally, the trousers The last part
doesnt have any secrets. The trousers are
white, thus being the front area covered in light.
The band is very noticeable here, so shade with
bluish greys and pay attention to the wrinkles.
Finish off the shoes, and you are done!
you can always blend the colours with the Blenders. For the hair, the 23
Rening some more If you feel you need to rene some more,
Medium Bristle Oils are perfect to get random colours and add more richness
to the strands. For details, use the Fine Camel or the Detail Oil Brush.
the jacket receives lot of light, thus 24
The jacket Like the rest of the gure,
having a lapel covered in light. Be careful with
the wrinkles too, and observe that its not only
carmine red, but shades of lavender and orange
that cover it in a subtle way as well.
BRUSHING
THE TEXTURE
To add brush texture that
can be best seen from far
away but dont want to
go for an impasto look,
you can use a brush like
the Smeary Round, which
simulates the feeling of
oils pretty well.
CAPTIVATING
DETAILS
Some parts may require
clean and precise lines. In
these cases, a Details Oil
brush can come in handy.
With high opacity and
almost no brush feature, it
can behave like the nest
of the brushes and provide
with eye-catching lines.
MIXING COLOURS
To mix several colours,
you may want to think
of a brush that blends
well with an underlaying
colour, such as the Round
Camelhair. When applying
high pressure, it will show
a feature like the Smeary
types, but it can provide
nice blending details when
applying low pressure.
NICE HAIR STROKES
Using brushes with
varying colour features
add richness to the
painting. The Medium
Bristles brush provides not
only oil features, but also
generates similar tones
depending on the colour
chosen and the area to
paint great for parts such
as the hair.
Head, shoulders, Hockneys and toes
The standing man
046-051_OPM_18 Hockney.indd 51 30/5/08 10:02:52
Art study How to paint boats
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All nautical elements transport us back to the last time we saw the ocean waves, pictures
of seashells, stacks of lobster pots, a rusty anchor In this segment, Cat Bounds explores
elements of painting boats and will help bring a bit of the sea into your art
pain t boa ts
How to
Im not a drawing artist and Ive never had
much patience for pencil drawing, not even
in drawing class, but sometimes its desirable
to do a rough outline sketch, and these
techniques work well for anyone who just
wants to get on with the painting! Theyre
also somewhat gestural and very simple but
provide a guideline for the addition of paints.
If you enjoy drawing, then they can be the
beginning of a more complete sketch.
Here, I made the lines a little heavier than
I normally would so it would show up better
in the image.
04
Paint the sky The landscape or
seascape is almost as important as the
boat itself, and because we have such a close-up
of the main image, we can afford to add textural
strokes throughout the background without the
concern of overpowering it. And so our painting
begins to come together with a boat that oats in
a sea of colour.
02
A few more guidelines From the
gure of eight, we can move on and
make our boat drawing as simple or as detailed
as we want. Ive done some simple strokes to
indicate the cabin and mast, but these may or may
not stay true to the sketch as I begin adding paint.
Working in layers simplies this process even
further because we dont have to worry about
painting away the sketch.
01
Figure of eight This is a good
perspective technique that will stand you
in good stead when laying out the hull of your
boat. Think of a boats hull as looking like a gure
of eight, and no matter which direction you turn
your eight, you will see the beginnings of a boat
at a particular perspective. A little practice, and
you will know how to position the eight in order
to have it t within the scene you have in mind.
03
Now we get to paint! I have the
patience of Job when it comes to the
painting. I spent the whole day on this one and
could have painted longer if there had been time.
I began adding some colour with the Airbrushes,
which are my favourite for applying colour where
I dont need brushstrokes yet. Once the basic
hues were in my boat, I began adding detail and
varying the colours.
Perspective
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pain t boa ts
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Colour palette
These swatches illustrate just how the different colour palettes affect the
overall images. Colour set A is light and bright, with enough mid-tones
and shadows to complement the brightness, but Colour set B is all about
dark tones and is ultimately less balanced. If you know the room where
your painting will hang, these are some things to take into account. A
painting full of light can either bring light into a room or get lost on a plain
white wall, while a painting done with a darker palette can either project
drama or gloom, depending on its surroundings.
IMPROVISED ILLUSTRATION
I began by doing a gestural drawing that dened the
shape and size of a boat but didnt offer much in the
way of detail. This left me free to improvise as I went
along. I like the scribbly, loose feel as I draw this way,
and I try not to erase much.
RIGHT OR WRONG?
I actually set out to paint
a right and wrong way
for painting boats and
as so often happens, I
found I liked them both,
but they are two distinct
approaches to painting
one scene. In the rst
example, I achieved more
or less a watercolour
effect using oil brushes.
Colour set A
Using the same gestural drawing but zooming in a bit, I set out to do a painting with
greater contrast and more apparent brushstrokes but still using the same oil brushes.
This time, the effect is more like an early autumn afternoon.
Rather than splashing on surprising violets and yellows, I stuck to a more sombre
colour palette in this one, choosing colours that read a bit more realistically. Again, I
left much of the drawing showing.
Most of the elements of the scene are fairly abstract with only the boat given any
detail. This in itself draws the viewers eye to the boat, and there is no competition for
focal point.
The intense lights and deep shadows give this one more drama than the previous
version. So, from one sketchy boat idea, we have now two very different paintings.
Colour set B
GESTURAL DRAWING
I have left the gestural drawing as part of my painting. This is simply a
matter of taste. You may choose to paint over your drawing or leave it
as a clue to your process. I kept the colours light and transparent and
the effect is that of a summers day.
ELUSIVE ELEMENTS
I also try not to explain
everything, leaving some
elements where the
viewer may question, Did
she mean for this to be a
ower or a pile of stones?
This makes an image so
much more interesting,
and the viewer becomes a
part of the process.
Colour set A Colour set B
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Art study How to paint boats
The same elements that go into making any good painting apply to making a
boat painting, and well add one more to the list: giving it room to move around
if its supposed to be in motion. Theres something about a boat painting that
makes us want to move with it.
Panoramic view
This familiar gondola scene depicts this concept clearly and exudes ambience of that
beautiful city for both those who have visited as well as those who have not. First we see the
boat, and our eyes follow the white path up through the narrowing stream and then back
down the channel to see where the boat is headed.
Composition
Heres the same boat with some serious cropping. We have a clearer view of the boat,
and this might be preferable if youre doing a realistic study of boats, but if you want
a composition that speaks of boats and motion upon the water, then give your boat
somewhere to travel and room for the viewers eye to travel throughout the painting.
Spick-and-span boats are a bit easier to paint than those in disrepair, but a
shipwreck can have its charm as well, so we thought we would paint some
weathered wood. I did this one in reverse of the ship where I did a preliminary
drawing and actually just began by laying in paint pigment ,adding the details
with ink pens toward the end.
Weathered wood
03
Finer detail When I
was ready to begin greater
detail, I chose the Croquil Pen 3 set
to default and blue/black as my ink. I
kept it loose and gestural. Here, I can
spend anything from half an hour to
days, depending on how detailed I
want it to be.
01
Rough it in Here, I used
the Grainy Colored Pencil
7 set to a large size and an Opacity
of four per cent over a paper texture
of Sandy Pastel Paper, just changing
colours here and there, not being too
careful about either form or shape yet.
02
Describe some shapes
Using the same Pencil, I
raised the Opacity and lowered the
size in order to begin to nd the
shapes of my weathered planks,
making sure I used darker browns and
blacks in-between the shapes.
Close croppin
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Paint a background Using
the Soft Airbrush 20 set to a
large brush and 50 per cent Opacity,
I spread various shades of beige and
brown over the canvas and then made
some arbitrary lines to represent metal
panels using the Thick n Thin Marker 10
from the Felt Pens library.
02
Making drizzles One of
the most excellent brushes for
making the kind of drizzles you nd on
rusted metal is the Smooth Runny Camel
Watercolor brush. Choose a rusty colour
and watch as it ows down the canvas.
03
Splotches of colour Here
we begin the abstraction that
represents rust, merely splotches and
splashes of paint, and because I must
have colour, I was compelled to add
some pale aqua here and there.
Rust
Rust may occur at the edges of metal panels in areas where the paint has
been damaged, and it may appear as drizzles as it washes down the metal. I
loved the way this piece turned out because I enjoy doing abstract pieces, and
I think it might look good hung on its own.
Sails
This piece also became an abstract. Sails are supposed to billow and
sweep, and the process of making brushstrokes that describe these
movements is one of great joy. My example is very close-up, but the
techniques are the same even for smaller sails in the distance.
01
A sail has to start
somewhere I laid in big
blocks of colour using the Dull Grainy
Chalk 20 and then softened it using Just
Add Water. The pattern is one of lights
and darks because even in a simple
image like this, we still need contrasts.
02
Sweeping lines Using
an Oily Colored Pencil, I
described the owing lines of my sail,
nothing too fussy at this point, just lines
that speak of freedom, soaring and
adventures on the waves.
03
Focus on the lines Going
back to the chalk, I zoomed
in and concentrated on dened lines,
sometimes softening with Just Add
Water. And thats a brief look at some
elements of bringing boats into our
repertoire of beautiful subjects.
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Tutorial Get creative with brushes
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058-063_OPM_18_Create the cover.58 58 29/5/08 11:10:39
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Being loose with custom brushes can render
appealing artworks, and a still life is a great theme
to play with. Discover how we created our cover
Get creative
with brushes
epicting a few everyday objects
either natural or man-made
arranged in artiicial scenery
has been quite popular among
the painters of Western art since the
Seventeenth Century.
