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Tiedeman Pond, one of four kettle

ponds in Middleton, is cleaner and


healthier today than it has been in
decades. Its more accessible to visitors
than ever before.
The improvements are the result of
a 14-year, nearly $1.3 million initiative
paid for by both city funds and grant
monies.
The conservancy area including
the water itself and the surrounding
paths and wetlands - is approximately
25 acres. During the spring, the pond
is usually plagued by floods from the
adjoining Stricker, Esser, and Graber
ponds.
Stricker Pond discharges directly
into Tiedeman Pond through an over-
flow pipe. Thirteen storm water run-off
pipes enter the pond, carrying pollution
and sediment into the water.
The area surrounding the pond is
primarily residential and the pollutants,
such as phosphorus, that drain into
Tiedeman Pond cause algae blooms.
Tiedeman Pond also drains into
Lake Mendota, causing algae blooms
there as well.
This project has been [many] years
in the making, said District 2 alder-
man Gurdip Brar. [The] Tiedeman
Pond Water Quality Improvement proj-
ect, though disruptive short term, is ex-
pected to have tremendous long term
benefits in term[s] of improved water
quality, increased diversity of plant
species and wild life.
Newly planted plant species, and
the detention ponds, should provide
new habitatsfor wild lifein this nature
preserve, Brar added.
The project was funded in part by an
approximately $25,000 Partners for
Recreation and Conservation or
(PARC) grant awarded in 2013.
The pond was made handicapped-
accessible in 2002 with a wildlife
viewing area in the northwest area of
the park that was funded through Wa-
terfowl USA donations.
Some of the more recent improve-
ments in the project are raised trails so
individuals can enjoy the scenery when
the pond is flooded during the spring.
VOL. 122, NO. 34 THURSDAY, AUGUST 21, 2014 SINGLE COPY PRICE: $1.25
www.MiddletonTimes.com
Inside this issue:
School: History: Sports:
Park Elementary gets Green
Ribbon Award. Page 6
Take a tour of the citys
museums Page 11
Football team gets
ready to roll. Page 12
Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Classieds . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Through city efforts, Tiedeman Pond is reborn
Photo by Michael Knapstein
The City of Middleton has been working for more than a decade to improve Tiedeman Pond. Above, a majestic
Great Blue Heron in the water.
Driver hits
pedestrian
At 7:59 a.m. Friday, the Middleton
Police Department was dispatched to a
motor vehicle versus pedestrian acci-
dent at the intersection of University
Avenue and Bristol Street.
The preliminary investigation has
revealed that an 87-year-old driver
from Richland Center failed to stop at
a red traffic light at the intersection.
The motor vehicle then struck a
pedestrian who was crossing the street
resulting in significant injuries to the
pedestrian, according to police.
Learn more about veterans memorial
Plans for a veterans memorial will be presented at the Knight of Columbus
Council 4549 meeting at St. Bernards Parish Center on Tuesday, August 26.
VFW Post 8216 Commander and former Middleton Mayor Doug Zwank
will present the plans and promotional materials for the Middleton Com-
munity Veterans Tribute at the meeting, which will start at 7:30 p.m. The
VFW, in conjunction with the City of Middleton, will be constructing the me-
morial at Lakeview Park, with a proposed start date sometime in the summer
of 2015. Plans have been drawn up and approved and will be available for
viewing Tuesday evening. The meeting will be open to the public.
Refreshments will be served after the meeting, compliments of the St.
Bernards Knights of Columbus Council #4549. VFW Post 8216 will soon
kick off a fundraising campaign to raise $300,000 to fund the memorial. The
many ways donations can be made will also be discussed.
Times-Tribune photo by Mary Langenfeld
Ready, set, action!
Middleton football coach Tim Simon and his Cardinals begin the sea-
son Friday at 7 p.m. when they host Janesville Parker. For full coverage
of the 2014 Cardinals, please see Sports.
See TIEDEMAN, page 10
See DRIVER, page 6
by JOE FIESS
Times-Tribune
Image contributed
PAGE 2 MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 21, 2014
Times-Tribune photos by Matt Geiger
At the farmers market
Top to bottom: Hanna and Eric Friedericks, of Seven Seeds Farm. Tom
Skala, of Brewery Creek Trading, with his jams, jellies, dilly beans, relishes,
honey and more. Lonesome Stones Amy Puckett cuts a slice of chocolate
cake made using her own recipe.
LOCAL FOOD
City pond tour draws a crowd
Approximately 30 Middleton resi-
dents learned about storm water re-
sources and local wildlife last
Wednesday night at a free, guided tour
around Strickers and Tiedeman pond.
The tour, hosted by ecologist Mike
Healy, wetland ecologist Mary Linton
and hydrologist Aaron Steber, detailed
Middletons efforts to restore the citys
storm water ponds.
According to Healy, principal ecol-
ogist for Adaptive Restoration, one of
the citys main goals is to improve
water quality and revitalize habitats for
area wildlife. With fiscal support from
Dane County Parks as well as Middle-
tons own financial resources, con-
struction on the project began in early
summer of this year.
Steber, hydrologist for Cardno
JFNew, said the storm water begins its
journey in Strickers, flows into Tiede-
man, where it then travels to Lakeview
Pond before finally streaming into
Madisons Lake Mendota. Due to the
algae and sediment that infiltrates the
ponds,
a high amount of phosphorus has con-
taminated Mendotas water.
The phosphorus gets into the lake
mostly through sediment thats carried
through the storm water, Steber said.
The city of Middleton has done a se-
ries of projects over the last five or six
years [] to ultimately try to clean that
water before it ends up in Lake Men-
dota.
Healy said the project is part of an ef-
fort to clean up 80 to 90 years worth of
poor water quality in the citys ponds.
According to Steber, Middleton in-
stalled various forebays in hopes that
sediment and pollutants will filter out
of the water. In addition to installing
sediment basins, ecologists also re-
Photo contributed
Hydrologist Aaron Steber speaks about water quality in Middleton.
by FRANCESCA YRACHETA
Special to the Times-Tribune
See TOUR, page 5
Troop 140, sponsored by St. Lukes
Church, had a very successful summer,
including trips around the country.
In June, a total of 24 Scouts and
leaders went to the National High Ad-
venture Base, Philmont Scout Ranch in
Cimarron, New Mexico for 10 days of
hiking 75 miles including mountain
tops over 12,400 feet. The scouts also
went whitewater rafting down the
Arkansas River, toured the US Air
Force Academy and the US Olympic
training facilities in Colorado Springs.
In July, a total of 16 Scouts and lead-
ers traveled to the National High Ad-
venture Base, Florida Sea Base is
Islamorada, Florida. They lived aboard
a 40 foot sailboat for a week where
they sailed, snorkeled, fished and did
stand up paddle boarding in the Florida
Keys.
In July, a total of 60 Scouts attended
summer camp at Camp Phillips near
Rice Lake, WI. Scouts earned over
150 merit badges and rank advance-
ment. Scouts went swimming, sailing,
canoeing, rock climbing, rifle and pis-
tol shooting for activities.
Also this summer, six Scouts com-
pleted their Eagle Scout Service Proj-
ect. Over 800 man hours were used to
complete these projects.
Projects included:
Built a wildlife viewing blind at the
Dorothy Carnes County Park;
Built an information kiosk at Blue
Mounds State Park;
Built 13 owl nesting boxes for the
City of Middleton Parks Department;
Built plant boxes for Elm Lawn ele-
mentary school;
Built an observation platform lo-
cated in the Pheasant Branch Conver-
sancy;
Constructed a boardwalk on the
Springfield Hill segment of the Ice Age
Trail.
If you are interested in joining Boy
Scout Troop 140, please visit
www.bsatroop140.com. The troop
meets on Monday evenings from 7-
8pm at St. Lukes Church on Hubbard
Avenue in Middleton.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 21, 2014 MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE PAGE 3
Photos contributed
Troop 140 at Camp Phillips (top) and National High Adventure Florida Sea Base (above).
Great summer for Troop 140
Al-Shihabi, Qais M, 27, Middleton, WI
53562, 06/26/2013, Motor vehicle liability
insurance required, $10.00
Anderson, Marni J, 43, Middleton, WI
53562, 06/23/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $114.00
Bakke, James J, 58, Madison, WI
53705, 06/17/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $88.80
Bartlett, Edward Charles II, 24, Madi-
son, WI 53713, 06/22/2013, Operating after
revocation, $114.00
Battaglia, Mary Autumn, 18, Madison,
WI 53717, 06/20/2013, FTS/Improper Stop
at Stop Sign, $88.80
Battaglia, Mary Kay, 49, Madison, WI
53717, 06/17/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $114.00
Beck, James A, 51, Middleton, WI
53562, 06/03/2013, Operating vehicle with-
out insurance, $114.00
Beck, James A, 51, Middleton, WI
53562, 06/03/2013, Vehicle Registration
Revoked/Suspended/Cancel, $88.80
Black, Candice, 19, Madison, WI 53711,
06/15/2013, Retail Theft/ Shoplifting,
$681.00
Black, Candice, 19, Madison, WI 53711,
06/15/2013, Resisting or Obstructing Offi-
cer, $429.00
Bongard, Matthew Alan, 18, Sauk City,
WI 53583, 05/31/2013, Underage Con-
sume/Possess Alcoholic Beverages,
$177.00
Bradstreet, Lynda Lea, 56, Verona, WI
53593, 06/21/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $88.80
Brown, Vadon D, 36, Cross Plaines, WI
53568, 06/18/2013, Operating after revoca-
tion, $114.00
Burgette, Angela D, 45, Madison, WI
53704, 06/30/2013, Operating vehicle with-
out insurance, $114.00
Busch, Andrea L, 27, Mazomanie, WI
53560, 06/18/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $88.80
Busch, Andrea L, 27, Mazomanie, WI
53560, 06/18/2013, Operating vehicle with-
out insurance, $0.00
Busch, Andrea L, 27, Mazomanie, WI
53560, 06/18/2013, Motor vehicle liability
insurance required, $10.00
Buth, Brianna Marie, 19, Sun Prairie, WI
53590, 06/30/2013, Operating vehicle with-
out insurance, $114.00
Calindo, Miguel, 29, Bolingbrook, IL
60440, 07/04/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $114.00
Calindo, Miguel, 29, Bolingbrook, IL
60440, 07/04/2013, Operating w/o a Valid
Drivers License, $114.00
Calzada Hidrogo, Soraida, 25, Sun
Prairie, WI 53590, 06/23/2013, FTS/Im-
proper Stop at Stop Sign, $88.80
Calzada Hidrogo, Soraida, 25, Sun
Prairie, WI 53590, 06/23/2013, Operating
vehicle without insurance, $114.00
Calzada Hidrogo, Soraida, 25, Sun
Prairie, WI 53590, 06/23/2013, Operating
while Suspended, $114.00
Carranza Morales, Gonzalo, 28, Middle-
ton, WI 53562, 06/17/2013, Operating while
Suspended, $114.00
Chandra, Sunita, 72, Middleton, WI
53562, 05/21/2013, Obstructing Traffic,
$88.80
Clyde, Eric Paul, 43, Metamora, MI
48455, 03/13/2013, Operating While Intox-
icated, $731.00
Clyde, Eric Paul, 43, Metamora, MI
48455, 03/13/2013, Operating With/PAC
.08-.099, $0.00
Coleman, Angela M, 36, Madison, WI
53719, 06/20/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $88.80
COURT REPORT
See COURT, page 8
At 5:52 a.m. Friday, Dane County
Sheriffs deputies, along with fire de-
partments from Middleton, Cross
Plains, Waunakee, Black Earth, Dane,
and Sauk Prairie, responded to a barn
fire at 6969 Riles Road in the town of
Springfield.
The owner of the farm discovered
the fire, which may have started from
wet hay being stored inside. The fire
is still under investigation, but it does
not appear suspicious. There were no
injuries or livestock lost in the incident.
The barn is considered a total loss.
Fire destroys barn on Riles Road
PAGE 4 MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 21, 2014
The Middleton Public Library last
week received a helping hand from
local Monsanto employees, in the form
of a $15,000 grant.
The grant was facilitated by the
Middleton Monsanto site, as part of the
Monsanto Funds 2014 site grant ini-
tiative. Representatives from the or-
ganization and from Monsanto
celebrated the grant with a check pres-
entation on August 12.
Funds from the grant will be used
for a Media Maker Lab. The library
will partner with local technology ex-
perts and provide students with an op-
portunity to further explore, discover
and develop their potential in technol-
ogy, science, math and engineering
while having fun
The Media Maker Lab aligns with
our mission to make a positive differ-
ence in the community, said Pamela
Westby, library director. We are ex-
cited to create new partnerships, build
on existing ones, see what innovative
ideas are produced and the positive im-
pact it has on Middletons youth.
Todays investment in our kids and in
our library is really a community in-
vestment for the future.
