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Teachers Manual

Macmillan Publishers India Ltd, 2013


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First published, 2013
MACMILLAN PUBLISHERS INDIA LTD
Bengaluru Bhopal Chandigarh Chennai Coimbatore Cuttack Delhi
Guwahati Hubli Hyderabad Jaipur Kolkata Lucknow Madurai Mumbai
Nagpur Patna Pune Raipur Thiruvananthapuram Visakhapatnam
Associated companies and representatives throughout the world
ISBN

SKEY 00 02 65

Published by
Amitabh Nagpal for Macmillan Publishers India Ltd
3A, 5th Floor, DLF Corporate Park, Gurgaon 122002 (Haryana), India
Printed at :

This book is meant for educational and learning purposes. The author(s) of the book has/have taken
all reasonable care to ensure that the contents of the book do not violate any copyright or other
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notify the publisher in writing for any corrective action.

CONTENTS
CLASS 2 TERMS 1 3
About the series ............................................. 4
Continuous and Comprehensive
Evaluation (CCE) scheme .............................. 5

1. Term 1
English
Features of lessons ........................................ 8
Methodology ................................................. 10
Scheme of lessons ....................................... 14
Lesson plans ................................................ 15
Tests ............................................................ 24
Answer key to tests ...................................... 28
Answer key to lessons in course book .......... 28
Answer key to grammar and language
worksheets ................................................... 32

Mathematics
Scheme of lessons ....................................... 99
Lesson plans .............................................. 100
Math lab activitiesformative
assessment ................................................ 104
Tests .......................................................... 106
Answer key to tests .................................... 109

Environmental Studies
Scheme of lessons ..................................... 111
Lesson plans .............................................. 113
Tests .......................................................... 120
Answer key to tests .................................... 126
Answer key to lessons in course book ........ 127
Answer key to lets revise ........................... 128

Mathematics

General Knowledge

Introduction .................................................. 34
Scheme of lessons ....................................... 35
Lesson plans ................................................ 37
Math lab activitiesformative assessment .. 43
Tests ............................................................ 46
Answer key to tests ...................................... 52

Answer key to lessons in course book ........ 129

Environmental Studies
Introduction .................................................. 54
Features of lessons ...................................... 55
Scheme of lessons ....................................... 56
Lesson plans ................................................ 59
Tests ............................................................ 67
Answer key to tests ...................................... 73
Answer key to lessons in course book .......... 73
Answer key to lets revise ............................. 74

General Knowledge
Answer key to lessons in course book .......... 75

2. Term 2
English
Scheme of lessons ....................................... 78
Lesson plans ................................................ 79
Tests ............................................................ 89
Answer key to tests ...................................... 93
Answer key to lessons in course book .......... 93
Answer key to grammar and language
worksheets ................................................... 97

3. Term 3
English
Scheme of lessons ..................................... 132
Lesson plans .............................................. 133
Tests .......................................................... 144
Answer key to tests .................................... 148
Answer key to lessons in course book ........ 149
Answer key to grammar and language
worksheets ................................................. 153

Mathematics
Scheme of lessons ..................................... 155
Lesson plans .............................................. 156
Math lab activitiesformative
assessment ................................................ 160
Tests .......................................................... 163
Answer key to tests .................................... 168

Environmental Studies
Scheme of lessons ..................................... 170
Lesson plans .............................................. 172
Tests .......................................................... 179
Answer key to tests .................................... 185
Answer key to lessons in course book ........ 186
Answer key to lets revise ........................... 187

General Knowledge
Answer key to lessons in course book ........ 188

FUSION

ABOUT THE SERIES


FUSIONFor Active and Holistic Learning is an exciting skill enhancement series for classes
1 to 5. In line with emerging thinking in syllabus development, FUSION covers three terms in each
academic year. Based on the Active and Holistic model of learning, the books closely interweave
concepts to lay a foundation at the primary level. Focussing on total learning experience, FUSION
brings together learning material required for English, Mathematics, Environmental Studies, Science,
Social Studies and General Knowledge in each term.
KEY FEATURES

Based on the curricular guidelines specified by the National Curriculum Framework for School
Education.

Graded and matched to the number of class hours planned by schools.

Language, mathematical and scientific concepts linked with interesting explanations, activities,
games and real-life examples.

Carefully structured exercises for formative assessment.

Model test papers for summative assessment.

Current information in the General Knowledge worksheets to increase general awareness.

Teachers Handbooks to facilitate teaching.

e-books for teachers with scheme of work, worksheets and tests.


English
Theme-based lessons on various topicsland and people, games and sports, animal lives, science,
adventure, biographies and autobiographies besides short stories from India and abroadnot only
help in developing a command over English, but also in inculcating values which will help students
grow into global citizens.
Each lesson has several sections which together help in the development of comprehension,
pronunciation, vocabulary and dictionary skills, and reading and writing skills. The exercises
and projects are varied, interesting and graded according to the students conceptual and
linguistic maturity.
Mathematics
The Mathematics section focuses on developing in students the ability to apply mathematical concepts
to real-life. With succinct explanation of concepts, easy-to follow examples and ample drill, the
Mathematics section helps in removing math phobia among students.
Environmental Studies
The Environmental Studies section follows a multi-sensorial, integrated and skills-based approach to
imbibe and foster scientific and environmental awareness among students.
Science
With clear and straight-forward text, supported by ample activities, experiments, projects, illustrations
and photographs, the Science section helps to empower students to apply science in everyday life.
Social Studies
The section on Social Studies offers a comprehensive foundation for History and Civics and Geography
taking off from Environmental Studies at classes 1 and 2. Easy-to-read lessons, interspersed with
interesting features such as Looking Closely, Quick Facts and Projects, make the learning of Social
Studies fun.
General Knowledge
The General Knowledge section has interesting and current information to increase General
Knowledge awareness.
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TEACHERS MANUAL

CONTINUOUS AND COMPREHENSIVE EVALUATION (CCE) SCHEME


The Continuous and Comprehensive Evaluation (CCE) scheme proposed by the Central Board of
Secondary Education (CBSE) is an initiative, attempting to shift emphasis from testing to holistic learning.
In this scheme, the term continuous is meant to emphasise that evaluation is a continuous process built
into the teaching-learning process and spread over the entire span of the academic session.
The second term comprehensive means that the scheme attempts to cover both the scholastic and the
co-scholastic aspects of students growth and development.
Scholastic aspects include curricular areas namely, languages, mathematics, science and social sciences,
whereas co-scholastic aspects include life skills, co-curricular, attitudes and values.
It aims at creating good citizens possessing sound health, appropriate skills and desirable qualities
besides academic excellence.
Its objectives are continuity in evaluation and assessment of broad-based learning and behavioural
outcomes.
How does CCE help in the teaching-learning process?

It helps the teacher to organise effective teaching strategies.

Continuous evaluation helps in regular assessment of the learners progress.

Continuous evaluation serves to diagnose weaknesses and permits the teacher to ascertain an
individual learners strengths, weaknesses and needs.

CCE provides immediate feedback to the teacher, who can then decide whether a particular lesson
or concept needs re-teaching in the whole class or whether a few individuals are in need of remedial
instruction.

By continuous evaluation, students can know their strengths and weaknesses. It provides students
self-assessment on how they study. It can motivate students to develop good study habits, to correct
errors and to direct their activities towards achievement of desired goals. It helps a learner to
determine the areas of instruction in which more emphasis is required.

Continuous and comprehensive evaluation identifies areas of aptitude and interest and thereby
helps in making decisions for the future, regarding choice of subjects, courses and careers.

CCE provides information on the progress of students in scholastic and co-scholastic areas and
thus helps in predicting the future successes of the learner.

In order to improve the teaching-learning process, assessment should be both formative and summative.
FORMATIVE AND SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT

FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT
An assessment is formative when the feedback from learning activities is used to adjust teaching
to meet the learners needs. Formative assessment is a tool used by the teacher to continuously
monitor students progress in a non-threatening, supportive environment. It can be used as a
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FUSION

link between teaching and learning. The purpose of formative assessment is to enhance learning, not
to give out grades.
Formative assessment encompasses teacher observation, questioning, classroom discussion, and analysis
of the students work, including homework and tests.
Direct and Immediate Feedback
Results of formative assessments are produced immediately. Teachers get a view of both individual and
class performances while students learn how well they have done.
Structured Information
Both teachers and students learn from the assessment results. Teachers can judge success and plan
improvements based on the formative results. Students can see progress and experience success.
Ways to Improve
Summarised formative results provide a basis for the teacher to re-visit topics lessons if necessary.
Individual student responses provide a basis for giving students additional experiences in areas where
they performed less well.

SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT
Summative assessment is carried out at the end of a course of learning. It measures how much a
student has learned from the course. It is usually a graded test, i.e. a student scores marks.
The difference between the two types of assessments is that classroom formative assessments occur
continuously while content is being taught and are not meant to assign grades. Their primary objective
is to inform the teacher of what students know or do not know. More importantly, classroom formative
assessments allow teachers to make decisions and monitor their teaching process based on students
performance, while summative assessment occurs at the end of a learning term and determines if the
content being taught is retained.
Summative assessments include end-of-unit or lesson tests and end-of-term or semester examinations.
Summative assessments are tools to help evaluate the effectiveness of programmes, school improvement
goals, alignment of curriculum, or student placement in specific programmes. Since summative
assessments occur after every few months, or once a year, they offer little scope to take corrective
steps to improve a students performance.

TEACHERS MANUAL

TERM 1
ENGLISH

FUSION

FEATURES OF LESSONS

The English section in Fusionfor Active and Holistic Learning, with themes based on varied topics
lands and people, games, animal lives, science, adventure, biography, autobiography, besides short
stories from India and abroad, not only help in developing a command over English but also in inculcating
values which will help students grow into global citizens.
Each lesson has several sections Comprehension, Vocabulary, Pronunciation, Listening and Speaking
and Language and Grammar. The exercises are varied, interesting and challenging and are graded
according to the learners conceptual and linguistic maturity.
Comprehension
The main aim of FusionFor Active and Holistic Learning is to expose students to various kinds of
reading material and extract meaning as efficiently as possible. Specially-devised exercises with varied
questions and activities help in achieving this aim. Comprehension questions are set on the organisation
or structure of the passage as well as its contents.
Let the pupils start with the overall meaning of the text (global meaning) and then go to the details.
Questions should aid the comprehension of the surface meaning of statements and also the implicit
ideas. At a higher level, students should make inferences, suggestions and judgements.
Questions leading to divergent thinking, provide scope for meaningful discussion.
Very often, in real-life situations, we talk or write about what we read. So reading should be linked with
listening, speaking and writing.
Vocabulary
If grammar provides the bones for the body, vocabulary provides flesh and blood. Without grammar,
something can be conveyed but without vocabulary nothing can be conveyed. Intensive and extensive
reading provide opportunities to come in contact with the right vocabulary in meaningful situations. New
words get added to ones storehouse of vocabulary.
It is not possible for one to be in close contact with people speaking English all the time. One has to
depend on reading for vocabulary acquisition. A text may contain known, unknown and imperfectly
known words. The student need not refer to a dictionary every time but should guess the meaning of
the words from the context. The skill to deduce the meaning of unknown words from their contexts has
to be sharpened.
A dictionary is used to know the meaning of unknown words, their usage, pronunciation, spelling,
grammatical category, affixes and so on. Students should be taught and encouraged to use a dictionary
for various purposes. Only elementary exercises are provided in Books 2 to 5.
Pronunciation
Each language has its own system of sounds. When children learn a foreign language, they should learn
its sound system also. English has three essential featuresindividual sounds or phonemes, stress
and intonation. All these are important for intelligibility.
Stress is of two kindsword stress and sentence stress. Each word of more than one syllable is
|
|
stressed at different points, for example, be fore is stressed on the second syllable, stu dy is stressed
|
on the first syllable, after noon is stressed on the third syllable.
Let us now consider the sentence given below.
The
8

first

thing he

saw in the

house was a

tub.

TEACHERS MANUAL

In this sentence, five words are stressed. These are content words with a lot of meaning. The others
the, he, in, the, was, a are structure words which have less meaning and are not normally stressed.
Listening and Speaking
Communication is successful only if what one says is appropriate to the situation and conforms to the
convention. If we want to make a request, state our opinion, disagree with someone or ask about ones
health, then we have to use specifically agreeable language patterns. The structures must agree with
the functions. The exercises in this section introduce the pupils to the appropriate use of language for
various functions.
Language and Grammar
Grammar is both formal and functional. Formal grammar uses special terminology and specific rules;
functional grammar gives the students a command over various sentence patterns and structures
without explicitly stating the rules. This series lays emphasis on functional grammar.
English uses capital letters unlike Indian languages. There are several punctuation markscomma,
semi-colon, colon, full stop, question mark, inverted commas, hyphen and dash. All these have a useful
purpose and the students should know how to punctuate a sentence.
Wrong punctuation may, in some cases, change the meaning completely.
Is spelling taught or caught? It has to be taught and also caught. In the case of homonyms, it is the
context that decides the spelling.
Correcting a composition is a bug-bear and several views have been put forth. The red ink spilt all over
the page makes the child lose confidence. The children need to be trained to revise their work and
correct the mistakes themselves. Children, when they begin to write, cannot find all their mistakes. You
can go round and put a cross in the margin against the line where you find a mistake for the child to
detect and correct it on his/her own.

COMPONENTS FOR FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT

Let Us Get Set: An ideal tool for formative assessment, Let Us Get Set Introduces the topic and
sets the mood for the lesson. It also helps in recapitulating background information.

Comprehension: A set of Comprehension questions to be asked by the teacher during the lesson
as well as after the lesson is taught.

Vocabulary: Interesting Vocabulary exercises based on the lesson to enhance vocabulary skills
of students.

Pronunciation: A special section to help children pronounce words with the right stress.

Listening and Speaking: An interactive section that provides ample opportunities for children to use
language in everyday conversation.

Language and Grammar: Well-graded exercises on Language and Grammar to help children
develop the right usage of English Language.

Project and Activities: Interesting and easy to do Projects and Activities to help develop critical
thinking skills.

COMPONENTS FOR SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT

Tests based on each lesson covering all aspects for summative assessment.
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FUSION

METHODOLOGY
1.

Design of the English Modules


English is divided into three terms, each term consisting of lessons, poems and listening tasks
besides exercises in grammar and vocabulary. It follows the Communicative Approach, which
recognises the need for plenty of interaction among the pupils themselves. Teacher-dominated
lessons are least enjoyable; pupil participation has to be encouraged wherever possible as it leads
to enjoyment and effective learning.

2.

Objectives
The objectives are, broadly speaking, inculcating skills listening, speaking, reading and writing
paying special attention to the grammar items. The ultimate aim is to effect a transfer or carryover
of the language learnt within the classroom to the real world. For example, a pupil who learns
question forms should be able to formulate a question when he/she needs to know if Bus 302 will
take him/her to the railway station or which bus he/she should take to go to the station. In other
words, the thematic content of the lessons is not as important as the language he/she is expected
to learn and the ability to use it in appropriate contexts and face the real world.

3.

Procedure for the main reading text


There are several ways in which you can teach the text. There is no hard and fast rule that can
be laid down. An easy way is suggested below:
Step 1: Topical introduction and motivation
Step 2: Reading aloud by the teacher (Optional)
Step 3: Pre-reading questions (Optional)
Step 4: Silent reading by the pupils
Step 5: Easy comprehension questions of your own
Step 6: Exercises in the Lessons oral and written
(You can do these in any convenient order.)
Step 7: Reading aloud by the pupils

4.

Procedure for the poem


Step 1: Introduction to the theme and motivation
Step 2: Reading aloud by the teacher (The pupils listen with their books closed.)
Step 3: Reading aloud by the teacher (The pupils follow the reading with their books open.)
Step 4: Silent reading by the pupils
Step 5: Questions of your own aiding comprehension and appreciation
Step 6: Exercises in the lessons
Step 7: Reading aloud by the pupils

5.

Pre-reading questions
Usually we ask questions after the pupils read the passage. But questions can be set before they
read; this is to train the children to read for specific information. Such questions should not be too
many. Two or three will do. You can frame these questions yourself or you may take a few from
the exercises in the lessons.

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TEACHERS MANUAL

If the text is long, you can divide it into two or three convenient sections and deal with them one
by one.
You need not always set pre-reading questions. An element of suspense is most welcome; the
pupils should not be able to anticipate what you will do at every stage. Let us not make the
teaching/learning process mechanical.
6.

Silent reading
Most of the reading we do in real life is silent. The pupils must be trained to read silently and fairly
fast without running their fingers along the lines or moving their lips and heads. You will have to
go round and help the slow learners with the meanings of difficult words.

7.

Reading aloud
This is more difficult than silent reading. The children ought to know how to pronounce the words
and where to make pauses and read with expression. Reading a poem aloud is still more difficult
and it has to be read out first. There should be a session when the pupils get practice in this skill.
Plays come in handy in this regard and the pupils can read taking different roles.

8.

Comprehension
Comprehension questions are of different kinds: Matching, True-False, Rearranging sentences in
the right sequence, Multiple Choice, etc. Whatever the type, some questions require the learners
to skim through the text and locate the answer; some others require them to go beyond the text
and infer the answers from what is in the text. Inferential questions are of greater value than matterof-fact questions as they force the learners to think and discuss the probable answers. It may be
convenient to get the pupils to number the paragraphs in the text so that you can quickly draw their
attention to a particular line or word. You may need to supplement the questions in the exercise
depending on the answers given. In the case of a multiple-choice question, it is useful to discuss
what exactly is wrong with the distractors. In the case of a true-false type question, the learner
should correct the false statements and make them true.

9.

Vocabulary
A number of exercises are given to practise vocabulary. Some of them are intended to extend the
vocabulary and help the children to learn more and more words, words other than the ones in the
reading texts. All words are not meant for active use. Do not load the class with too much
vocabulary. At the same time do not confine yourself to those given in the texts. The children must
be taught to use the right word in the right context. The longer the context, the more meaningful
the vocabulary and the easier for the pupil to learn and recall the item presented.
You will need to devise additional exercises to consolidate the use of new words.