Still-life paintings give the artist far
more freedom in the arrangement of the
elements within a composition than other
types of subjects such as landscape or
portraiture. Also, they can be the perfect
solution to a bad day of weather or due
to the absence of a model to sit for you.
Vincent Van Gogh, best known for his
landscapes and portraits, discovered in
still life a great opportunity to express
his art, from A Pair of Shoes to a Vase with
Twelve Sunlowers.
Besides other conveniences, a still life is
a great theme for practising a loose style
of painting. If you start with a set of a few
elements arranged in a composition, you
will probably get better chances to play
with brushwork styles than if you were
working on a portrait, where the likeness
is a crucial matter.
For this tutorial, most of the loose
feel will be provided by a category of
brushes not included on the original
Painter discs. Den brushes are a Denise
Laurent creation and this set of brushes
is included in Jeremy Suttons Painter X
Creativity book (www.paintercreativity.
com) as well as in Marilyn Sholins Painter
Tutorial CDs (www.msholinprosales.
com). For the sake of simplicity, only
three of them will be employed in this
tutorial. Dont worry if you havent got
these brushes, though. Weve given the
Painter X alternatives so you can still
enjoy the tutorial.
The source photo is already included on
the CD, but you can capture your own shot
to use. Theres also a box on page 61 for
some tips on setting the environment for
shooting your own composition.
Take many shots of your still-life
scene so you have lots to choose
from when it comes to painting
Artist
Time needed
Skill level
Marcelo Chiarella
3 hours
Intermediate
Tutorial info
On the CD
Original photo and
final artwork
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60
In the beginning, there was an apple
Get started Get started
Tutorial Get creative with brushes
before.jpg). For this tutorial, we will clone the original photo just to 01
Quick Clone Start by opening the source image from the CD (cover
establish the main shapes of our work. Choose File>Quick Clone.
the Clone Color button in the Colors palette in order to get the colour 02
Select a brush Select Dull Conte 15 from Conte brushes and press
from the original photo as you paint. Change the Opacity to ten per cent and
Size to around 80. Ensure that Tracing Paper is selected on the Canvas menu.
order to interact with. Choose Select>All, Edit>Copy, Edit>Paste In 05
Real Oils brush Most brushes require stuff in the working layer in
Place. Select Real Oils Soft Wet from RealBristle Brushes, set Size to 40,0 and
Opacity to 80 per cent and make sure that Layer 1 is selected.
06
Increasing variety Start working with this oil brush in order
to increase the expressed energy. Be loose in the entire image, but
allow some portions of the canvas layer to show up. In the Colors palette,
alternate from selecting Clone Color (to get some portions of the original
photo) and white (for a blending effect).
Brush
settings
Just to make sure
you have configured
your brush settings
accordingly for each
step of this tutorial,
choose Restore Default
Variant from the drop-
down menu for the
selected brush. Once
youve done this you
can use the settings
weve given and be
sure youll get the
same result.
Respect
the values
More important than
respecting the colour
map from the original
photo is constructing
a reliable distribution
of light and shadows
(values). To accomplish
this, look at your
source photo with your
eyes half-closed and
compare it with your
working image. Try
to analyse the values
(not the colours) and
to change any areas
that need correction
by using lower and
higher values where
needed. In the Color
Wheel (Window>Color
Palette>Show Colors),
you select the main
colour by using the
surrounding circle
as well as the value
pointing up and down
in the inside triangle.
04
Calibrate colours Depending
on the applied pressure and number
of overlaying brushstrokes in some areas, the
resulting image tends to be a bit dark. You can
compensate for this by choosing Effects>Tonal
Control>Equalize and moving the Black slider
towards 98 per cent, White to zero per cent and
the Brightness to around 27 per cent. Save.
03
Rough
underpainting
Now, lets create a rough
muck-up with the main
shapes of our composition.
For this step you dont
have to be worried about
being too precise. Use your
stylus, varying the pressure
and direction to ll in
the canvas. Leave some
unpainted areas for your
image to breathe.
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Partially revealing the layer
The purpose of working in a new
layer is the exibility allowed for experimenting
with composite method and opacity values.
Try to change the opacity to lower values and
experiment with other composite methods. This is
the result achieved by choosing Gel at 92 per cent
Opacity. Select Layers>Drop.
have Den Brushes in your Painter set, choose Oil Brush Blender from 08
Blend it up Lets provide a smoother feeling to the image. If you
this category. Otherwise, use Blenders>Coarse Oil Blender 30 with Jitter set
to 1,00. Try to work with sizes around 30. Control the pressure and direction,
trying to reproduce the original image movement.
09
Dening the forms (shapes)
Use Oil Brush Luscious from Den
Brushes to establish the shapes limits (optionally,
Gouache>Fine Bristle 30). From now on, avoid
cloning. Use the Alt key to select a colour already
in the working canvas, and change ever so slightly
the hue, saturation or value in order to achieve
more appealing results.
with some brushstrokes indicating the reections. Use Den>Oil Brush 10
Reinforcing reections The bronze pot will recover its shine
Luscious, changing Jitter to 1,50, Size 20 (optionally, Gouache>Fine Bristle 30),
choosing any ochre colour already on canvas and changing it slightly toward
the white corner on the colours triangle and a little in the yellow direction on
the surrounding circle.
11
Additional effects For this step, rotate your canvas using
Spacebar+Alt while dragging the image in order get a natural feel.
Drawing some arcs for dening the pot shape. Use Den>Oil Brush Luscious
with Size 20 and Jitter 0 (optionally, Gouache>Fine Bristle 30) for these lines.
Use Den>Oil Spatter Brush, Size 50, for additional effects leaving some
splashes here and there (or Pens>Leaky Pen, Size 50, Opacity 20).
Setting up the environment for shooting
If you decide to set up your own composition,
start with a few elements for experimenting
with light and camera controls (although the
automatic settings generally can render nice
shots, as you can see here).
A good place for the table with the objects
is close to a window. This way they will be
illuminated by a natural source of diffused
light. For the opposite side from the incoming
light, you may alleviate the shadows by using
a handmade reflector, constructed by gluing a
metallic foil to a cardboard.
The tripod is a nice accessory as it helps to
maintain steady the camera during the shot.
As these indoor scenes generally require low
speed because of the weak sources of light,
there are far less chances to produce blurred
images using a tripod than if hanging the
camera manually.
Another valuable tip is to use the timer. This
way, the instant of the shot will not occur in
the instant you depress the shoot button, but
rather a little later, when the camera is not
being touched.
Try varying the position of the objects
on the scene and always check the camera
display in order to get a better feeling of
each arrangement.
Use a lamp, experimenting with different
positions or even the internal ambient light,
so that you can warm up the scene and get
interesting effects.
Take light and angles into consideration
Materials:
Digital camera, tripod (optional), lamp
(optional), table, aluminium paper roll,
cardboard, towel (optional) and some objects
or food to compose the scene.
058-063_OPM_18_Create the cover.61 61 29/5/08 11:11:49
62
Tutorial Get creative with brushes
Dont forget your greens!
Create an organic feel
12
The grapes
Using the Den
Oil Brush Luscious,
Oil Brush Blender and
Oil Spatter or the
alternatives weve given
reinforce the grapes
shapes. Always try to
create new colours by
picking up some green
already on the canvas
and varying the value,
saturation and hue
on the Colors Wheel,
according to your close
observation of the
source photo.
Create an organic feel
13
Remaining vegetables Using the same technique, dene the
shape of the lemon, tomatoes and apple. This way, you can give more
spontaneous brushstrokes and bring back the roundness of the front elements
that was lost in the previous steps. Save your work now.
14
Surrounding elements Add some calligraphic signs here and
there in order to increase the energy and create an organic feel to your
work. For this purpose you can use Oil Brush Luscious, Size 20, picking colours
from your work. The Calligraphy brushes also work well. You will realise how
diverse the same colour will seem to be, depending on its surrounding!
15
Increasing contrast For reinforcing the overall colour vividness,
choose Effects>Tonal Control>Equalize and move the black arrow to
around 85 per cent and white to 15 per cent. The image will leave the washed
aspect and gain another dimension in respect with its colours.
of the values. For this, a great tip is to create a new layer (Ctrl/ 16
Revealing values Often you must analyse the overall distribution
Cmd+Shift+N), make the current colour white, choose Effects>Fill>Current
Color and change its composite method to Color. Click the eye icon of this
white layer to alternate the view between colour and black and white.
17
Correcting values Using the tip from
the last step, try to reproduce the value
map from the original picture by observing both
images in respect of the light and shadows. Make
the corrections needed by varying the brush and
picking up colours from the canvas, changing the
value if necessary. Also, observe the details on
the bronze pot and only suggest them with some
brushstrokes here and there.
18
Applying some texture Get a
convincing impasto oil effect instantly by
choosing Effects>Surface Control>Apply Surface
Texture, using Image Luminance, Softness set to
zero and Amount to around 20 per cent. This will
give a discreet rough texture feeling to your work,
depending on the luminance.
Be bold with
your layers
At some stages of your
work in progress, you
may be tempted to try
a completely different
brushwork or style.
Creating a new layer
is the way for these
experiments. The bad
point is the fact that
some brushes seem
not to work with a
blank new layer. To
compensate this,
select the entire work
on the canvas layer
(Ctrl/Cmd+A), copy it
(Ctrl/Cmd+C) and paste
it in the same place in
a new layer (Ctrl/
Cmd+Shift+V). Now
you can dare with your
brushstrokes without
destroying the work
already done, and even
experiment with the
composite methods
and transparency in
this layer. If you got
appealing results, drop
the layer. Otherwise,
discard it and try
another direction.