Each winter, Monsanto employees
can invite nonprofit organizations to
apply for grants, and winners are then
selected to receive the grants through
the Monsanto Fund. The goal of the
site grant program is to address critical
needs in rural communities where
farmers and Monsanto employees live
and work. Primary focus areas for
funding include K-12 education and
critical community needs such as
hunger, nutrition and first responders.
This year, the Monsanto Fund
awarded 137 site grants to nonprofit or-
ganizations, and made 50 contributions
to local United Way organizations in
27 states and in Puerto Rico, with over
$1.5 million distributed in total. In
Wisconsin, three site grants were
awarded and total $33,000.
Nationally, the Monsanto Fund
awarded a total of $1,094,343 to com-
munity improvement organizations in
2014.
Westport approves emergency plan
The Town of Westport on July 21
voted unanimously to approve a new
Waunakee Area Emergency Operations
Plan.
The decision came after a board dis-
cussion regarding a recent emergency
response at an apartment complex on
Westshire Circle in Westport.
The response, which was prompted
by a car fire, brought forth discussion
due to the number of citizens affected
by the emergency, and the debate
proved insightful
We never got to the point, advised
town administrator Tom Wilson,
where the emergency operations plan
went into effect.
As presented, the new Waunakee
Area Emergency Plan aims to assist of-
ficials locate personnel and equipment
should a widespread emergency strike
the area, and has already been agreed
to by surrounding municipalities. The
Waunakee Area Emergency Plan was
approved as presented with board
chairman Van Dinter being authorized
to execute promulgation after the unan-
imous vote.
The board did host a short discus-
sion regarding the current potential for
a new county jail complex to be lo-
cated in Westport, in addition to dis-
cussing and voting to approve a rezone
from ER-1 to AA-2 for a new lot on
Shilling Lane.
The rezone was approved unani-
mously, and was required to allow for
the landowners to construct of a shed
on the lot. Discussion related to the
potential construction of a new county
jail in Westport was brief, and added to
the agenda after County Supervisor
Tim Kiefer brought the item to the
boards attention at the last board meet-
ing. Board Administrator Tom Wilson
reported that despite attempts to verify
whether the suspected site in Westport
[named by Tim Kiefer as being the
Dane County Law Enforcement gun
range on Highway 19], no solid an-
swers were available.
I guess that disturbs me, com-
mented board chair Van Dinter, and it
disturbs me tremendously.
The board held no votes on this
item, but members did express concern
as to the ramifications of having a new
Jail complex located within the town-
ship, though instructions were left for
Board Administrator Tom Wilson to
continue seeking answers from the
Dane County Sheriffs Department.
Before adjourning, the Westport
board also paid the towns bills for the
previous period, and rejected a claim
on a lateral sewer line along Woodland
Dr., per the towns insurers recom-
mendation. The board voted unani-
mously to reject the claim that had
been filed against the township on the
sewer line, and authorized Administra-
tor Wilson to prepare the proper rejec-
tion notifications. Though this item
had been slated for potential closed
session, the board did not convene to
closed session and instead took action
immediately to reject the claim.
Work on the new public
works building continues
The Town of Westport heard an up-
date on the new Town Public Works
Facility construction, learning at the
town boards Aug. 8 meeting that the
cement foundation had been laid and
that cement walls were being installed.
Theyve been working pretty furi-
ously actually, commented board ad-
ministrator Tom Wilson. Hopefully
theyll stay on the path theyre sup-
posed to be on to get it done.
Westport hired Fischl Construction
to construct the new facility in early
May 2014 for the $981,100 project.
Construction had recently been de-
layed due to the location being water-
logged by heavy rains, and work
wasnt able to be completed due to the
difficulty presented by voiding the site
of water, but is now proceeding after
the water has been removed.
Wilson also updated the board on a
reply from Dane County Sheriff David
Mahoney regarding the potential for a
new county jail complex being con-
structed on county land inside the
Photo by Jeff Martin
From left to right, (seated) Chris Clay and Anne Irish; (standing) Deb
Smith, Travis Frey (Monsantos representative), Angela West-Blank, Jere-
miah Tucker, Joan Gillman and Steve Soeteber. All are members of the Mid-
dleton Library Board except for Frey, who is Monsantos Middleton site and
dicot transformation lead.
Library gets $15,000 grant
by MIKE DREW
Times-Tribune
by MIKE DREW
Times-Tribune
See WESTPORT, page 5
THURSDAY, AUGUST 21, 2014 MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE PAGE 5
paired a series of collapsed stream
banks and replanted over 1,000 native
plant species.
Along with the host of plants that in-
habit the area, Healy said various ani-
mals including Blue and Green Herons,
Goldfish, Fathead Minnows and three
species of turtles call Tiedeman and
Strickers their home.
Linton, wetland ecologist at Snap-
ping Linton Ecology, said Snapping
Turtles, Western Painted Turtles and
Midland Painted Turtles inhabit the
ponds.
Linton said the water restoration
project will greatly benefit the turtle
population; it is expected to increase as
water quality improves.
Turtles actually store oxygen in
their limbs, their legs, those thick,
meaty legs that they have, [and over
winter], they burrow under the water
and have to be able to survive on that
stored oxygen, Linton said. [As
water quality improves], so will oxy-
gen levels because its not being
sucked out by algae and other things.
Healy also addressed the Giant Lo-
tuses that are invading Strickers Pond.
He noted that Strickers has the largest
watershed area of all the ponds in Mid-
dleton. In turn, the pond continues to
host a gradually increasing number of
Giant Lotus plants. While Strickers is
currently nearly halfway inhabited
with the Lotuses, Healy said he does
not expect the plant to take over the en-
tire pond.
While Middleton is underway with
the restoration project, Healy encour-
aged Middleton residents to do their
part in preventing further storm water
runoff from infiltrating the ponds.
According to Healy, much of the
runoff comes from an excess number
of lawn clippings from area homes, as
well as other garden debris and sedi-
ment. In place of letting the clippings
make their way to area water bodies, he
encourages residents to collect the clip-
pings and dispose of them properly. In
addition, Healy said residents could
plant small prairies on their land, in
order to help native plant species in-
habit the area. Rain barrels also cut
down on the amount of sediment and
water runoff that heads into the ponds.
Healy, Steber and Linton said
theyre confident the project will grad-
ually restore pond water quality, bring-
ing area plants and animals back to a
freshly renovated home.
TOUR
continued from page 2
Town of Westport.
Concern that the current Dane
County Shooting Range on High-
way 19 could be a potential green-
field site for a new county jail
complex was initially raised to the
board by county supervisor Tim
Kiefer on July 7 after Kiefer had re-
portedly questioned the sheriff on
the possibility.
He told me that this is a long
way off, commented Wilson.
Theres still a lot of work that
needs to be done with the county
board.
Board supervisors expressed
concern as to at what point they
would be advised of that possibility,
and discussion included some focus
on the pricing of such a facility.
As far as he is concerned, fur-
ther advised Wilson on his discus-
sion with Mahoney, before the
Westport site is going to be consid-
ered, we would know before that.
Additionally, Westport heard up-
dates from board supervisors from
various committees, paid the
towns outstanding bills, and unan-
imously voted to approve a drive-
way change permit to be issued in
the future for town residents off of
Lighthouse Drive for the construc-
tion of a new garage.
WESTPORT
continued from page 3
Park Elementary school principal
Monica Schommer, teachers Amy Cal-
lies and Jodi Klare and custodian Rod
Peanuts Esser received the Green
Ribbon Schools award from the U.S.
Department of Education on Tuesday,
July 22.
Park was one of 48 schools honored
for its exemplary efforts to reduce en-
vironmental impact and costs, promote
better health, and ensure effective en-
vironmental education. Nine districts
were also honored with the District
Sustainability Award.
U.S. Secretary of Education Arne
Duncan, White House Council on En-
vironmental Quality Acting Chair
Mike Boots and U.S. Assistant Secre-
tary of Commerce were on hand at the
ceremony in Washington, D.C.
Healthy, safe and sustainable facil-
ities combined with wellness practices
like outdoor physical activity, nutri-
tious food and hands-on environmental
learning form a strong foundation for a
quality education, Duncan said.
Todays honorees are leading the way
on incorporating best practices to re-
duce facility costs and increase
achievement, health and equity, for all
schools not just aspiring green
schools.
The U.S. Department of Education
Green Ribbon Schools were chosen
from a pool of candidates nominated
by 30 state education agencies. Hon-
orees include 39 public schools and
nine private schools. The schools serve
various grade levels, including 29 ele-
mentary, 16 middle and 18 high
schools from 27 states. Twenty-one of
the 2014 honorees serve a disadvan-
taged student body, and 18 are rural.
The 2014 U.S. Department of Ed-
ucation Green Ribbon Schools are
leading by example for the rest of the
country, Boots said. As they take im-
portant steps to improve public health
and reduce environmental impacts, like
cutting carbon pollution and improving
water quality, todays honorees are also
increasing efficiency and cutting costs.
Thats exactly the kind of leadership
we need to build a cleaner and safer
world.
Duncan also announced the 2014
Healthy Schools, High-Achieving Stu-
dents Best Practices Tour. The annual
Green Strides Best Practices Tour will
take place from August to October and
spotlight school environmental health.
This years tour legs include past and
present school and district honorees in
Colorado, Florida, Kentucky, Mary-
land, Minnesota and West Virginia.
Duncan also said colleges and uni-
versities will be eligible for the 2015
Green Ribbon Schools awards for the
first time.
Middleton High School was part of
the inaugural class of Green Ribbon
Schools award winners in 2012.
PAGE 6 MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 21, 2014
Park Elementary earns prestigious Green Ribbon Award
Photo contributed
From left: Park kindergarten teacher Amy Callies, custodian Rod
Peanuts Esser, principal Monica Schommer and third-grade teacher Jodi
Klare received the Green Ribbon Schools award from Adam Honeysett of
the U.S. Department of Education in late July in Washington, D.C.
by PERRY HIBNER
Middleton-Cross Plains Area School Dist.
The Middleton-Cross Plains Area School District held an open
house at Kromrey Middle School on Wednesday, Aug. 13. District of-
ficials offered tours of the completed areas of the remodeled and new
spaces at 5 and 6 p.m.
The tour included a look at the two-story fifth-grade wing, a walk-
through of the administrative areas and a stop in the new cafeteria and
stage area. Officials from Bray Architects, the firm that designed the
building, and J.H. Findorff & Son, which has handled the construction,
answered questions about the voter referendum-approved project.
Kromrey holds open house
The driver of the motor vehicle was
issued a citation for Failure to Stop for
a Traffic Signal.
The Middleton Police Department is
asking anyone who may have informa-
tion or witnessed this accident to con-
tact the police department at
608-824-7300, tipster line at 608-824-
7304 or text at 608-824-7300.
DRIVER
continued from page 1
Photo contributed
Family friendly
audiobooks
Taking a road trip with your family
this summer? Why not download or
bring along an audiobook to pass the
time together? The Middleton Public
Library has many titles available for
you to borrow just in time for your trip.
So as you drive mile after mile down
that lonesome highway with your fam-
ily in tow, remember theres an alterna-
tive to road trip BINGO or the license
plate game. Consider listening to an
audiobook everyone can enjoy! Here
are some suggestions to get you
started:
With younger kids, this classic
might be a good option. A Bear Called
Paddington by Michael Bond is about
a small bear from Peru who is found by
the Brown family sitting on a train sta-
tion platform in London. Hanging
around Paddingtons neck is a sign that
reads Please look after this bear.
Thank you. The Brown family does
just that. Stephen Fry narrates this hu-
morous story with comic timing and
wry wit. (Ages 5 and up, 2 hours 40
minutes.)
Another classic listen is Matilda, by
Roald Dahl and this version has been
given a refreshing makeover by narra-
tor Kate Winslet. This story is about a
sweet and extraordinarily gifted little
girl who by the age of four has already
read all the childrens books in her
local library. Matilda unfortunately
has neglectful parents and a child-hat-
ing headmistress to contend with but
Matilda handles her challenges at
home and at school in her own unique
way. Winslet flawlessly captures
Matildas spirit and strength. (Ages 8-
12, 4.5 hours long.)
In the book Better Nate Than Ever
by Tim Federle, you cant help but root
for 13 year old Nate Foster in this hi-
larious and heartwarming story of a
small town boy with big city dreams.
Read wonderfully by the author, we
travel with Nate as he sneaks to New
York City for an open casting call of
the new Broadway musical E.T.: The
Musical. Even though this charming
book covers some heavy issues such as
sibling rivalry, bullying, and gay or
questioning teens, it does it with a re-
markably lighthearted touch. (Ages 10
and up, approx. 6 hours long.)
Other audiobooks to consider are the
Newbery Honor book Charlottes Web,
by E.B. White. This standout is about
a pig named Wilbur who befriends an
exceptionally talented spider named
Charlotte. This timeless classic comes
to life in a delightful recording read by
the author himself. (Ages 7 and up, 3
hours & 20 minutes.)
Theres also The Graveyard Book,
fantastically read by author Neil
Gaiman with music arranged and per-
formed by Bela Fleck. This dark story
about an unusual boy living in a grave-
yard and being raised by ghosts will
make you want to keep driving so you
can keep listening! (Ages 10 and up,
7.5 hours.)