10. Structures or grammar items


Vocabulary and structures have to go together for receptive and productive skills. The structures
selected for practice are all taken from the syllabus, but are given in a different order depending
on the language in the texts. A good number of the exercises given are different from the conventional
types. These require the children to engage themselves in a conversation working in pairs or small
groups. Such exercises are of great value and these are the ones that help in the transfer of
language to real life situations. You should give special attention to conversation practice and time
spent on these exercises is time well spent. Do not hurry through these.
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FUSION

11. Writing
Writing is the most difficult of all the skills. It does not teach new things but only fixes things already
learnt. Whatever exercise we give, the pupils need thorough oral preparation before they can write.
There is no place for free composition at this stage. The easiest type is sentence construction
based on a model, given a few cue words. Sometimes the information given in the text can be
transferred to a table and these hints can be used to construct sentences. Also we can guide the
pupils to write four or five sentences on a given topic.
12. Talking time and listening time
We should make a distinction between talking time and listening time. A lesson where the
teacher talks all the time and the pupils just listen can be highly boring. On the other hand, a
lesson so planned as to give more talking time to pupils can result in qualitative learning. With
this end in view, we have to give more time to those exercises which are largely communicative
and which give scope for discussion. Divergent thinking is to be encouraged; we should induce
pupils to think creatively and come out with their own ideas or opinions which may be different
from our own.
13. Pupil errors
The communicative approach implies a change in our attitude to pupil errors. There was a time
when it was thought that errors should be stamped out as and when they were made as otherwise
they would get implanted. It is now agreed that making mistakes is a necessary part of language
learning. We therefore, have, to encourage children to try out language with confidence and not
shout at them if they happen to go wrong. It is not suggested that children should go on making
mistakes unchecked. We have to decide when to correct and when not to correct. We should also
know how to correct without undermining the learners confidence.
14. Pair work
In a normal class, pupils seldom have a chance to speak.
Maybe a pupil says something once in two or three days! He/she only writes in his book what he/
she sees on the blackboard. And when in real life situations he/she has to communicate, he/she
hesitates and falters. He/she does not have the confidence he/she needs to be able to apply what
he/she has learnt in the classroom to real life. We can give him/her this confidence by providing
opportunities for him/her to engage himself/herself in conversation, working in pairs of small
groups as often as possible. Communicative activities help in the transfer of learning to real life
situations. They bridge, to a large extent, the gap between skill-getting in the classroom and skillusing in real life.
15. Group work
Group work gives the children opportunities to work in co-operation and learn from each other. A
workshop atmosphere can be created in the classroom and each child will be responsible for the
work done by the group. They learn to be independent and go ahead with the work assigned to
them with confidence. Groups should be so organised that each group will have one or two bright
pupils who can lead the rest. The leaders should know what exactly they should do. Desks may
have to be arranged to help the pupils face each other. It is advisable to change the leader after
some time.
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TEACHERS MANUAL

16. Games and Puzzles


Language games and puzzles provide variety and relieve monotony. Games create healthy
competition when players are grouped into rival teams. They are like sugar-coated pills and provide
ample scope for activity.
17. The use of the mother tongue
There was a time when the use of the mother tongue was taboo in the English classroom. But it
comes in handy to explain what the children are expected to do with an exercise, what they have
to do when they go into groups to discuss a question, or what each partner should do during pair
work. We can also use the mother tongue to explain difficult words. But we should, at the same
time, guard against its use when we feel we can manage with English.
18. Dictionary work
There are few exercises which require the use of a dictionary. It is good to train the pupils to use
the dictionary. It is essential to select a dictionary that will be easy enough to refer to and get the
information needed. A dictionary can be used at this stage to find the meanings of unknown words
and also the spellings. If some pupils cannot afford to buy one, you could carry your dictionary to
the classroom every day and let the class use it.
19. Role play
During role play, children take different roles and speak to each other in hypothetical situations. You
can supplement the exercises in the lessons with your own.
Here is an example: You go to a shop with your mother. You see a bar of chocolate. You want
her to buy one for you. She says she has got some at home (or it is expensive, or it is bad for
your teeth, or she will buy you something better). But you do not agree with her.
One pupil can play the role of the mother and another that of the child. You will see that children
enjoy these sessions more than the others and they use language spontaneously. They communicate
with each other without interference. They feel highly motivated and say what they have to say and
learn how to say it. They really have to listen to their partners and respond suitably.
Whenever you find the class too tired with the normal work, you can switch over to a game
of role play.
20. Activity
Every lesson suggests activities that are related to the theme in that lesson. Children can work in
groups and do them. Let them talk about their activities in class.
21. Role of the teacher
In the new approach recommended, you should pay a secondary role and do everything possible
so that the children interact with each other and learn on their own as much as they can. You have
to guide them to learn by doing and go thoroughly prepared every day. Decide on what you have
to do and what the children can do by themselves in pairs or in groups. Do not take over things
when not necessary. Your teaching can result in learning only when the pupils engage themselves
in some activity or other.
Try teaching this way. Your pupils are sure to learn better and enjoy themselves.

13

14

Filling in the
blanks

2. Vinod
speaks the
truth

Matching
words with
their meanings
Animal
sounds

Matching
words with
their
meanings
Compound
words

Night words

3. The blue
jackal

4. A tigers
tale

Night

Nature
words

Filling in the
blanks
Opposites

1. A Japanese
fairy tale

Who has
seen the
wind?

Vocabulary

Lesson

Short
answers
Rhyming
words

Information
/s/ /sh/
transfer
Whquestions

Choosing the /a:/ /c:/


correct ending
Whquestions

Short answers

Rearranging
/ts/ /dz/
sentences
Whquestions

Rearranging
/i/ /I/
sentences
Whquestions

Comprehension Pronunciation

Rewriting in
the first
person

Picture
composition

Picture
composition

Composition

-ed (past
form)
Double
consonant
words

Spelling

Commas

Full stops
and capitals

Punctuation

Asking for
information
(can...?)

Asking for
information

Apologising
and replying

Offering and
replying

Function

Before, after
(prepositions)
some, any,
can, cant
anything,
something
Collective
nouns

Adverbs of
manner
Reflexives

Alphabetical
order

Whquestions
Prepositions
Direct and
indirect
speech

Choosing the When (conj.)


right meaning Which
questions
Past form

Alphabetical
order

Alphabetical
order

Dictionary Skill Language and


Grammar

FUSION

SCHEME OF LESSONS

TEACHERS MANUAL

LESSON PLANS
1. A JAPANESE FAIRY TALE
Learning objectives
Students will be able to

listen to the story and understand the meaning

read the story using expressions and maintain a proper flow

learn the use of common words

learn the opposites of common words (antonyms)

replace words with similar ones (synonyms)

arrange words in alphabetical order

Introduction
Before starting the lesson, explain to the children the meanings of the words like: spring, recognise,
thrilled, mind the house, and closely. Ask students whether they know how a human being grows from
a baby into an adult. Do they think that an old person can really become young again?
Help the students read between the lines of the story and understand the moral. You can relate the
moral of the story to minor real life incidents that may occur in a childs life and tell them how even a
little carelessness can sometimes lead to serious consequences.
Teaching suggestions
Reading
Read the lesson slowly and loudly with voice modulation and laying stress on difficult words. Then have
the children read it in parts. As you read, you can list the glossed words on the board. Pause in between
to ask and explain what the children have understood till then and then proceed. The crux of the story
might be small but let the student understand the use of language and words to explain simple thoughts
and the plot. As the student reads a paragraph, explain the meaning of each line to make sure the
purpose of writing the paragraphs is understood.
Teaching questions
Factual comprehension
1. Who is a woodcutter?
2. Where did the woodcutter and his wife live?
3. Why did the woodcutter come to a spring?
4. Why was the woodcutters wife surprised?
5. Why was the woodcutters wife sad?
6. Why did the woodcutters wife go to the spring?
7. What did the woodcutter see when he went to the spring to look for his wife?
8. What happened to the woodcutters wife and why?
Inferential comprehension
1. What special quality did the water of the spring have?
2. What mistake did the woodcutters wife make?
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FUSION

3. What did the woodcutter understand when he saw the three months old baby?
4. What is the moral of the story?
Critical thinking comprehension
1. Do you think the story is true?
2. Find out the difference between a spring, a river and a lake.
Vocabulary
1. Words from the lesson are used to fill in the blanks of sentences in different contexts. This will bring
about a better understanding of their meanings. You may ask students to frame more sentences
using the same words.
2. An antonym is a word having a meaning opposite to the given word. Writing antonyms of the words
used in the lesson will help the students learn the opposites of common words.
Pronunciation
Have students repeat the words given. Some words may have different meaning and spellings but very
similar pronunciation. Such words may cause confusion when not pronounced clearly. Learning proper
pronunciation is very important for students at this stage.
You can also ask the students to write the words as you pronounce them in class.
Listening and speaking
You can use the hints in the exercise and more such examples to practise the language pattern given
in the exercise. Students will learn the method of offering and replying politely during day to day
conversations. Use of the phrase may I and words like please will help to convey the same messages
in a subtle manner and help the students to be polite.
Make pairs and have children practise similar situations.
Language and grammar
1. A synonym is a word similar in meaning to the word given. A single word may be used
instead of a phrase or vice versa. Students will be able to learn the synonyms of words used in
the lesson.
2. The act of arranging words in alphabetical order is a step in what will further help the students in
the use of a dictionary. Start with simple words where only the first alphabet has to be seen while
arranging a set of words in alphabetical order.
Project
Encourage students to talk and write simple sentences after looking at the picture. You might want to
drop a few hints for students who find it difficult to start with.

2. VINOD SPEAKS THE TRUTH


Learning objectives
Students will be able to

understand and relate to the plot of the story

read the story with proper pronunciation

learn new words and use them in different contexts

16

TEACHERS MANUAL

form words with double consonants

learn how to pronounce words ending with the same alphabets but different sounds

arrange words in alphabetical order

Introduction
Ask students if they have seen an oil lamp and when is it used. Ask how many of them have pets like
a cat or dog and what games they play with them.
Narrate the story in the lesson in a nutshell and ask whether they think it is ok to blame a pet animal
for ones own mistakes as the animal cannot speak.
Teaching suggestions
Reading
Read the lesson aloud in class so that the students can understand how to pronounce new words and
can also know how voice is modulated while delivery of different expressions in dialogues. As you read,
you may list the glossed words on the board.
A round of silent reading can be done so that each student can decide as to how a line needs to be
read, imagined and expressed. You can select students randomly to read aloud a particular paragraph
or dialogue from the lesson with expressions and voice modulations.
Teaching questions
Factual comprehension
1. At what time did Vinods mother decide to go and fetch water?
2. What did Vinods mother instruct him before going out of the house?
3. How did the oil lamp break?
4. What did Vinod first think he would do to avoid his mothers anger?
5. Why were Vinods parents proud of him?
Inferential comprehension
1. Why did Vinod think of blaming the cat?
2. Why did Vinod not blame the cat finally?
3. What is the moral of the story?
Critical thinking comprehension
1. What would you have done if you were in place of Vinod?
2. What kind of a boy was Vinod?
Vocabulary
1. Explain to the students how simple words can be replaced with other words called synonyms without
changing the meaning of the sentence.
2. You can tell the students that they have to double the final consonant before a suffix beginning with
a vowel if both of the following are true: the consonant ends a stressed syllable or a one-syllable
word, and the consonant is preceded by a single vowel.
Note: English has no double consonants in pronunciation. Only in spelling, the letter is at times doubled.
17

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Pronunciation
The contrast is between /ts/ and /dz/.
The final consonant is /s/ in cats, bats and /z/ in fields.
Read the words given in the list slowly and clearly. Let the students repeat after you. Form simple
sentences in which one word from each list given is used. You can give them more examples in which
this difference is evident.
Listening and speaking
You can use the hints in the exercise and more such examples to practise the language pattern given
in the exercise. Students will learn the method of apologising and replying politely in suitable situations.
You may arrange the students in pairs and have them enact similar situations using the given pattern.
Language and Grammar
1. The concept of before and after can be explained easily with a simple activity in the class.
Arrange the students in a straight line. Now ask them to name the students before and after them.
This will help the student understand the concept and apply it to different contexts.
2. Arranging words in which the first alphabet is the same and the consequent alphabets are different
is a step towards learning how to use a dictionary to find the meanings of words.
Project
You can discuss about the picture in class before the students write about it. As the picture depicts
mostly pet animals, this discussion will help those students who do not have any pet animal at home.

WHO HAS SEEN THE WIND?


Learning objectives
Students will be able to

understand the metaphors used by the poetess

learn the use of rhyming words

read the poem with expressions

identify the blowing of the wind by spotting the metaphors used by the poetess

Introduction
The students need to understand that the title of the poem is a question to which the poem is like an
answer. The poetess asks whether anyone has seen the wind and then gives two examples by which
the blowing of the wind can be sensed and recognised.
You can ask the children to name few more examples by which the blowing of the wind can
be recognised.
Teaching suggestions
Reading
Read the poem in class laying stress on each line. Have the students make pairs and recite the poem
in a question and answer form. Let them change roles and recite it a second time. Have the students
learn the poem and recite it with proper expressions.
18

TEACHERS MANUAL

Teaching questions
Factual comprehension
1. How do the leaves move when the wind passes by?
2. What do the trees do when the wind passes by?
Inferential comprehension
1. How does the poetess explain the passing of the wind?
2. Why does the poetess give examples of the movement of leaves and trees?
Critical thinking comprehension
1. What more examples can you give to demonstrate the movement of wind?
2. Can wind be seen anyhow?
Project
You can guide students as to which colour would be best for which part of the picture.

3. THE BLUE JACKAL


Learning objectives
Students will be able to

understand the nuances of a popular Panchatantra Tale

listen to the story and scan details

read the story with proper pronunciation

understand the meaning of new words

understand the use of conjunctions

learn animal sounds

use punctuations

find text-relevant meanings

Introduction
Ask the students how a jackal looks like. Show pictures of the animal so that its original colour is clearly
visible and so that students are able to understand how the jackal fooled the other animals. The story
is an adaptation of a Panchatantra Tale with the morals that destiny cannot be changed and being
greedy is harmful.
Teaching suggestions
Reading
You may read the lesson for the children and then ask them to read it in parts one by one. Try to make
sure that the continuity of the lesson is maintained and the students read the dialogues in an interesting
and narrative manner. As they read, you may list the glossed words on the board. If possible, have
the students enact the story in class where some students can play roles of different animals and
learn the dialogues.
Teaching questions
Factual comprehension
1. Why did the jackal go to the town?
19

FUSION

2. Why did the jackal run into a weavers house?


3. Why did the jackal decide not to leave the jungle again?
4. How did the jackal become blue in colour?
5. When did the jackal realise that he was looking different?
6. How did the jackal use his new appearance for his benefit?
7. How did the jackal get caught?
8. What did the other animals do when they realised that their king was a jackal?
Inferential comprehension
1. Why did the other animals accept the jackal as their king?
2. Was the jackal a wise animal?
Critical thinking comprehension
1. Do you think the story is true?
2. How does the story prove that destiny cannot be changed?
Vocabulary
You may point out the words in the lesson text to help the students match them with their meanings.
Pronunciation
Contrast the sounds /a / and / /
Note: The difference between far and four.
Listening and speaking
We say By bus or In a bus. It is wrong to say By a bus. We omit the article when we talk about the
mode of transport.
Language and grammar
1. A conjunction is a joining word used for joining together sentences and sometimes words or phrases.
Words such as but, or, yet, when and if are conjunctions.
Help students to join the given sentences. If time permits, have them do more such exercises.
2. You may use the pictures of the mentioned animals to help the children make the right answer
choice. If resources are available, you may play the corresponding sound clips for the children telling
the name of the animal or after showing its picture. This will help the students relate the sounds with
the correct animal name and appearances.
3. You may question students about how a specific object or phenomenon is identified and named.
Then question them about the specific characteristics of the mentioned qualities of the options in the
questions. They will then understand about the link between the question and the options provided.
4. Explain to students the rules of punctuation with examples.
At this level, the following rules may be shared:
1. Begin the first letter of the first word of a sentence in capital letter.
2. I is always written in capital.
20

TEACHERS MANUAL

3. Commas are used to separate a number of things or phrases in a list. They are also used in
direct quotes.
4. A question always ends in a question mark.
Dictionary skills
Demonstrate to students how to use a dictionary. A single word may have more than one meaning and
this can be explained by giving the students examples of both the meanings of the given word.
Project
Encourage students to find pictures in old magazines and newspapers. They should use the magazines
and newspapers only after the permission of their parents.

4. A TIGERS TALE
Learning objectives
Students will be able to

understand the life of a tiger

listen to the story and scan details

read the story with proper pronunciation

learn new words and use them in different contexts

form two words of different meanings from a single word

learn how to enquire and reply

use wh words to enquire and also learn how to reply to them

understand the use of commas

arrange words in alphabetical order

Introduction
Ask students if they have been to the zoo and seen a tiger. Arrange for a picture of a tiger in its natural
habitat to show to the students (you may also use the pictures given in the lesson).
Tell them that the tiger is our national animal. Have students tell about their knowledge of a tiger
and its habits. You can use subtle pictures to show the different aspects of a tigers life and why it is
in danger.
Teaching suggestions
Reading
Ask the students to read the lesson silently. Now randomly choose students to read a paragraph each.
As they read, you may list the glossed words on the board. You may also note the characteristics of
a tiger on the board as the lesson progresses.
Teaching questions
Factual comprehension
1. How does a tiger look like?
2. How is the tigers sense of smell?
3. Why can no one hear a tiger walk or run?
21

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4. What does the tiger like to eat?


5. When does the tiger go out for hunting?
6. Which places in the world can one find tigers?
7. What does a tigers coat look like?
8. Why cant tigers be spotted easily?
9. How is tigers mother like? What does it teach its children?
10. Why cant people hunt tigers anymore?
Inferential comprehension
1. Do tigers live alone or in groups?
2. What part of the lesson tells that the tiger is a wild animal?
3. How are tigers in danger when in the open?
Critical thinking comprehension
1. What can humans do to help tigers?
2. Find out about the laws that are made for tigers.
Vocabulary
1. You may read the parts of the lesson having the mentioned words as this may help the students
to understand the relevant meaning of it and match it correctly.
2. Some words may be broken down into two parts or words and each of these words may have a
different meaning altogether. Explain to the student how not all but some of the words can be broken
down according to this rule.
Pronunciation
Read out the words highlighting the difference in spelling on the board. Minimal pairs in /s/ and /sh/ are
listed in contrast for practice. The remaining sounds in each pair are identical. In some areas, the
students may find it difficult to make this distinction. To improve their pronunciation, you may prepare
flash cards of the words and then ask each child to pronounce the word shown in the placard.
This will help the student to identify the correct way of pronunciation and also indicate to you the
students that need more attention.
Listening and speaking
Help the students to use the hints provided and enquire in a polite manner. Students need to understand
the difference between possible and difficult tasks and reply accordingly.
Use of positive and negative expressions may also be demonstrated through this exercise.
Language and grammar
1. Most of the questions for students at this stage may start with wh-. Therefore, they should also be
aware of the method to make such questions even when the full information is not given. The
exercise contains questions related to the lesson text with very obvious answers. Help the student
to write the answers first and then frame the questions.
2. Commas are used to separate a number of things or phrases in a list. They are also used in direct
quotes. Student should be able to mark commas in the given sentences with a little guidance.
22

TEACHERS MANUAL

3. Arranging words in which the first alphabet is same and the consequent alphabets are different is
a step towards learning how to use a dictionary to find the meanings of words.
Project
Drop hints for students as to how they can depict the tiger better by using the information given in the
lesson. They may use the cues in the comprehension exercise to write about tigers.

NIGHT
Learning objectives
Students will be able to

identify the events related to the falling of night

understand the metaphors used by the poet

learn the use of rhyming words

read the poem with expressions

Introduction
You should first differentiate between the different times of the day and also that night comes after the
day and then a new day begins again. You may tell children about the events related to the day and
night and how they are different. The poet uses indicative phrases for some of the words instead of
writing them directly.
Teaching suggestions
Reading
Read the poem in class laying stress on each line. Have the students relate each line with the topic
of the poem and also understand what the poet means by it. Have the students learn the poem and
recite it with proper expressions.
Teaching questions
Factual comprehension
1. In which direction does the sun descend?
2. What do the birds do at night?
3. What does the poet mean by evening star?
Inferential comprehension
1. What does the poet means by the line that the moon shines at the night?
2. Why does the poet compare the moon with a flower?
Critical thinking comprehension
1. What words does the poet use to make the night sound beautiful?
2. What does the poet seek?
Project
Guide children to think about all that happens during the day time. They may also use their imagination
to depict more events related to the day on the picture.
23

FUSION

TESTS

TEST
1

A JAPANESE FAIRY TALE


A.

Fill in the blanks with the words given in the box.


myself themselves yourself himself itself ourselves herself

B.

clean.

1.

The cub fell into a ditch but licked

2.

I put on the new dress and looked at

3.

John was careless with the knife and hurt

4.

Each of the four monkeys wanted the cake for

5.

Take care of

6.

We should not just help

7.

I am not going to let him escape, the policewoman said to

in the mirror.
.
.

when you cross a busy road.


. We should help others too.
.

Rewrite the following sentences using the words given in the list in place of the underlined
words.
took only delighted deep dense
1.

Not far from their house was a thick forest.

2.

My mother will be happy to see me home early.

3.

It is far inside the forest.

4.

The puppy was just three months old.

5.

Rohan carried the heavy bag home.

Students Name:
24

Class

Sec

Date:

TEACHERS MANUAL

TEST
2

VINOD SPEAKS THE TRUTH


A.

Complete the table. Write names of people, animals, places and things.

People

Places

f.

i.

Students Name:

c.

e.

b.

g.

d.

a book

a.

Things

Name the things and write as shown.

B.