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Perspective lines Add some sense of
depth, suggesting some horizontal and
vertical lines for the background and slanted for
the towel, always trying to be loose and to vary in
colour, value and expression of the brushstroke.
20
Integrate elements Pick up some
blue tones from the towel and using the
Den>Oil Spatter Brush at Size 40, create some
stains on the background. Repeat this with other
colours to integrate the elements on the scene.
21
Final touches For the nal touches, use the Pens>Scratchboard
Tool on a new layer, setting its Transparency to around 50 per cent.
This will create some intermediate tones. Use Impasto>Thick Clear Varnish 20,
Depth Lofter and others from the Impasto category in a new layer (with layer
Opacity set to zero per cent) to add some relief details and bring a convincing
feel to your work. After the nal embellishments, sign your work, preferably in
a new layer so you can move it freely and study an appropriate position.
Finalise your painting with the last few adjustments
Put it into perspective Put it into perspective
Experiment with the settings Brushes to get creative with
You can get
interesting variants
on each selected
brush by controlling
its Jitter value. This
property controls the
degree of randomness
of your brushstrokes:
low values for dabs
following directly
along the stroke path
and higher values for
dabs going randomly
outside the path. This
way, you can produce
stunning effects if you
explore this property
before using each
selected brush.
TONAL VALUES
When you are working from a
photo, even if you are cloning the
colour, it helps to keep an eye on
the tonal values. Keep looking
at the original and your painting
through half-closed eyes. It sounds
strange, but its the best way of
seeing the tones!
DEFINE THE ELEMENTS
When you are working with a loose style such as
this, its common for elements to get smudged and
obliterated. After laying down the rough strokes,
begin the work in the dened shapes.
IMPASTO EFFECT
Building up a feeling of thick
paint is pretty easy when you use
the Surface Control command. It
allows for a subtle, yet effective
nish and lets you have more
control over the look than if you
relied on the Impasto brushes.
CUSTOM BRUSH
Although Painter has a
phenomenal amount
of brushes, its worth
investigating some of
the ones created by
Painter artists. These
are tailored to specic
tasks and often give
phenomenal effects
with just a few strokes.
058-063_OPM_18_Create the cover.63 63 29/5/08 11:13:42
64
eres another in our series
where we explore the various
tabs of the Brush Controls
palette. Most of us began using
Painter by grabbing some brushes to see
what each of them could do, leaving the
customisation for later, and thats actually
a good thing because once were familiar
with the many default capabilities of
these brushes, the rest evolves easily
and naturally. In previous issues, weve
covered the General, Size, Spacing, Angle
and Bristle tabs. This time, were dipping
into the Well, to discover at least a few of
its plethora of possibilities.
The sliders and tabs we ind within
the Well controls relate to how our brush
strokes interact with underlying pixels,
blend with them and convey colour in
the form of available mediums to the
canvas, attributes that are controlled by
the Resaturation slider (applies colour)
and Bleed (picks up underlying colour).
These two controls are so vital to the
modiications were able to make in our
brushes that they also appear on the
Brush Property bar.
So open Painter and, if its not already
open, go to Window>Brush Controls to
click Show on all the tabs that you want
to appear in the palette. Now choose your
favourite colour-bearing brush variant
and follow along as we explore the sixth
tab, keeping in mind that any of the tabs
can be dragged to a more convenient
position in the palette for easier access.
Well
Resaturation
When we talk about Resaturation and Bleed, they need
to be discussed in tandem as they are set up to work
together. With the brush youve chosen, begin on the right
side of a new canvas, with the brushs default settings,
and depending on the relationship between the two
settings, it most likely lays down a good deal of colour.
Now gradually begin shifting the Resaturation slider to
the left and the Bleed slider to the right, and watch as the
strokes seem to grow more transparent as they pick up
the underlying colour. By the time both sliders are pushed
all the way, there will be little or no colour applied and
only a blending and shifting of underlying colour.
Primer Brush controls: Well
Here is a second example of the reciprocal relationship
between the Resaturation and Bleed sliders. To start, we
will choose two colours and fill one half of a new canvas with
each. Then, alternating the brush colours and experimenting
with the Resat and Bleed percentages, we watch the
interplay of those two colours as we stroke from side to side.
This could easily be the beginning of a powerful abstract
painting, all done with one brush as the overlapping strokes
are charged in varying degrees by the applied medium and
the underlying colours; note that the colour changes can be
as subtle or as dramatic as we want them to be. Add some
impasto, and the strokes become even more powerful.
Bleed
BRUSH CONTROLS
RESATURATION EXPRESSION
As in previous tabs weve discussed in
which the Expression menu is available, this
is where the Resaturation slider attributes
are further customised according to the
direction of our stroke, the pressure applied,
the tilt or bearing of the pen, the source
image, on a random basis, and so forth.
A look at how the Brush Controls Well tab
works to enhance our Painter brushes
RESATURATION SLIDER
The Resaturation slider controls
come in increments between 0
and 100 per cent, the amount
of colour that is replenished in
a brush stroke on our canvas.
Set at zero, the brush does not
produce any colour, but with
Resaturation less than ten per
cent, while Bleed is less, the
colour fades in gently.
Pick up
multiple
colours
This is all very cool,
but at some point the
results might look a bit
prescribed. Painters
with traditional
tools know that their
brushes can pick up
and paint with multiple
colours, but how can
we do that digitally?
Heres how: enable
Brush Loading by
checking the Brush
Loading checkbox at
the bottom of the Well
palette. Now your
brush can actually pick
up colours hair by hair,
giving truer colour
interaction, amazing
colour variations,
smearing and better
cloning results.
064-065_OPM_18_brushes.indd 64 30/5/08 14:32:54
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Dryout
The Dryout slider works in union with
Bleed, so the Bleed slider must be set
above zero for it to work, and we amend
the Dryout effects by changing the Bleed
setting as the Dryout control determines
just how quickly a brush runs out of
medium. Dryout is measured in pixels,
and moving the slider to the left causes a
brushs reservoir to empty more quickly,
producing brush strokes that fade gently. If
Dryout is set on high, the brush never runs
out of colour.
BLEED EXPRESSION
Here again we have the same setup,
where the Bleed settings we have chosen
are further enhanced by the choices
we make within the Expression menu.
Choose Direction, and the Direction slider
appears. At rst glance, these controls may
quite possibly appear a bit intimidating,
but theyre logically arranged and
progressively understandable.
The Well options
DIRECTION SLIDER
This slider is only available when
Expression Direction is selected and
lends further control over that option.
Choose one of the other Expression
options, and it will be greyed out,
but for now choose Direction and
experiment with the subtle changes
it makes in your brush variants use
of colour.
Resaturation
Envisage a traditional paintbrush
and how it has to be saturated
with paint in order to apply
medium to the canvas. The
advantage of digital over
traditional art is that our brush
can be continually resaturated.

Bleed
Sometimes we want the base
colour to bleed through. The
Bleed slider grants full control
over the amount of this effect.

Resaturation/Bleed
Remember, if Resaturation is
greater than zero, the current
colour will be applied to the
canvas, and if Bleed is greater
than zero, any underlying colour
will be blended into that stroke.

Expression
The Expression options offer
endless possibilities for each
of us to create our own custom
variants, whether we choose
None, Direction, Pressure, Wheel,
Tilt, Bearing, Rotation, Source or
Random from the fly-out menu.

Dryout
The Dryout slider works in union
with Bleed, so the Bleed slider
must be set above zero for it
to work. The Dryout control
determines just how quickly a
brush runs out of medium.
Brush Loading
Enable Brush Loading by checking
the relevant checkbox. This
affects how dab-based brushes
interact with underlying pixels.
P
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A lot of the creativity, as well as intuitive choices, await you
in the Expression controls in this or any of the Brush Control
tabs. For example, if we want a brush that applies and smears
colour, we can tweak the pressure actions of Bleed. Now we
will mention one more option, the Bleed Invert box located
to the right of the Expression fly-out menu. Checking this box
reverses the sense of pressure with respect to Bleed, and so
rather than having pressure increase with that attribute, the
pressure will decrease the Bleed. As a result, Resaturation
takes over and the brush transitions from a blender to a
colour-wielding brush. Experiment with each of the options in
the Expression menu.
Expression
BLEED SLIDER
The Bleed slider controls just how
much our brush colours will smear
the underlying colour or colours,
including the canvas colour. Set the
Bleed percentage higher than the
Resaturation percentage, and more
colour will bleed through than were
actually applying as our medium. Thus,
the stroke doesnt reach its full opacity.
How to control the settings
064-065_OPM_18_brushes.indd 65 30/5/08 14:35:10
66
Drawing 101 The simple guide to watercolours
Watercolours
The simple guide to
ince its development, watercolour
painting has enjoyed a gently
passionate popularity. When
compared to the serious, slow
and deep intenseness of oil painting,
watercolours lightness of touch has
charmed dabblers and debutantes in equal
measure. The evolution and importance
of watercolour paints has been rather
overshadowed in art historical terms by
the new chemical developments of oils and
acrylics. Watercolour has an ancient past,
which begins with an organic, all-natural
application of pigment on cave walls in
prehistory. Such an iconic birth has rather
sadly not lent the material weight in terms
of status. It has been regarded by most as
a very practical and cost-effective solution
for preparing and planning the big inish.
Watercolour has been perceived as the
middle-class cousin of the art material
world. Traditionally a favourite of people
like recreational painters and illustrators,
satirists and children, its renowned simplicity
belies a need for a sound understanding of
how it behaves.