Lastly, recommended here is
Lemony Snickets Series of Unfortu-
nate Event: The Bad Beginning, ex-
pertly read by Tim Currie. However,
according to the Mr. Snicket there is
nothing to be found in this audiobook
other than misery, despair, and discom-
fort so you may want to choose another
book to listen to. (Ages 8 and up, 3
hours & 17 minutes.)
THURSDAY, AUGUST 21, 2014 MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE PAGE 7
Letter to the editor,
This past Saturday the Mid-
dleton Community again
showed its giving spirit by shop-
ping for items needed by the
Sauk Trail Elementary staff.
Members of the Middleton Ac-
tion Team collected a van full of
tissues, wipes, zip-lock bags,
note cards and snacks as well as
other paper products.
Thank you to Walgreens and
all the generous shoppers of
Middleton. Students and staff
will benefit from your contribu-
tions.
Middleton Action Team
Tom Vandervest
An update from
the administrator
Summer is slowly winding down,
and Middleton has tremendous vitality
this time of year with Good Neighbor
Fest on the horizon. Following are just
a few updates from your Good Neigh-
bor City government:
Going for the Gold! Congratula-
tions to the Citys Public Lands Depart-
ment which, for the second year in a
row, has been named a finalist for the
National Recreation & Parks Associa-
tions Gold Medal for communities
under 25,000 population. A Middleton
delegation will be attending the NRPA
conference in Charlotte, North Car-
olina, in October in hopes of bringing
home the gold.
Downtown Brick & Crosswalk
Replacement Project:
The under $1.1 million project
funded by Tax Increment Financing
(TIF) has been completed, came under
budget, and despite inconvenience for
Downtown property owners and busi-
nesses, the final product is outstanding.
The new sustainable crosswalks and
clay bricks have created a much safer
and more attractive walking environ-
ment, have introduced on-site storm
water infiltration, and should have
much longer durability than the previ-
ous product. Our research has shown
that clay bricks have lasted beyond 100
years, so it is not unreasonable to ex-
pect that the new bricks will outlast all
who read this. The City provided ap-
proximately 70,000 concrete bricks to
the public for no charge to keep them
from going to the landfill.
Terrace Avenue Reconstruction
(Parmenter St. to High Point Rd.):
This $3.8 million project also is
funded by TIF. The project started in
mid-June, and construction likely will
be substantially complete by mid-No-
vember. Along with the complete re-
construction of the street, the City is
replacing or updating storm water fa-
cilities and water/sanitary sewer lines,
undergrounding overhead utilities and
adding a small parking lot next to the
Quarry Skate Park. Were also in-
stalling terrace bricks on the north side
of the street just like those in the re-
mainder of the Downtown and placing
more bicycle parking while construct-
ing a new public market arcade adja-
cent to Capital Brewery to enhance the
activities at the brewery and to add for
the prospect of more public events and
entertainment space.
Branch Street Reconstruction:
Branch Street reconstruction be-
tween Century Avenue and University
Avenue is still underway. Detours are
being posted as the project is scheduled
to be completed in three phases. Please
look for periodic updates on the Citys
web site.
Other Updates:
The City has a number of exciting
new infill private developments under-
way in our TIF Districts. For more in-
formation on these proposed
developments, see: http://www.ci.mid-
dleton.wi.us/DocumentCenter/View/18
28. Warning: this document could take
a few minutes to download and my not
be completely up-to-date since the
projects are very fluid.
The Middleton Tourism Commis-
sion has received very positive com-
ments about the exploratory trolley that
connects Greenway Station, Down-
town Middleton and Discovery Springs
on one route. The current schedule is
Monday-Friday from 5:30 to 10:30
p.m. For 2015, their plan is to expand
service on Fridays to midnight and to
add Saturday evenings. The service is
funded entirely through visitors hotel
taxes and is open to visitors/residents
alike. I applaud the Tourism Commis-
sion for their commitment to this serv-
ice.
The Tourism Commission, Parks
Recreation & Forestry Commission
and Conservancy Lands Committee
have all partnered to bring new way
finding signs to the Citys trail system.
The signs look great and provide useful
information about distances to various
Middleton destinations. Each sign also
has a QR code that enables smart
phone users to access up-to-date infor-
mation from the Middleton Tourism
site. Ten signs will be placed this sum-
mer. We plan to add more as money is
available in succeeding years. This
years signs were funded without gen-
eral tax dollars.
Clean & Green is scheduled to be
back on Saturday, October 18, from 9
a.m. to 1 p.m. on Nursery Drive. The
last such event will be in April, 2015,
since the Citys new Municipal Opera-
tions Center on the north end of Par-
menter Street will have a fully
operational Recycling Center next
spring/summer that is planned to be
available on Saturdays from 8 a.m. to
noon. For further information, look for
updates on the Citys web site under
City News.
The Common Council passed a res-
olution this year declaring our commu-
nity to be Dementia-Friendly. Im
pleased to note that 5 local businesses
stepped up to provide their employees
training to be certified as such. Those
businesses are Walgreens, State Bank
of Cross Plains, Willy West Co-op,
Fitzgeralds and Ace Hardware of Mid-
dleton Springs. For more information
please see www.alzwisc.org.
The road at the Middleton Refuse
District is now completely paved with
porous asphalt for the benefit of soccer
and dog parks patrons, and it was built
with park development funds, not gen-
eral tax dollars.
The 2014 Citizen Satisfaction Sur-
vey is now concluded, and well be an-
alyzing the data from you soon and
prior to the Citys budget deliberations
this fall.
The Citys 2015 budget meetings
start in September, and we will post the
meetings publicly for those interested
in attending. The tentative schedule is
as follows:
September 10 Finance Committee
deliberations start and continue on Sep-
tember 11, 17, 18, 24 and 25 if/as
needed.
October 8 Council deliberations start
and continue on October 9, 15, 16, 22,
23 & 29 if/as needed.
November 6 Public Hearing (well in
advance of Councils final approval).
This is a change to allow for more pub-
lic input after the budget legally has
been advertised and before final Coun-
cil approval. If needed, Council will
deliberate further on November 11 &
12. Nov. 18 Council considers final
2015 Budget approval.
Dont miss Good Neighbor Fest and
the GNF parade this weekend, August
22-24! It is Middletons largest annual
event, and numerous great community
organizations benefit from the pro-
ceeds. It all starts with United Way
Day of Caring on Friday as hundreds
of volunteers work on various commu-
nity projects. Good Neighbors all!
For more information on City activ-
ities and meetings, please subscribe to
any of our list-serves on the Citys web
site at Notify me: http://www.ci.mid-
dleton.wi.us/list.aspx/.
Good Neighbors
and City Government
by Mike Davis
City of Middleton Administrator
Community
showed a
giving spirit
Coleman, Angela M, 36, Madison, WI
53719, 06/20/2013, Motor vehicle liability in-
surance required, $10.00
Cooper, Virginia E, 71, Monona, WI
53716, 06/30/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $88.80
Cooper, Virginia E, 71, Monona, WI
53716, 06/30/2013, Motor vehicle liability in-
surance required, $10.00
Cornwell, Justin Louis, 23, Middleton, WI
53562, 06/30/2013, Failure to Keep Vehicle
Under Control, $126.60
Cornwell, Justin Louis, 23, Middleton, WI
53562, 06/30/2013, No Motorcycle License,
$88.80
Cornwell, Justin Louis, 23, Middleton, WI
53562, 06/30/2013, Operating vehicle without
insurance, $0.00
Cruz, Luisanna Angela, 30, Madison, WI
53705, 06/16/2013, Operating w/o a Valid Dri-
vers License, $114.00
Cruz, Luisanna Angela, 30, Madison, WI
53705, 06/16/2013, Operating vehicle without
insurance, $114.00
Darwin, Mark Jordan, 20, Middleton, WI
53562, 03/10/2013, Motor vehicle liability in-
surance required, $0.00
Darwin, Mark Jordan, 20, Middleton, WI
53562, 03/10/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $88.80
Darwin, Mark Jordan, 20, Middleton, WI
53562, 04/16/2013, Speed Indicator-None-
Defective, $88.80
Darwin, Mark Jordan, 20, Middleton, WI
53562, 05/13/2013, Operating vehicle without
insurance, $0.00
Darwin, Mark Jordan, 20, Middleton, WI
53562, 07/01/2013, Underage Consume/Pos-
sess Alcoholic Beverages, $177.00
De Alba Nuno, Jose, 45, Madison, WI
53713, 07/02/2013, Operating while Sus-
pended, $114.00
941.00, De Chambeau King, 45,
03/13/2013, Verona, Issuance Worthless
Checks, Michelle R, $1
416.83, De Chambeau King, 45,
03/14/2013, Verona, Issuance Worthless
Checks, Michelle R, $2
De La O, Mark John, 32, Middleton, WI
53562, 07/01/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $88.80
Deiss, Raymond A, 55, Antigo, WI 54409,
06/26/2013, Exceeding Zones and Posted
Limits, $88.80
Deptula, Shannon Leray, 39, Cross
Plains, WI 53528, 02/14/2013, Issuance
Worthless Checks, $893.54
Dickenson, Lori A, 47, Evansville, WI
53536, 06/29/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $114.00
Dickert, Timothy James, 26, Madison, WI
53711, 06/18/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $88.80
Dickert, Timothy James, 26, Madison, WI
53711, 06/18/2013, Motor vehicle liability in-
surance required, $10.00
Diebold, Andrew W, 23, Cross Plains, WI
53528, 06/29/2013, Traffic Control Signal Vi-
olation red, $88.80
Ditsch, Katheryn K, 47, Madison, WI
53714, 06/30/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $88.80
Ditsch, Katheryn K, 47, Madison, WI
53714, 06/30/2013, Motor vehicle liability in-
surance required, $10.00
Dix, Aaron H, 29, Middleton, WI 53562,
06/01/2013, Disorderly Conduct, $88.80
Dull, Justin R, 26, Boscobel, WI 53805,
06/30/2013, Exceeding Zones and Posted
Limits, $88.80
Dura, Connor James, 18, Middleton, WI
53562, 07/04/2013, Operating vehicle without
insurance, $0.00
Dyer, Janet L, 50, Madison, WI 53704,
06/26/2013, Exceeding Zones and Posted
Limits, $88.80
Edmunds, Yvonne K, 52, Sauk City, WI
53583, 06/11/2013, Non Registration, $88.80
Fatsis, Nicole M, 26, Madison, WI 53704,
06/17/2013, Exceeding Zones and Posted
Limits, $88.80
Fleischmann, Jessica L, 30, Middleton, WI
53562, 06/02/2013, Motor vehicle liability in-
surance required, $10.00
Fleischmann, Jessica L, 30, Middleton, WI
53562, 06/02/2013, Operating while Sus-
pended, $0.00
Fleming, Bonita R, 63, Fitchburg, WI
53711, 06/23/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $88.80
Fowler, Mercedes Noelle, 18, Middleton,
WI 53562, 07/03/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $88.80
Frost Nerbonne, Julia Ariadne, 42, Min-
neapolis, MN 55406, 06/21/2013, Speeding
55 MPH Zone, $88.80
Frye, Sara Leslie, 18, Cross Plains, WI
53528, 06/24/2013, Underage Consume/Pos-
sess Alcoholic Beverages, $177.00
Garcia Alejandro, Isidro, 40, Madison, WI
53715, 06/23/2013, Resisting or Obstructing
Officer, $429.00
Garcia, David J, 42, Madison, WI 53718,
06/17/2013, Vehicle Registration
Revoked/Suspended/Cancel, $88.80
Garcia, David J, 42, Madison, WI 53718,
06/17/2013, Non Registration, $88.80
Garcia, David J, 42, Madison, WI 53718,
06/17/2013, Operating while Suspended,
$114.00
Gee, Debra J, 44, Middleton, WI 53562,
07/05/2013, Exceeding Zones and Posted
Limits, $114.00
Gee, Katelyn Joanna, 20, Middleton, WI
53562, 06/13/2013, FTS/Improper Stop at
Stop Sign, $88.80
George, Kristin L, 27, Middleton, WI
53562, 06/23/2013, Motor vehicle liability in-
surance required, $10.00
Geramo, Abebech Chemma, 52, Madi-
son, WI 53719, 06/18/2013, Vehicle Registra-
tion Revoked/Suspended/Cancel, $88.80
Giebel, Jesse J, 26, Stevens Point, WI
54481, 06/17/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $88.80
Green, Rachel T, 40, Cadott, WI 54727,
06/22/2013, Speeding 55 MPH Zone, $88.80
Guerra, Hector H, 29, Middleton, WI
53562, 02/16/2013, Unlawful Use Of Tele-
phone, $0.00
Haldemann, Oscar C, 82, Middleton, WI
53562, 06/17/2013, Deviation from Desig-
nated Lane, $88.80
Handowski, David J, 50, Madison, WI
53719, 06/24/2013, Unsafe Backing Of Vehi-
cle, $88.80
Hankel, Ashley A, 21, Lodi, WI 53555,
06/22/2013, Speeding 55 MPH Zone, $88.80
Hansbro, Alvah J, 29, Madison, WI 53719,
07/01/2013, Exceeding Zones and Posted