Animals

Class

Sec

Date:
25

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TEST
3

THE BLUE JACKAL

Write the name of each animal in the blanks. Choose from the ones given in the box.
goat

parrot

tiger

giraffe

elephant

h.

i.

f.

B.

c.

e.

b.

g.

zebra

d.

a.

lion

monkey

rabbit

A.

Choose a naming word from the box and add it to each butterfly to make a new word. One
has been done for you.
post ball man room

lamp
Students Name:
26

post

post

foot
bed
Class

Sec

Date:

TEACHERS MANUAL

TEST
4

A TIGERS TALE
A.

B.

Answer the following questions.


1.

Where do tigers live?

2.

What do tigers eat?

3.

When do tigers hunt?

4.

What is the young one of a tiger called?

Write the number name and the naming word as shown.

one cat

Students Name:

Class

Sec

Date:
27

FUSION

ANSWER KEY TO TESTS


TEST 1
A. 1. itself
5. yourself

2. myself
6. ourselves

3. himself
7. herself

4. themselves

B. 1. Not far from their house was a dense forest.


2. My mother will be delighted to see me home early.
3. It is deep inside the forest.
4. The puppy was only three months old.
5. Rohan took the heavy bag home.
TEST 2
A. Individual response
B. b. A kite
f. A rose

c. A sweater
g. A car

d. A balloon
h. A cup

e. A shoe
i. An egg

TEST 3
A. a. Lion
f. Parrot

b. Zebra
g. Giraffe

c. Goat
h. Tiger

d. Elephant
i. Rabbit

B. b. Bedroom

c. Football

d. Postman

e. Monkey

TEST 4
A. 1. Tigers live in forests.

2. Tigers eat meat.

3. Tigers hunt at night.


B. 2. Three balls

4. The young one of a tiger is called a cub.


3. Two toffees

4. Seven ants

5. Six birds

ANSWER KEY TO LESSONS IN COURSE BOOK


1. A JAPANESE FAIRY TALE
Comprehension
I. 1. Cut wood
4. Because she was old

2. A spring

3. Became young and handsome

5. Too much

6. She became a three-months old baby

7. Individual response
II. 2. He was tired and thirsty.
3. He came to a spring.
4. He drank water from it.
5. He became young and strong.
6. His wife wanted to become young too.
7. She also went to the spring but drank too much water.
Vocabulary
I. 1. thick

2. handsome

3. spring

4. Mind

5. return

II. 1. thin

2. slowly

3. short

4. outside

5. laugh

28

6. early

TEACHERS MANUAL

Language and grammar


I. 1. dense

2. a lot

3. deep

4. only

5. took

II. Bharat, Divya, Madhav, Neha, Rajiv, Sudhir

2. VINOD SPEAKS THE TRUTH


Comprehension
I. 1. To fetch water
4. Individual response

2. After the ball hit it

3. Because he felt guilty

5. Happy

6. Individual response

II. 2. Vinod was alone in his house.


3. His cat mewed two or three times.
4. Vinod knew the cat wanted to play with him.
5. He took the ball and bounced it against the wall.
6. This time it hit the lamp and the chimney broke.
Vocabulary
I. 1. ceiling

2. waist

3. guilty

II. 2. clapped

3. robbed

4. stopped

4. scolds

Language and grammar


I. 1. before
II. 1. bat

2. after
2. biscuit

3. black

3. after
4. book

4. before
5. bring

6. butter

5. after
7. bye-bye

WHO HAS SEEN THE WIND?


Comprehension
1. They tremble

2. bow down their heads

3. Asks about the experience of individual children. It encourages divergent thinking.


4. Individual response

5. you through, I by

LISTENING TASK 1. THE LION AND THE MOUSE


SPEAKING TASK
1. Lion is big and mouse is small
2. Mouse was playing on the lions back
3. Begged the lion to set it free
4. Fell into a net
5. The lion roared
6. Cut the net into pieces
7. Individual response
29

FUSION

3. THE BLUE JACKAL


Comprehension
I. 1. he did not go hunting
2. dog was chasing him
3. the jackal cleverly cheated them
II. 1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.

To look for a lamb or chicken


Into a weavers house nearby
From the blue dye in the weavers tub
When he saw himself in the river
That God had sent him to be their king
Because he heard other jackals howling
They pounced on him and tore him to pieces

Vocabulary
1. c

2. a

3. e

4. b

5. d

Pronunciation
Read the words given in the list and lay stress on the vowel sound. Let the students repeat after you.
Listening and speaking
Read out the situations given in the exercise. Students will learn how to ask simple questions and how
to reply to them. You may arrange the students in pairs and have them enact similar situations using
the given pattern.
Language and grammar
I. In this exercise when is used as a conjunction and not as an interrogative adverb.
2. When I saw the red light on, I stopped my car.
3. When I went to South Africa, the World Cup was on.
4. When the rat saw a cat, it ran into a hole.
5. When I heard a knock, I went to open the door.
II. 2. c

3. a

4. g

5. h

6. d

7. e

8. f

III. The aim of the exercise is to frame questions using the interrogative pronoun which.
2. Which is bright day or night?
3. Which is sweet sugar or salt?
4. Which goes fast a bus or a cycle?
IV. The first thing he saw was a tub. He jumped into it and hid himself. The dogs sniffed at the tub for
a while and went away. The jackal quietly crawled out of the tub and ran back into the jungle.
V. 1. not easily removed

2. chief

4. A TIGERS TALE
Comprehension
I. 1. It has a nice, striped, furry coat
2. Because its paws have pads and are soft
30

TEACHERS MANUAL

3. In jungles
4. Meat
5. Because of the stripes on their bodies and the colour of their coat
6. It has made a law that people cannot hunt tigers
Vocabulary
I.

1. b

2. c

II. 2. under stand

3. e

3. after noon

4. a

4. in side

5. d

5. red dish

6. some one

Listening and speaking


Note: I think it will rain.
I dont think it will rain (Negative)
I think it wont rain. (Wrong)
Language and grammar
I. 2. Tigers eat meat.

3. Tigers hunt at night.

What do tigers eat?

When do tigers hunt?

II. 1. The tiger likes to hunt deer, pigs, cows and goats.
2. Tigers are found in India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Korea and Siberia.
III. same

sharp

sister

slight

smell

some

spot

sun

NIGHT
Comprehension
I. 1. stars

2. Birds are silent in their nests

II. 1. nest west

2. shine mine

3. a flower

3. flower bower

4. Bower
4. delight night

LISTENING TASK 2. THE CROW AND THE SNAKE


SPEAKING TASK
1. The tree was thick with leaves
2. In a hole under the tree
3. Crawled up the tree and ate the eggs
4. It flew back to the nest early
5. In a tank behind the palace
6. Into the snake hole
7. Men helpers of the queen
8. Killed the snake
31

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ANSWER KEY TO GRAMMAR AND LANGUAGE WORKSHEETS


1. A JAPANESE FAIRY TALE
I. 1. near

2. passed

3. suddenly

4. sadly

5. return

II. 2. neatly

3. sweetly

4. carefully

5. clumsily

6. slowly

III. 1. Turn right


5. Dont turn left

2. Go slow. School ahead


6. Dont park here

IV. 1. itself
5. yourself

3. Turn left
7. Dont turn right

2. myself

3. herself

6. ourselves

7. himself

6. daily

4. Park here
8. Dont sound the horn
4. themselves

2. VINOD SPEAKS THE TRUTH


I. 2. some

3. any

4. no

5. any

6. some

II. 1. flock
6. heap

2. gang
7. crowd

3. range
8. swarm

4. herd
9. pack

5. bunch
10. litter

III. 1. can, cant

2. can, cant

3. cant, can

4. cant, can

5. can, cant

6. can, cant

IV. anything, something, some, some, any, no

3. THE BLUE JACKAL


I. 2. Which bird
5. Which mountain peak
II. see.....saw

3. Which country

4. Which river

6. Which fruit

7. Which game

think.....thought

come.....came

become.....became

hide.....hid

stand.....stood

keep.....kept

forget.....forgot

leave.....left

tear.....tore
begin.....began

4. A TIGERS TALE
I. 2. The woman asks the fruit-seller to give her a kilo of apples.
3. The magician asks the children to clap their hands.
4. The mother asks the child to drink a glass of milk everyday.
5. The cat asks the kitten not to run away from her.
II. 1. He asked me not to move.
2. They asked us not to wait.
3. Mother asked me not to eat more.
4. Teacher asked us not to talk.
5. Mother told me not to tell a lie.
III. 1. on

2. with

3. from

4. of

5. at

6. in

IV. 1. before

2. after

3. before

4. after

5. before

6. after

32

7. before

TEACHERS MANUAL

TERM 1
MATHEMATICS

33

FUSION

INTRODUCTION
Based on the NCF 2005 Guidelines, the mathematics section in Fusion aims to develop childrens
abilities to think and reason mathematically. The concepts are introduced in a variety of ways in simple
language. Different methods to solve a problem are also provided to enable teachers and students to
choose the method that they are most comfortable working with. The step-by-step examples and
practice exercises ensure that all students learn mathematics systematically and easily. Besides numbers
and number operations, importance is given to shapes, spatial understanding, patterns, measurement
and data handling.
Lets revise, revision tests, test papers and question banks help in assessing the mathematical concepts
learnt.
Math lab activities given in Teachers Manual are excellent resources for associating mathematical
concepts to real life. They also help students actively participate in learning and enable formative
assessment, besides developing Higher Order Thinking Skills. These activities and games can make
mathematics classes very enjoyable, exciting and interesting.

34

TEACHERS MANUAL

SCHEME OF LESSONS
Unit

Lesson

No. of Periods

Contents

Learning Outcomes

Revision

Missing numerals
Number names
Place value
Before / After
Ascending / Descending
order
Greater / Smaller
Skip count

Children will be able to recapitulate the concept on Numbers


studied in Class 1

Numbers

10

Numbers from 101 to 300


Numbers from 301 to 500
Numbers from 501 to 999

Place Value

10

Hundreds, Tens and Units

Children will be able to match numbers on the abacus with their


expanded forms
Children will be able to identify place value of the indicated digits
and show them on the abacus
Children will be able to compare 3-digit numbers

Place Value
Comparison of 3-digit
numbers
Greater / Smaller
Ascending / Descending
order
4

Addition

16

Revision
Properties of Addition

Addition of 2-digit Numbers


without Carry Over
Addition of 2-digit
Numbers with Carry Over
Addition of 3-digit Numbers
with 1-digit Number
without Carry Over
Addition of 3-digit
Numbers with 1-digit
Number with Carry Over
Addition of 3-digit Numbers
with 2-digit Numbers
without Carry Over
Addition of 3-digit Numbers
with 2-digit Numbers with
Carry Over

Children will be able to recall numerals from 101 to 300


Children will be able to recall numerals from 301 to 500
Children will be able to recall numerals from 501 to 999
Children will be able to insert missing numerals upto 999
Children will be able to write the number names of numerals

Children will be able to identify the biggest and smallest numbers


in a given set
Children will be able to arrange numbers in ascending/descending
order

Children will be able to understand that in addition, the order of


the numbers is not important
Children will be able to appreciate that the sum of a number and
zero is the number itself
Children will be able to learn that when 1 is added to a number,
the answer is the next number
Children will be able to solve simple word problems on addition
Children will be able to add two digit numbers by writing them as
tens and ones
Children will be able to add 2-digit numbers with carry over
Children will be able to add a 3-digit and 1-digit number without
carry over
Children will be able to add a 3-digit and 1-digit number with
carry over
Children will be able to add a 3-digit and 2-digit number without
carry over
Children will be able to add a 3-digit and 2-digit number with
carry over

35

FUSION

Addition of 3-digit Numbers


with 3-digit Numbers
without Carry Over
Addition of 3-digit
Numbers with 3-digit
Numbers with Carry Over

Addition of More than


Two Numbers on a
Number Line
5

Shapes

Plane shapes
Solid shapes

Subtraction

12

Revision
Subtract by counting
backwards

Subtraction of a 1-digit
Number from a 2-digit
Number with Borrowing
Subtraction of a 2-digit
Number from a 2-digit
Number with borrowing
Subtraction of Two 3-digit
Numbers without
Borrowing
Subtraction of 3-digit
Numbers with Borrowing
Addition and Subtraction
Combined

Children will be able to add a 3-digit and 3-digit number without


carry over
Children will be able to add a 3-digit and 3-digit number with
carry over
Children will be able to add these numbers without the support
of number blocks (place value)
Children will be able to add more than two numbers on the
number line

Children will be able to identify plane figures


Children will be able to identify solid figures

Children will be able to subtract on the number line by counting


backwards
Children will be able to solve word problems
Children will be able to fill in the missing digits in a subtraction sum
Children will be able to subtract with borrowing

Children will be able to subtract with borrowing

Children will be able to subtract without borrowing

Children will be able to subtract with borrowing


Children will be able to solve word problems
Children will be able to identify the correct operation
Children will be able to analyse and identify the correct operation
and solve word problems

36

TEACHERS MANUAL

LESSON PLANS
2. NUMBERS
Previous Knowledge
Knowledge of numbers 1-500, number names
Concept Development

Recall numbers 1-9, and their number names. Recall the concept of zero.

Recall 2-digit and 3-digit numbers; extend till 999, and discuss their practical applicationnumber
of students in class, cost of articles, and so on.

Divide students into two groups. One student from Group A will give an example of a 2-digit
number. (Give hints such as Childrens Day, their own birthday, number of students in the school,
and so on)

Another student of Group A will give the relevant number, while a student of Group B will give the
corresponding number name.

Next, Group B will give the number and Group A will give the number name, and so on.

Students can now complete the exercise in the lesson.

Assessment

Text 1 Q. 3, 4

Spotlight

Check if students are writing the correct spelling for the number name. For example, forty is
frequently written as fourty by students.

Students frequently mistake 9 for 6 and vice-versa. Explain this patiently to those who do so.

At this stage, emphasise on writing the numerals clearly and legibly, as this is what is carried
forward to their higher classes, and life, in general. Particular attention to be given to number
pairs like 6 and 0, and 4 and 7.

3. PLACE VALUE
Previous Knowledge
Familiarity with the abacus and the expanded form of 3-digit numbers.
Teaching Aid
Abacus (knitting needles, playing clay and beads could be used to make the abacus).
Concept Development

Take a few 2-digit numbers and 3-digit numbers and recall their expanded form.

Represent these numbers on the abacus.

Explain that the same digit, say 7, has different values depending on where it is placed in
the abacus.
37

FUSION

Show the hundreds, tens and units place in the abacus.

Demonstrate how a number is represented on the abacus, while explaining the value of
each place.

Ask a few students to come forward and show given numbers on the abacus.

Guide them to do the exercise on Page 58, Q 1-3.

Continue this activity for a few days. During each class, ask a few students to show numbers on
the abacus. This will give opportunity to every student to have first-hand experience and reinforce
the concept to all students, without them getting distracted, which would happen if all students were
to do it on the same day.

Discuss the method of writing numbers in their expanded forms by giving examples relevant to them,
say, the runs scored by their favourite batsman.

Ask students to complete Q. 4 and 5 in the exercise.

Recall how they compared numbers earlier, the numbers that come before, after, in between, largest
and smallest.

Guide them to work out the exercises on Page 61, Q. 1-4.

Students can be paired and asked to work out the exercise questions.

Recall the symbols for greater than and less than, and the meaning of ascending and descending
order.

Guide them to work out the exercises on Page 63, Q. 5-8.

Conduct lab activity 1.

One section of the blackboard could be earmarked for giving an example, or meaning of new terms,
to help students refer to it while doing the exercises.

Assessment

Test 1 Q 1, 2, 5 9

Spotlight

The common error made is interchanging the symbols for greater and less than. You could illustrate
that the larger number is always inside the birds mouth. 2 < 5, and 7 > 3. (Use the greater than
and less than symbols as the beak of the bird, and draw the head).

Confusion with regard to the meaning of ascending or descending can be reduced by referring to
the word SAL (small to large ascending here small comes first). It is sufficient to give a memory
hint for one. The other follows naturally.

Glossary

Place units, tens, hundreds, and so on.

Place Value the value of the digit in a place, multiplied by the value of the place. For example,
place value of 2 in 245 is 2 100 = 200.

38

TEACHERS MANUAL

4. ADDITION
Previous Knowledge
Addition of 2-digit numbers without carry over.
Teaching Aid
Objects like pencils that are readily available in class, Number cards, picture cards for word problems,
10 bundles of 10 plastic drinking straws each; 10 10 square boards, 10 1 rectangular strips and
1 1 unit squares (made with cardboard).
Concept Development

Recall addition of 1-digit numbers using concrete objects.

Call a student to work out a simple 1-digit addition sum on the board, and another student to solve
a 2-digit addition sum without carry over.

Ask them to complete the revision exercise on page 66.

Discuss the properties of addition; ask students to work out the exercise Q. 1-3 on page 68.

While solving word problems, these methods can be adopted:

Ask one student to read the question aloud, while the others listen attentively.

Ask another student to repeat the question in her/his own words. Encourage them to visualise
the fact.

Students can also be asked to enact the questions, for example, taking roles of Mary and the
shopkeeper, each displaying the relevant number card.

Guide students to work out the questions on page 69 as above.

Before going on to addition with carry over, give an example of addition by splitting the tens and
units, and combining them.

Ask them to work out the exercise on page 70.

Demonstrate a simple addition sum, say 14 + 28, using the bundles of straw:

First show 14 as 1 bundle + 4 loose.

Now, show 28 as 2 bundles of 10 each, + 8 loose.

Combine both sets, keep aside the 3 bundles.

Put together the 4 + 8 straws.

Tell them that as there are many of them, we group them as 10 + 2.

The 10 straws are made into a bundle with a rubber band, and kept along with the other 3
bundles.

Thus we have 4 bundles and 2 loose straws, which means that 14 + 28 = 42.

Tell them that, as the digit in the tens place increases, we say that 1 is carried over to the
tens place.

Tell them that regrouping is another term that conveys a meaning similar to carry over.

Write the numerals on the board, and show how addition with carry over is done.

Demonstrate a few more such examples with students involvement.

Ask students to work out the exercises on page 72.


39

FUSION

While most students may be able to solve these questions easily, a few may need help. Move to
them and coach them one to one, so that they will also grasp the concept.

Extend it to 3-digit addition with the help of 10 10 square boards, 10 1 rectangular strips and
1 1 unit squares (made with cardboard).

In a similar manner, the other questions given in exercises till page 80 can be completed.

Demonstrate the method of addition on the number line, and conduct lab activity 2.

Instruct students to work out the exercises on page 81.

Summarise the different types of addition and guide students to complete the exercises on page 83.

Assessment

Test 2

Spotlight

Emphasise on the process, more than on the answer. This will help them to correctly work out
questions from a mixed bag of operations, especially in word problems.

Stress on neatness and legibility. While listing out numbers, they must always write them neatly one
below the other, with attention to the place values. This will then become a lifelong habit, which will
go a long way in reducing careless errors.

Glossary

Regrouping when the number in any place exceeds 9, the place cannot hold it; and regrouping
is required. For example, on addition, suppose the figure in the units place is 15, it (the 15 units)
has to be regrouped as one tens and five units. It is the one ten that is carried over to the tens place.

5. SHAPES
Previous Knowledge
Recognition of square, rectangle, triangle and circle.
Teaching Aid
Paper cut-outs of basic shapes in coloured paper, and solid shapes (small boxes used for packing can
be brought).
Concept Development

Have a quick recall of the basic shapes.

Show the solid shapes. Allow students to feel them.

Elicit the difference between plane shapes and solid shapes.

Elicit the difference between a cube and a cuboid.

Guide students to complete the exercises.

As an assignment, students can be asked to observe and record the different shapes that they see
at home and in school.

Assessment

40

Test 3 Q. 1

TEACHERS MANUAL

Spotlight

Explain the difference between side (of a plane figure) and side (of a solid figure) also called
face - as students are likely to get confused.

Glossary
Side of a plane figure the straight line segments that form the boundary.
Face of a solid figure the plane surfaces that are on the outside of a solid figure. The faces are
commonly called sides of the solid figure.