In this tutorial, we aim to explore
watercolours limitless potential. If you
approach it with a preconceived notion that
it is just good for colouring in careful pencil
drawing, the happy accidents and calculated
risks that can prove to be so rewarding will
remain undiscovered. This is an explorers
and an adventurers material, lexible and
practical enough to take to the Amazon
jungle, yet mysteriously sensitive and
expressive to be capable of great beauty and
aesthetic prowess. So lets get acquainted
with this versatile medium.
Experience the potential and the complexity of one of our best loved art materials
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Forward planning is the key to success
Creating a watercolour
The irst thing to remember with watercolour is that even though it is an
expressive and at times accidentally brilliant material, it needs quite a bit
of forward planning and adherence to certain golden rules. The two most
important are to work in layers, starting with the lightest area or leaving
the paper untouched, and adding gradually darkening detail. Second of
all, be patient and allow your work to dry before adding other layers.
Many paintings have been ruined because the colours have bled into one
another. Choose which areas need to remain white so that the layers of
colour do not inluence later detail. Planning is very important to allow
the unpredictable nature of the paint to behave to your advantage.
Correction protection
Imagine feeling very pleased with yourself. You have
worked steadily with expression and created a beautiful,
thoroughly effective and enticing landscape. Then,
horror of horrors, a tragic accident occurs, out of
nowhere and totally unexpected! A splash, a splatter,
a spray or a spill occurs, usually of some hideously
inappropriate colour. This happened to us just as we
were getting ready to complete step five! Deep, dark
brown stains shattered the perfection of the all-green
landscape, so carefully engineered and spoiled by
this brown muck! Thankfully, your work is eminently
salvageable, use the lifting-out technique on page 69,
with a clean, wet brush and tissue to mop up the mess.
03
Darker and more specic washes Now
its time to employ a smaller brush to build up
some form in the foreground. In this instance, we have
spontaneously tried to ascertain and conrm the darkest
areas of the darkest areas, namely the depths of the trees
and hedges. Just have fun and freely express your idea of
how the shapes are composed. This really isnt the time
to be accurate.
05
Final deepest touches
Now begin to raise the level
of contrast between background and
foreground. Overlay your trees darkest
washes with a lighter tone to block in
the full shape of the tree. Sharpen them
up with a much smaller brush and an
ever-deeper tone. Ensure you allow the
rst wash to dry to prevent the second
one bleeding without control. Use a
brisk, stippled effect that reects the
sense of foliage.
04
Specic background
details Now turn your
thoughts to the background. The key
principle is to keep the background pale,
watery and abstract, with a few subtle
but condently placed mountains. The
water is suggested purely by reection
so use milder versions of your tones
to represent them. Use a similar small
brush to block in the ow of vegetation
on the island.
01
The lightest of touches To begin with,
use an HB pencil to very lightly sketch out the
general shapes and positions of the major features of
the landscape. While you analyse these forms, consider
the rst place you want to lay down colour. In this
example, we chose a watery layer of light blue to begin
creating a sense of the pale blue aerial perspective of the
far distance.
of colour with watery washes in large sweeping 02
Tonal washes Lightly paint the major blocks
brushstrokes to avoid brush marks that can break up at
surfaces. To create a sense of distance, the background
should remain pale in relation to the foreground, which
should become increasingly sharp in contrast. Mix colours
to achieve accurate tones, avoiding the temptation of
using unmixed raw colour straight from the box.
066-069_OPM_18_drawing.indd 67 29/5/08 18:54:24
Drawing 101 The simple guide to watercolours
Look for a thick, textured sheet
Paper options
68
WET-IN-WET PROCESS
This is a very spontaneous and
expressive method that works
well for watery or airy spaces.
Avoid using it for specific detail
or small areas; it is immediate,
impressionistic and immensely fun.
The main principle is to layer colour
next to or on top of each other when
both layers are wet. This means
that they merge softly and bleed
into one another to give a soft focus
mark. This is very effective for many
surfaces but the main pitfall is that
the colours can mix and create an
unwanted green, for example.
ORDINARY PAPER
This paper is almost completely flat, with an entirely
smooth surface. It reveals the really delicate and
sensitive capacity watercolour has to make really
nuanced marks and intense or muted ranges of
colour. Hot pressed watercolour paper has a similarly
smooth surface but is comparatively thicker.
COLD PRESSED PAPER
This is a much more gentle and subtle textured
paper, but it is still solid enough to bear the wrinkling
effect that water and subsequently watercolour can
have on it. We have used it in this instance to support
the more subtle washes and wet-on-wet effect. It
works better for delicate, small-scale work.
ROUGH WATERCOLOUR PAPER
This is the thickest and most textural sort of paper.
Sometimes the texture appears like ripples and the
colour sinks in to reveal the texture quite clearly. It
is very good for chunky, spontaneous, big brushes,
bright colours and watery washes; for example, the
sturdy, exciting intensity of the salt-textured pictures.
Watercolour is such a lexible, light and
delicate material, which is applied with
soft and elegant brushes of various sizes.
In contrast, the paper traditionally used
is usually heavy, textured and full of
character. The original papers would
have been handmade, so mouldmade or
machinemade papers today mimic the
denseness of this manufacturing method.
MASKING
FLUID
TECHNIQUE
Masking fluid that you
might find in most art
suppliers is usually pale
yellow to differentiate
from the whiteness of
the paper, and has an
acrid rubbery smell.
Read the directions
on the back of the
bottle carefully and
choose an image in
which you anticipate
troublesome white
areas, for example, a
field of daises. The fluid
protects the paper from
the staining paint that
you apply once your
mask has dried. Remove
when it is entirely dry,
using an eraser softly.
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69
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Watercolour is a cost-effective
solution for planning the big finish
WATERCOLOUR GRADUATED WASHES
The wash image that we have used is brightly coloured with separately
distinguishable washes. The best way to create smooth graduated washes
is to use the paper itself. We began this painting halfway down. The sky
begins with an orange and yellow hue and merges into purple. Use a large
brush to paint a watery yellow wash along the horizon and then tip the
paper at 90 degrees so that the entire watery wash travels down to the
top edge. At intervals, add more water or colour as desired to ensure it
travels down a level.
WATERCOLOUR LIFTING-OUT
This is both a corrective and effective technique. One of the challenges
watercolour pushes you towards is to set white in stone. Because it pays
to work from white (or light) towards layers of dark, it means that your
first layer of colour has to be just right; if you obliterate too much white
paper, that highlight or cloud could be lost without hope. However, by
using a wet, clean brush and wiping it over the surface of the paint, you
can remove colour to reveal the white paper beneath. Use a clean cloth
or tissue to wipe away the excess.
WATERCOLOUR SALT EFFECT
This is a technique that allows for lots of happy accidents and spontaneous effects.
This natural phenomenon is best produced on the heavier rough paper. To begin
with, saturate the paper with deep, intense colour watery is pretty ineffective
and while the paper is still shiny with moisture, sparingly sprinkle crystals of
salt over the top. This should allow the salt to suck up the pigment. Feel free to
experiment with table, crushed and rock salt. It can take a few goes to get the exact
right ratio of colour to water to salt, but persevere and the results will be worth it.
066-069_OPM_18_drawing.indd 69 29/5/08 18:58:05
74
Official Painter Magazine Q&A, Imagine
Publishing Ltd, Richmond House, 33 Richmond
Hill, Bournemouth, Dorset, BH2 6EZ.
Alternatively you can email us at
opm@imagine-publishing.co.uk
Your questions answered
Send in your questions
for our experts to answer
at opm@imagine-
publishing.co.uk
What youll find in this section
Send in your queries to
Software Dont get bogged
down in a Corel Painter black hole
write to us and well help you
work harmoniously
Fine art When it comes
to creating art, you often find
little niggles that ruin your
masterpiece. We sort them out
Illustration Make sure
your illustrations are in top form
by following our advice
On this issues panel
SHARE
YOUR
PROBLEMS!
Jim Scullion
Jim is a world-renowned
artist so we are delighted
he is keen to share his
knowledge with us!
He looks at depicting
movement as well as
fashion illustrations.
Joanna
Michalak
Joanna brings her paint
skills to us this issue,
looking at how to paint
delicate fabric as well as
how to add a touch of Art
Nouveau magic to work.
Delicate fabric
Id really like to paint a period piece but
am having trouble getting the costumes
correct. Do you have any advice for
delicate fabrics? (based on your Pride and
Prejudice image)
X
The two most important aspects of painting
Delicate fabric
Id really like to paint a period piece
of art but I am having real trouble
getting the costumes correct. Do
you have any advice for delicate fabrics? I
dont want heavy effects.
N E
The two most important aspects
of painting delicate fabrics are
transparency and texture. Most soft
fabrics are somewhat sheer. Thus you need to
remember that things underneath the fabric
have to remain more or less visible. Keep in
mind that these fabrics may be soft like muslin
or stiff like tulle. To paint muslin we use soft
brushes or blenders, and to paint tulle we use
hard-edged brushes on low Opacity (we can
also draw tulle using cross-hatching, which
will create a more visible texture). As for the
fabrics weave, it can radically change the
character of the cloth it can either make it
heavy and rough or delicate and soft. The
same rules apply to adding a pattern we
have to remember that a dense ornament will
make the fabric look heavier.
03
Pattern
Another way
of emphasising the
softness of the fabric
is to add a delicate
pattern, like owers.
We can either use a
ready-made brush
or create one on our
own. We can set the
layer with the pattern
to Overlay mode
and partially erase
the areas in shadow
(with low Opacity
Erasers>Eraser).
on a low opacity to dene the shape and 01
Muslin We use the Pens>Fine Point Pen
texture. Because we want to paint muslin, we will
soften some parts with the Blenders>Soft Blender
Stump. The Fine Point Pen alone can be used to
paint tulle, which is a more stiff fabric.
and transparency of a fabric, we can 02
Frills In order to show the softness
paint frills. We draw strong outlines (Airbrush>Fine
Detail Air on a high Opacity). We dont ll the
inner parts completely and we use a brush on a
low Opacity. A single layer of a transparent fabric
shows whats underneath.