Limits, $88.80
Hansbro, Alvah J, 29, Madison, WI 53719,
07/01/2013, Motor vehicle liability insurance
required, $10.00
Hansbro, Alvah J, 29, Madison, WI 53719,
07/01/2013, Operating after revocation,
$114.00
Harrison, Tina M, 46, Mc Farland, WI
53558, 06/14/2013, Motor vehicle liability in-
surance required, $10.00
Hartwig, Nathan E, 71, Monroe, WI
53566, 06/20/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $88.80
Haskins, Alyssa Kohler, 29, Madison, WI
53711, 06/28/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $88.80
Hellenbrand, Eugene P, 65, Middleton, WI
53562, 06/23/2013, Improper left turn/inter-
section, $88.80
Hernandez Rodriguez, Jose L, 41, Madi-
son, WI 53717, 06/25/2013, Stopping/stand-
ing in prohibited areas, $58.00
Hernandez Rodriguez, Jose L, 41, Madi-
son, WI 53717, 06/25/2013, Operating w/o a
Valid Drivers License, $114.00
Hernandez Rodriguez, Jose L, 41, Madi-
son, WI 53717, 06/25/2013, Operating vehi-
cle without insurance, $114.00
Hoffman, Scott T, 50, Glenview, IL 60025,
07/05/2013, Exceeding Zones and Posted
Limits, $114.00
Holland, Melissa E, 43, Madison, WI
53719, 06/12/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $88.80
Howard, Corey C, 29, Waterloo, WI
53594, 07/03/2013, Operating while Sus-
pended, $114.00
Howe, Daniel J, 20, Middleton, WI 53562,
06/12/2013, Possession of Controlled Sub-
stance, $523.50
Howe, Daniel J, 20, Middleton, WI 53562,
06/12/2013, Possession of Drug Parapherna-
lia, $177.00
Howe, Daniel J, 20, Middleton, WI 53562,
06/12/2013, Underage Consume/Possess Al-
coholic Beverages, $177.00
Huebner, Keith M, 39, Madison, WI
53717, 06/20/2013, Possession of Drug para,
$177.00
Ilkevitch, Alexandra, 29, Madison, WI
53705, 07/06/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $114.00
Jagla, Sara A, 33, Madison, WI 53703,
06/18/2013, Non Registration, $0.00
Johannes, Jennifer Ann, 25, Milwaukee,
WI 53213, 06/14/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $88.80
Johnson, Lexus C, 19, Madison, WI
53717, 06/10/2013, Operating vehicle without
insurance, $114.00
Johnson, Lexus C, 19, Madison, WI
53717, 06/10/2013, Operating while Sus-
pended, $114.00
Johnson, Shane P, 29, Verona, WI 53593,
06/30/2013, Exceeding Zones and Posted
Limits, $88.80
Jonikaitis, Ramunas, 35, Downers Grove,
IL 60516, 06/22/2013, Speeding 55 MPH
Zone, $88.80
Kaleas, Jean M, 65, Madison, WI 53718,
06/29/2013, Exceeding Zones and Posted
Limits, $114.00
Kazmierczak, Troy S, 24, Lodi, WI 53555,
07/05/2013, Ride in Vehicle without seatbelt,
$10.00
Khilji, Nellofer I, 53, Madison, WI 53719,
06/19/2013, Non Registration, $88.80
Kiefert, Brianne L, 32, Middleton, WI
53562, 06/29/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $88.80
Krausse, Justin D, 28, Middleton, WI
53562, 05/08/2013, Prohibited Noise Distur-
bance, $88.80
Kundert, Stephen B, 45, Waunakee, WI
53597, 06/18/2013, Operating vehicle without
insurance, $114.00
Kundert, Stephen B, 45, Waunakee, WI
53597, 06/18/2013, Non Registration, $88.80
Leiterman, Zachary J, 32, Middleton, WI
53562, 06/29/2013, Disorderly Conduct,
$240.00
Lewis, Lamar Tobias, 37, Middleton, WI
53562, 06/21/2013, Disorderly Conduct,
$240.00
Lietzow, Calvin D, 29, Madison, WI
53726, 05/07/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $88.80
Long, Amram, 35, Middleton, WI 53562,
06/16/2013, Vehicle Registration
Revoked/Suspended/Cancel, $88.80
Long, Amram, 35, Middleton, WI 53562,
06/16/2013, Operating vehicle without insur-
ance, $114.00
Love, Latoya Nicole, 27, Madison, WI
53711, 06/29/2013, Operating while Sus-
pended, $114.00
Love, Latoya Nicole, 27, Madison, WI
53711, 06/29/2013, Failure to Follow Indi-
cated Turn, $88.80
Love, Latoya Nicole, 27, Madison, WI
53711, 06/29/2013, Motor vehicle liability in-
surance required, $10.00
Lynn, Jason D, 36, Madison, WI 53719,
07/03/2013, Exceeding Zones and Posted
Limits, $88.80
Maciejewski, Valerie Ann, 33, Madison,
WI 53717, 06/30/2013, Non Registration,
$0.00
Mandarino, Debra Ann, 58, Madison, WI
53711, 07/01/2013, Non Registration, $88.80
Mc Grane, Patrick E, 47, Stoughton, WI
53589, 07/04/2013, Operating vehicle without
insurance, $114.00
Mendez Lera, Jose Carmen, 33, Madison,
WI 53713, 07/01/2013, Operating w/o a Valid
Drivers License, $114.00
Meyer, David Craig, 46, Middleton, WI
53562, 06/25/2013, Speeding 25 MPH Zone,
$88.80
Miller, Maxwell A, 25, Madison, WI 53713,
05/08/2013, Exceeding Zones and Posted
Limits, $88.80
Millholland, Carl D, 60, Monona, WI
53716, 07/01/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $88.80
Missall, Tyler Jon, 31, Arlington, WI 53911,
07/11/2013, Unsafe Lane Deviation, $88.80
Montague, James J, 33, Madison, WI
53719, 07/04/2013, Speeding 25 MPH Zone,
$88.80
Montoya, Mario H, 20, Middleton, WI
53562, 06/17/2013, Underage Consume/Pos-
sess Alcoholic Beverages, $177.00
Moore, Michael J, 28, Madison, WI 53713,
06/15/2013, No Motorcycle License, $114.00
Moore, Michael J, 28, Madison, WI 53713,
06/15/2013, Operating vehicle without insur-
ance, $0.00
Moore, Michael J, 28, Madison, WI 53713,
06/15/2013, Non Registration, $0.00
Nacker, Kristy Ann, 40, Madison, WI
53705, 06/14/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $114.00
Nacker, Kristy Ann, 40, Madison, WI
53705, 06/14/2013, Motor vehicle liability in-
surance required, $10.00
Nondorf, Evan D, 24, Dodgeville, WI
53533, 06/17/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $88.80
Norris, Tara M, 45, Sun Prairie, WI 53590,
06/20/2013, Exceeding Zones and Posted
Limits, $114.00
Novotny, Johanna M, 49, Waunakee, WI
53597 1745, 06/24/2013, Exceeding Zones
and Posted Limits, $114.00
Ockenga, Deborah L, 59, De Forest, WI
53532, 06/18/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $114.00
Oppermann, Arin Elizabeth, 28, Fitchburg,
WI 53711, 06/23/2013, Speeding 55 MPH
Zone, $88.80
Orozco Barragan, Maria Isabel, 19, Fitch-
burg, WI 53713, 07/04/2013, Operating vehi-
cle without insurance, $114.00
Ortega Mendez, Armondo, 22, Middleton,
WI 53562, 07/08/2013, Failure to Keep Vehi-
cle Under Control, $126.60
Ortega Mendez, Armondo, 22, Middleton,
WI 53562, 07/08/2013, Operating vehicle
without insurance, $114.00
Palmer, Aesha Shalom, 36, Madison, WI
53719, 06/19/2013, Operating w/o a Valid Dri-
vers License, $114.00
Paulino Henriquez, Luis Manuel, 61, Mid-
dleton, WI 53562, 06/29/2013, Exceeding
Zones and Posted Limits, $88.80
Perry, David Lee, 26, Madison, WI 53719,
05/24/2013, Non Registration, $0.00
Perry, David Lee, 26, Madison, WI 53719,
05/24/2013, Operating while Suspended,
$0.00
Perry, David Lee, 26, Madison, WI 53719,
05/24/2013, Operating While Intoxicated,
$731.00
Perry, David Lee, 26, Madison, WI 53719,
05/24/2013, Operating With/PAC .08-.099,
$0.00
Peterson, Carissa L, 44, Waunakee, WI
53597, 06/23/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $88.80
Piontek, Leonard J, 58, Madison, WI
53705, 06/25/2013, Non Registration, $88.80
Prindle, Andrew H, 25, Middleton, WI
53562, 05/29/2013, Possession of Drug Para-
phernalia, $177.00
Puccio Jr, Anthony R, 47, Madison, WI
53704, 06/16/2013, Non Registration, $88.80
Puccio Jr, Anthony R, 47, Madison, WI
53704, 06/16/2013, Operating vehicle without
insurance, $114.00
Puccio Jr, Anthony R, 47, Madison, WI
53704, 06/16/2013, Motor vehicle liability in-
surance required, $10.00
Puccio Jr, Anthony R, 47, Madison, WI
53704, 06/16/2013, Operating while Sus-
pended, $114.00
Rains, Tori J, 51, Prairie Du Sac, WI
53578, 07/04/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $88.80
Regele, Jessica J, 42, Middleton, WI
53562, 06/17/2013, Dog/Cat Not Run At
Large, $101.40
Reyes, Sergio R, 21, Madison, WI 53719,
06/25/2013, Operating after revocation,
$114.00
Reyes, Sergio R, 21, Madison, WI 53719,
06/25/2013, Vehicle Registration
Revoked/Suspended/Cancel, $88.80
Rincon, Aaron Jose, 25, Madison, WI
53711, 06/13/2013, Disorderly Conduct,
$240.00
Rittenhouse, Jason A, 39, Milton, WI
53563, 07/03/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $88.80
Roberts, Kiana T, 22, Madison, WI 53713,
06/30/2013, Operating while Suspended,
$114.00
Rosenthal, Verah A, 32, Madison, WI
53704, 06/25/2013, Non Registration, $88.80
Rosenthal, Verah A, 32, Madison, WI
53704, 06/25/2013, Operating vehicle without
insurance, $114.00
Ryan, Mary M, 52, Madison, WI 53705,
07/06/2013, Operating while Suspended,
$114.00
Ryan, Mary M, 52, Madison, WI 53705,
07/06/2013, Vehicle Registration
Revoked/Suspended/Cancel, $88.80
Santiago, Antonio E, 21, Middleton, WI
53562, 03/23/2013, Improper Display of Li-
cense Plates/Tags/Decal, $63.60
Schaffer, Susan R, 34, Madison, WI
53719, 07/03/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $88.80
Schauske, Amber J, 38, Middleton, WI
53562, 06/16/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $88.80
Schmitz, John James, 18, Waunakee, WI
53597, 06/24/2013, Underage Consume/Pos-
sess Alcoholic Beverages, $177.00
Seamon, John Alan, 49, Middleton, WI
53562, 06/18/2013, Non Registration, $88.80
Seferino Reyes, Alfredo, 35, Middleton,
WI 53562, 06/22/2013, Operating while Sus-
pended, $114.00
Seferino Reyes, Alfredo, 35, Middleton,
WI 53562, 06/22/2013, Operating vehicle
without insurance, $114.00
Shelbrack, Shirley A, 76, Cross Plains, WI
53528, 06/14/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $88.80
Shoemaker, Gabrielle A, 29, Fitchburg, WI
53713, 06/16/2013, Vehicle Registration Re-
voked/Suspended/Cancel, $88.80
Shoemaker, Gabrielle A, 29, Fitchburg, WI
53713, 06/16/2013, Operating while Sus-
pended, $114.00
Shoemaker, Gabrielle A, 29, Fitchburg, WI
53713, 06/16/2013, Operating vehicle without
insurance, $114.00
Slattery, James F, 23, Fitchburg, WI
53711, 07/04/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $114.00
Slaughter, Michael A, 33, Middleton, WI
53562, 06/30/2013, Resisting or Obstructing
Officer, $429.00
Slaughter, Michael A, 33, Middleton, WI
53562, 06/30/2013, Consumption Alcoholic
Beverage in Public, $177.00
Smith, Duardo B, 45, Middleton, WI
53562, 06/29/2013, Criminal Trespass To
Land, $114.00
Smith, Logan B, 21, Verona, WI 53593,
05/14/2013, Exceeding Zones and Posted
Limits, $114.00
Solis, Enrique Mendoza III, 37, Madison,
WI 53705, 06/25/2013, Non Registration,
$88.80
Souza, Lindsay Britt, 26, De Forest, WI
53532, 06/11/2013, Non Registration, $88.80
Struck, Maximilian W, 20, Verona, WI
53593, 06/08/2013, Underage Consume/Pos-
sess Alcoholic Beverages, $366.00
Thornton, Ashley Anne, 21, Janesville, WI
53548, 06/17/2013, Motor vehicle liability in-
surance required, $10.00
Thornton, Ashley Anne, 21, Janesville, WI
53548, 06/17/2013, Operating vehicle without
insurance, $114.00
Thornton, Ryan J, 26, Madison, WI
53717, 06/30/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $88.80
Thornton, Ryan J, 26, Madison, WI
53717, 06/30/2013, Motor vehicle liability in-
surance required, $10.00
Travis, Charlotta Bridgett, 21, Middleton,
WI 53562, 05/31/2013, Disorderly Conduct,
$240.00
Urban, Nicholaus V, 18, Middleton, WI
53562, 06/02/2013, Underage Consume/Pos-
sess Alcoholic Beverages, $177.00
Uriostegui Valencia, Antonio De
Jesus, 26, Madison, WI 53713, 07/02/2013,
Exceeding Zones and Posted Limits, $114.00
Uriostegui Valencia, Antonio De
Jesus, 26, Madison, WI 53713, 07/02/2013,
Operating while Suspended, $114.00
Urso, Michelle C, 41, Middleton, WI
53562, 06/01/2013, Motor vehicle liability in-
surance required, $10.00
Urso, Michelle C, 41, Middleton, WI
53562, 06/01/2013, Seatbelt Required
Oper/Pass, $10.00
Varela Flores, Guillermina, 36, Middleton,
WI 53562, 06/30/2013, FYR while Making
Left Turn, $88.80
Varela Flores, Guillermina, 36, Middleton,
WI 53562, 06/30/2013, Operating w/o a Valid
Drivers License, $114.00
Varela Flores, Guillermina, 36, Middleton,
WI 53562, 06/30/2013, Operating vehicle
without insurance, $114.00
Vargas Perez, Omar Francisco, 20, Madi-
son, WI 53711, 06/27/2013, Operating while
Suspended, $114.00
Vargas Perez, Omar Francisco, 20, Madi-
son, WI 53711, 06/27/2013, Motor vehicle li-
ability insurance required, $10.00
Velasco, Hector Laguna, 46, Madison, WI
53717, 06/14/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $88.80
Volgarino, Deborah A, 23, Madison, WI
53719, 06/14/2013, Non Registration, $88.80
Wagabaza, Daniel E, 35, Middleton, WI
53562, 06/01/2013, Operating vehicle without
insurance, $114.00
Wagner, Ashley Nicole, 22, Middleton, WI
53562, 06/20/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $114.00
Warren, Aaron Jason, 33, Lodi, WI 53555,
06/30/2013, Exceeding Zones and Posted
Limits, $88.80
Warren, Aaron Jason, 33, Lodi, WI 53555,
06/30/2013, Motor vehicle liability insurance
required, $0.00.