6. SUBTRACTION
Previous Knowledge
Subtraction of 1- and 2-digit numbers without borrowing.
Teaching Aid
Straws few bundles of tens + some loose straws.
Concept Development

Have a quick recall of the meaning of subtraction, relating to their life experience.

Recall subtraction on the number line.

Ask students to work out the revision exercises Q. 1-4.

Ask any student to come forward and work out vertical subtraction from Q. 5 on the board.

Discuss and guide students to work out Q. 5-9.

Guide students to work out Q. 10. They can use the fact that subtraction is the reverse of addition
to work out these. For example, 7 ? = 5 is the same as 5 + ? = 7, for which they can easily write
the answer as 2. You could also indicate that 7 ? = 5 is same as 7 5 = ?.

Before introducing the vertical method of subtraction with borrowing, first use concrete objects (loose
straws), and show take away.

Next, demonstrate borrowing as follows: (27 8)

Show 2 bundles of 10 straws each and 7 loose straws.

Ask a student to come forward and remove 8 straws from the 7 straws.

As it is not possible, take one bundle of straws and untie the bundle.

Now there are 10 + 7 = 17 loose straws.

On taking away 8 loose straws from these, there will be 9 straws left behind.

But, when we look at the bundles of tens, 1 bundle is less as it has been broken down into
loose straws.

Write the working on the board, showing that 1 ten has been borrowed to the units column,
therefore 1 ten has to be reduced from the tens column.

Use this method for the questions from the exercises on page 91 with the active involvement of
students.

Extend the concept for subtraction of a 2-digit number from a 2-digit number, involving borrowing.

Conduct lab activity 3. They can simultaneously work out the exercises on page 93.
41

FUSION

The concept can be extended to subtraction of 3-digit numbers with borrowing, and the exercises
till page 96 can be completed.

While solving word problems, these methods can be adopted:

Ask one student to read the question aloud, while the others listen attentively.

Ask another student to repeat the question in her/his own words. They can think of the problem
with smaller numbers so that they can understand the process.

Students can also be asked to enact the questions, holding the relevant number card.

As many students have a mental block against word problems, make this a fun activity. You can use
the term story-time.

Give them practical illustrations for combined addition and subtraction, as on page 100.

Elicit more such examples from students.

Conduct lab activity 4.

Guide them to carefully work out the exercises on pages 101 and 102.

It would help if at least a few word problems involving combined operations are enacted using
concrete objects.

It could be a graded progression as follows:

Role-play with concrete objects.

Role-play with number cards.

Numbers written vertically after reading together.

Independent reading and solving.

Assessment

Test 3 Q 2 7

Spotlight

Introduce the idea of verification by the reverse process, and encourage them to use it regularly.
Example, 62 27 = 35. Verification: 35 + 27 = 62.

Students tend to make mistakes when 0 is involved. Refer to the example given on page 95,
(600 329) and clarify the point.

Glossary
Borrowing: taking 1 from a higher place, converting and adding to the current place to enable subtraction.

42

TEACHERS MANUAL

MATH LAB ACTIVITIESFORMATIVE ASSESSMENT


Maths is a subject towards which students have strong opinions. Either they love it or they hate it. While
Mathematical concepts are essentially logical, students of various abilities can be encouraged to imbibe
and internalise the concepts in their own unique learning styles. The Math lab helps in giving a handson experience to students. The multi-sensory exposure helps in reinforcing the basic concepts. Various
forms of group activities encourage peer learning, and the games provide an environment of fun and
joy, thus helping to prevent the phobia for Mathematics that is widely seen among school students. It
also serves to relate textual learning to their daily life experiences, thus making education more meaningful.
With the current emphasis on CCE, the Math lab provides a convenient environment for formative
evaluation, while helping in inculcating life-skills like team-spirit and co-operation.
The activities given here are intended to serve as a launching pad. Each of these can be modified and
extended to include more concepts, depending on the creativity of the teacher and the level and
enthusiasm of the learners. Please note the following during the Math lab activities:
a.

Give clear instructions before beginning each activity.

b.

For pair and small group activities, instructing each group to record the sums on paper, and
checking them will help in ensuring that concepts are imbibed correctly.

c.

At the end of each activity, discuss and summarise the concept studied.

d.

Get students into the habit of gathering all the materials used, and replacing them in order, at the
end of each activity. This is an essential life-skill which must be instilled from the very beginning.

e.

Flash cards once prepared, can be kept in zip-lock covers, labelled with the name of the relevant
activity, and used for other classes. These will serve as quick ready-made teacher resources.

Activity 1: Small group activity


Concept: Numbers and Place Value
Aim of the activity: To arrange numbers in ascending/
descending order

345

299

101

Things required: Flash cards of 3-digit numbers.


Procedure
a.

Distribute one flashcard to each child randomly.

b.

Ask them to form groups row-wise, or according to their classroom seating arrangement (around
6 members per group).

c.

Let them compare their numbers and arrange themselves in order.

d.

Ask them to come and stand in order (some in ascending order from left to right, and some groups
in descending order) as each group is called out. They must hold up their cards for the rest of the
class to see, and point out errors, if any.

Teachers note
i.

You can distribute one-sided used greeting cards/invitation cards, and ask students to write out
different 3-digit numbers of their choice.

ii.

This kinesthetic activity helps in catering to students of different learning styles.


43

FUSION

Activity 2: Pair activity - Make your own Number line and add in tens
Concept: Addition in tens
Aim of the activity: To develop the skill
of making a number line, and using it for addition in tens
Things required: a piece of thick cardboard or thermocole 22 cm long, a long ruler, sketch pen for
each pair
Procedure
a.

Draw a line across the cardboard, leaving 1 cm margin on either side.

b.

Mark equal intervals, leaving gap of 2 cm in between.

c.

Mark serially the numbers 0, 10, 20, and so on.

d.

Student 1 gives a problem, say 20 + 30.

e.

Student 2 works it on the number line and gives the answer.

f.

The activity is continued, including even 3-step addition in tens.

Teachers note
i.

The number line above will allow children to perform additions only from 10 100. It can be
modified if you wish to include numbers till 200.

ii.

You can modify the number line. For example, you can use pins to mark the numbers, and piece
of string or wool to perform the activity. Or, you could use the blunt end of a pencil to show the
steps and indicate the operation that you wish to use it for skip counting, adding, subtracting,
and so on.

iii.

This activity promotes peer-learning while reinforcing addition skills.

Activity 3: Small group activity Subtraction


a) Concept: Subtraction without borrowing
Aim of the activity: To find the difference between two numbers.
Things required: Abacus thermocole base, toothpicks (or broomsticks or knitting
needles) for rods, beads or buttons that can go into toothpicks green for units,
blue for tens and red for hundreds.
Procedure

a.

Divide the students into groups of 4, having one abacus for each group.

b.

Student 1 gives a subtraction sum, say 487 - 312

c.

Student 2 shows the first number on the abacus, using the correct number and colour of beads
for each place value.

d.

Student 3 removes the correct numbers of beads (here 3-1-2) and gives the answer

e.

Student 4 says the answer in the expanded form, 100 + 70 + 5

f.

Now Student 2 gives the subtraction sum, and others take turns to continue the process.

g.

One student can be given the responsibility of recording all the questions and answers, which can
be presented to the whole class at the end.

Teachers note
i.

First demonstrate the method of working out the problems.

ii.

You can give graded problems sheet for each group, involving 1-digit, 2-digit and 3-digit subtraction
problems without borrowing (regrouping). (Refer page 88 and page 94 of Fusion 2 Term 1)

44

TEACHERS MANUAL

iii.

Alternatively, you can call out the subtraction problems while children, as a group, work it out.

iv.

Instead of the abacus, you can also use multiple copies of cardboards
or laminated sheets of squares-strips-squares a 1 1 cm square can
be used to represent units, 10 1 cm strip can represent tens, and a
10 10 cm square can represent hundreds. These can be made from
different coloured papers.

b) Concept: Subtraction with borrowing


Aim of the activity: To find the difference between two numbers involving borrowing.
Things required: Abacus thermocole base, toothpicks (or broomsticks or knitting needles) for rods,
beads or buttons that can go into toothpicks green for units, blue for tens and red for hundreds.
Procedure
a.

Follow the same method as in activity 3 (a)

b.

If a sum involves borrowing, a tens bead will have to be exchanged for 10 ones beads, before
performing the subtraction.

For example, 63 48.


i.

As 3 < 8, the child must remove 1 ten from the 6 tens (to reduce to 5 tens), and add 10 units to
the 3 units. (exchange 10 ones for 1 ten)

ii.

Now 13 ones 8 ones = 5 ones; and 5 tens 4 tens = 1 ten

Teachers note
i.

Give graded problems of 2-digit and 3-digit borrowing type subtraction problems. (Refer page 93
and page 96)

ii.

This activity can be used for reinforcing addition and subtraction. It greatly helps in visualising the
concept of regrouping, and lays the foundation for clear understanding of addition and subtraction.

Activity 4: Small group activity Problem solving


Concept: Addition and subtraction combined
Aim of the activity: To develop the skill of creating word problems, and
thus relating mathematical concepts to daily life.

23
+ 12

87
41

Things required: Question cards with simple addition, subtraction and


combined problems for each group each card can have four questions.
Procedure
a.

Divide the students into groups of 4 or 5

b.

Ask students to look at question 1.

c.

Let them discuss and frame a suitable word problem.

d.

Similarly let them frame questions for each question, and write out each one neatly on flash cards.

e.

The questions framed by Group 1 can be given to children of Group 2 for solving, and so on.

Teachers note
i.

This exercise will help to remove the mental block for word problems, commonly seen among young
learners. It helps to integrate learning across different subjects, and makes it more relevant for
children, as the questions are framed from their perspective.
45

FUSION

TESTS

TEST
1

NUMBERS, PLACE VALUE


1.

Show the numbers on the abacus.


a.

b.
T

809

2.

795

Write the numerals.


a.

b.
H

3.

4.

5.

Write the number name.


a.

876

b.

504

Write the numerals for the following:


a.

Six hundred eighty-eight

b.

Eight hundred fifty-two

Complete the sequence.

229
46

233

TEACHERS MANUAL

6.

7.

Write the numeral that comes:


a.

before 461

b.

after 665

c.

between 789 and 791

a.

Write in the expanded form.


979 =

b.

Write the numeral.


800 + 90 + 1 =

8.

9.

Write the place value of:


a.

9 in 964

b.

8 in 689

c.

5 in 915

Fill in the boxes with > or < signs.


a.

486

468

b.

891

790

c.

699

701

d.

765

667

47

FUSION

TEST
2

ADDITION
1.

2.

Fill in the boxes using properties of addition.


a.

6 + 2

b.

2 +

c.

3 +

d.

4 +

+ 6

Add by writing as tens and units.


a.

31 and 42
31 =

tens +

units

+ 42 =

tens +

units

31 + 42 =

tens +

units

27 =

tens +

units

+ 51 =

tens +

units

27 + 51 =

tens +

units

31 + 42 =

b.

27 and 51

27 + 51 =

3.

Add the following:


a.

48

+ 2

b.

c.

+ 3

4
2

d.

+ 1

TEACHERS MANUAL

4.

Add.
a.

b.

c.

+ 4

+ 3

e.

f.

d.
7
+

g.

+ 4

h.

+ 4

+ 2

+ 5

5. I bought a pencil box for ` 45 and a water bottle for ` 37. What amount did I have to pay?

49

FUSION

TEST
3

SHAPES, SUBTRACTION
1.

2.

Match the following:


a.

Four equal sides

i.

cube

b.

Six rectangular faces

ii.

triangle

c.

Three sides

iii.

circle

d.

Six square faces

iv.

square

e.

No corners

v.

cuboid

Subtract on the number line.


a.
14

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

b.
12

3.

Subtract in tens and units.


a.

b.

tens +

units

tens +

units

tens +

4.

tens +

units

tens +

units

tens +

units

units

tens + 5

units

tens +

units

tens +

units

Subtract.
a.

b.
5

50

c.

c.

d.

TEACHERS MANUAL

5.

In a cricket match, the two teams together scored 642 runs. If one team scored 315 runs,
find the number of runs scored by the other.

6.

Of the 485 students in a high school, 218 decided not to burst crackers for Diwali. How many
had not yet decided?

7.

38 people were seated in a bus. In the next stop, 13 people got down and 20 people got in.
How many were in the bus now?

51

FUSION

ANSWER KEY TO TESTS


Test 1

6. a. 460 b. 666 c. 790

b.

7. a. 979 = 900 + 70 + 9

1. a.

2. a. 927

H T U

8. a. 9 hundreds
b. 8 tens

b. 460

d. 4 + 1 = 5

b. Five hundred four


4. a. 688

b. 852

5. 229, 230, 231, 232,


233, 234, 235, 236, 237

52

1. a. iv

b. v

c. ii

e. iii

2. a. 73

b. 78

3. a. 88

c. 61

3. a. 5 tens + 5 units

d. 459

b. 1 ten + 5 units

b. 265

c. 5 units
3. a. Eight hundred
seventy-six

Test 3

d. i

b. 891
H T U

c. 3 + 0 = 3

2. a. 11

b. 5

c. 5 tens + 7 units

9. a. >

c. <

4. a. 675

e. 105

b. >

d. >

b. 848

f. 953

c. 851

g. 960

d. 546

h. 993

Test 2
1. a. 6 + 2 = 2 + 6 = 8
b. 2 + 3 = 3 + 2 = 5

5.

82

4. a. 520

b. 321

c. 236

d. 279

5. 327
6. 267
7. 45

TEACHERS MANUAL

TERM 1
ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

53

FUSION

INTRODUCTION
The fundamental aim of education is to equip children with skills to lead a productive and harmonious
life in society. It is important that children first acquire knowledge and understanding of the world in
which they will live and work as adults. In the elementary school, the subjects of social studies, science
and environmental studies together cover the topics that relate to the world around.
In the first two years of primary school, Environmental Studies or EVS is a composite subject that
introduces the child to both the natural and social environment. The syllabus for these two years has
been built within a child-centred perspective of themes that provide a common interface of issues in
social studies, sciences and environmental education. The objective of teaching science and social
studies as one subject in the first two classes is to enable the children understand relationships between
the natural, social and cultural environment.
The EVS curriculum typically has the child at the centre and moves outwards to include family, home,
neighbourhood, State and the Universe. In each class knowledge, appropriate to the age, is provided.
The carefully drawn up content ensures that the child is able to see himself/herself in the larger context
as part of a community, the country and also, as a citizen of the world.
Environmental Studies aims to give young children, a basic knowledge of the real world. Hence, it
cannot and should not be presented as abstract ideas to be learnt by rote. EVS lessons should be
drawn from experiences of the child. The learning should be based on observations and the teaching
method should include a lot of look-around trips outside the classroom and hands-on experiences.

54

TEACHERS MANUAL

FEATURES OF LESSONS
The EVS modules are based on the premise that children are naturally motivated to learn. The lessons
aim to imbibe and foster scientific and environmental awareness among students.
Clear and simple text is supported by attractive illustrations to familiarise students with their environment
and to arouse their curiosity about the natural environment, places and people.
Ample scope is provided for both formative assessment and summative assessment as outlined below.

COMPONENTS OF FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT


New words I have learntThis section contains a list of commonly used words with their meaning.
This will help students to recognise those words and enhance their vocabulary.
Now I know Lists the key points focussing on concepts learnt in the chapter. This will further
strengthen a students learning skills.
Now I will A feature that guides a student to think and practise ways to create a healthy and
sustainable environment.
Now I canA useful tool to reinforce learning is by doing simple exercises before moving on to complex
ones and this is the emphasis of this section.
In classMultiple level questions to assess the understanding of the lesson.
ProjectInteresting projects to develop creative and critical thinking skills of children.

COMPONENTS OF SUMMATIVE ASSESSMENT


Lets ReviseA question bank at the end of each term for summative assessment.
TestsTests of each lesson for summative assessment.

55

FUSION

SCHEME OF LESSONS
Lesson

Lesson Contents

1. My body

Parts of the body


Head

Trunk
Chest

Abdomen

Limbs
External and
internal organs
Bones
Muscles
2. Taking care of
our body

Eyes

Ears

Nose

Tongue

Skin

3. Houses that
we live in
Huts

House with tiled


roofs

56

Learning Outcomes
Children will be able to identify the major divisions
of the human body.
Children will be able to understand that the brain is
located inside the head and it controls all the parts
of the body and their functions.
Children will be able to recall that the trunk can be
divided into two parts.
Children will be able to locate the position of the heart
and lungs in the chest portion of the trunk, and
identify their functions.
Children will be able to locate the position of the
stomach, liver, intestines and kidneys in the abdomen
portion of the trunk, and recall their functions.
Children will be able to identify that the arms and
legs are together called limbs.
Children will be able to differentiate between external
and internal organs.
Children will be able to appreciate that a skeleton
made of bones gives shape and protection to our body.
Children will be able to infer that movement is possible
because of the muscles attached to the bones.
Children will be able to understand the functions and
importance of the eyes.
Children will be able to identify the dos and donts related
to the eyes.
Children will be able to understand the functions and
importance of the ears.
Children will be able to identify the dos and donts
related to the ears.
Children will be able to understand the functions
and importance of the nose.
Children will be able to identify the dos and donts
related to the nose.
Children will be able to understand the functions and
importance of the tongue.
Children will be able to identify the dos and donts
related to the tongue.
Children will be able to understand the functions and
importance of the skin.
Children will be able to identify the dos and donts
related to the skin.
Children will be able to appreciate and take care of the
various parts of the body.
Children will be able to recall the parts and uses of
a house.
Children will be able to identify how a hut looks like.
Children will be able to identify the materials used in
the construction of a hut.
Children will be able to identify how houses with tiled
roofs look like.
Children will be able to identify the materials used in the
construction of a house with tiled roof.

Evaluation
Exercise A
Exercise D - Q 2 (FA)
Exercise B - Q 4,
Exercise C - Q 1 (FA)
Exercise D - Q 3 (FA)
Exercise C - Q 2 and 3 (FA)

Exercise B - Q 1 and 5,
Exercise C - Q 4 (FA)
Exercise D - Q 1 (FA)

Exercise B - Q 2 (FA)
Exercise B - Q 3
Exercise D - Q 5 (FA)
Exercise B (FA)
Exercise A - Q 2 and 3 (FA)
Exercise B and C (FA)
Exercise D (FA)
Exercise B and C (FA)
Exercise D (FA)
Exercise A - Q 1, Exercise B (FA)
Exercise D (FA)
Exercise B and C (FA)
Exercise D (FA)

Exercise C - Q 4 (FA)

Exercise C - Q 1 (FA)
Exercise A - Q 3 (FA)

TEACHERS MANUAL

Lesson

Lesson Contents
Apartments

Bungalows

Tents

Igloos

Caravans
Houseboats

4. The food
we eat

Cereals
Pulses
Dairy products
Frozen foods
Vegetable and fruits
Importance of food

Energy-giving foods
Body-building foods

Protective foods

Good eating habits


5. The clothes
we wear

Cloth
Cotton
Silk

Learning Outcomes
Children will be able to identify how an apartment
looks like.
Children will be able to identify the materials used in
the construction of an apartment.
Children will be able to infer the difference between
a kuchcha and a pucca house.
Children will be able to identify how a bungalow
looks like.
Children will be able to identify the materials used in
the construction of a bungalow.
Children will be able to identify how a tent looks like.
Children will be able to identify the materials used in
the construction of a tent.
Children will be able to recall the meaning of an igloo.
Children will be able to identify the materials used in
the construction of an igloo.
Children will be able to recall the meaning of a
caravan.
Children will be able to identify how a houseboat
looks like.
Children will be able to imagine living in a houseboat.
Children will be able to appreciate the wide variety
in the types of houses.
Children will be able to appreciate the importance of
keeping our homes clean and living joyfully in
our homes.
Children will be able to name a few cereals.
Children will be able to identify the different types
of pulses.
Children will be able to identify the different types of
dairy products.
Children will be able to identify the different types of
frozen foods.
Children will be able to identify the different types of
vegetables and fruits.
Children will be able to understand that food gives us
energy to work and play and food also helps us to
grow and remain healthy.
Children will be able to infer that foods that give us
energy to work are called energy-giving foods.
Children will be able to infer that foods that help the
body to grow and repair damaged parts are called
body-building foods.
Children will be able to infer that foods that help
protect the body from diseases are called
protective foods.
Children will be able to appreciate the importance of
eating different kinds of food.
Children will be able to list the materials used to make
clothes.
Children will be able to give reason why cotton clothes
are worn in summers.
Children will be able to identify the source of silk cloth
and its uses.