074-079_OPM_18_artclass.indd 74 30/5/08 14:43:09
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I like the elements of Alphonse Mucha and Art Nouveau but want to
tie them in with my own design. Have you got any tips to help me
re-create this style while giving it my own twist? I know borders
were a big thing, so maybe something along those lines?
S M
Art Nouveau
01
Hair The rst
thing you can
stylise is hair make it
curly and ornament-like.
You dont have to treat
them realistically and
rather like one more
ornament. Mark the
contour with a thicker
curvy line.
02
Nature
elements
and background
One of the most
common elements used
by Art Nouveau artists
were owers, plants,
branches, etc. You can
approach them either
realistically (which will
create a nice contrast) or
just like another element
of the stylisation. Dont
be afraid to use your
imagination and create
your own ornaments.
03
Frames You
can create a
nice whole by enclosing
the picture with a
decorative frame. The
frames are mostly based
on curves and circles.
They correspond with
the main object of the
picture and can merge
with the elements of the
drawing. They either can
be open or closed.
The best thing to start with would be to analyse the Art Nouveau pieces.
Next, try looking at real things from your surroundings as if they were
part of Muchas graphics. The key to achieving the mentioned style is
the ability of transforming objects into ornaments. In Art Nouveau, the elements
of a picture very often merge with each other there is no strict division
between the foreground (eg, the gure), background and the frame. This style
was meant to present people and things in a decorative manner, to be utilitarian
(furniture, jewellery, advertising posters) and therefore had not much use for the
traditional painting rules. However, we may use it today to draw, for example, a
comic book and incorporate it in our own style, adding modern elements.
074-079_OPM_18_artclass.indd 75 30/5/08 14:43:45
76
Q&A Art class
motion in an American football illustration. 01
Streaking Here we use Painter to portray
A series of small pencil sketches were made and the
preferred one was tidied up a bit and scanned into
Painter. A freehand sketch of the footballer was made
using Oil Brush variants. Blender brushes were then used
to streak the paint in the direction of the movement.
02
Completed painting In this painting,
the background and the foreground were
painted on separate layers. They were painted using Oil
Brushes and the paintings had very little detail. When
the background layer was complete, it was streaked
by blending, then both layers merged before the
foreground was streaked into the background.
brushes to depict a wet night-time scene in 03
Street scene Here we use watercolour
New York. We use blurring to convey movement in the
picture. The people and the vehicles are very loosely
created and are blurred using the Blur brush. The lights
on the vehicles are streaked slightly using blender
brushes, as are the reections on the wet road.
Motion commotion
How can I capture the feeling of motion
in my paintings?
D C
Portraying motion in a painting can be a
difcult task to do successfully and there
are several ways to do it. Painter allows trial
and error and allows us to undo our mistakes, which
can happen fairly frequently in this type of work.
Traditional painting methods are not so forgiving,
so preparation is necessary. It is useful to use the
same preparation methods when using Painter. In
sport artwork, the use of small pencil thumbnail
sketches allows us to determine the composition in
Painting illustrations
I like the vector look, but I dont want
to learn a different program in order to
get the effect. Does Painter have a clone
vector option?
A H
Although Corel Painter does have vector
capabilities, it doesnt in the way that you
mean. But you can employ some other
tools to help you get the effect. Their simplied
colours and clean edges typify vector illustrations.
But you havent got to work this out for yourself
Painters Posterize effect will simplify a photos
colours for you. You can then make and ll
selections with at colour, or use a brush to paint
in the colour. Were going to show you how to do
it this way.
the painting and to consider the motion we wish to
convey. A series of small thumbnail sketches of about
six inches by four gives you the opportunity to work
fast and freely. They take very little time and can
save you from having to make major changes while
working on the nal painting. These can be created
in small sketchpads or even in Painter.
Motion is inherent in sport artwork and in work
involving people, water, animals and transportation.
We should also consider how motion could impact
on other subjects. The weather, clouds, wind, rain,
etc, can affect landscapes. The weather as well as the
movement of people and transport can also affect
cityscapes and scenes.
With your tweaked photo, set it as a Quick Clone
(File>Quick Clone) and either use one of the default clone
brushes or pick another brush and enable the Use Clone
Color icon. Paint over the colour areas to get the effect.
Although you can obviously use any photo you
like, it does help if you have one with good contrast
and relatively simple shapes. Go to Effects>Tonal
Control>Posterize and enter a number to simplify the
colours; the lower the number, the less colours.
074-079_OPM_18_artclass.indd 76 30/5/08 14:51:09
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to change this. To do so, just click the grout square and then decide on the 02
Grout and paint The default grout colour is white, but you might like
colour. Black is a good contrast to a brightly coloured image, so we plumped for that.
Set a size for the brush and test it out. You might have to experiment a bit, though we
ended up choosing fairly swiftly.
03
Lay down the tiles Now its time to get mosaicing! Follow the form of the
photo and the tiles will be placed down automatically. Be sure to alter the tile
size so its appropriate for what you are painting. Small size for detail works best! If you
want a varied effect, pick Randomness from the Settings menu and use the Cut slider to
alter the shape of the tile ends and the Grout slider to play with the spacing.
I like the mosaic effect that Ive seen respected artists such as
John Derry use, but they look complicated. Is there an easy way
of creating them?
R B
Quick mosaics
Good news, Rose. You can use the mosaic feature the same as any
cloning brush, allowing you to pick a photo and then apply the effect
with nothing more than a few brushstrokes. When cloning a photo, its
best to pick one thats relatively simple in shape, with good contrast between the
colours. If you think of most traditional mosaics, the forms are relatively simple,
so consider this. You can control the size of the tiles, which means you dont
obliterate detail, and you can even change the colour of the grout. Heres a look
at how it works.
After
Before
the Colors palette and make sure that the Use Clone Color button is enabled. 01
Set up the clone Open your source le and go to File>Clone. Head up to
Now go to Canvas>Make Mosaic. Enable the Use Tracing Paper box so you can see the
photo underneath.
074-079_OPM_18_artclass.indd 77 30/5/08 14:45:18
78
Q&A Art class
Id like to do some photo editing
in Painter but am at a loss for
where to start. I love working with
dramatic scenes so need something that
works with that.
D F
Create a sepia tone
greyscale) and then go to Window>Show Gradients if the palette 01
Set the gradient Open up your image (it can be colour or
isnt already open. Go to the picker drop-down menu and scroll down to the
Sepia Browns option.
the menu at the end of the Gradients palette (accessed by clicking 02
Apply the effect With the browns selected, you need to go to
the triangle) and select Express in Image. Click OK to apply the brown shades.
Notice that there are also blue and violet options in the preset gradients, plus
you can create your own.
before you are completely happy with the effect. A good tool 03
Extra tweaks You might have to make a few other twiddles
to use is Effects>Tonal Control>Equalize. This helps boost contrast. Or go
to Effects>Tonal Control>Adjust Colors. This lets you warm the colours, or
reduce the effect using the Saturation slider.
After
Before
You can easily apply pretty dramatic
effects to photos in Painter and
the nal results is as good as youd
expect from a dedicated photo editor. Since
you mention you like dramatic scenes, were
going to show how to apply a sepia effect to
this photograph of an imposing building. This
is a classic style, typied by a reddish-brown
cast that was traditionally achieved by the
photographer submerging the print in a special
toner bath. You can get a similar effect using a
preset gradient setting. So, as promised, heres
how its done.
074-079_OPM_18_artclass.indd 78 30/5/08 14:46:21
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I feel that the details of a building add to its overall
character. Can I create a painting with just a door or a
window as the subject?
E B
Quality street
I have an interest in fashion illustration.
Is digital artwork suitable in this
type of work and would Painter be an
appropriate program to use?
J H
The name of the shop in the photograph that we are using in
this example answers your question perfectly: Why Not. The
detail on a building can make an ideal subject for a painting. We
have no hesitation on concentrating on a subjects face when creating a
portrait, so why not concentrate on the detail of a building to help portray
the character of the building?
It should be said that a direct, very detailed, accurate copy of a window
or door could result in a painting that may be lacking in interest for many
viewers. Try to avoid a mathematically precise rendering by viewing the
door or window from an angle, which will help to detract from constant
horizontal and vertical lines and add a sense of depth and shadow.
In our example we have used a photograph of a street scene in
Portugal, which is far from exciting. However, the shuttered window
above the shop offers potential.
In the nished painting, we have used strong colour and light to
emphasise textures and reect the warm climate. We have also added the
image of a beautiful Latin woman peering out from the opening in the
shutter. This adds a sense of intrigue and interest for the viewer.
Fashion show
Over the past ten to fteen years, there
has been a signicant transformation
in the world of fashion illustration. The
introduction of the internet and the prolic use of
computers combined with advances in the media
have led to a greater awareness, accessibility,
sharing and creativity in the world of art. Fashion
illustration is no longer restricted to portraying the
designer clothing for the elite few, from the runways
of Paris, but offers us expression, ideas, music,
characters, lifestyles, etc, while attempting to reect
the needs and desires of the people on the street.
Computer art has played a major part in the
fashion illustration revolution. Painter is the perfect
program for this type of work, allowing for scanned
fabrics or textiles to be combined with photographs,
vector work and a host of traditional art materials.
This is the ideal tool for allowing illustrators to use
more traditional artistic skills combined with digital
artwork in creating new and exciting work.