White, Niaisha Aline, 29, Middleton, WI
53562, 06/30/2013, Operating while Sus-
pended, $114.00
Whitney, Hollie Renee, 32, Madison, WI
53719, 07/06/2013, Exceeding Zones and
Posted Limits, $88.80
Wolff, Noah Richard, 20, Verona, WI
53593, 07/01/2013, Prohibited Noise Distur-
bance, $177.00
Wolske, Sara Kristine, 23, Hudson, WI
54016, 06/15/2013, Non Registration, $88.80
Wolske, Sara Kristine, 23, Hudson, WI
54016, 06/15/2013, Operating while Sus-
pended, $114.00
Wolske, Sara Kristine, 23, Hudson, WI
54016, 06/15/2013, Motor vehicle liability in-
surance required, $10.00
Yanke, Sarah R, 29, Middleton, WI 53562,
06/19/2013, Non Registration, $88.80
Yanke, Sarah R, 29, Middleton, WI 53562,
06/19/2013, Operating w/o a Valid Drivers Li-
cense, $114.00
Young Sherman, Kawana Lanette, 31,
Waunakee, WI 53597, 05/05/2013, Exceed-
ing Zones and Posted Limits, $88.80
Younger, Rebecca A, 43, Fitchburg, WI
53711, 06/20/2013, Non Registration, $0.00
Zegarra, Pamela N, 26, Middleton, WI
53562, 06/01/2013, Disorderly Conduct,
$88.80
Zhang, Zeng-Tao, 78, Madison, WI
53711., 06/19/2013, Non Registration,
$88.80.
COURT continued from page 3
CHURCH NOTES
THURSDAY, AUGUST 21, 2014 MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE PAGE 9
June was a busy month for Middleton police
Officers handled 1,523 calls for
service in the month of June, of which
502 were field initiated and 1,021 were
dispatched. They issued 305 citations
and 83 written warnings, made seven
criminal arrests and investigated 39 ac-
cidents.
In May, Middleton Officers handled
1,428 calls for service, of which 479
were field initiated and 949 were dis-
patched. They issued 292 citations and
80 written warnings, made 34 criminal
arrests and investigated 34 accidents.
Theft from automobile calls for
service were once again on the rise in
June. Again thieves searched area
neighborhoods for unlocked vehicles
and stole valuables from within these
vehicles during the overnight hours.
The vast majority of theft from auto-
mobile cases are crimes of opportunity
where thieves steal only from unlocked
vehicles. The Middleton Police Depart-
ment urges everyone to be certain that
their vehicles are locked whenever
they are left unattended.
SIGNIFICANT EVENTS
Private Apartment, 6300 Block
Lakeview Blvd, Residential Burglary:
A victim reported that someone kicked
in her apartment door and stole her 40
flat screen television. The victim be-
lieves that a former friend committed
the crime.
BP Gas Station, 6504 University Av-
enue, Theft: During overnight hours,
suspects forcibly entered an outside
soda machine. Approximately $50.00
in coins was stolen and hundreds of
dollars of damage was done to the soda
machine.
Ace Hardware, 2540 Allen Blvd, Re-
tail Theft: Two male suspects have re-
peatedly stolen power tools from area
Ace Hardware stores. The suspects
were captured on camera concealing
items. The police were called after the
suspects left with merchandise. One of
the suspects was later identified and ar-
rested.
Private Apartment, 7400 Block Cen-
tury Avenue, Residential Burglary: A
victim came home to find an ex-
boyfriend burglarizing her apartment.
The suspect fled the scene prior to po-
lice being contacted. While fleeing, the
suspect struck another vehicle in the
apartment parking lot. Blocks away
from the residence, the suspect hit an-
other vehicle in the roadway and dis-
abled his own truck. The suspect fled
the second accident scene on foot. Of-
ficers located the suspect hiding out-
side of a neighboring residence. The
suspect failed to comply with officers
commands and was tasered. The sus-
pect was taken into custody for OWI,
Burglary and Disorderly Conduct,
without further incident.
Private Residence, 1200 Block
Boundary Road, Residential Burglary:
Victims inadvertently left their over-
head garage door and walk door into
their home unlocked overnight. Un-
known persons entered the occupied
home during the overnight hours and
stole electronics and cash.
Wisconsin Trade Center, 8401
Greenway Blvd, Storm Damage: Dur-
ing the severe storms on 06-18-14, nu-
merous calls for service were received
for area flooding, trees down in road-
ways, and power lines down. Officers
also responded to the Trade Center
where strong winds tore several stories
of siding off the northwest faade of
the building.
Harrington Tree Service, 1630
North High Point Road, Theft of Auto-
mobile: The business owner reported
the theft of a company truck and wood
chipper from the establishment. The
vehicle was later located and an em-
ployee of the tree service company was
cited for unauthorized use of a motor
vehicle.
Walgreens, 2010 Branch Street, Re-
tail Theft: Walgreens reported that two
suspects stole a number of DVDs from
the store. Staff provided a complete de-
scription of the suspects and their ve-
hicle. The suspects were later located
and were cited for a number of viola-
tions.
Hody Tavern, 1914 Aurora Street,
Battery: A victim reported to police
that, around 11:30 p.m., she was bat-
tered outside of the Hody Tavern. The
female victim reported that an uniden-
tified subject struck her and poured
water on her. The victim then went
home, waited three hours and called
the police.
Club Tavern, 1915 Branch Street,
Battery: At 11:45 p.m. Middleton Po-
lice were called to the Club Tavern for
the report of a fight. Officers responded
and found that a male victim was
struck in the face by another tavern pa-
tron. The victim received a significant
laceration to the face. Utilizing witness
statements and tavern security footage,
officers continue to investigate the in-
cident.
INVESTIGATIVE UNIT
The Investigative Services Bureau
(ISB) had another steady month in
June. The Detectives stayed busy in-
vestigating their assigned cases while
also completing multiple background
investigations on potential officer can-
didates at the same time. These back-
ground investigations take a significant
amount of time to complete, but are in-
credibly important to make sure we get
the best officers.
The Bureau is also one Detective
short at this time due to the fact that
Detective Tyler Loether is currently as-
signed to the Dane County Narcotics
Task Force. Detective Loether has been
assigned to the Task Force since com-
ing to ISB in the middle of April. He
has been learning valuable investiga-
tive techniques and skills that we are
excited for him to bring back to Mid-
dleton. Detective Loether will be back
with us in Middleton in the middle of
July.
During the month of June we took a
report of a residential burglary of an
occupied home. This type of crime is
particularly concerning because of how
vulnerable it can make someone feel
even while inside their own residence.
The investigation into this particular
incident is still ongoing.
Luckily this type of crime is rare in
Middleton. That said, there are a few
steps the citizens can take to try to pre-
vent becoming a victim. One thing you
can do is make sure your residence is
secure, especially when you go to bed.
It is very easy, especially during the
summer months, to forget to secure
your garage doors before turning in for
the night. Keep in mind that many of
these incidents are crimes of opportu-
nity. When someone sees a garage door
is open, they take advantage of the vul-
nerability and commit the crime. If you
are able to limit the opportunities, you
are less likely to become a victim. We
also recommend that you secure all
doors that provide access to your
home, including the door from the
garage. Many people like to leave these
doors open, but adding another barrier
making it more difficult for criminals
may make them think twice.
If you see anything suspicious,
please do not hesitate to call or text the
Police Department at 608/824-7300, or
in the case of an emergency, dial 911.
Many times people are reluctant to call
the police because they do not want to
be an inconvenience. However, we
would much rather come and investi-
gate before a crime is committed. Keep
in mind that the people who know the
neighborhood best are those who live
in it. You are more likely than an offi-
cer to know if someone or something
is out of place.
STAFFING
After the retirement of Sergeant
Barry Reynolds, Officer Scott Moen
was promoted to the rank of Sergeant
on June 19, 2014.
Sergeant Scott Moen has been in law
enforcement for eight years and has
served the City of Middleton Police
Department for five of those years.
Sergeant Moen worked for the City of
Whitewater Police Department before
coming to Middleton.
As an officer for the City of Middle-
ton, Sergeant Moen has previously
served as a patrol officer, a field train-
ing officer and recently completed a
two year assignment as the Middleton
High School Resource Officer. Ser-
geant Moen is also an assistant leader
of the Middleton Special Events Team,
an instructor for Emergency Vehicle
Operations and Control, Vehicle Con-
tacts, and Active Shooter Response.
Sergeant Moen is originally from La
Crosse, WI, but moved to the Madison
area after attending and graduating
from UW-Madison with a Bachelor of
Arts Degree in Political Science. Ser-
geant Moen enjoys spending his time
off with his wife, daughter, and two
dogs.
CRIME PREVENTION/
COMMUNITY RELATIONS
Community Events:
On June 4, the 2014 Citizens Acad-
emy class graduated. Congratulations
to everyone that participated.
On June 4, Middleton Police went to
Northside Elementary School to teach
bike safety to the students.
On June 5, Middleton Police Offi-
cers participated in the Torch Run for
the Special Olympics. Law enforce-
ment carried the torch, representing the
Flame of Hope.
On June 5, Middleton Police Offi-
cers helped served lunch at Sauk Trail
Elementary School.
On June 25, Middleton Police in-
stalled two car seats. Officer Julie Nor-
mann and Officer Jill Tutaj are certified
Child Passenger Safety Technicians by
the National Child Passenger Certifica-
tion Training Program.
On June 26, Middleton Police did a
presentation to TDS employees on ac-
tive shooter response.
Also during June, Middleton Police
did Safe Assured IDs for kids in the
community.
If you would like more information
or would like to involve the Police De-
partment in a community presentation
or event, please contact Community
Awareness Officer Jill Tutaj at 824-
7323 or jtutaj@ci.middleton.wi.us.
If you would like to join the Middle-
ton Business Watch or need to update
your contact information, please con-
tact Community Awareness Officer Jill
Tutaj at 824-7323 or jtutaj@ci.middle-
ton.wi.us.
Citizens can subscribe to receive
Middleton Business Watch email alerts
and other informational emails on the
Police Departments website at middle-
tonpd.com.