Evaluation
Exercise B (FA)
Exercise C - Q 2 and 3 (FA)
Exercise A - Q 1, 2 and 5 (FA)

Exercise B (FA)
Exercise A - Q 4 (FA)

Exercise B (FA)

Exercise A - Q 1 (FA)
Exercise A - Q 2 (FA)
Exercise A - Q 3 (FA)

Exercise A - Q 4 and 5 (FA)


Exercise B - Q 1 (FA)

Exercise B - Q 2 (FA)
Exercise B - Q 3 (FA)

Exercise B - Q 4 (FA)

Exercise A - Q 1 (FA)
Exercise A - Q 2 (FA)
Exercise A - Q 5 (FA)

57

FUSION

Lesson

Lesson Contents
Wool
Nylon and polyester

Clothes of different
states
Uniforms

6. Keeping
healthy and
clean

Hygiene
Rules for a
clean body
Environment

Rules for a clean


home
Rules for a clean
school
Rules for clean
surroundings

58

Learning Outcomes
Children will be able to recognise the source of
woollen clothes and explain why they are worn in winters.
Children will be able to identify the source of nylon
and polyester clothes and explain why they are called
synthetic.
Children will be able to appreciate the wide range in
the clothes worn by the people of different states.
Children will be able to recall the meaning of uniforms.
Children will be able to identify the different materials
of clothing by feeling their texture.
Children will be able to appreciate the value of
hygiene in all aspects of life.
Children will be able to identify the rules to be
followed for keeping the body clean.
Children will be able to differentiate between a clean
and a dirty environment and appreciate the
importance of a clean environment.
Children will be able to infer the rules to keep the
home clean.
Children will be able to infer the rules to keep the
school clean.
Children will be able to understand how to keep
their surroundings clean.

Evaluation
Exercise A - Q 4 (FA)
Exercise A - Q 3 (FA)

Exercise B (FA)

Exercise A - Q 1 (FA)
Exercise A - Q 2 (FA)

Exercise A - Q 4 and 5,
Exercise C (FA)
Exercise A - Q 5, Exercise D (FA)
Exercise B (FA)

TEACHERS MANUAL

LESSON PLANS
1. MY BODY
Lesson overview

Teaching suggestions

Explain to children the internal parts of the body and their functions. Encourage children to play outdoors.
Make children do some simple, common exercises. Bring attention to the part of the body that is
being stretched in each case.
Get a working stethoscope and let each child wear it and listen to the heartbeat. Make children feel
their pulse at the wrist.
Get one X-ray film of chest/limb to show the ribs and bones.
First aid for scratches or a bleeding injury or swelling.
1. Wash the area well under a tap for five minutes.
2. Pat dry with a clean cloth.
3. If the bleeding continues, press down with fingers for a few minutes. Wash the blood and cover
with a bandage, if needed. If the cut is big and the bleeding does not stop, go to the doctor
immediately.
59

FUSION

4. For a fall, rub the area vigorously for a few minutes. Apply ice on the area to reduce pain. If the
hurt is on the head, rest for a while. If there is any giddiness or vomiting go to the hospital
immediately.
5. Let the class learn the song Found a peanut
Found a peanut, found a peanut, found a peanut, just now
Found a peanut, found a peanut, found a peanut just now.
I will eat it
Stomach is aching.
Call the doctor.
I am the doctor.
Operation, ..
Got the peanut.
I am alright
Thank you doctor
Good bye doctor..

2. TAKING CARE OF OUR BODY


Lesson overview

60

TEACHERS MANUAL

Teaching suggestions
Explain to children the need to keep the sense organs clean. Let them list the different objects
needed to keep the body clean.
You can provide situations and ask children how they will handle it, for example, how will you take
care of your eyes? Why should you have a bath every day?

3. HOUSES THAT WE LIVE IN


Lesson overview

Teaching suggestions
Explain to children the different types of houses such as apartments, tents, igloos, caravans and
houseboats. Recall their knowledge about different parts of the house.

Take the children out on a walk around the area to observe different kinds of homes.

Ask children to make a collage of a hut on a sheet of chart paper. Draw a hut. Let them follow these steps.
Gum and stick plant materials to get a thatch roof.
Make a thick paste of clay and apply on the walls.
Make doors and windows using ice-cream sticks and matchsticks.
In another sheet, draw an outline of a two-storied building with doors and windows. Cut out small
(1 cm 3 cm) bricks from red cardboard sheet. In a small bowl, mix together little cement, sand,
water and liquid gum. Paint the walls, line by line and get children to lay rows of bricks.
61

FUSION

Bring a tile and brick to class for children to hold and touch. Ask children to bring samples of other
construction materials like cement, sand, stones, wood, steel and glass.

THE THREE LITTLE PIGS: You can read out this story to the class.
Once upon a time there was a mother pig who had three little pigs.
The three little pigs grew so big that their mother said to them, You are too big to live here any longer.
You must go and build houses for yourselves. But take care that the wolf does not catch you.
The three little pigs set off. We will take care that the wolf does not catch us, they said.
Soon they met a man who was carrying some straw. Please will you give me some straw? asked the
first little pig. I want to build a house for myself.
Yes, said the man and he gave the first little pig some straw.
Then the first little pig built himself a house of straw. He was very pleased with his house. He said, Now
the wolf wont catch me and eat me.
I shall build a stronger house than yours, said the second little pig.
I shall build a stronger house than yours, too, said the third little pig.
The second little pig and the third little pig went on along the road. Soon they met a man who was
carrying some sticks.
Please will you give me some sticks? asked the second little pig. I want to build a house for myself.
Yes, said the man and he gave the second little pig some sticks.
Then the second little pig built himself a house of sticks. It was stronger than the house of straw.
The second little pig was very pleased with his house. He said, Now the wolf wont catch me and eat me.
I shall build a stronger house than yours, said the third little pig.
The third little pig walked on, along the road, by himself. Soon he met a man carrying some bricks.
Please will you give me some bricks? asked the third little pig. I want to build a house for myself.
Yes, said the man and he gave the third little pig some bricks.
Then the third little pig built himself a house of bricks.
It took him a long time to build it, for it was a very strong house.
The third little pig was very pleased with his house. He said, Now the wolf wont catch me and eat me.
The next day the wolf came along the road. He came to the house of straw which the first little pig had built.
When the first little pig saw the wolf coming, he ran inside his house and shut the door.
The wolf knocked on the door and said, Little pig, little pig, let me come in.
No, no, said the little pig. By the hair of my chinny chin chin, I will not let you come in.
Then Ill huff and Ill puff and Ill blow your house in, said the wolf.
So he huffed and he puffed and he huffed and he puffed. The house of straw fell down and the wolf
ate up the first little pig.
The next day the wolf walked further along the road. He came to the house of sticks which the second
little pig had built.
62

TEACHERS MANUAL

When the second little pig saw the wolf coming, he ran inside his house and shut the door.
The wolf knocked on the door and said, Little pig, little pig, let me come in.
No, no, said the little pig. By the hair of my chinny chin chin, I will not let you come in.
Then Ill huff and Ill puff and Ill blow your house in, said the wolf.
So he huffed and he puffed and he huffed and he puffed. The house of sticks fell down and the wolf
ate up the second little pig.
The next day the wolf walked further along the road. He came to the house of bricks which the third
little pig had built.
When the third little pig saw the wolf coming, he ran inside his house and shut the door.
The wolf knocked on the door and said, Little pig, little pig, let me come in.
No, no, said the little pig. By the hair of my chinny chin chin, I will not let you come in.
Then Ill huff and Ill puff and Ill blow your house in, said the wolf.
So he huffed and he puffed and he huffed and he puffed. But the house of bricks did not fall down.
Ask children to complete the story

63

FUSION

4. THE FOOD WE EAT


Lesson overview

Teaching suggestions
Explain to children the importance of food. Show children pulses and cereals. Encourage them to eat
fruits and vegetables regularly.

If possible, get a freshly harvested bunch of paddy/wheat to the class for children to see the grains
as they grow.

Get green legumes like thuvar/thovare, papdi/avare, peas/mattar from a vegetable market. You could
also get some dry, cereals from a provision store to enable children to understand that the cereals
are dried seeds.

Split open a whole cereal like channa (after soaking) or fresh peas or peanut. Show children the tiny
kernel in between. Mention that the kernel is rich in protein and hence it is good to eat whole grains.

Show the symbol of a green dot inside a white square indicating that the product is from a plant
source and not an animal source.

64

TEACHERS MANUAL

5. THE CLOTHES WE WEAR


Lesson overview

Teaching suggestions
Associate the clothes we wear to the seasons.
Weave a mat
You could follow the directions and weave a mat.
1. Cut a piece of coloured paper into a 10 square.
2. Fold the square in half. Cut evenly spaced strips starting from the folded edge to up to half inch from
the ends. Open the paper.
3. Cut 1 inch 12 inch strips of another colour. Weave the strips in and out of the slits. Turn the mat
and fold the excess paper in and gum the strips.

You could explain to children the meaning of dry cleaning.


Some fabrics like silk and wool shrink or spoil if they are washed in water. They are to be drycleaned. Dry cleaning is cleaning clothes and textiles with a chemical and not water.

65

FUSION

6. KEEPING HEALTHY AND CLEAN


Lesson overview

Teaching suggestions
Explain to children the rules to keep clean. Let them understand that clean surroundings are important
for healthy living.

66

TEACHERS MANUAL

TESTS

TEST
1

MY BODY

I.

Match the following:


A

II.

III.

1.

Brain

a.

Abdomen

2.

Lungs

b.

Head

3.

Intestines

c.

Chest

Write true (T) or false (F).


1.

The body is divided into head, trunk and abdomen.

2.

The skeleton gives support and shape to the body.

3.

The body has two lungs and two livers.

Fill in the blanks.


1.

The

pumps blood to different parts of the body.

2.

The

help in breathing.

3.

The arms are joined to the


the

Students Name:

and the legs are joined to

Class

Sec

Date:
67

FUSION

TEST
2

TAKING CARE OF OUR BODY

I.

II.

Fill in the blanks.


1.

We should not read in

light.

2.

The tongue helps us to

and

3.

The nose helps us to

and

Write true (T) or false (F).


1.

We should use soap and water to clean our eyes.

2.

We should sit at least four feet away from the television set to
watch our favourite cartoon.

3.

III.

We can clean our ears with match sticks and ear buds.

Match the following:


A
1.

Swallow food

a.

Skin

2.

Feel things

b.

Ears

3.

Maintain body balance

c.

Tongue

Students Name:
68

Class

Sec

Date:

TEACHERS MANUAL

TEST
3

HOUSES THAT WE LIVE IN


I.

II.

Fill in the blanks.


1.

A house protects us from

2.

Houses made of mud, straw, and grass are known as

3.

Areas which get heavy rainfall have houses with

and

houses.
roofs.

Match the following:


A

III.

1.

Apartment block

a.

House of ice

2.

Caravan

b.

Building with many flats

3.

Igloo

c.

Mobile house

Give one word answers.


1.

A mixture of cement, sand, steel, stones and water.

2.

Where can you find house boats in India?

3.

What are houses made of bricks and stones known as?

Students Name:

Class

Sec

Date:
69

FUSION

TEST
4

THE FOOD WE EAT

I.

II.

Encircle the correct option.


1.

Wheat and corn are cereals/pulses.

2.

Junk food makes us weak/strong.

3.

Rice, ghee and potato are energy-giving/protective foods.

Fill in the blanks.


1.

Milk and curd are

2.

Fruits and leafy vegetables give us

3.

Foods that help in growth and repair of damaged body parts are called

products.
.

III.

Give quick answers.


1.

Why should we eat good food?

2.

What are protective foods?

3.

Why should we avoid junk food?

Students Name:
70

Class

Sec

Date:

TEACHERS MANUAL

TEST
5

THE CLOTHES WE WEAR

I.

II.

III.

Tick the correct option.


1.

Cotton/Wool is made from the hair of sheep and goats.

2.

Silk/Nylon is a synthetic material.

3.

Wool/Silk is soft and shiny.

Rearrange the following to form meaningful words.


1.

TNSYHETCI

2.

TTCOON

3.

OLNYN

Fill in the blanks.


1.

Silk is made from silk thread obtained from the

2.

We wear

3.

We wear woollen clothes in

Students Name:

of silkworms.

clothes in summers.
.

Class

Sec

Date:
71

FUSION

TEST
6

KEEPING HEALTHY AND CLEAN

I.

II.

Fill in the blanks.


1.

We should cover our mouth with a

2.

We should avoid using plastic bags as they

3.

We should bathe with

everyday.

Match the following:


B

1.

Germs

a.

Healthy

2.

Cleanliness

b.

Cavities

3.

Good food

c.

Hygiene

Write true (T) or false (F).


1.

We should eat food in the bedroom.

2.

We should not scribble on public property.

3.

We should throw garbage only in dustbins.

Students Name:
72

the drains.
and

III.

when we sneeze or cough.

Class

Sec

Date:

TEACHERS MANUAL

ANSWER KEY TO TESTS


TEST 1
I. 1. BrainHead

2. LungsChest

3. IntestineAbdomen

II. 1. False

2. True

3. False

III. 1. heart

2. lungs

3. shoulder, hips

I. 1. poor

2. speak, taste food

3. breathe, smell

II. 1. False

2. False

3. False

III. 1. Swallow foodTongue

2. Feel thingsSkin

3. Maintain body balanceEars

2. kuchcha

3. sloping

TEST 2

TEST 3
I. 1. rain and cold

II. 1. Apartment blocksBuilding with many flats


3. IglooHouse of ice

2. CaravanMobile house

III. 1. Concrete

2. Kashmir

3. Pucca

I. 1. cereals

2. weak

3. energy-giving

II. 1. dairy

2. protection from diseases

3. body-building foods

TEST 4

III. 1. Food gives us energy to work and play. It also helps us to grow and remain healthy.
2. Foods that protect our body from diseases and keep us healthy are called protective food.
Examples are fruits, vegetables and nuts.
3. We should avoid junk food because they are not good for our health.
TEST 5
I. 1. Wool

2. Nylon

3. Silk

II. 1. Synthetic

2. Cotton

3. Nylon

III. 1. cocoons

2. cotton

3. winter

I. 1. handkerchief

2. choke

3. soap, water

II. 1. GermsCavities

2. CleanlinessHygiene

3. Good foodheathly

III. 1. False

2. True

3. True

TEST 6

ANSWER KEY TO LESSONS IN COURSE BOOK


1. MY BODY
B. 1. heart, lung, stomach
3. In movement
C. 1. brain
D. 1. limbs

2. Give shape to the body and protect the internal parts


4. Inside the head
5. To remove waste matter from the blood
2. heart

2. head, trunk, limbs

3. nose
3. chest, abdomen

4. neck

4. kidney
5. muscles, bones
73

FUSION

2. TAKING CARE OF OUR BODY


A. 1. To speak and taste food
3. Individual response

2. Sit at least eight feet away and not watch it for too long

C. 1. F

2. T

3. F

4. T

3. HOUSES THAT WE LIVE IN


A. 1. Tent, bungalow
2. Thatch leaves, stem, grass, sticks; Walls bricks and mud
3. No
4. Houses built of ice
5. Bricks, cement, sand, steel, wood and glass
B. True 1, 3, 4
C. 1. plastic

2. plants

3. paper

4. diseases

4. THE FOOD WE EAT


B. 1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

For energy to work and play. Also to grow and be healthy.


They give the body the energy to work. Example rice
They help the body to grow and repair the damaged parts. Example pulses
They protect the body from diseases and help to remain healthy
Eat three meals a day, eat fruits and vegetables, do not waste food

C. True 1, 3, 5
D. 1. pulses.

2. cereals

3. fruits

4. fish

5. chicken

6. rice

7. wheat

8. milk

5. THE CLOTHES WE WEAR


A. 1. Cotton, wool
2. Cotton clothes
3. Clothes made with nylon and polyester threads that are made in factories
4. As they keep the body warm
5. from silkworms
C. 1. cotton cloth

2. silk cloth

3. woollen cloth

4. synthetic cloth

6. KEEPING HEALTHY AND CLEAN


A. 1. To live a healthy life
5. In the waste basket
B. 1. F

2. Practise hygiene
6. Roads, parks

2. T

3. Rats, ants, flies

3. T

4. on the shoe-rack

4. F

5. F

ANSWER KEY TO LETS REVISE


A. 2. NO

3. NO

4. YES

B. True 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 9, 10
C. 1. neck
5. brick/mud
9. cotton

2. nylon and polyester


6. milk
10. around

5. YES

6. NO

7. NO

8. YES

False 3, 5, 7
3. arms and legs
7. umbrella
11. hips

4. woollen
8. brain
12. peas and rajma

D. 1. heart
2. two
3. woollen
4. energy-giving food
5. skeleton
E. 1. heart, lungs
2. cricket, football
3. cement, bricks, steel, wood
4. milk, butter, cheese
5. They help in the growth and repair of damaged parts of the body.
6. They protect the body from diseases and help us remain healthy.
74

TEACHERS MANUAL

TERM 1
GENERAL KNOWLEDGE
ANSWER KEY TO LESSONS IN COURSE BOOK
1. OFF TO SCHOOL
C H A

K O

C W

M E

R S

N S

C H

N R

C O

M P

C E

M N

C K

N C

C C

C W R

2. TRAVEL TIME
2. L

3. L

4. W

5. L

6. L

7. L

8. L

9. L

10. A

11. W

12. L

3. HELPING HANDS
1. chef

2. baker

3. artist

4. fireman

5. dentist

6. plumber

7. soldier

8. architect

9. greengrocer

10. conductor

4. ANIMAL BABIES
2. horse and foal

3. cat and kitten

4. pig and piglet

5. dog and puppy

6. duck and ducling

7. lion and cub

8. sheep and lamb

9. hen and chicken

5. MIXED BAG
1. tree

2. jug

3. bread

4. plate

5. book

6. apple

6. FOOD
A. 1. f.

2. d

3. g

4. i

5. b

6. h

7. c

8. a

9. e
75

FUSION

7. GAMES WE PLAY
A. 2. f
B. 1. pithoo

3. h

4. e

2. running

5. g

6. b

3. skipping

7. j

8. d

4. hide and seek

9. c

5. kho kho

10. a

6. hopscotch

8. MAGIC RAINBOW
P

9. THEY GO TOGETHER
1. chair

2. paint

3. key

4. spoon

5. thread

6. bone

7. pencil

8. ball

10. PEOPLE OF INDIA


1. Naga

76

2. Manipuri

3. Himachali

4. Haryanvi

5. Bihari

TEACHERS MANUAL

TERM 2
ENGLISH

77

78

Vocabulary

The little
bird

4. Birds

Whquestions

Colours
Rhyming
words

Action words
Rhyming
words

Short answer
questions

Replacing by Short answer


a single word
questions
Parts of a
bird (body)
Odd one out

Rearranging
sentences
Whquestions

Short
answers

/i/ /i:/
(revision)

/n/ /ng/

/ks/ /gz/

/ts/ /bz/

Comprehension Pronunciation

Locating
Main content
words
of paragraphs
Time words
Whquestions
Confusables
Word building

3. Jomo and
Locating
the dolphin
words
Filling in
blanks
Weather
words

Where go
the boats?