A quick, more
traditional fashion
sketch created in
Painter using Pen
and Ink brushes
combined with
Digital Watercolor
brushes work well
A comic book heroine created solely in Painter using Oil Brushes. This illustration is an example of
how the boundaries between creative industries are becoming more blurred. This image could be a
character for a comic book, a computer game, a book illustration, a movie or a fashion magazine
This painting was created in Painter using the Oil Brushes. The detail in the wrought
ironwork is not painstakingly re-created. The detail is hinted at as the viewers eye
will actually fill in the missing detail. The addition of a figure adds interest. Adding
something else, flowers, plants, a bird, a cat, etc, could also have done this
A fairly standard photograph of a
street corner in Portugal. The photo
was taken using a basic point-and-
shoot digital camera. This photo
was taken for use as a reference for
figurative work
074-079_OPM_18_artclass.indd 79 30/5/08 14:46:58

Reviews Casio Exilim S10
82
with a decent amount of scene modes we
particularly liked the scenery mode and the
natural green mode, which made for lush results.
The zoom is controlled by a lever surrounding
the shutter release button and so is easy to reach.
We did ind it very sensitive, though. You need to
use the lightest movement, otherwise you risk
overshooting the zoom setting you want.
You have the option for manual control, but
the auto option combined with the preset modes
offers those new to photography all they need
to capture great-looking shots. It really is the
perfect compact model its size means you can
carry it around with no problem and the 10.1
megapixels give you enough information for
whatever you want to do at the editing stage. With
our Painter head on, this camera is excellent for
taking resource shots. The different modes let you
monkey with the colours in-camera, plus there
is the option to use coloured ilters. These give
a cast to the image and actually work quite well
in setting up a mode for a style of painting. The
macro option lets you get extremely close to take
texture resource shots to be turned into papers,
and the portrait mode will automatically blur the
background, giving the perfect clone base to paint
a masterpiece!
You get a range of quality settings, allowing
you to control the inal resolution of the image.
One thing we liked with this was that each setting
also told you what the inal image could be used
for (A4 print, poster, etc). Going back to the preset
modes for a moment, you have some options that
automatically shoot in a desirable resolution.
The auction mode will process small iles that
are easily uploaded and the YouTube option
records a movie thats all set to be uploaded to the
successful site.
ets face it, the sheer glut of digital
cameras on the market makes it very
tricky for the average Joe (or Jo) to
differentiate between models. However,
with the Exilim S10, Casio has managed to buck
that trend.
The S10 is a tiny thing, making it irresistible
to pick up and have a play with. Even the box it
comes in is tiny more comparable to mobile
phone packaging than the usual excess of
cardboard were used to. The camera itself is also
reminiscent of a mobile phone. Its dimensions
are pretty much identical to most models and it
weighs about the same (maybe a touch more).
This is one camera that wont weigh you down!
Everything is designed to it around its
portability, and for the most part is designed
well. There are always going to be limitations
when building on a Lilliputian scale, and the most
obvious ones here are that some functions are a
bit iddly. For instance, there is a small hook that
has to be held down in order to insert the battery,
which does make things a bit tricky. This reviewer
had the beneit of longish nails and smallish
hands, but its clear to see that the more sausage-
ingered among us might struggle. The same
can be said for the actual control buttons. The
menu, playback and D-pad control sits next to a
gloriously large 2.7-inch LCD screen, but this does
mean that they are small. We tested the camera
over a period of days and had the occasional press
of the wrong button. It was nothing catastrophic,
but is worth mentioning.
We took the camera out on a variety of days,
from the very bright and sunny to more overcast
conditions. On every occasion it performed very
well indeed. Colours were bright and true, and
detail was crisp and vivid. The camera comes
250 | A svelte design makes this a true compact
Different view
The large LCD screen
means that you can frame
unusual shots but still see
whats going on
Casio Exilim S10
2.7-inch LCD
Record
button
Strap
hook
Playback
Scene
modes
Menu
D-pad
Lens
The Casio Exilim S10 offers sharp
images and a 3x optical zoom,
thanks to its powerful lens. It
retracts smoothly when the camera
isnt in use
Zoom and shoot
The control for zooming in and out
can be found around the shutter
button. This makes it easy to frame
and then take a shot, but do be
careful of wiggling the control too
much and missing the target!
Small structure
Its a tiny camera pretty much the
same size as this mobile phone!
Obviously its stature makes it
perfect for putting in your pocket
for opportune shots
082-83_OPM_18_camera.indd 82 29/5/08 19:01:19

83
Composing shots is easy with the large screen,
and even in glaring sunlight it was easy to see
what was happening. It did seem to take a little
while to write to the memory card, even at a
lower quality setting, so you might ind this
frustrating if you are at a sports event. But for
most shots it caused no problem at all.
We really liked this camera. Its portability and
quality of results far outweighs any of the niggles
weve mentioned in this review. Its perfect for
photography newbies as all the scene and auto
options will allow you to take great images by
just pointing and clicking. More experienced
users can experiment with the manual options,
and the YouTube setting and auction setting
caters for the online fans. But as a companion
camera to keep in your bag or pocket for any
opportunities that might arise, it is pretty
perfect. We would suggest you try holding the
camera before buying, just to see how you get
on with the small controls, but if you do this we
suspect youll end up buying it anyway!
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9.0
Overall
score
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Small and easy to use
Takes great shots
Large LCD with
excellent playback
What we dont like
Zoom control is
very sensitive
Tendency to push the
wrong buttons
What we like
A camera that is
truly compact,
which also
delivers fabulous
results whatever
the weather may
decide to do
Features
9.0
Ease of use
9.0
Quality of results
9.0
Value for money
9.0
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Casio Exilim S10
We took the camera out on a variety of conditions, from bright
sun to rainy, and on every occasion it performed very well indeed
Macro shots
The macro setting works well and picks up sharp detail exactly
when you need it. The colours also remain bright and true, with
crisp whites and deep hue
Menus
The menu screens are exceptionally bright and legible, making
them easy to read, even in bright, sunny conditions. They are also
very easy to navigate and understand
Price
250
Web
www.casio.co.uk
Megapixels (effective)
10.1
Max resolution
3,648 x 2,736
Lens data
f2.8 to f5.3 (36-
108mm)
Zoom
3x optical
Focus/macro
Normal: 40cm-inf
Manual: 15cm-inf
Macro: 15-50cm
Shutter speed
1/2 to 1/2,000 sec
ISO sensitivity
A, 50, 100, 200, 400,
800, 1,600
Metering options
Multipattern, centre
weighted, spot by
imaging element
Exposure compensation
-2EV to +2EV (in 1/3
EV steps)
Flash modes
A, Fon, Foff, soft
flash, red-eye
reduction
Connectivity
USB, AV
Weight
113g excl. batteries
and accessories
Dimensions (mm)
94.2 x 54.6 x 15.0
Batteries
Lithium-ion
Storage
SD, SDHC, MMC,
MMCplus
Build quality
The camera feels very solid in the hand and is surprisingly light. All the
controls are easy to access and the menus are intuitive
Maximum zoom
Although there is just a 3x optical zoom, it is plenty big enough for
most situations and can still make sure that you get the shot that
you want
082-83_OPM_18_camera.indd 83 29/5/08 19:02:50
Reviews Axiotron Modbook
84
unlike any PC slate on the market, you get the
new Leopard OS and the Wacom pressure
sensitivity is twice that of any PC. At 512
levels, we could not tell the difference between
our Intuos Wacom experience as it had the
same sensitive response while drawing. That
feature alone makes the Modbook an excellent
mobile sketchpad to take on the road and away
from the home or ofice! We found sketching
in Painter no different than working on an
iMac. The 13. 3-inch screen is, of course, much
smaller than a home work station, but more
than adequate for mobile needs and larger
than the new 12-inch Cintiq. Many artists want
to rid themselves of being tethered to the wall
and contending with a tangle of cords, and the
Modbook is perfect for sitting on the couch at
home and sketching out ideas while joining
the family. The professional artist knows the
isolation of sitting in a corner ofice at home
or work, so this slate not only makes you more
mobile, but less isolated!
If you are a loyal Mac fan and want mobility,
power and a responsive digitizer, then the
Modbook is your answer and, as of now, the
only one of its kind!
f you are a digital artist, then you have
no doubt heard of the Modbook. It is
the answer to inally having the ability
to sketch or paint directly on your
computer screen the same as a Cintiq, while
still having a full-blown MacBook computer
with all the memory and power you need to
run your creative software. It is very close to
having your cake and eating it too, with just
a few crumbs missing. There are a few quirks
that need to be ironed out, but are not a deal
breaker. The Bluetooth will only work if you
load Windows or use a USB dongle (but this
is being worked on) and our demo unit kept
needing the pen digitizer reset each time we
turned it back on. There is no Portrait mode,
but a MacBook never had this anyway and you
can rotate your artwork in Painter if you need
to. The best thing about the Modbook is that,
$2,279 | Could this be the ultimate digital design tool?