The next academy will start in April
of 2015 and class size is limited to 12
students.
If you live or work in Middleton and
are interested in attending a future
academy, please contact Community
Awareness Officer Jill Tutaj at 824-
7323 or jtutaj@ci.middleton.wi.us.
VIPS assist the Middleton Police
Department by performing tasks which
free up officers to work on more im-
portant police matters. VIPS help at
events like GNF (Good Neighbor Fes-
tival), National Night Out and Family
Safety Day and with programs like
Speed Watch and Safe Assured IDs.
Junior VIPS are teens age 14 to 17
years old. We also have an Associate
VIPS program where family members
of VIPS and civic groups can assist
VIPS with events without having to be-
come individual VIPS members.
If you are interested in the Middle-
ton Police Department VIPS program,
please contact Community Awareness
Officer Jill Tutaj at 824-7323 or jtu-
taj@ci.middleton.wi.us.
Safe Assured ID Kits:
Middleton Police will take reserva-
tions for having kits made. Kits are free
for Middleton residents or MCPASD
students.
If you would like to register, have
the ID system at an event or if you
would like to donate money for the
purchase of more kits, please contact
Community Awareness Officer Jill
Tutaj at 824-7323 or jtutaj@ci.middle-
ton.wi.us.
Community Awareness Fund:
Middleton Community Awareness
Programs such as GREAT, Speed
Watch, National Night Out, Citizens
Academy, Bike Safety Day, NSI Fam-
ily Safety Day and Shop with a Cop are
funded almost entirely from commu-
nity donations. We need your help!
If you would like to donate money
to the Community Awareness Fund
please send a check or money order to
Middleton Community Police Part-
nership Inc. or MICOPP Inc., 7341
Donna Drive, Middleton, WI, 53562.
Together we can make a difference.
If you have any questions about dona-
tions or programs please contact CAO
Jill Tutaj at 824-7323 or jtutaj@ci.mid-
dleton.wi.us.
TRAFFIC ENFORCEMENT
Sgt. Mueller attended the quarterly
Dane County Traffic Safety Commis-
sion meeting on the 10th. The atten-
dance at these meetings has grown
dramatically over the past couple of
years as more and more departments
pay more attention to traffic safety con-
cerns. Statewide motor vehicle crash
deaths are down compared to the first
quarter last year although deaths in-
volving motorcyclists and pedestrians
are up. He briefed those in attendance
on the road construction projects ongo-
ing in Middleton as they have a major
impact on traffic flow around the city.
One topic of interest brought up by
DOT and Dane County Highway was
that it appears the speed limit for High-
way 12 from Highway K to Sauk City
will be raised to 65 MPH in the near fu-
ture. Sgt. Mueller suspects that change
will have the effect of raising the
speeds of vehicles entering Middleton
on Highway 12 from the north. Vehicle
speeds on Highway 12 going through
Middleton are already a continuing
concern and this change will certainly
make it more so.
New Sergeant Jessica Quamme has
been informed that she will be taking
over the traffic safety and grant duties
from Sgt. Mueller when he retires early
next year. She will undergo training on
how to write the grants and be intro-
duced to the various traffic safety per-
sonnel from other agencies and
Department of Transportation prior to
assuming those duties.
There were 38 reportable accidents
this month with 12 of those in parking
lots compared to 29 last year with ten
in parking lots.
OWI grant high visibility patrol was
performed for 16 hours this month.
Twenty-two enforcement actions were
taken: two citations for Speeding with
nine warnings; four citations for Seat-
belt; three citations for Insurance; two
citations for Operating After Suspen-
sion; and two warnings for Equipment.
In addition, one officer assisted at the
scene of a fallen tree blocking the road-
way.
Due to staffing limitations, no mo-
torcycle patrols were performed during
the month.
Directed traffic patrols were per-
formed for approximately 18 hours
during the month. Forty-one enforce-
ment actions were taken: 31 citations
for Speeding with four warnings; two
citations for Insurance; and two warn-
ings each for Failure to Obey Sign and
Speeding in School Zone. Roads tar-
geted were Century Avenue, Stonefield
Road, N Gammon Road, N High Point
Road, High Road, Pleasant View Road,
and Hwy Q.
Mark Walther posted the informa-
tional signs by the road construction
areas prior to construction commenc-
ing which helped with traffic control
once the roads were closed off. In ad-
dition, directed patrols were performed
at the road construction zones on
Branch Street and Terrace Avenue to
warn drivers that the road is only open
for local traffic going to and from busi-
nesses or residences in the construction
zone.
COURT ACTIVITY
Dane County Adult Criminal Refer-
rals:
18 Adults, 33 Criminal Counts, 0
Civil Forfeitures.
Crime & Public Safety
[P]eople are very pleased, said
Brar regarding the ponds raised path-
ways.
Currently the city is trying to control
the cattail reeds that crowd out other
vegetation and wildlife.
Brar said he expects improvements
at the pond to actually lower the citys
maintenance expenses going forward.
Cardno JFNew, an ecological con-
sulting firm that specializes in water
restoration projects, assisted with the
work.
According to a Cardno JFNew re-
port, since 2000, the City of Middleton
has spent $1,289,013 of city funds and
grant monies on improvements in and
around the water at Tiedeman.
The Tiedeman Pond Water Quality
and Trails Enhancement Project is part
of Middletons ongoing commitment to
environmental health, according to the
companys report.
Controlling storm water runoff and
the pollution that comes with the runoff
is also a component of this ongoing ini-
tiative.
The construction of a two-acre fore-
bay (a small body of water typically
constructed in front of a larger one)
should help with pollution problems by
allowing pollutants to settle out be-
fore they enter Tiedeman Pond.
The area where the forebay was con-
structed was previously dominated by
cattails and reed canary grass.
The wetland is designed to maxi-
mize available habitat, as well as aid in
the microbial breakdown of pollutants
such as phosphorus by way of plant
up-take. All of this is done to control
algae blooms and weed problems.
The area has been re-vegetated with
numerous plants native to this part of
Wisconsin.
Middleton public lands manager
Penni Klein said improvement at
Tiedeman Pond will benefit plants, an-
imals, and the citys human inhabitants.
Many people have come to me and
told me that because of the Tiedeman
pond restoration project, their property
values have increased, said Klein.
As the population of Middleton
ages, many elderly are just happy to
have hard-surfaced, dry walking
paths, she continued. Some people
just come to the pond to see the new
wildlife and habitat.
Klein thanked the many people and
organizations that contributed to the
ponds overhaul.
The pond restoration project would
not have been possible without the
hard work, dedication, and persever-
ance of various groups working to-
gether over the last ten years, she said.
According to Klein, more than
50,000 people visited Tiedeman Pond
last year.
PAGE 10 MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 21, 2014
TIEDEMAN continued from page 1
THURSDAY, AUGUST 21, 2014 MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE PAGE 11
A T
A TOUR OUR OF OF
M
MIDDLETON IDDLETON

S S
M
MUSEUMS USEUMS
A glimpse of
Middletons
rich history
Clockwise from top right, the
Military Room in the Rowley
House; the Childrens Room in the
Rowley House; the Kitchen in the
Rowley House; World War II dis-
plays in the Middleton Depot Mu-
seum; a patriotic WWII newspaper
at the Middleton Depot Museum;
the historic Depot from the outside.
Photos by Jeff Martin
PAGE 12 MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 21, 2014
Great expectations for MHS
CROSS PLAINS Tim Simon
has seen the coin land both ways. And
he undoubtedly likes this view the
best.
Simon, Middletons 11th-year
football coach, has had teams with an
unquenched thirst for the sport. Hes
had others that werent quite as pas-
sionate.
When the Cardinals begin the 2014
campaign Friday against visiting
Janesville Parker at 7 p.m., Simon
believes this will be one of the most
ardent and zealous outfits hes ever
fielded.
Weve got some hungry kids,
Simon said. This group loves foot-
ball as much as any team weve had.
A lot of years you have 30 kids
where football is their No. 1 sport.
Then you have another 20 or 30
where football is No. 2, and so on.
But this year, its like football is No. 1
with everybody.
Even last year during JV basket-
ball (where Simon is the head coach),
a lot of days all they wanted to talk
about was football. These kids cant
wait.
Neither can Simon.
Simon ran the offense his first nine
Cardinals
offense should
be high-powered
by ROB REISCHEL
Times-Tribune
See OFFENSE, page 13
Veteran defense
looks to shine
by ROB REISCHEL
Times-Tribune
See DEFENSE, page 15
CROSS PLAINS Tom
Cabalka typically plays things close
to the vest.
No matter how much Middletons
veteran defensive coordinator loves
his unit, hell rarely sing their praises
in August.
This season was different, though.
Weve got a chance to be a pretty
good defense, Cabalka said.
That statement alone might tell it
all.
Middleton which hosts
Janesville Parker Friday at 7 p.m. in
the season-opener for both teams
brings brings back eight defensive
players that started at least one game
a year ago. Six of those were starters
throughout the season.
So after allowing 17 points a
game in 2013, these Cardinals have
their sights set even higher.
Shutouts. Thats what we want,
senior safety Max Boehnen said.
Were ready for it.
The Cardinals certainly seem
ready for big things.
The defensive line is experienced
and deep. The linebackers can run.
And theres a bevy of talent through-
out the secondary.
You can just feel it, senior line-
backer Brian Chapman said.
Throughout the whole defense,
WEEK 1: MIDDLETON VS. JANESVILLE PARKER
Times-Tribune photos by
Mary Langenfeld
Ready
to roll
Ivan Monreal
(top), Mitchell
Andrews (bottom)
and the rest of
Middletons football
team begin the sea-
son Friday against
Janesville Parker.
Follow Rob
Reischel on
Twitter at
@robreischel
THURSDAY, AUGUST 21, 2014 MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE PAGE 13
MIDDLETON FOOTBALL ROSTER
No. Name Yr Pos. Ht Wt
1 K. J. Willis 12 WR/DB 5-9 151
2 Blake Carey 11 QB/DB 5-11 139
3 Hayden Denson 12 RB/LB 5-10 185
4 Travis Zander 12 WR/DB 6-0 163
5 Max Boehnen 12 RB/DB 6-1 187
6 Alex Wood 12 RB/DB 5-9 148
7 Brett Joers 12 QB/DB 6-1 167
8 Kellan Schulz 12 QB/DB 6-1 172
9 Mitchell Herl 12 TE/DE 6-4 212
10 Ivan Monreal 11 RB/DB 5-6 151
11 Ethan Lengfeld 11 WR/DB 5-10 145
12 Zach Shoemaker-Allen 12 WR/DB 6-0 168
13 Brennan Schmitt 11 QB/DB 5-11 160
15 Peyton Brunker 12 TE/DB 5-11 178
16 Eli Zietlow 11 WR/DB 5-11 158
17 Declan Whinnery 12 WR/DB 6-3 193
18 Shaun Wettstein 12 RB/LB 5-9 186
19 Ian Holkanson 12 WR/DE 6-4 200
21 Jervon Walker 12 RB/DB 5-8 150
22 Nick Maes 12 WR/DB 6-0 170
23 Griffin Gussel 11 WR/DB 5-9 160
24 Henry Dean 12 WR/DB 6-1 175
25 Tyler Holley 12 WR/DB 5-9 175
26 Travis Raffel 11 RB/LB 5-8 161
27 Joel Noriega 11 WR/DB 5-9 151
28 Derek Pettit 12 RB/LB 5-8 155
29 Javonte Kitchen 11 WR/DB 5-9 180
30 Alex Leahy 12 RB/DB 5-7 153
31 Matthew Wakai 11 WR/DB 5-7 137
32 Cam Maly 11 RB/DB 5-9 163
33 David Vande Sande 11 WR/DB 5-10 161
34 Nick Miazga 11 WR/DB 5-8 153
35 Jake Manser 12 RB/LB 5-11 170
37 Arandeep Thind 11 RB/DB 5-8 172
38 Max Collien 11 WR/DB 5-10 164
39 Mitch Andrews 11 TE/DE 6-1 194
40 Brian Chapman 12 RB/DB 6-1 183
41 Alex Bermea 12 WR/DB 5-7 148
42 Nolan Kouba 11 QB/DB 5-11 169
44/70 Eric Karwoski 12 TE/DE 6-3 203
45 Alex Wills 12 RB/DE 6-0 178
46 Garrett Graf 11 RB/LB 5-11 180
47 Benny Nevarez 12 RB/DL 5-8 199
48 Joe Ludwig 10 WR/LB 6-1 180
49 Josh Hellbach 12 TE/DE 6-0 205
50 William Braxton 11 OL/DL 5-6 209
51 Hunter Westhoff 12 OL/DL 5-8 191
53 Kamon Ennis 11 OL/DL 6-0 240
54 Nikko Miller 12 OL/DL 6-1 225
55 Saygo Henderson 11 OL/DL 5-9 224
59 Chase Jollie 12 OL/DL 5-11 250
60 Max Mayhew 11 OL/DL 5-8 161
61 Jake Hollfelder 11 OL/DL 5-8 176
63 Max Milovets 12 OL/DL 6-2 264
64 Malcolm Schneider 11 OL/DE 6-0 188
65 Derek Ramsey 12 OL/DL 5-9 190
66 Kajuan Redus 11 OL/DL 5-7 215
69 Trenell Seals 11 OL/DL 6-0 275
70/44 Eric Karwoski 12 TE/DE 6-3 203
71 Axel Ciefuegos 11 OL/DL 5-9 229
72 Jarod Powless 12 OL/DL 6-6 218
73 Justin Gurtner 11 OL/DL 6-3 201
76 Garrett Piernot 12 OL/DL 5-11 225
77 Sean Benedict 12 OL/DL 6-2 297
79 Austin Collins 12 OL/DL 6-2 289
80 Brandon Munoz 11 WR/DB 5-11 151
81 Sam Lauenstein 11 WR/DB 5-11 158
82 Kevin Ripp 11 WR/DB 5-10 160
85 Mitchell Bacon 11 WR/DB 5-11 170
86 Jacob Mefford 11 TE/DE 6-1 171
87 Kyle Beckwith 12 WR/DB 6-1 151
90 Leron Goodall 12 WR/DB 5-10 155
91 Cody Markel 11 WR/DB 6-5 194
92 Spencer McNight 11 WR/DB 5-9 154
93 Max Lofthouse 12 WR/DB 6-0 160
97 Edson Ramirez 11 OL/DL 5-7 188
98 Nate Shapiro 12 WR/DB 6-1 170
99 Jack Donley 12 TE/DE 5-8 175
Head Coach Tim Simon
Varsity Assistant Coaches Tom Cabalka, Rick VanderSanden, Jason
Pertzborn, Dan Drangstveit, Joe Poehls, Ryan Oliversen, Max Peternell,
Tyrell Rosemeyer, Grant Malmquist, Seth Coyne.