2. What is the
time?

1. Guru Nanak Matching


words with
their
meanings

Lesson

Guided
composition

Picture
composition

Describing
an object

Guided
composition
based on a
model
Picture
composition

Composition

Missing
letters

Missing
letters

Missing
letters
Changing f
to ves for
plural

Spelling

Full stop
and
question
mark

Capitals

Capitals

Punctuation

Role-play
(dialogue)
Asking for
information

Asking for
information
(when? what?
past tense)

Role-play
(dialogue)
Asking for
information

Asking for
information
(when, past
progressive)

Function

Choosing
the correct
meaning

Choosing
the correct
meaning

Choosing
the correct
meaning

Choosing
the correct
meaning

Dictionary
Skill

General
present
(Revision)
Many, a few,
a lot of
Opposites
Prepositions
Action words
Animal sounds

More
prepositions
Future tense
Opposites
Phrases
Action words
Word power

Telling
the time
(minutes)
when? how?
other, the,
other, another
Prepositions

Verbs
Past
progressive
Ask, want +
noun +
infinitive
Opposites

Language and
grammar

FUSION

SCHEME OF LESSONS

TEACHERS MANUAL

LESSON PLANS
1. GURU NANAK
Learning objectives
Students will be able to

identify the founder of Sikhism

listen to the story and scan details

read the story with proper pronunciation

learn new words and their meanings

learn the opposites of words

learn to enquire and reply

use verbs to complete sentences

use hints to answer questions

use the dictionary to find the appropriate meaning

Introduction
Ask the students if they have heard about Guru Nanak, more commonly called Guru Nanak Dev. There
might be some sikh student in class but it would be wise not to ask them to tell about Guru Nanak right
in the beginning of the lesson. As the lesson proceeds, you may ask the students to add any information
they know and which is not written in the lesson.
Explain to the students about the life of Guru Nanak and how he was different from the rest in some
aspects of life.
Teaching suggestions
Reading
Have the students read the lesson as a narrative. Encourage them to ask about any fact or word
mentioned in the lesson that they are not clear about.
Ask the students to read the lesson silently. Now randomly choose students to read a paragraph each.
As they read, you may list the glossed words on the board.
Teaching questions
Factual comprehension
1. Who was the founder of the Sikh faith?
2. Where and when was Guru Nanak born?
3. What did Nanak see the people of Haridwar doing while bathing?
4. Why were the people of Haridwar offering water back to the river, facing east?
5. How did Nanak teach a lesson to the people of Haridwar?
6. What lesson did Nanak teach to the people of Haridwar?
7. How did Nanak lie down when he was tired after his journey to a holy place?
8. Why did Nanaks friends ask him to turn his feet away from the holy place?
9. What lesson did Nanak teach his friends?
79

FUSION

Inferential comprehension
1. Why did Nanak have no interest in studies?
2. Why did Nanak give examples to teach important lessons?
Critical thinking comprehension
1. Was Guru Nanak a God? Give reasons for your answer.
2. Find out more about Kartarpur.
Vocabulary
1. Matching the words with their proper meanings will help the students have a better understanding
of the lesson. You may tell the students to close their books and then you can ask them where the
words appeared in the lesson and then the meanings of the words. Drop hints wherever necessary.
2. Before commencing the writing of the opposites of the given words, discuss the meanings of the
given words in class. Then prompt the children to say the opposites of the words aloud before writing
them down.
Pronunciation
There is a difference of just one alphabet in the given words. Help the student identify the alphabets
that are different and then pronounce the pair of words correctly.
The final consonant is /s/ in the words cups, caps, pups, slaps and /z/ in the words cubs, cabs, pubs,
slabs. This is because of the previous sound /p/ or /b/.
Listening and speaking
Read out the situations given in the exercise. Make pairs among students and ask them to come up
with similar situations as given in the hints and enact them in class.
Language and grammar
1. A verb is a telling-word or saying-word. It is a word used to tell something about a person or thing.
It tells what a person or thing is, does or suffers. A verb may refer to the present, past or future.
They are called the three tenses of the verb. You may give the students simple examples of each
type and ask them about the type.
2. Answering questions in which answers are hinted help the students develop a habit of thinking about
the key point of the answer and then frame the sentence around it. The frequent use of -ing after
the verb will also instill the sense of the tense used in the sentence.
Dictionary skills
Demonstrate to students how to use a dictionary. A word may have more than one meaning and
you may have to explain to the students that the same word may be used in different contexts in
different situations.
Project
Encourage students to do the project forming groups. This is an effective tool for formative assessment.

2. WHAT IS THE TIME?


Learning objectives
Students will be able to

80

know the history of watches

TEACHERS MANUAL

learn facts as to how the present day watches came into existence

read the lesson with proper pronunciation

learn the spelling of new words

learn new words and their meanings

understand pronunciation of similar sounding words

learn how to converse politely

understand how to answer in the proper tense

know how to punctuate

learn to use a dictionary

learn to mark the time on a clock

Introduction
Ask students about the types of watches they have seen. You may question them as to how they think
the clocks and watches work and why some watches stop when there is no battery in them. You may
help them to make a simple timeline as to how the clocks were in the olden times and then how they
improved step by step.
If resources permit, you may collect a few types of clocks and watches including some primitive types
for better understanding.
Teaching suggestions
Reading
Encourage student to read the lesson and pay attention to the pictures provided in the lesson. You may
also use other appropriate pictures to help the students identify what they are reading about. This will
also help the student in understanding the meanings of important words.
Teaching questions
Factual comprehension
1. How did people in the olden times use the suns movement to tell the time?
2. How did people in the olden times know the time after sunset?
3. What is an hourglass?
4. How does an hourglass work?
5. What did the Chinese use to tell time?
6. How were candles used to tell the time?
7. Who was Galileo?
8. Why were some clocks called grandfather clocks?
9. Why are atomic clocks better than the others?
Inferential comprehension
1. Why did the people feel a need to tell the time?
Critical thinking comprehension
1. What types of clocks are usually in use today?
2. Find out more about atomic clocks.
81

FUSION

Vocabulary
1. The exercise will solve two purposes. Firstly it will have the students guessing the meaning of the
sentence and secondly it will test their spelling skills. Drop hints relating to the missing word and
let the children guess. After they have guessed the correct word, then have them fill in the missing
alphabets in the blanks provided.
2. You may help the students to find the words whose meanings are given in the exercise. Let them
read the paragraph containing the word and then find out the exact word corresponding to the
meaning. It is seen that sometimes the students will learn just the meaning pertaining to the context
referred to in the lesson. Help them generalise the meaning of the word by having them make new
sentences using the same word.
Pronunciation
Student often make an error in pronouncing and spelling words that sound somewhat similar.
Read the words given in the list slowly and clearly. Let the students repeat after you. List the words
on the board and make students write down the words as they pronounce them.
The final sound is /s/ in the first set of words locks, docks... and /z/ in the second set of words logs,
dogs... /k/ is followed by /s/ and /g/ is followed by /z/.
Listening and speaking
Students need to learn the general manner of conversation in day to day life using full sentences.
Starting of the conversation, its body and then conclusion can be stressed separately before explaining
to the students about the proper conversation.
Language and grammar
1. In many situations, the answer to a question about the past needs the answer to be given in
past tense. In such questions, several action words of the question need to be changed to the past
tense accordingly.
This exercise uses the same format and it will help the students understand this important rule.
2. At a young age, students often tend to write the spellings of words exactly as they pronounce them.
This habit needs to be changed and this can be done by giving examples of mistakes and then
having the students correct these.
Punctuation
Explain to students the rules of punctuation with examples. Proper nouns and sometimes words derived
from them need to begin with capital letters.
Dictionary skills
Demonstrate to students how to use a dictionary. A word may have more than one meaning and
you may have to explain to the students that the same word may be used in different contexts in
different situations.
Project
Use an actual clock in the class to explain to the students how the time needs to be seen. Many times,
phrases are used to tell the time in some texts. Help the students to understand the meaning of each
word used in the phrase to tell the time.
82

TEACHERS MANUAL

WHERE GO THE BOATS?


Learning objectives
Students will be able to

understand the metaphors used by the poet

learn the use of rhyming words

read the poem with expressions

identify the meaning of the lines in the poem

Introduction
Ask students if they have been to a riverside or seen a body of flowing water in which they have
let dry leaves or paper boats afloat. Have them share their experiences and also describe how they
felt about it.
You may find animated versions of the poem on the internet. If resources and time permit, have the
students see one of the animations for a better visualisation of the poem.
Teaching suggestions
Reading
Read the poem in class laying stress on the required words in each line. Read slowly so that the
students can catch the proper pronunciation of the words. List the glossed words on the board. Have
the students learn the poem and recite it with proper expressions.
Teaching questions
Factual comprehension
1. What is the colour of the river?
2. What is the colour of the sand?
3. What is present on either side of the river?
4. Which places does the river pass by?
5. Who shall bring the boats ashore?
Inferential comprehension
1. What does the poet mean by castles of the foam?
2. Why does the river always flow down?
Critical thinking comprehension
1. What do you think helps the boats flow in the water?
2. Find out about a few types of boats that float on water.
Project
You can guide students as to how to begin the outlining and the colours to be used to fill in the picture.

3. JOMO AND THE DOLPHIN


Learning objectives
Students will be able to

understand the story


83

FUSION

listen to the story and scan details

read the story with proper pronunciation

learn new words and use them in different contexts

learn opposite words

use words of the lesson in sentences of their own

identify different animals

learn the correct order of words in sentences

punctuate paragraphs

use the dictionary

Introduction
Ask students if they have seen a dolphin in real life or on the television. Ask them to describe what they
remember about the animal. Tell them about the nature of the animal and where it is found around the
world and in India.
Ask how many of the students know how to swim. Ask them what they would have done if they were
in the water and they see an unknown creature in the water. Now tell them the story in brief in
your own words.
Teaching suggestions
Reading
Ask the students to read the lesson silently. Now randomly choose students to read aloud a paragraph
each. Do note that a student should be asked to read a paragraph fully because one full paragraph
contains one thought process or concept. As they read, you may list the glossed words on the board.
Teaching questions
Factual comprehension
1. Where does the story take place?
2. Why did Jomo decide to go for a swim?
3. Why was Jomo happy when he reached the river?
4. What did the friends decide?
5. Who would win the prize of the competition?
6. What did Jomo see in the river?
7. Why was Jomo scared?
8. Why could Jomos friends not help Jomo?
9. What did the dolphin do with Jomo?
10. What did Jomo and the dolphin do when they became good friends?
Inferential comprehension
1. How did Jomo start trusting the dolphin?
2. What can you say about the nature of dolphins after reading this story?
Critical thinking comprehension
1. What other animals would you find in a river?
2. What would you have done if you were Jomo?
84

TEACHERS MANUAL

Vocabulary
1. Before commencing the writing of the opposites of the given words, discuss the meanings of the
given words in class. Then prompt the children to say the opposites of the words aloud before writing
them down.
2. You can help the students to fill in the appropriate words in the blanks. Explain to them the meaning
of the word separately and not just in the context of the sentence in which the word is used.
3. Using words to make sentences on their own will help the students understand the meanings of the
words better. Sometimes a word may have more than one meaning. In such cases, you can help
the students to understand the difference by reading two such sentences in which the same word
has been used differently.
Pronunciation
Read the words given in the list slowly and clearly. Let the students repeat after you.
The words have different spellings and meanings but might sound similar when pronounced. You
may have the students write down the words and tell them the meaning of each word in the pair for
a better understanding.
Listening and speaking
Read out the situations given in the exercise. Draw attention to the mode of enquiring and replying. You
may conduct a role play in class and give more situations for students to practise. You could use finger/
glove puppets to make the class interesting.
Language and grammar
1. The exercise will solve two purposes. Firstly it will have the students guessing the name of the
animal and secondly it will test their spelling skills. Drop hints relating to the name of the animal and
let the children guess. After they have guessed the correct word, then have them fill the missing
alphabets in the blanks provided.
2. Putting thoughts into words and then framing a proper sentence using those words may be difficult
in the beginning for students at this level. You may give situations to students and ask them to
express their thoughts in proper sentences. Encourage the use of smaller sentences first, as the
longer the sentence, the more the mistakes.
Punctuation
Using capital letters at proper places is one of the most important rules of writing English. Some of the
rules for using capital letters are:
1. Begin the first letter of the first word of a sentence in capital letter.
2. I is always written in capital.
3. Proper nouns, names, days of the week, months of the year and names of festivals always begin
with a capital letter.
Dictionary skills
Demonstrate to students how to use a dictionary. Draw their attention to head words. A hyphen
(a short line) is used to join two written words or parts of words, or for dividing a word at the end of
a line of writing.
Project
Encourage students to do the project forming groups. This is an effective tool for formative assessment.
85

FUSION

4. BIRDS
Learning objectives
Students will be able to
relate the text of the lesson to the knowledge of birds
know more about the birds
read the lesson with proper pronunciation
learn new words and use them in different contexts
learn to use different language functions
identify different types of birds
understand the use of prepositions
learn to use a dictionary
Introduction
Ask students about the types of birds they have seen. Do they know the names of all the birds they
have seen? You can collect pictures of common birds in their natural habitat and show them to the
students for identification.
Have them notice the distinguishing features of the birds that help us in differentiating between two or
more types of birds and also tell them how birds are different from us humans.
Teaching suggestions
Reading
As the lesson is not a story, you can have students read it in a way that is different from how they read
a story. As they read, you may list the glossed words on the board. You may collect solitary bird videos
for the children to see while they read the lesson. Collect videos on different habits of the birds. This
will help the students relate to the text of the lesson.
Teaching questions
Factual comprehension
1. Name a few common birds.
2. How are the various types of birds different from each other?
3. Why do birds fly away when we go too close to them?
4. How can crows see things that are behind it?
5. How do birds reproduce?
6. Why do small birds lay many eggs?
7. Why do birds need to keep their eggs warm?
8. How do birds keep their eggs warm?
9. Why is the cuckoo called a clever bird?
10. When do baby birds leave their nests?
Inferential comprehension
1. Why do big birds lay fewer eggs at a time when compared to smaller birds?
Critical thinking comprehension
1. Find out about some birds that cannot fly.
2. How does the better sight of birds help them?
86

TEACHERS MANUAL

Vocabulary
1. Replacing a word or phrases with a single word having the same meaning will give the students an
understanding of the meaning of the word and also the sentence in which it is used. The use of
words from the lesson in the same or different contexts will help the students understand the
different places in which the word can be used.
2. Before commencing the writing of the opposites of the given words, discuss the meanings of the
given words in class. Then prompt the children to say the opposites of the words aloud before writing
them down.
Pronunciation
Read the words given in the list slowly and clearly. Let the students repeat after you. The words in pairs
have different spellings and meanings and so should be pronounced in a proper manner.
Minimal pairs are used to bring out the contrast between the short /i/ and the long/i:/.
A game: Call out a few of these words at random. The class should say whether the word belongs to
Column 1 or Column 2. This is a kind of ear-training exercise.
Listening and speaking
Read out the situations given in the exercise. The exercise will help students understand the use of the
words, a few, a little and a lot. Help them to understand the difference in the use of the mentioned
words and how these words are used while answering specific queries.
You may have the students frame more dialogues using the same words and practise.
Language and grammar
1. As an additional resource to the exercise, you may show to the students, pictures of the birds as
hints. The exercise will serve two purposes. Firstly it will have the students guessing the name of
the animal and secondly it will test their spelling skills. Drop hints relating to the name of the animal
and let the children guess. After they have guessed the correct word, then have them fill the missing
alphabets in the blanks provided.
2. A preposition is a word placed before a noun or pronoun to show in what relation the person or thing
named (by the noun or pronoun) stands in regard to something else.
The exercise will help the student identify the correct preposition to be used in the given sentence
and also understand the pattern of use of prepositions.
3. Many times, a number of living and non-living things of various varieties are said or written together.
In such cases, when one wants to segregate the mentioned words into particular categories, he/she
should know the basis of differentiating the subjects.
The exercise given is a small step towards this. You should help children visualise the mentioned
things and then try to find out the one that is different from the other three.
Punctuation
Ending of a sentence with a period or question mark greatly changes the way a sentence is spoken.
A sentence with a period or full stop at the end is a statement and is spoken accordingly. A period marks
the longest pause in a sentence. A sentence with a question mark at its end sounds like a question.
However some sentences may sound like questions but may also end with an exclamation mark in
some cases.
Help the students understand the difference between the uses of these punctuation marks.
87

FUSION

Dictionary skills
Demonstrate to students how to use a dictionary. The exercise shows that a single word may have more
than one meaning and how the proper meaning can be known by understanding the sentence in which
the word is used.
Project
Encourage students to do the project forming groups.

THE LITTLE BIRD


Learning objectives
Students will be able to

recite the poem in rhythmic form

learn the use of rhyming words

read the poem with expressions

identify the meaning of the lines in the poem

Introduction
Birds are a common sight in the surroundings. Ask the students about the types of birds they have seen
around them. Then let them describe how the birds move from one place to another other than flying.
You may play for them a video in which they can clearly see how a bird is hopping on the ground or
any other surface.
This is a simple rhyme which the students will enjoy reciting. It is about a common theme relating to
birds. Ask the class what they do when they see a little bird hopping close to them.
Teaching suggestions
Reading
Read the poem in class laying stress on the required words in each line. Read slowly so that the
students can catch the proper pronunciation of the words. List the glossed words on the board. Have
the students learn the poem and recite it with proper expressions. You may play some background
music to make the recital of the poem more interesting.
Teaching questions
Factual comprehension
1. What kind of a bird did the poet see?
2. What was the bird doing?
3. Which are the rhyming words in the poem?
4. What did the poet want to ask the bird?
5. What did the bird do before it flew away?
Inferential comprehension
1. Why do you think the bird flew away?
2. Did the poet want to harm the bird?
Critical thinking comprehension
1. Name the birds that you commonly see in your surroundings.
2. Find out about a bird that mostly stays on the ground and does not fly frequently.
88

TEACHERS MANUAL

TESTS

TEST
1

GURU NANAK
A.

B.

Match the person with the action. One has been done for you.
1.

teacher

2.

tailor

3.

doctor

4.

carpenter

5.

dancer

6.

singer

7.

baker

8.

farmer

9.

artist

10.

cobbler

11.

grocer

12.

plumber

dances
sings
teaches
bakes cakes
makes clothes
treats people who are ill
makes furniture
sells grocery
repairs water pipes
grows crops
paints pictures
mends shoes

Write the action words hidden in these puzzles.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

Students Name:

Class

Sec

Date:
89

FUSION

TEST
2

WHAT IS THE TIME?


A.

Look at the table below and answer the questions.


Olympic Games

B.

Year

Place

2000

Sydney

2004

Athens

2008

Beijing

2012

London

1.

Where were the Olympic Games held in 2012?

2.

Where were the Olympic Games held after Sydney?

3.

How often are the Olympic Games held?

4.

Were the Olympic Games ever held in India?

Rewrite the following in words.


11.00

eleven o clock

8.35
4.20
5.45
6.10
9.30

Students Name:
90

Class

Sec

Date:

TEACHERS MANUAL

TEST
3

JOMO AND THE DOLPHIN


A.

Fill in the blanks with the plural form of the word given in brackets.

1.

There are two

(girl) on the see-saw.

2.

3.

The

(boy) in my class are very quiet.

(pen) in his box.

Ram has two

4.

(bag) must be left outside

All the
the classroom.

5.

6.

B.

(book).

The library has many

(page).

This notebook has a hundred

Fill in the blanks with suitable words.


after of in on for around on
The sun was shining brightly

the little town

Hippo

North Africa. Jomo rubbed his eyes and stretched his arms

nights sleep.
The dolphin swam

him

some time and suddenly took him

his back.

Students Name:

Class

Sec

Date:
91

FUSION

TEST
4

BIRDS
A.

B.

Rewrite these sentences using capital letters and full stops. Remember that names of festivals
always begin with capital letters.
1.

tomorrow is holi

2.

i read a story about animals

3.

she is my teacher

4.

the nurse took the baby to bed

5.

they got off the bus

6.

this park is huge

Put in or out in the blanks.

1.

The cat is

the basket.

2.

3.

They are

the classroom.

4.

5.

The pencil is

Students Name:
92

of the bus.

The children are

The clown is

of the box.

the box.