Axiotron Modbook
Axiotron Modbook
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QuickClicks
The QuickClicks software
keyboard pops up while surfing
the net or writing notes, fading
in and out as needed
Corel Painter
performance
We found that the Wacom pen
responded excellent without
any more lag time than our
iMac and Intuos tablet
Pen garage
The pen is thin and plastic but
very responsive. It is housed
in the bottom left and is easily
removed with a fingernail
Cooling fan vents
The cooling vents are located
at the very top, which was
awkward when holding the
Modbook as a tablet as our
hands wanted to be there
The Modbook is perfect for
sitting on the couch at home
and sketching out ideas
Price
From $2,279 USD
Website
http://eshop.
macsales.com/shop/
modbook
Operating System
Mac Leopard OS X
Fastest Modbook
Mac OS X Leopard
2.4GHz Core 2 Duo
Intel Graphics Media
Accelerator
Built-in iSight
Apple Remote
Wireless 802.11 b/g/n
& Bluetooth
2.0GB of 667MHz
DDR2 SDRAM
160GB 5,400RPM
SATA Hard Drive
Double-Layer
Superdrive
Anyview 13.3-inch
wide screen
ForceGlass Screen
Wacom Penabled
digitizer with 512
levels of sensitivity
Axiotron Digitizer
Pen
WAAS enabled GPS
built-in
w
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What we dont like What we like
The pen is accurate
and responsive
Excellent durable glass
screen surface
No Portrait mode
Screen loses colour
accuracy when tilted
Resetting the pen on
start-up is annoying
Macbook ports Pen garage Leopard operating system
Pen reset Cooling fan Camera Power button
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9.5
Overall
score
This is ideal
for those who
want a MacBook
without being
tethered to an
electrical outlet
or having to hook
up a Wacom
or Cintiq
Features
9.0
Ease of use
8.0
Quality of results
10.0
Value for money
10.0
084_OPM_18_ Modbook.indd 84 29/5/08 11:30:11
85
$2,295 USD | An all-in-one creative machine for PC users
Sahara i440D
Tablet PC
We have heard a lot of good things about the
Sahara i440D, so we thought we would give it
a whirl. Talking to the good folks at Allegiance
Technology, we found that they offer 48-hour
loans if you pay for shipping. So after dishing
out $69, they sent us a demo unit. It didnt come
with a stand or a manual, and ours arrived
with no pen (but this was shipped overnight).
Were sure the new ones come with everything
included, so theres no need to be worried!
Immediately, we were impressed with the
slick look of the white casing (also available in
black) and were quite amazed at how light it is
(3.3lbs). The screen was beautiful and bright,
with wonderful colour and contrast. Carrying
it around like a sketchbook is simple, with the
Portrait mode button working like a charm.
The Digitizer pen was easily accessible (though
not easily removed) and the response on the
screen was accurate, immediate and ready to
use without any calibration needed.
The screen switches easily from touch to
pen with a touch of a button, and both work
beautifully. An artist would probably prefer
using the pen, but the touch screen would be
appreciated for both its convenience and the
lack of fear of misplacing your inger!
ablet computers have been around
for a while now, but most have
been targeted for the business
professional on the move, where
holding the computer like a clipboard without
the interference of a keyboard is a convenient
and lightweight way to do business. Therefore,
most tablets are aimed at the medical, retail,
restaurant or delivery business, and the needs
of the artist have been largely ignored.
However, with the popularity of Wacoms
Cintiq, many artists have been craving a mobile
solution for their creative needs, where they
can have the ability to sketch out an idea at
a client meeting or work in their car, bus or
wherever they may be when being tethered to
an electrical outlet is just not convenient. In
other words, artists want the ability and ease
to sketch in the traditional pen and paper way
while having a computer at their ingertips. A
tablet PC sounds like it would be the perfect
solution, but has it progressed enough to
really satisfy the demands of a professional
illustrator or digital artist? In this review, we
will take a look at one of the top tablet PCs and
see how it performs when you are looking to
take it for a spin in the creative ield.
s
p
e
c
s
Price
$2,295 USD
Website
http://alltp.com/
Operating systems
Microsoft Windows
Vista Business or XP
Weight
3.3lbs
Display
Standard wide-angle
view display
12.1 TFT XGA wide-
angle view LCD
Dual mode
active Digitizer
Touch-screen display
Intel Centrino Duo
Mobile technology
Intel Core Duo
LV L2500
Memory
1,024MB DDR2 RAM
Hard Drive
80GB SATA hard
disk drive
Built-in wireless
a/b/g networking
Bluetooth 2.0+EDR
Biometric
fingerprint reader
Body style
Choice of white or
black plastic casing
Can also be
custom-configured
Pen problems
The pen does not have
anywhere near the pressure
sensitivity of a Wacom tablet,
with only 256 levels
Handwriting
recognition function
The handwriting recognition is
excellent and a breeze to use.
Great for taking notes quickly
Ports
The Sahara has a nice range of
ports, including ones for VGA,
FireWire, Ethernet, eSATA,
modem and two ports for USB
Sketch Book Pro:
made for the tablet PC
Possibly the perfect solution
for working up a sketch to take
to the desktop later
Sahara i440D Tablet PC
v
e
r
d
i
c
t
8.0
Overall
score
For the artist
who needs a
mobile solution
for drawing up
quick sketches
to take to the
workstation
later, this is a
good choice
Features
8.0
Ease of use
10.0
Quality of results
7.0
Value for money
8.0
w
e

s
a
y
What we dont like What we like
The weight and size of
the tablet
Perfect size
Pen was accurate
and responsive
Doesnt perform as
well in Corel Painter
Viewing angle of the
screen loses colour
accuracy when tilted
Volume control Change to Portrait mode Wacom pen
12-inch
screen
Switch from
touch to
pen mode
Fingerprint
security
Custom
program
functions
085_OPM18_Sahara review.indd 85 29/5/08 11:31:45

Reviews Books
86
or those unfamiliar with the
Expos concept, where have you
been? This book is the sixth in the
series and celebrates the work of
talented digital artists globally.
The book is compiled from what is
essentially a huge digital art competition.
International design maestros are drawn
in from every corner of the globe to judge
the thousands of entries submitted. The
competition for Expos 6 saw a total
of 5,130 images entered. These were
whittled down to 334 images produced by
257 artists from 43 countries.
The fantastic thing about the series is
that it provides an amazing opportunity
to unpublished artists who are waiting
for their chance to be noticed. The
Expos titles have become quite a cult
series as far as digital artists go, with
everyone desperate to get their hands
on the coveted graphics bible. The book
now comes in three versions: soft back,
hardback and even a Limited Edition
Collectors Edition.
Expos 6 is divided into 17 chapters,
dividing the artwork into the following:
Portrait (Painted & Rendered); Fantasy;
Fantasy Femmes; Architecture (Exterior
& Interior); Concept Art; Creatures;
Environment; Futurescapes; Matte
Painting; Science Fiction; Abstract &
$64 | Take a look at the finest digital masterpieces from around the world
Expose 6
Fast-paced action
If the thrill of action scenes really
gets you going, then this book has
plenty of incredible fast-paced
scenes to enjoy
Authors
Daniel Wade
Price
$64
Publisher
Ballistic Publishing
ISBN
978-1-921002-50-2
Imaginative characters
The Fantasy Femmes section displays
some of the worlds finest examples
of 3D digital painting, many of which
have been finished in Painter
Design; Product Design & Still Life;
Warriors; Conlict; Humorous; Whimsical;
Storytelling and Transport.
Each chapter displays a range of
winning artists work, each accompanied
by a caption stating the title, discipline,
the artists names and their country.
No image is printed smaller than a
quarter page, giving you enough to really
appreciate the detail and work that goes
into each picture. Some lucky artists
even get a whole page dedicated to a
single image, which really makes for a
stunning art book. The format follows its
predecessors suit, by placing all images
on a black background, really giving them
the opportunity to stand out and shine.
Whether Painter, Photoshop or even 3D
software is your bag, then Expos 6 has it
covered. Many images combine a range
of programs, while others stick rigidly to
single discipline. If any particular artist
catches your eye, then the handy index
of artists websites enables the perfect
opportunity to investigate them further.
This is yet another great addition to the
Expos series, scoring you plenty of arty
points if placed on your coffee table.
Stunning portraits
The book kicks off with a stunning portrait section,
which is crammed full of weird and wonderful faces to
really get you inspired
Historical figures
It seems every topic is covered with
this book from action to horror
and even historical figures. Check
out the impressive armour
Sci-fi fanatics
There is plenty for the sci-fi fan, with
a huge amount of artwork dedicated
to the theme. Discover some truly
awe-inspiring scenes
086-087_OPM_18_books.indd 86 29/5/08 11:32:30
Colour correction
There are plenty of practical sections for the reader to
get stuck into, including this helpful chapter on digital
colour correction

87
erhaps one of the most obvious
things people notice about an
image is the colour whether
its too dark, too light, too bland,
too saturated or even if youre lucky,
absolutely perfect. The fact is that colour
plays a monumental role in our lives
artistically as well as generally, so its
time we paid the subject a bit of attention.
Loaded with a barrage of bold, bright
illustrations and photographs, this book
gets down to the nitty-gritty of colour
theory, providing you with a great
grounding in everything from capturing
colour through to correcting it.
It strikes a perfect balance between
informative, detailed examples of colour
theory, paired with hands-on practical
advice, which you can put into practice in
your image editing.
This is one of those great must-have
books that are handy to dip in and out of
when needed. Trust us, it will be a well-
thumbed addition to your bookshelf.
Authors
Michael Walker with
Neil Barstow
Price
19.95
Publisher
ILEX
ISBN
9-781904-705246
igh dynamic range imaging
sounds like a mighty scary
term to the average person.
However, the truth is that the
principles are pretty easy to understand
when you get stuck into the subject.
The HDRI Handbook is a pretty hefty
textbook dedicated to the art of HDR
imaging and sets out to ill you in on
every single detail going. From Tone
Mapping to CGI Application, we will warn
you that this book is not for those with
a short attention span. As interesting
as it is, this book requires a fair amount
of commitment something that not
everyone will be able to give with a book
this long and detailed.
On the plus side, all the bases of the
subject are covered, which is something
that very few other books can do on
the subject. However, the book does
assume the reader has a decent degree
of photographic knowledge, so if youre
more of a happy snapper than a seasoned
pro, this may be a bit heavy going.