J.V Coaches Jay Redders, Steve Bruckner, Shawn Welit, Darrell
Hellenbrand, Jerry Raffel.
Freshman Coaches Brad North, Joe Line, Jon Templin, Chase Butler,
Mark Oesterle, Eric Hubbard.
years at the helm. Last year, Simon
relinquished play-calling duties to
offensive coordinator Jason Pertzborn
so he could take on more of a big
picture role.
But theres no doubt, offense is
Simons calling card. And hes down-
right giddy about the potential of this
years Cardinals.
Middleton graduated seven offen-
sive players that earned all-confer-
ence honors last season, including
first-team running back Charles
Braxton and first-team offensive tack-
les Hayden Acker and Jack Mayers.
But MHS rarely rebuilds. It
reloads. And that figures to be the
story again this year.
Ive been so impressed with the
talent and the people stepping up,
said senior center Sean Benedict. I
just think we have such great talent
and well have a great season.
That seems to be the belief
throughout the program.
Middleton averaged 29.3 points
per game last year and eclipsed 30
points five times. While the majority
of those key contributors are gone, the
Cardinals have a bevy of gifted play-
ers that have been biding their time.
Middletons offensive line, which
paved the way for its rushing attack to
average 190.8 yards per contest, was
a major strength in 2013. And this
year should be no different.
Senior right guard Derek Ramsey
was an honorable-mention all-confer-
ence performer last season and should
anchor the unit.
Junior left guard KaJuan Redus
has been one of the stars of training
camp, while Benedict has improved
dramatically in the past year.
Senior Austin Collins will start at
left tackle, while both seniors Eric
Karwoski and Max Milovets are bat-
tling at right tackle.
It always starts up front, Simon
said. And our goal is to equal or be
better than last year.
Last year was really, really good.
But we think we can be pretty good
again.
Braxton was a hammer in the
backfield last season, inflicting as
much punishment as he endured.
Middletons running game will have a
different flavor this season, as junior
Cam Maly and senior Alex Leahy
bring more of a home run threat to the
position.
Both Maly (5-9, 163) and Leahy
(5-7, 153) are smallish backs. But
each player has the vision, speed and
elusiveness to go the distance every
time they touch the ball.
Theyre both Jaime Hofer-type
backs, Simon said, referring to the
Cardinals all-state back in 2010.
Theyre big-play guys.
Junior Travis Raffel was the front-
runner at fullback, but was sidelined
by a staph infection. Raffel returned
to practice Monday, but senior Jake
Manser seems likely to start the open-
er.
Senior Kellan Schulz had a strong
Quarterback
1. Kellan Schulz
2. Brett Joers
Fullback
1. Jake Manser
2. Alex Wills/Garrett Graf/Travis
Raffel
Running back
1. Alex Leahy/Cam Maly
2. Ivan Monreal/Travis Raffel
Tight end
1. Mitchell Herl
2. Mitchell Andrews
Flanker
1. Mitchell Bacon
2. Zach Shoemaker-Allen
Split End
1. Travis Zander
2. Cody Markel
Left tackle
1. Austin Collins
2. Jarod Powless
Left guard
1. KaJuan Redus
2. Hunter Westhoff
Center
1. Sean Benedict
2. Garrett Piernot
Right guard
1. Derek Ramsey
2. Jake Hollfelder
Right tackle
1. Eric Karwoski/Max Milovets
Offensive Depth Chart
OFFENSE
continued from page 12
n
See OFFENSE, page 14
PAGE 14 MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 21, 2014
first two weeks of training camp and
won the quarterbacking job. Senior
Brett Joers is No. 2.
I think we could win with either
kid, Simon said. But Kellan made a
few more plays with his feet and his
arm and graded out a little higher.
Schulz should have a gifted group
of pass catchers to work with.
Senior tight end Mitchell Herl was
a second-team all-Big Eight player
last year after catching 23 passes for
323 yards and three touchdowns. Herl
(6-4, 215) added 25 pounds of muscle
this offseason, runs the 40-yard dash
in 4.7 seconds, and could be poised
for a huge senior season.
Im really excited, Herl said.
But Im more excited for the team.
These guys are ready and I think
were going to make a lot of great
things happen.
Senior Travis Zander is the most
experienced returning receiver.
Zander was the Cardinals No. 3
wideout last year and is one of the
fastest players on the team.
Senior Zach Shoemaker-Allen and
junior Mitchell Bacon should both
have major roles, as well.
Middleton has experimented more
with the spread offense this fall, and
could incorporate some of that into its
offense. At the end of the day, though,
the Cardinals are and always have
been a run-first operation.
Middleton ran the ball on 61.4% of
its plays last year and figures to have
a similar split this season.
When you look at our weapons
and how we want to attack people,
youd like to have about a 60-40
split, Simon said. But really, we just
want to score points no matter how
we do it.
By the looks of it, that shouldnt be
a problem this fall.
OFFENSE
continued from page 13
n
THURSDAY, AUGUST 21, 2014 MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE PAGE 15
were so far ahead of where we were
last year.
We all know what were doing.
Weve put in way more things than
this time last year and I just dont
think we have any weaknesses right
now.
Right now, two things stand out to
Cabalka more than any other about
his defense.
First off, theyre fast. Very fast.
We can really run and get after
people, Cabalka said. I think well
be as fast as weve been since 2010.
Chapman agreed.
Were a very quick team,
Chapman said. Most of us have
been together since middle school.
We know what we can do.
Second is that the Cardinals are
substantially ahead of where they
were 12 months ago.
Last season, Middleton brought
back just one defensive starter. This
time around, the Cardinals will boast
DEFENSE continued from page 12 n
See DEFENSE, page 16
Times-Tribune photo
by Mary Langenfeld
Mi ddl et ons
Griffin Gussel
(23) makes a
tackle during the
C a r d i n a l s
scrimmage last
Friday.
a far more experienced bunch.
To have that experience back is
pretty important, Cabalka said. I
think theyre going to be awfully
competitive.
Middletons most experienced
unit is the defensive line, where all
four projected starters had key roles
a year ago.
Senior defensive tackle Chase
Jollie (5-11, 250) was a second-team
all-Big Eight Conference player last
season. Jollie was fifth on the
Cardinals in 2013 with 49 tackles,
fourth in tackles for loss (five) and
posted 1.5 sacks.
Hes a really big, strong kid,
Cabalka said of Jollie. He has nice
strong hips.
Senior Nikko Miller (6-1, 225), an
honorable-mention all-Big Eight
player in 2013, is back at the other
defensive tackle spot. Millers con-
sistency is a huge strength, and he
and Jollie should form one of the
conferences top tackle tandems.
Nikko has that experience thats
extremely important, Cabalka said.
We hope those two make it awfully
tough to run the ball.
Senior Josh Hellbach (6-0, 205)
was a part-time starter at one defen-
sive end spot last year. Hellbach is a
solid anchor against the run and has
some pass rush ability, as well.
Speedy senior Alex Wills (6-0,
178) will start at the other defensive
end spot. Wills started occasionally a
year ago, and like the rest of the
defensive linemen, has plenty of
game-experience.
Were pretty excited about that
group, Cabalka said.
The Cardinals are excited about
their potential at linebacker, too.
Senior Brian Chapman is a return-
ing starter and will man the strong
side. Senior Hayden Denson steps
into the middle linebacker spot,
while senior Peyton Brunker and
junior Garrett Graf are battling for
time on the weakside.
I think that group will mesh real-
ly well, Cabalka said. Those guys
can run.
So can the defensive backs.
Boehnen (6-1, 187), a three-year
starter, will lead the group. Hes big,
strong, tough and physical.
There isnt much Boehnen hasnt
seen, and as one of the Cardinals
captains, he figures to be both a
leader and a dynamic player.
Im really excited about the
whole defense, Boehnen said. The
juniors have picked things up really
fast, and weve got a lot of experi-
ence back. I think were going to
really put it together.
Sophomore Joe Ludwig, whose
father Andy is the offensive coordi-
nator at the University of Wisconsin,
will make the jump to varsity and
figures to start at free safety.
Ludwig (6-1, 180) has all the
physical tools to contribute immedi-
ately. And as the son of a coach, hes
also ahead of the game mentally.
We know hes an athlete,
Cabalka said of Ludwig. Hes never
played that position, but he can run
and hes a smart kid. He seems to be
pretty mature for a sophomore.
Senior Alex Wood (5-9, 148) will
man one cornerback position. Wood
is slightly undersized, but started
much of last year and is a fighter.
Senior Nick Maes (6-0, 170) gets
first crack at the other cornerback
job.
I just think its going to be phe-
nomenal, Boehnen said of the sea-
son on tap. You talk about gelling,
we have everybody helping every-
body.
We had a lot of guys back, and
the new guys have picked it up
quickly. I cant wait.
PAGE 16 MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 21, 2014
Rush End
1. Alex Wills
2. Erik Karwoski
Stud End
1. Josh Hellbach
2. Mitchell Andrews
Junk Tackle
1. Nikko Miller
2. Axel Cienfuegos
Nose Tackle
1. Chase Jollie
2. Max Milovets
Strongside Linebacker
1. Brian Chapman
2. Derek Petit
Middle Linebacker
1. Hayden Denson
2. Shaun Wettstein
Weakside Linebacker
1. Peyton Brunker/Garrett Graf
Cornerback
1. Alex Wood
2. Ivan Manreal
Cornerback
1. Nick Maes
2. K.J. Willis
Strong Safety
1. Max Boehnen
2. Kevin Ripp
Free safety
1. Joe Ludwig
2. Declan Whinnery/Henry Dean
Defensive Depth Chart
DEFENSE continued from page 15 n
File photo
Middleton defensive coordinator Tom Cabalka loves the look of his 2014 defense.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 21, 2014 MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE PAGE 17
The casual observer might look at
Middletons boys soccer team and
predict a rebuilding season.
Guess again says Cardinals coach
Ben Kollasch.
For the foreseeable future we will
be reloading, said Kollasch, whose
team begins its season Thursday
against visiting Mount Horeb at 7 p.m.
We have the largest program in the
state in terms of participation, which
gives me lots of athletes that know
how to play soccer well.
Middleton lost 15 seniors from last
years team that finished second in the
Big Eight Conference. That group also
went 11-8-1 overall.
Despite heavy losses to graduation,
though including all-state defense-
man Jack Hagstrom the Cardinals
still have a 14-person senior class.
And Kollasch is extremely optimistic
that this group can do some damage.
Our sophomore and junior classes
this year have just as much talent as
we have come to expect in our previ-
ous graduating classes, Kollasch
said. So we have good things on the
horizon as well.
The Cardinals welcome back eight
players with varsity experience.
Seniors Devin Ott and Ivan
Khamenka are in their third varsity
seasons and will lead Middletons
offense.
They will drive our offense with
the potential for highlight reel materi-
al at any time, Kollasch said.
Seniors Roger Walleffe and Jordan
Grapentine will lead the defense,
while big things will be expected from
senior keeper Caleb Ostrem.
People will look at how we gradu-
ated defenders and wonder if we have
the people to play there, Kollasch
said. You cannot replace three-time
all state winner Jack Hagstrom, but we
have athletes that can not only defend
but turn up the field as well.