Class

Sec

Date:

TEACHERS MANUAL

ANSWER KEY TO TESTS


TEST 1
A. 2. Tailormakes clothes

3. Doctortreats people who are ill

4. Carpentermakes furniture

5. Dancerdances

6. Singersings

7. Bakerbakes cakes

8. Farmergrows crops

9. Artistpaints pictures

10. Cobblermends shoes

11. Grocersells grocery

12. Plumberrepairs water pipes

B. 1. Swimming

2. Dancing

3. Reading

4. Sleeping

5. Eating

TEST 2
A. 1. Olympic Games were held in London in 2012.
2. Olympic Games were held in Athens after Sydney.
3. The Olympic Games are held after every four years.
4. No, the Olympic Games were never held in India.
B. 1. Thirty-five past eight

2. Twenty past four

4. Ten past six

3. Quarter to six

5. Half past nine

TEST 3
A. 1. girls

2. boys

3. pens

4. bags

5. books

6. pages

B. On, of, in, after, around, for, on


TEST 4
A. 1. Tomorrow is Holi.
4. The nurse took the baby to bed.
B. 1. in

2. I read a story about animals.

3. She is my teacher.

5. They got off the bus.

6. This park is huge.

2. out

3. in

4. out

5. in

ANSWER KEY TO LESSONS IN COURSE BOOK


1. GURU NANAK
Comprehension
1. In Talwandi

2. Nankana Saheb

3. With sadhus

4. He faced west, took some water and poured it down into the river. (He taught people the lesson that
it is important to take care of our elders when they are alive.)
5. Asked him to turn his feet away from the place of worship
6. That God is everywhere
Vocabulary
I. 1. c
II. 1. save

2. e
2. dislike

3. b
3. learn

4. far

4. f
5. old

5. a
6. weak

7. happy

6. d
8. foolish
93

FUSION

Language and grammar


I. was, had, went, pulled, stayed, did, returned, was sitting, playing, patted, looked, felt, returned,
jumped, ran, came, gave, drove.
II. This exercise teaches the use of the Past Progressive Tense.
1. I was brushing my teeth.

2. He was reading the newspaper.

4. I was playing.

5. I was playing football.

3. She was drinking tea.

III. b. relax or sleep

2. WHAT IS THE TIME?


Comprehension
I. 1. They watched the suns movement and its effect on shadows. They planted a stick vertically in
the ground and fixed stones around it in a circle. As the sun went up or down, the shadow of
the stick shifted and the position of the shadow helped them tell the time.
2. By watching the position of the stars and their movement
3. Sixty minutes
4. The candles had lines at equal distances. The distance between two lines showed them that a
certain length of time had passed. As the candles burned, they became shorter and the remaining
lines in the candle showed the time that had passed.
5. Galileo
6. They were very tall and called grandfather clocks.
7. Individual response
II. True 2, 4, 5
Vocabulary
I. 1. loses

2. narrow

3. different

4. scientist

5. shadows

II. 1. measure

2. hourglass

3. disappear

4. invented

5. accurate

Language and grammar


I. 1. begin

2. meet

3. did, die

II. 1. no

2. know

3. suns

4. circle

5. some, see

III. 1. Galileo, an Italian scientist, invented the pendulum.


2. The Chinese used candles and oil lamps.
IV. a

WHERE GO THE BOATS?


Comprehension
1. Dark brown

2. Golden

3. Paper

4. Mill, valley

Lets enjoy
1. Individual response
94

2. green leaves, foam, boats

3. A hundred miles or more

TEACHERS MANUAL

LISTENING TASK 1. THE FOOLISH WOLF


SPEAKING TASK

1. To look for food


2. Play the flute
3. Yes
4. Danced
5. Dogs
6. Ran away
7. The donkey

3. JOMO AND THE DOLPHIN


Comprehension
I. 1. Because it was warm
2. His friends
3. The boy who swam the farthest from the shore
4. A dolphin
5. Because he was frightened
6. The dolphin swam around Jomo for a while and dived under him to take him on his back. It then
carried Jomo on its back for a ride in the river.
II. 2. He wanted to swim.
3. He went to the river close by.
4. His friends were already there.
5. They had a swimming competition.
6. Jomo saw a dolphin and swam away from him.
7. The dolphin followed him and took him on its back.
8. Jomo and the dolphin became friends.
Vocabulary
I. 1. end

2. day

3. up

4. lose

5. near

II. 1. Shake

2. belongs

3. warm

4. prize

5. stretches

Language and grammar


I. 1. elephant
5. tiger

2. giraffe

3. rhinoceros

4. tortoise (tortoise is pronounced /t tis/)

6. deer

II. soft white cloth

white soft cloth

tall old man

old tall man

heavy three boxes

three heavy boxes

long wooden table

wooden long table

95

FUSION

III. Let me go for a swim. It is so warm today, Jomo thought. He ran to the river close to his house.
To his joy, he found many of his friends by the river.
IV. close

4. BIRDS
Comprehension
1. Crow, eagle, sparrow
2. Yes. The bird has eyes on the sides of its head. With a slight turn of its head, it can see things that
are behind it.
3. The suns heat helps the chicks to grow inside the eggs and then break out of them.
4. In a crows nest
Vocabulary
I. 1. passes

2. completely

3. feed

4. hatch

5. almost

II. 1. similar

2. dull

3. straight

4. light

5. difficult

6. catch

3. eagle

4. ostrich

5. parrot

6. pigeon

4. at

5. for

6. on, to

Language and grammar


I. 1. cock
II. 1. of

2. crane
2. in

3. behind, with

III. 1. Do you watch birds?

2. Birds are our friends.

3. Have you seen a peacock?


IV. 1. goat

2. crow

4. Small birds have a short life.


3. man

4. nose

5. fish

V. beak

THE LITTLE BIRD


Comprehension
1. A little bird

2. Hopping

3. To stop

5. Flew away

6. hop stop, do flew

LISTENING TASK 2. THE MONKEY AND THE TWO CATS


SPEAKING TASK
1. Piece of cake
2. Divide the cake
3. Broke it into two unequal pieces and kept repeatedly biting it
4. No
5. The monkey ate the whole cake
6. We should not quarrel as others might take advantage
96

4. To say, How do you do?


7. Individual response

TEACHERS MANUAL

ANSWER KEY TO GRAMMAR AND LANGUAGE WORKSHEETS


1. GURU NANAK
I. 1. Laila cant fry the nuts. She wants her mother to fry them.
2. Rahul cant write a letter. He wants his sister to write it.
3. Shruti cant cross the road. She wants the policeman to help her.

2. WHAT IS THE TIME?


II. loaves, calves, leaves, shelves, knives
III. 1. other

2. other

3. others

1. other

2. the other

3. the other

1. another

2. another

3. the other

4. the other

IV. from, of, into, by, for, from, to

3. JOMO AND THE DOLPHIN


I. to, on, for, around
II. 1. frog

2. tortoise

3. cow

4. parrot

5. sparrow

III. will be, will take, will stay, will go, will visit

4. BIRDS
II. till, draw, pull
III. 2. Ducks quack
6. Cocks crow

3. Doves coo

4. Parrots talk

7. Crows caw

8. Hens cluck

5. Owls hoot

IV. similar, dull, straight, light, difficult, catch

97

FUSION

TERM 2
MATHEMATICS

98

TEACHERS MANUAL

SCHEME OF LESSONS
Unit
1

Lesson
Multiplication

Metric Measures

No. of Periods
22

15

Contents
Revision
Multiplication Table for
One (1)
Multiplication Table for
Two (2)
Multiplication Table for
Three (3)
Multiplication Table for
Four (4)
Multiplication Table for
Five (5)
Multiplication Table for
Six (6)
Multiplication Table for
Seven (7)
Multiplication Table for
Eight (8)
Multiplication Table for
Nine (9)
Multiplication Table for
Ten (10)
Properties of Multiplication
Multiplication of a 2-digit
Number by a 1-digit Number
Multiplication of a 3-digit
Number by a 1-digit Number
Circle game
Length
Measuring Length with
a Ruler
Addition of Length
Subtraction of Length
Addition and Subtraction
of Kilometers and Meters
Weight

Addition of Weight
Subtraction of Weight
Capacity and Volume
Volume
Addition of Capacity
Subtraction of Capacity

Learning Outcomes
Children will be able to recall the multiplication table for 1
Children will be able to recall the multiplication table for 2
Children will be able to recall the multiplication table for 3
Children will be able to recall the multiplication table for 4
Children will be able to recall the multiplication table for 5
Children will be able to recall the multiplication table for 6
Children will be able to recall the multiplication table for 7
Children will be able to recall the multiplication table for 8
Children will be able to recall the multiplication table for 9
Children will be able to recall the multiplication table for 10
Children will be able to understand the properties of multiplication
Children will be able to find the products
Children will be able to find the products
Children will be able to enjoy playing with numbers
Children will be able to recall the units of length and their relationship
Children will be able to measure length with a ruler
Children will be able to identify the appropriate unit of measurement
of length
Children will be able to add lengths
Children will be able to subtract lengths
Children will be able to add and subtract kilometres and metres

Children will be able to recall the units of weight


Children will be able to read the weights from packs of daily use
Children will be able to add weights
Children will be able to subtract weights
Children will be able to compare capacities
Children will be able to recall the units of volume
Children will be able to add capacities
Children will be able to subtract capacities

Geometry

Basic terms

Children will be able to recall the meaning of dot, line, line


segment, ray, horizontal, vertical, zigzag
Children will be able to identify a line, line segment, ray

Data
representation

Pictograph

Children will be able to interpret and draw pictographs

99

FUSION

LESSON PLANS
1. MULTIPLICATION
Previous Knowledge
Familiarity with multiplication as repeated addition; tables of 2, 3, 4, 5 and 10; simple word problems.
Teaching Aid
Flashcards, pencils/chalk pieces or other readily available objects.
Concept Development

Recall that multiplication is repeated addition with the help of a few simple day to day concrete
examples relevant to students. (Call any 3 students, and give them 4 pencils each ask them for
the total number of pencils with all the three)

Conduct a quick quiz on multiplication tables of 2, 3, 4, 5 and 10 using flashcards.

Go over all the remaining tables till 10 10.

Conduct lab activity 1.

Guide students to complete the exercises on page 59 and 60.

Discuss the properties of multiplication. Students can work out the exercises on page 61.

Discuss the example on page 62. As they are familiar with regrouping in the case of addition and
subtraction, you can refer to it, and they will be able to work out questions with carry over in the
exercises on page 62.

Extend this to 3-digit by 1-digit multiplication and ask them to do the exercises on page 64.

While most students will be able to work out these comfortably, you can move to those who face
difficulty and attend to them one on one.

If students of high ability complete it fast, ask them to create word problems of practical relevance
on 3-digit by 1-digit multiplication.

Discuss word problems as was done for addition and subtraction.

Conduct the circle game.

Assessment

Test 1

Spotlight

Emphasise that they write the answer neatly, with reference to the place value.

Wherever the answers extend to four digits, they can write 2 digits under the hundreds place. This
way, they will get a feel of how the number system progresses.

Glossary

Multiplicand the number that is multiplied.

Multiplier the number by which it is multiplied.

Product the answer obtained on multiplication.

100

TEACHERS MANUAL

2. METRIC MEASURES
Previous Knowledge
Familiarity with the different commonly used units of length, weight and capacity.
Teaching Aid
Ruler, metre scale, weights, measuring jars of different capacities.
Concept Development

Introduce the lesson bringing out its practical application in day to day life.

Ask students to take out their rulers and measure the length of their pencil.

Recall that the centimetre is a small unit, and elicit from students the unit they would use to find the
length of the classroom or the distance from their homes to school.

Ask them to highlight in their books 1 m = 100 cm, and 1 km = 1000 m.

Discuss the exercise on page 66.

Conduct the circle game.

Elicit examples of situations where it would be required to add and subtract lengths.

Demonstrate an example for addition of lengths, call a student to work out another example, and
guide students to complete the questions on page 68.

Do likewise for subtraction of length.

Extend this to addition of kilometres and metres; and also to add and subtract weights and capacities,
giving practical illustrations for each.

Conduct lab activity on measurements.

Assessment

Test 2

Spotlight

Motivate students to get into the habit of writing the units wherever required, by highlighting that the
values have no meaning without the units.

Although the correct scientific term to be used is mass and not weight, at this stage, it is alright to
use the term weight.

These units are written in the lower case, for example, we write km and not Km.

Glossary
Unit a standard value used in measurement.

3. GEOMETRY
Previous Knowledge
Familiarity with plane and solid shapes.
Teaching Aid
Cut-outs of plane shapes and models of solid shapes.
101

FUSION

Concept Development

Have a quick recall of the plane and solid shapes they are familiar with, using the models and
cut-outs.

Draw a straight line on the board using a ruler.

Mark two points A and B on it. Ask students if it is possible to measure the distance between
A and B.

Tell them that since it is possible to measure the distance between them, it is called a line segment.

Give examples of line segments. You can show the sides of the plane rectilinear figures (triangle,
square, rectangle) which are line segments.

Draw another line with a point A at one end and an arrow at the other end. Tell them that the arrow
here means that it can be stretched in that direction, but the point is fixed.

Tell them that this is called a ray, similar to the suns rays, which start from the suns surface, and
can be extended to any distance.

This could trigger off a discussion, as some student might say that the sun is not a point. Ask for
the view of other students, then appreciate the child for the observation and say that it comes from
a point on the surface of the sun.

Next draw a line with arrows at both the ends and point out that, as this has no beginning and end
point, it is called a line. Illustrate the different types of lines.

They can now complete the exercises independently.

Assessment

Test 3 Q 1 4

Spotlight

Emphasise that points on the lines or line segments, and thus the vertices of plane figures are
marked with capital letters.

Avoid free-hand drawing on the board, as students tend to imitate what is done by the teacher.
Always use a ruler.

Glossary

Line segment it has two end points. It has a fixed length.

Ray it has one fixed point and can be extended on one side. It has no fixed length.

Line it has no fixed point and can be extended on both sides. It has no fixed length.

4. DATA REPRESENTATION
Previous Knowledge
Familiarity with data tabulation and pictograph.
Teaching Aid
Newspaper or magazine cut-outs showing tabulated data or pictograph (available in the section of daily
temperature/rainfall, or market survey or types of food, and so on)
102

TEACHERS MANUAL

Concept Development

Have a quick recall of the need for data tabulation and pictographs.

Discuss the various areas of its use, by showing the cut-outs.

Discuss the example and ask them to work out the exercises.

For Q. 3, they can draw stick men as shown in Q. 2.

For Q. 4, help them obtain the data by making a table on the board for the various modes of
transport, and filling in the numbers as students raise their hands for the relevant item. Next guide
them to draw the pictograph.

Assessment

Test 3 Q. 5, 6

Spotlight

Insist that they do neat work. Let them get into the habit of always using only sharp pointed pencils.

If they make a mistake in writing a number, let them erase or neatly strike out the entire number,
and write it again. Rewrite, do not over-write, must be their motto.

Glossary

Data information

Pictograph data represented by pictures

103

FUSION

MATH LAB ACTIVITIESFORMATIVE ASSESSMENT


Activity 1: Large group activity Birthday Fun
Concept: Multiplication
Aim of the activity: To recall multiplication tables
Things required: Folded slips with names of each student
Procedure
a.

Place all the slips in a bowl or empty chalk box.

b.

Call any student at random and ask her to pick a paper.

c.

Let her read the name on the paper.

d.

The student comes forward and says his birthday, say, 25 April.

e.

The first student will tell the product, 2 5 = 10, and go back to her place.

f.

Now student 2 picks a slip, and the game continues.

g.

If the date has only one digit, say, 3 September, the multiplication table to be done would be
3 9, as September is the 9th month.

h.

Students can be given the choice of using the numerals in the birth date in any way they want,
for example 25-4-2006, can be made into a problem as (2 + 5) 4 = 7 4 = 28.

Teachers note
i.

Let this be a fun activity, points need not be given.

ii.

This activity can be used by the teacher to challenge the gifted children, and giving a feel of
success, for the average children, by using the appropriate numerals.

iii.

Encourage students to enjoy working with numbers as they commute, by looking out for patterns
in vehicle numbers, say 6742: 6 7 = 42. They will find countless such patterns if they are trained
to observe.

Activity 2: Pair activity - Measurement


Concept: Measurement
Aim of the activity: To develop the
skill of measuring length of objects
Things required: Fusion Term book,
ruler, pencil, notebook
Procedure
a.

Divide the class into pairs.

b.

Instruct students to take out their rulers and note the markings.

c.

Instruct them to measure the length and the width of their Fusion term books.

d.

Ask them to note down their observations in a table as shown below.


Object
Fusion Term book - Length
Fusion Term book - Width
Pencil box - length

104

Length in cm

TEACHERS MANUAL

Teachers note
i.

Depending on the level of your students, you can either ask them to ignore the millimetres, or you
could explain in the beginning, how to read the millimetres in the ruler. The focus here is not on
accuracy, but on estimation.

ii.

Once they have taken a few measurements, you can challenge them to estimate other lengths, for
example, length of your palm, an A-4 sheet of paper, the blackboard, the length of the classroom,
and so on. You could use a measuring tape to verify if their estimate is correct. If any student wants
to use the Fusion book as a standard, and measure the length of the blackboard (using multiplication
or repeated addition), encourage her to do so.

Activity 3: Small group activity Data Handling Project


Concept: Data Handling
Aim of the activity: To develop the skill of recording and tabulating data
Things required: Paper, pencil
Setting: Playground
Procedure

Hobby

Number of persons

Reading

a.

Divide students into groups of five.

b.

Assign a project (ideas given below)


to each group.

Painting

c.

Instruct them to collect and tabulate


the data, drawing pictographs
wherever possible

Music

d.

Assign a reasonable time-frame and


let them present it to the class.

Cooking
Others

Teachers note
Here are some ideas for data collection project
i.

Birthdays of students in each month (or two months, say, Jan and Feb taken together)

ii.

Number of members in the family (students can collect data from any 20 teaching and non-teaching
staff)

iii.

Favourite pastime of teachers (suggest common activities reading, music, and so on one
category for others)

iv.

Time taken by school staff to commute to school (suggest classes less than 10 minutes,
10 20 minutes, and so on)

v.

Most commonly used word in a given page of their favourite story (give some words the, and,
a, an, when, but)

105

FUSION

TESTS

TEST
1

MULTIPLICATION
1.

2.

3.

4.

Write the following as repeated additions.


a.

5 3 = 15

b.

4 4 = 16

Match the following:


a.

8 6

i.

40

b.

3 9

ii.

28

c.

4 7

iii.

48

d.

6 4

iv.

27

e.

5 8

v.

24

Fill in the blanks.


a.

= 7

b.

= 9

c.

7 0 =

d.

45 10 =

Find the products.


a.

3 4

b.

2 3 1

c.

4 7

d.

3 0 5

5.

How many days are there in 37 weeks?

6.

42 families were living in Royal Enclave. Each family had 4 members. How many people were living
in Royal Enclave?

106

TEACHERS MANUAL

TEST
2

METRIC MEASURES
1.

Match the following with the correct measurement.


a. Packet of butter

i. 600 km

b. Distance from Chennai to Kochi

ii. 500 ml

c. Packet of Milk

iii. 2 kg

d. Potatoes for the family

iv. 15 cm

e. Length of a small ruler

v. 100 g

2. Find the sum.


a.

b.
12

45 cm

+ 13

23 cm

c.

23 kg

205 g

38 kg

457 g

12 km

454 m

31 km

546 m

65 kg

528 g

kg

125 g

54

56 cm

27

28

d.

12 l

385 ml

4 l

27 ml

3. Subtract.
a.

b.
50

km

080 cm

21

km

430 cm

c.

d.

30 l

750

ml

5 l

168

ml

cm

107

FUSION

GEOMETRY, DATA REPRESENTATION

TEST
3

1. Match the following:

2.

3.

a.

i.

vertical

b.

ii. curved

c.

iii. horizontal

d.

iv. zig zag

What am I?
a.