Authors
Christian Bloch
Price
$49.95 / 25.65
Publisher
Rocky Nook
ISBN
9-781933-952055
The HDRI Handbook
Tone Mapping
The chapter on Tone Mapping offers advice and tips on
what is a very subjective thing personal taste will rule,
but the book does a great job filling you in on the details
Application in CGI
For those who want to take it a step further, the
book progresses onto the subject of CGI (computer-
generated imaging)
Choose
your tools
By the time youve
finished with this
title, youll have a
fantastic grounding
in tools and
technical jargon,
explained clearly
and concisely
The RGB & CMYK battle
We love this easy-to-follow chapter on a rather tricky
subject RGB and CMYK. Learn how and when to apply
these two formats
Getting Colour Right
19.95 | Explore the theories of colour
25.65 | Discover the magic of high dynamic range
The
science bit
The book kicks off
with the basics of
how we actually
see colour. This
provides a good
basis for the rest
of the colour
lessons to come
086-087_OPM_18_books.indd 87 29/5/08 11:32:46
Output PhotoBox Collage Poster
88
hotoBox is one of Europes
biggest online photo services
and is renowned for superb
print quality and eficient
processing times but what else does it
have to offer? We decided to check out the
Collage Poster service.
Getting started is easy. Once youve
registered for free, youre given the option
to upload images into your own albums. If
you place images in your Temporary Print
Album, the amount you may upload is
unlimited. Anyone who signs up gets free
storage space too, so you can store and
share your JPEG images in one safe place.
Youre irst given 200MB of space (this
Artist
Natalie Johnson
Tutorial info
Time needed
20 minutes
Skill level
Beginner
PhotoBox Collage Poster
Learn to show off your work in an arresting way with this service from PhotoBox
amounts to hundreds of images) and this
goes up by 50MB every time you order
more prints.
To start creating your Collage Poster,
simply go to the Gifts section of the
website (www.photobox.co.uk) and
select the appropriate tab. Click Create A
Collage Now, and the rest is pretty self-
explanatory. There are various design
layouts for you to choose from: Classic
displays nine or 25 images, Modern
displays a mix of 12 or 18 landscape
and portrait images and Flowers gives
a choice of four or ive photos on a
decorated background. We opted for
Modern, and away we went.
Any images you have uploaded are
available in a column next to the collage.
Build up your poster by dragging and
dropping each image into one of the
squares in the template. This process
is really easy, and you can tweak
the positioning of the image and the
magniication once inserted in a square.
The poster is 30 x 20 inches in size, and
incredibly, we received ours the day after
we ordered it. The service is second to
none, due to speedy turnaround times and
impeccable packaging. If youre looking
for a quirky gift idea, the PhotoBox Collage
Poster is a great idea for an impressive
item with very little effort.
Photo artwork
PhotoBox offers a massive range of products. Whether you are looking to showcase your
artwork or share your photos, see what the company has to offer
If you re looking for a quirky gift idea, the
PhotoBox Collage Poster is a great idea for
an impressive item with very little effort
088-089_OPM_18.indd 88 29/5/08 11:33:32
89
Set up your collage with no hassle
Logging on Logging on
Consider
the images
Its easy to get carried
away and bundle
a bunch of images
together without
really thinking about
how they work
together. Unless
its on purpose, try
to avoid lots of the
same colour. It will
just mean that your
image gets lost. Also,
try to avoid having
clashing images
together. And dont be
afraid to add pacing
images maybe just
blank areas. This is
important if you have
complex images.
site and get a feel for the products on offer. As you can see, there are 01
Register Spend some time having a look around the PhotoBox
loads and loads! Its the perfect site for personalised presents. Log on rst: go
to www.photobox.co.uk and register for free. This only takes a minute and
requires the usual contact information and passwords.
home page. Pick the images you want to use and add them to the 02
Upload Once you have registered, click the Upload link on the
site, to create your album. Once done, click Products>Wall Dcor>Collage
and then click the Create A Collage link. You have a choice of small or large.
getting the composition just right. When everything is as it should 04
Pay and wait You might nd you need to spend a bit of time
be, hit Add to Basket and enter your payment details. If you do it before 4pm,
itll be with you the next day!
side; drag and drop them into place. Be aware that you cant change 03
Style it up Pick a collage template. The images will appear on the
these templates, so think about the shape of the image you want to use.
Theres no point trying to squeeze them in a gap they shouldnt t into. You
can choose to let PhotoBox autoll the spaces for you.
Create your collage in no time at all
Working with PhotoBox
ORDERING
If you get your
order in before
4pm on a
weekday, then
PhotoBox will
dispatch your
order the same
day meaning
that theres no
agonising wait
for your collage!
LAYOUT
Once you drop your images into place,
you can move them around and zoom
in and out. You can even rotate your
shots and delete them if they dont look
right in that particular spot
PRICE
Each large collage costs 17.99, but
you can get a small one for 9.99.
Your costs are calculated at the
bottom of the page, so there are no
surprises when you nish!
088-089_OPM_18.indd 89 29/5/08 11:34:09
92
Readers gallery issue eighteen
nthusiast Fred Taylor irst
sunk his teeth into the package
when Corel launched Painter 3.
Before that time, the avid artist
produced illustrations in traditional
transparent watercolours and opaque
gouache. I was very interested in inding
a way to paint on the computer where
constant interruptions of my worklow,
in a busy design and illustration studio,
wouldnt affect the outcome of my work.
Having already made the transition
from traditional pen and ink to vector
illustration in Adobe Illustrator, Taylor
wanted to actually paint on the computer.
And what better direction to go in than the
Painter route?!
How would you describe your own style
of painting?
I suppose realistic. I grew up in a time
when the realistic style of Norman
Rockwell and others of that time was so
admired, so naturally, I was drawn to
that style.
What is it about Painter that you enjoy
the most?
The fact that there is no hesitation to
boldly try something new without the fear
of wasting expensive paint and paper. I
love the never-ending, free art supplies
within Painter.
Do you have a secret technique?
I use the 2B Pencil for my original sketch
on the canvas. Then I move the sketch up to
a transparent layer and paint underneath
the layer with the Oil paintbrush and the
Airbrush. I blend and smooth out my work
with an old Fine Dry brush thats from
Painter Classic version 1.0.1. This brush is
not included in todays versions of Painter.
I have sent it to Corel in the hope that they
will bring it back to Painter.
Tell us about your next piece?
I am working on a painting of my ifth
great-grandfathers home. It is the oldest
house in the state of Georgia, it was built
before the Revolutionary Wars. I plan to
have a few people, in pre-Revolutionary
period costume, in the yard and on the
road beside the house.
What advice would you give a fellow
digital art enthusiast?
Learn the program and stick with it until it
becomes second nature to you. You wont
be sorry. It takes time and effort to become
proicient at anything. There is no magic
bullet and no easy road to perfection, but
at least with Painter the trip is a whole lot
of fun!
Who has given you the biggest
compliment about your Painter work?
I suppose Id have to say it was the
managing editor of The Saturday Evening
Post, who saw the illustrations on my
website and bought one-time publication
rights to one of them for the May-June issue
of the magazine.
Retired Fred Taylor is proof that Painter isnt just for the
young. In what he calls his showcase of realistic painting
(http://fredtaylorart.com), the 71-year-old whizz kid
demonstrates that age is not a limit
G
a
l
l
e
r
y
Do you have an ultimate aim in mind with
Corel Painter?
Now that I am retired, I paint in Painter for
enjoyment and offer giclee prints for sale
on my website. The site is mostly a hobby
for me these days. I try to keep it updated
and I hope to completely rebuild it every
couple of years.
Share your art with
other readers
These pages of the
magazine are given over
to you, as a place for you
to share your creations
with readers all around
the world and also to
publicise your gallery
on our website. If
you have a gallery
that youre proud
of, send an email
to opm@imagine-
publishing.co.uk.
There is no magic bullet and no easy road to perfection,
but at least with Painter the trip is a whole lot of fun!
Title: Indian
A cigar store Indian in front of an
antique shop in Madison, Georgia. I
thought it would be a good subject for
a painting.
01
092-095_OPM_18_gallery.indd 92 29/5/08 11:21:56
93
Title: Madison
This is a painting of a street in Madison,
Georgia. I was taken with the light and shadow
on the buildings and wanted to capture the
moment of this bright afternoon.
02
Title: Lighthouse
The lighthouse at St. George Island, Florida, in
the Gulf of Mexico. That is my kids Hobie Cat on
the beach. The lighthouse is gone now. They plan
to rebuild it if the money can be raised.
03
092-095_OPM_18_gallery.indd 93 29/5/08 11:22:22
94
Readers gallery issue eighteen
G
a
l
l
e
r
y
Title: Still Life
I wanted to capture the realism of the
still-life paintings that were so popular
a couple of hundred years ago. I used
things around the house that were
handy for my setup.
04
092-095_OPM_18_gallery.indd 94 29/5/08 11:22:39
95
Title: Man Portrait
This is a portrait I painted in Painter and had printed
on canvas. It was a retirement present for a friend.
06
Title: Summer
An illustration for a magazine article warning of the dangers of
too much sun on the skin. One of my granddaughters was the
model for this one.
05
Title: Allergy Man
An illustration for an American corporate magazine. Second
publication rights were purchased by The Saturday Evening Post
magazine for the June 2008 issue.
07
092-095_OPM_18_gallery.indd 95 29/5/08 11:23:19
Pa ge 28
Official Magazine
Pa ge 20
Pa ge 46 Pa ge 52
100_OPM_18-back cover.indd 1 28/5/08 15:32:23