We (also) have a senior goalie
again for the umpteenth year run-
ning, Kollasch continued. But for
the first time in a few years he is
returning for a second year on varsity
and we expect good things from Caleb
Ostrem.
Central midfielder Alban Jonuzi is
one newcomer Kollasch expects to
make a huge mark. Gabe Garlough-
Shah, Nick Bilodeau and Monte
Urban are others that Kollasch
believes will take a major jump.
In addition, Middletons sopho-
more class is expected to make signif-
icant contributions.
We have a handful of sophomores
that are ready for prime time and I am
looking for them to take some signifi-
cant roles as they get used to the var-
sity level, Kollasch said.
While Middletons lineup may be a
work-in-progress early in the season,
Kollasch knows one thing about his
team.
This team is quick, he said.
They are working on slowing down
enough to connect all their ideas and
communicate them fast enough and
that will come as soon as the team gets
some time to settle in. The weaknesses
right now is getting the communica-
tion systems and strategy unified
among the team so they can make the
most of their creativity.
The Big Eight Conference appears
wide open.
Madison Memorial won the league
last season, going a perfect 9-0. But
the Spartans fell in the sectional finals
to Madison West, which had finished
fifth in the league.
Kollasch expects great parity
and potential surprises again this
year.
The Big Eight is wide open, he
said. This conference has gotten bet-
ter every year and now we are lucky if
we can relax in one game within the
conference. We will need to be consis-
tent to win conference and win against
a few good teams to go to state.
The smaller divisions for the
WIAA tourney make it that much
harder to get to state. That said I
would match up my smart soccer play-
ers against any talent pool they might
face in the state.
Soccer Cardinals looking to reload
Middleton has
strong senior
class again
by ROB REISCHEL
Times-Tribune
File photo
Ivan Khamenka and Middletons boys soccer team open their season
Thursday against Mount Horeb.
ASHTON Kevin Peternell
like most of his teammates wasnt
born when Ashton last qualified for a
berth in the Home Talent League Final
Four in 1986.
Peternell did his part, though, to
make sure that steak would end on
Sunday, although he did have a little
help from his offense, too.
Sixth-seeded Cross Plains man-
aged just three hits off Peternell
through six innings and fifth-seeded
Ashton exploded for nine runs in the
bottom of the first inning en route to a
14-1 victory in a Northern Section
final amateur baseball game.
Ashton (14-5) advanced to host
Eastern Section champion DeForest
(17-2) on Sunday in the first game of
the HTL round-robin Final
Four.Cross Plains was looking for its
first appearance in the Final Four
since winning the 2011 title.
Its about time, Ashton manager
Dave Adler said with a grin. But
when you get nine runs in the first
inning, all you have to do is get on top
and throw strikes.
Dave Adler was a pitcher for
Ashton the last time it played in a
Final Four game and picked up a win
in relief. So he couldnt stop smiling
after earning the opportunity to finally
manage a team in the season-ending
tournament.
Its also pretty nice when you
come out and hit the ball like that in
the first inning, Adler said, after
Ashton recorded seven hits in the
opening frame. They werent cheap
shots. There were some well-hit
balls.
Garrett Novinski went 4-for-5,
while Josh Adler and Shane Adler had
three hits apiece to power Ashtons
16-hit attack off three Cross Plains
pitchers.
We know weve got the hitters
and weve shown we can do it all year
long, said Novinski, who won the
Northern Section batting title and was
one of three Ashton hitters to finish in
the top 10.
Meanwhile, Cross Plains (12-7)
could manage just six hits combined
off right-handers Peternell and reliev-
er Nick Maier.
We had plenty of chances. We had
plenty of innings left being down nine
runs, Cross Plains manager Dave
Sarbacker said. Its not unusual for a
team to score 10 in a nine-inning
game.
We just couldnt get anything
going today. Kevin (Peternell) did a
really nice job for them on the mound.
Pitching ahead like that you can just
throw strikes and have some success.
Cross Plains starter Jared Haack,
who tossed a complete-game shutout
against defending champion
Middleton a week ago, couldnt repeat
that magic.
Aaron Gowan drew a walk on a 3-
2 pitch to leadoff the first inning, and
Shane Adler fought off a breaking ball
to drop a single into right field to
jumpstart the Ashton offense.
Novinski followed with a perfect
bunt along the third base line, which
he beat out for a base hit to load the
bases. Derek Prochaska then lined a
two-run double to left-center field for
a 2-0 lead.
However, Ashton was just getting
started.
Kasey Miller followed with an
RBI-single to score Novinski. After
Peternell was hit by a pitch to load the
bases again, Josh Adler singled home
Prochaska, while Miller and Peternell
both scored on an error on the play for
a 6-0 lead.
During batting practice all week,
we were just crushing the ball,
Peternell said. We were expecting
(Haack) to go curve ball, first pitch
off-speed, and then see what was after
it.
When Gowan got on base, it got
us going and Shane comes back and
hits that one to right and just gets on
base. We just worked the ball around a
little bit.
After Haack retired Kevin
Drunasky on a ground ball and Nick
Maier on a pop up, Gowan singled
home Josh Adler and Shane Adler fol-
lowed with a two-run homer to cap the
nine-run surge.
It was a 1-0 count and I was trying
to sit back and see something over the
plate, Shane Adler said of his blast to
center field. I got a fastball low and
in, and I was happy when it went over
the fence.
Ken Allen then replaced Haack and
retired 12 of the first 15 batters he
faced to stymie Ashton temporarily.
Cross Plains, though, was only able
to put four runners on base against
Peternell, who retired nine of the first
10 batters he faced and didnt allow a
base hit until Jordan Lueck led off the
fourth inning with a single to right
field.
My two-seam fastball was work-
ing, Peternell said. In the third and
fourth innings it was just diving. It
was working real well. The curve ball
was working well.
Drew Meinholz followed Luecks
hit with a two-out single, but Peternell
retired Allen on a ground ball back to
the mound to end the threat.
Ashton put the game out of reach
when it scored four runs with two outs
in the bottom of the fifth to extend its
lead to 13-0. Shane Adler, Novinski
and Prochaska delivered consecutive
RBI-singles to provide Peternell more
than enough support.
We wanted to come out with ener-
gy. Getting nine in the first always
helps, Novinski said. We told Kevin
(Peternell), Throw strikes and the
defense will do its job. We were pret-
ty confident after that nine-run first
inning.
Cross Plains avoided a shutout in
the top of the eighth inning when
Brian Lochner doubled to right-center
field and Ty Foye delivered a two-out
run-scoring single to left.
Im really proud of these guys. We
played well the last couple of weeks,
even the last few games of the regular
season, Sarbacker said of his
squad. After losing a tough game to
Black Earth, we came back to beat
them the next week and beat a tough
team in Middleton. We thought we
had a good shot today, but just didnt
have it.
Ashton capped the scoring in the
bottom of the eighth when Drew
Haack lined a two-out single to right
and Josh Adler followed with an RBI-
double to center field.
Maier then retired Cross Plains in
order in the ninth to seal the victory to
the delight and roar of the overflow
home crowd.
The last time Ashton made the
playoffs I wasnt even a thought at
that point, Gowan said with a chuck-
le. This town deserves it. As far as
Im concerned, we have the best fans
in the Home Talent League. We want-
ed to do it for them.
Shane Adler said he was proud to
help his dad, Dave, earn the opportu-
nity to manage a team in the Final
Four.
Ive been watching a lot of
Northern championship games from
the stands, Shane Adler said. It feels
good to finally win one. The fans have
wanted this for a long time and
havent seen us go very far in the play-
offs.
Ashton 14, Cross Plains 1
Cross Plains ..... 000000 010 1 64
Ashton ... 900 004 01x 14 16 0
Pitching (IP-H-ER-BB-K): Cross Plains
Jared Haack (L, .2-7-9-1-0), Ken Allen (5.1-7-3-
0-4), Garrett Knudtson (2-2-1-0-2). Ashton
Kevin Peternell (W, 6-3-0-1-5), Nick Maier (S,3-
2-1-0-2).
Hitting leaders: Ashton Garrett Novinski
(4x5), Josh Adler (3x5), Shane Adler (3x4),
Aaron Gowan (2x4), Derek Prochaska (2x4).
2B Brian Lochner, Derek Prochaska, Josh
Adler. HR Shane Adler.
PAGE 18 MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 21, 2014
Ashton ousts
Cross Plains
HTL team reaches
Final Four for first
time since 1986
by DENNIS SEMRAU
For the Times-Tribune
Times-Tribune photo by Mary Langenfeld
Ken Allen (above) and Cross Plains Home Talent League team had its season end Sunday.
Theyve waited in the wings.
Theyve patiently bided their time.
Now, several members of
Middletons girls golf team are ready to
show their stuff.
The Cardinals finished sixth at the
21-team, WPGA Invite held at Yahara
Hills last Friday. It was Middletons
first event of the year, and it competed
without standout Loren Skibba, who
was sidelined with a back injury.
The Cardinals had three girls who
never competed in a varsity match, and
two others with limited varsity experi-
ence. Still, Middleton hung tough
against many of the states elite teams.
Milton won the tournament with a
322 team score, while Madison
Edgewood (323), Verona (327),
Homestead (329) and Arrowhead (338)
rounded out the top five. Middleton
was sixth at 342.
I am extremely happy with the way
Friday turned out, Middleton coach
Becky Halverson said. We were miss-
ing Loren Skibba and took sixth place.
Thats pretty impressive. I was pleased
with the scores from all five girls.
Senior Rachel Thornton led the
Cardinals with an 82, while sophomore
Alexis Thomas carded an 83.
Sophomore Morgan Narowetz shot an
85 and sophomore Morgan Miles shot
a 92.
It was great senior leadership from
Rachel and a great confidence builder
for all of them to play against this level
of competition and play as well as they
did, Halverson said. I saw some
rough putting out there from the girls,
so we know where our focus is going to
be.
As for Skibba, the Cardinals will
take a wait-and-see approach.
Were not sure right now how long
shell be out, Halverson said. She
may play here and there in the coming
weeks, but we dont want to make her
back any worse. In the meantime, we
have some girls that are ready to show
their abilities and get some experience
at the varsity level.
On deck: Middleton was at the
Brookfield Central-Homestead Invite
Monday and Tuesday. The Cardinals
then host Janesville Parker Thursday at
Pleasant View at 9 a.m., and head to the
Waunakee Invite Monday at 8:30 a.m.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 21, 2014 MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE PAGE 19
Golfers off to
strong start
by ROB REISCHEL
Times-Tribune
Times-Tribune
photo by Mary
Langenfeld
Senior Rachel
Thornton and
the rest of
Mi ddl e t o n s
girls golf team
got off to a ter-
rific start last
week.
PAGE 20 MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE THURSDAY, AUGUST 21, 2014
Tennis Cardinals
2nd at Hartford
Middletons girls tennis team began
its season with a second place finish at
the Hartford Invitational last Saturday.
The Cardinals defeated Whitefish
Bay, 5-2, and toppled Waukesha West,
7-0. Middleton then fell to Hartland
Arrowhead, 5-2, in the title match.
Middleton head coach Deke
Bradley didnt respond to a request for
comments about the matches.
In Middletons win over Bay,
Kaisey Skibba rolled to a 6-2, 6-1 win
at No. 1 singles, while Emily
Oberwetter notched a 6-0, 6-0 win at
No. 2 singles.
The Cardinals also won all three
doubles flights. Abbey Webber and
Allison Ragsdale rolled to a 6-0, 6-1
victory at No. 1 doubles, while Bailey
Gold and Lauren Coons notched a 6-4,
6-0 win at No. 2. Megan Peyton and
Jessica Wang also posted a 6-4, 4-6, 11-
9 win at No. 3 doubles.
Middleton had a far easier time
against Waukesha West.
Skibba cruised to a 6-0, 6-1 win at
No. 1 singles, while Oberwetter posted
a 6-0, 6-0 win at No. 2 singles. Amanda
Huff earned a 6-0, 6-3 win at No. 3 sin-
gles and Liddy Whitenour rolled to a 6-
0, 6-1 win at No. 4.
Webber and Ragsdale posted a 6-1,
6-3 win at No. 1 doubles, while Gold
and Coons cruised to a 6-1 6-0 win at
No. 2 doubles. And at No. 3, Peyton
and Wang rolled to a 6-3, 6-1 win.
Middleton fell to Arrowhead,
though, in the championship match.
Oberwetter earned a hard fought, 6-
1, 5-7, 10-8 win at No. 2 singles. And
the Webber-Ragsdale duo won at No. 1
doubles, 7-5, 0-6, 10-8.
On deck: Middleton hosted
Janesville Parker Tuesday, then is at the
Madison Memorial Invitational Friday
and Saturday.
by ROB REISCHEL
Times-Tribune
File photo
E m i l y
Oberwetter
a n d
Middletons
girls tennis
team fin-
ished second
at the
H a r t f o r d
Invite last
Saturday.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 21, 2014 MIDDLETON TIMES-TRIBUNE PAGE 21
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