I can be extended in both directions.

b.

I have one fixed point and can be stretched in one direction.

c.

I have two fixed points. I am the shortest distance between any two points.

Count the number of line segments in the figure.


B
C

H
G

E
F

4.

Write the names of the following:


a.

108

b.

c.

TEACHERS MANUAL

5.

The following data shows the type of snacks brought by the students of a class. Make a
pictograph for the data.
Type of Snack

6.

Number of students

Fruit

Biscuit

Chocolate

Chips

Salad

The following pictograph shows the number of newspapers sold by a vendor from Monday
to Friday.
Day

Number of newspapers

Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Answer these questions.
a.

On which day did he sell the highest number?

b.

How many did he sell that day?

c.

On which two days were the sales equal?

d.

On which day did he sell the lowest number?

ANSWER KEY TO TESTS

1. a. 5 + 5 + 5 = 15
b. 4 + 4 + 4 + 4 = 16
2. a. iii
d. v

b. iv
e. i

c. ii

3. a. 6 7 = 7 6 = 42
b. 9 1 = 9
c. 7 0 = 0
d. 45 10 = 450
4. a. 68
c. 282

b. 693
d. 1525

b. cube
c. cone

c. 25 l 582 ml
d. 27 m 28 cm

5. 259

Test 1

6. 168

5.
Test 3

Test 2
1. a. v
d. iii

b. i
e. iv

2. a. 25
b. 61
c. 16
d. 44

m 68 cm
kg 662 g
l 412 ml
km

3. a. 28 km 650 m
b. 61 kg 403 g

c. ii

1. a. iii
c. ii

b. iv
d. i

2. a. straight line
b. ray
c. line segment
3. 8
4. a. cylinder

Snacks

No. of students

Fruit
Biscuit
Chocolate
Chips
Salad
6. a. Thursday
b. 7
c. Wednesday and
Friday
d. Tuesday
109

FUSION

TERM 2
ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

110

TEACHERS MANUAL

SCHEME OF LESSONS
Lesson
1. Good manners

Lesson Contents
Good and bad
manners
Please
Sorry
Thank you

2. Safety habits

Safety rules
Safety on the road
Safety with water
bodies
Safety with animals

3. The plants
around us

4. The world of
animals

Learning Outcomes
Children will be able to differentiate between good and
bad manners.
Children will be able to understand the use of the word
please as a good manner.
Children will be able to understand the use of the word
sorry as a good manner.
Children will be able to understand the use of the word
thank you as a good manner.

Exercise A (FA)

Children will be able to give reason why certain safety


rules have to be followed.
Children will be able to recall the safety rules to be
followed when on the road.
Children will be able to recall the safety rules to be
followed when near a water body.
Children will be able to recall the safety rules to be
followed with respect to animals.

Exercise B, Exercise C (FA)

Types of plants

Children will be able to identify the major types of plants


i.e. herbs, shrubs and trees.
Plants provide shelter Children will be able to understand that plants provide
shelter for many animals.
Plants clean air
Children will be able to recall that plants purify and clean
the air around us.
Plants provide food
Children will be able to appreciate that all living beings
depend directly or indirectly on plants for food.
Roots as food
Children will be able to identify the roots that are used
as food.
Stems as food
Children will be able to identify the stems that are used
as food.
Flowers as food
Children will be able to identify the flowers that are used
as food.
Seeds as food
Children will be able to identify the seeds that are used
as food.
Oil
Children will be able to identify the seeds from which we
get different types of oils.
Plants as medicines Children will be able to recognise the plants from which
we get medicines.
Wood, rubber, gum
Children will be able to recognise the plants from which we
and paper
get wood, rubber, gum and paper.
Fibre
Children will be able to recognise the plants from which
we get fibres of different kinds.
Perfumes
Children will be able to identify plants from which perfumes
can be made.
Plants and soil
Children will be able to understand that plants help to hold
the soil together.
Children will be able to appreciate the wide range of uses
of plants and imbibe the value of protecting plants and trees.
Domestic animals

Wild animals

Evaluation

Children will be able to recall domestic animals as those


which we see around in our homes and farms.
Children will be able to recognise the uses of various
domestic animals.
Children will be able to differentiate wild animals from
domestic animals.

Exercise C (FA)
Exercise C (FA)
Exercise C (FA)

Exercise A - Q 2 and 5 (FA)


Exercise A - Q 1 and 4 (FA)
Exercise A - Q 3 (FA)

Exercise A - Q3 (FA)
Exercise A - Q 1 (FA)
Exercise B - Q 1 (FA)
Exercise A - Q 2 (FA)
Exercise D, Exercise E (FA)
Exercise D, Exercise E (FA)
Exercise D, Exercise E (FA)
Exercise E (FA)
Exercise C (FA)
Exercise C (FA)
Exercise C (FA)
Exercise B - Q 3 (FA)
Exercise C (FA)
Exercise B - Q 5 (FA)

Exercise A - Q 1 and 4 (FA)


Exercise D (FA)
Exercise A - Q 2 (FA)

111

FUSION

Lesson

Lesson Contents
Zoos
Aquatic animals

Animal homes

Natural homes
Herbivorous animals
Carnivorous animals

Omnivorous animals

5. Seasons

Weather and season

Summer

Monsoon

Winter

Animals and
seasons
Plants and seasons

6. Our
environment

Pollution
Air pollution

Water pollution

Noise pollution

Steps to reduce
pollution
112

Learning Outcomes
Children will be able to recognise that zoos are places
where wild animals are kept in enclosures for visitors to see.
Children will be able to understand that aquatic animals
are those which live in water bodies like ponds, rivers
and seas.
Children will be able to identify that homes of domestic
animals are built by owners of the animals for the animals
to live and rest.
Children will be able to understand that natural homes are
animal shelters that are not man-made.
Children will be able to recognise that herbivorous
animals are those animals that eat only plant food.
Children will be able to recognise that carnivorous animals
are those animals that eat only the flesh of other animals
for food.
Children will be able to recognise that omnivorous animals
are those animals that eat both plant and animal food.
Children will be able to appreciate the role of animals
in our lives.
Children will be able to understand the meaning of the
word weather.
Children will be able to differentiate between the words
weather and season.
Children will be able to describe the summer season.
Children will be able to recall the clothing and fruits of the
summer season.
Children will be able to describe the monsoon season.
Children will be able to recall the clothing and activities of
the monsoon season.
Children will be able to describe the winter season.
Children will be able to recall the clothing and fruits of the
winter season.
Children will be able to explain the change in behaviour of
animals with the change in seasons.
Children will be able to describe the adaptation of plants
to seasons.
Children will be able to relate the seasons with their
corresponding months in the region where they live.
Children will be able to appreciate the way in which living
beings adapt to changing seasons.
Children will be able to understand what is pollution.
Children will be able to understand what is air pollution.
Children will be able to recognise the various sources of
air pollution.
Children will be able to understand what is water pollution.
Children will be able to recognise the various sources of
water pollution.
Children will be able to understand what is noise pollution.
Children will be able to identify the various sources of
water pollution.
Children will be able to relate the effect to the type of pollution.
Children will be able to visualise the consequences of pollution.
Children will be able to identify the various ways in which
pollution can be reduced.

Evaluation
Exercise A - Q 2
Exercise B - Q 4 (FA)
Exercise A - Q 3 and 5 (FA)

Exercise E (FA)

Exercise E (FA)
Exercise C (FA)
Exercise C (FA)

Exercise C (FA)

Exercise B - Q 1 (FA)
Exercise B - Q 2 (FA)
Exercise A (FA)
Exercise B - Q 3 (FA)
Exercise A,
Exercise B - Q 5 (FA)
Exercise A (FA)
Exercise B - Q 4 (FA)

Exercise D (FA)

Exercise A - Q 1, 3, 6, 8 (FA)

Exercise A - Q 2, 7 (FA)
Exercise A - Q 4, 5 (FA)

Exercise B (FA)
Exercise C (FA)

TEACHERS MANUAL

LESSON PLANS
1. GOOD MANNERS
Lesson overview

Teaching suggestions

Get children to speak one sentence using one of the phrases Excuse me or Please or Sorry
or Thank you

Playact the story of the two pairs of goats on a narrow bridge. The bridge is very narrow and the
two goats are coming from opposite sides. The first set of good mannered goats greet each other,
talk to each other politely and decide that one would lie down and allow the other to walk over it
and go across. They thank each other and wish good bye and go on. The second set of goats are
rude to each other. They use bad language, fight and finally both fall into the river.

Everybody likes a well-mannered person. Speak in two different ways and ask which of the two
sounds good.

1. Hey, show me some dresses. Do it fast, dont be lazy. You will make me miss the bus. What! The
price is too much! You are cheating. I dont want your filthy stuff. I will go to another shop.
2. Can I see some dresses please? Can you show them quickly please, because I am in a hurry to
catch a bus. I think the price is high. I am sorry I cannot afford to buy it. Thank you for showing.
Bye, bye
Ask children to make up similar dialogues at home/school.
113

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2. SAFETY HABITS
Lesson overview

114

TEACHERS MANUAL

Teaching suggestions

Discuss safety rules to be followed when lighting firecrackers during Diwali:


1. Do not wear synthetic clothes. Wear only cotton clothes. Do not wear flowing dresses like ghaghra,
duppatta, lehenga, pavadi.
2. Wear footwear to protect your feet. Otherwise you may step on some burning pieces.
3. Never light firecrackers inside the house.
4. Always have an adult to watch over you when you and your friends light firecrackers.
5. Always light rockets on the terrace so that the piece goes up into the sky.
6. Never hold bombs in your hand.
7. Never throw burning fireworks away. Have a bucket of water and dip them into it.
8. Never buy fireworks that are very loud. They are harmful to everybody.

Discuss safety while travelling in a vehicle. Mention the use of helmets and seat belts.

Discuss safety rules to be followed when on a visit to the zoo.

Discuss safety rules to be followed in a beach.

Discuss safety rules to be followed when visiting crowded places like exhibitions. Tell children the
importance of knowing their home address and phone number.

Discuss why they should not talk to strangers or take anything like chocolates from them.

115

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3. THE PLANTS AROUND US


Lesson overview

Teaching suggestions
Take children on a nature walk. Show them trees, herbs, shrubs, creepers and climbers. Let them
observe their stems.

Narrate the story of the King Paari, noted for his charity.
King Paari was a great Tamil King. He was a generous and kind person. Once when he was
travelling, he saw a tender jasmine climber bent down because it did not have a support. The King
got down from the chariot and left the chariot by the side of the plant for support.

Hug a tree. Take the children outdoors and let them hug a tree. This will give them an idea of the
feel and the girth of the tree. Also tell them how the Bishnois prevented the people who had come
to cut down trees by hugging the trees bravely while facing the axe.

Get a climber plant and show how tender and weak the stem is

Get a mint plant to class and let children smell the leaves.

Craft work at home. Tape a large leaf or a creeper stem with leaves to a paper. Spray paint all over
with discarded toothbrush and tea strainer. Remove leaf to get the design on paper. The same can
also be done with fabric paint on a white T-shirt.

116

TEACHERS MANUAL

4. THE WORLD OF ANIMALS


Lesson overview

Teaching suggestions
Bring out the difference between wild and domestic animals. List the uses of animals. Explain to children
the different animal homes, both natural and man-made. Draw childrens attention to the food habits of
different animals.

Animal puzzle. All children to get at least one, fairly large animal picture. Cut up the pictures into
four parts and mix up the pieces. Ask the children to join the correct parts and reform the picture.
Children exchange the sets so that everybody gets to do many puzzles.

Draw a particular part of an animal like its tail/horns or ears and ask children to guess the name

Give word jumble of simple animal names example LWFO (Wolf) BZREA (Zebra) ACT (Cat) etc.
117

FUSION

5. SEASONS
Lesson overview

Teaching suggestions

Discuss how the trees on the roadside bloom during a particular month in summer.

Get large, colourful pictures of scenery that clearly shows it is summer (flowers), monsoon, (rainy
puddles) and winter (snow) and display them in class

Talk about the seasonal fruits and vegetables. List them.

Speak about the various bird sanctuaries where migratory birds come to nest in winter from cold
places.

118

TEACHERS MANUAL

6. OUR ENVIRONMENT
Teaching suggestions
Explain to children the need for efficient waste disposal. Introduce the 3Rs (Reduce-Reuse-Recycle)
concept of waste management.

Waste separation. Have two bins labelled wet waste and dry waste. In chits of paper write banana
peel, leaves, rotten tomato, waste paper, chocolate wrapper, broken glass, broken water can etc.
Have as many chits as the number of students. Make each child pick a chit, read it out to the class
and put the waste in the correct bin.

Speak about good habits that help the environment.


1. Not wasting water, electricity, petrol, gas etc.
2. Not wasting food.
3. Reducing plastic and reusing what is possible.

Art from waste. Make children create some art work (with adult help) from some waste item like a
discarded can, bottle, a bus from a shoe box, streamers to decorate using magazine covers.

119

FUSION

TESTS

TEST
1

GOOD MANNERS

I.

II.

Rearrange these letters to form meaningful words.


1.

RROSY

2.

AEPLSE

3.

REMANNS

Match the following:


A

III.

1.

Receive a gift

a.

Please

2.

Hurt someone

b.

Thank you

3.

Want something

c.

Sorry

Fill in the blanks with please, sorry and thank you.


1.

Can you

2.

I broke your box. I am

3.

Students Name:
120

lend me your pencil for the day?


.
for the beautiful birthday gift.

Class

Sec

Date:

TEACHERS MANUAL

TEST
2

SAFETY HABITS
I.

Fill in the blanks.


1.

If we cover our face with a polythene bag then we will not get enough
.

II.

III.

2.

Sticking things in an electric socket may give us a

3.

Throwing a banana peel on the road may cause someone to

.
.

Write true (T) or false (F).


1.

Peeping into an open tank is safe and fun.

2.

We should not run on an escalator.

3.

We should cross the road at a zebra crossing.

Give quick answers.


1.

Why should we not stick our head or hand out of a moving vehicle?

2.

Why should we not lean over balcony railings?

3.

Why should we never hide inside a closed box?

Students Name:

Class

Sec

Date:
121

FUSION

TEST
3

THE PLANTS AROUND US


I.

Match the following:


A

II.

1.

Trees

a.

Hard and many woody stems

2.

Shrubs

b.

Soft, green stem

3.

Herbs

c.

Hard and strong stems

Fill in the blanks.


1.

from the seeds of plants like groundnut and

We get
mustard.

III.

2.

We get

from an acacia tree.

3.

We eat

of plants like cauliflower and broccoli.

Name the following:


1.

A plant that gives us medicine.

2.

A flower used for making perfumes.

3.

A tree whose wood is used to make furniture.

Students Name:
122

Class

Sec

Date:

TEACHERS MANUAL

TEST
4

THE WORLD OF ANIMALS


I.

Match the following:


A

II.

III.

1.

Buffalo

a.

Egg

2.

Hen

b.

Wool

3.

Sheep

c.

Milk

Encircle the correct option.


1.

The skin/dung of animals is used as manure.

2.

Elephants and giraffes are wild/pet animals.

3.

Animals like rats and snakes live in dens/burrows.

Give one word answers.


1.

What are the animals that eat only plant food known as?

2.

Name a place where wild animals are kept in enclosures for people to see.

3.

Another name for animals that live in ponds, rivers and seas.

Students Name:

Class

Sec

Date:
123

FUSION

TEST
5

SEASONS
I.

II.

Encircle the correct option.


1.

Summer is the warmest/coldest season of the year.

2.

We wear gumboots and raincoats during spring/monsoon.

3.

We use heaters in winter/summer season.

Match the following:


A

III.

1.

Summer

a.

Sweaters

2.

Winter

b.

Ponds fill up

3.

Monsoon

c.

Swimming

Give one word answers.


1.

When is it summer season in India?

2.

What do you wear during monsoon season to protect yourself from the rain?

3.

Name the season when days are short.

Students Name:
124

Class

Sec

Date:

TEACHERS MANUAL

TEST
6

OUR ENVIRONMENT
I.

II.

III.

Fill in the blanks.


1.

Vehicles and industries give out smoke that

2.

Impurities in the environment cause

3.

Aquatic animals die when the

the air.
.
is polluted.

Write true (T) or false (F).


1.

Pollution is caused by human activities.

2.

Polluted water can make us sick.

3.

Air pollution causes cough and eye infections.

Name the following:


1.

An air pollutant.

2.

A water pollutant.

3.

An effect of noise pollution.

Students Name:

Class

Sec

Date:
125

FUSION

ANSWER KEY TO TESTS


TEST 1
I. 1. Sorry

2. Please

3. Manners

II. 1. Receive a giftThank you

2. Hurt someoneSorry

3. Want somethingPlease

III. 1. Please

2. Sorry

3. Thank you

I. 1. air

2. shock

3. slip

II. 1. False

2. True

3. True

TEST 2

III. 1. We should not stick our head or hand out of a moving vehicle as we might hurt ourselves.
2. We should not lean over balcony railings as we might fall.
3. We should never hide inside a closed box as we will not get air to breathe.
TEST 3
I. 1. TreesHard and strong stems
2. ShrubsHard and many woody stems
3. HerbsSoft, green stem
II. 1. oil

2. gum

3. flowers

III. 1. Neem

2. Jasmine

3. Teak

I. 1. BuffaloMilk

2. HenEgg

3. SheepWool

II. 1. dung

2. wild

3. burrows

III. 1. Herbivorous

2. Zoo

3. Aquatic

I. 1. warmest

2. monsoon

3. winter

II. 1. SummerSwimming

2. WinterSweaters

3. MonsoonPonds fill up

III. 1. May, June, July and August

2. Raincoats

3. Winter

I. 1. pollute

2. pollution

3. water

II. 1. True

2. True

3. True

III. 1. Smoke

2. Sewage

3. Headache

TEST 4

TEST 5

TEST 6

126

TEACHERS MANUAL

ANSWER KEY TO LESSONS IN COURSE BOOK


1. GOOD MANNERS
B. 1. manners

2. polite

3. sorry

4. rude

5. thank you

C. 1. please

2. Excuse me

3. Good morning

4. sorry

5. Thank you

3. bush

4. alone

5. road

6. please

2. SAFETY HABITS
A. 1. tank, well

2. zebra

B. 1. We may get a shock

2. We may not get enough air to breathe

C. True 2, 3, 4, 5

3. THE PLANTS AROUND US


A. 1. Provide shelter, provide food

2. Carrot, potato

3. Plants with woody stems

4. Groundnut, mustard

B. 1. purify, clean

2. wood

3. jute, cotton

4. trunk

5. soil

C. 1. sunflower

2. rubber

3. tulsi

4. rose

5. bamboo

6. cotton

7. acacia

8. teak

2. flower

3. stem

4. leaves

5. fruit

D. 1. fruit
6. root
E. 1. radish and turnip

2. spinach and coriander

3. peas and beans

4. potato and ginger

5. banana and mango

4. THE WORLD OF ANIMALS


A. 1. Animals that are used to living with humans. Examples cows, horses
2. Forest, zoo

3. Fish, turtles, sharks

4. Dog, cat

5. Whales, dolphins

B. True 1, 4, 5
C. 1. flesh of animals

2. grass

D. 1. b

2. c

3. bananas

4. plants and animals

3. a

5. plants

4. e

6. grass
5. d

5. SEASONS
B. 1. Summer, winter and monsoon

2. Summer

3. Monsoon

4. Birds fly from cold places to warmer place before the start of winter.
5. They are light and dry quickly
C. 1. seasons
6. woollen

2. summer

3. monsoon

7. umbrella

8. mango

4. winter

5. hot
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FUSION

6. OUR ENVIRONMENT
A. 1. air
7. water
B. 1. d

2. water

3. air

4. noise

5. noise

6. air

3. e

4. f

5. b

6. c

8. air
2. a

C. True 3, 4, 5

ANSWER KEY TO LETS REVISE


A. True 3
False 1, 2, 4, 5, 6
B. 1. Garbage bin

2. Sorry

3. Zebra crossing

4. Good Morning

C. 1. We may not get enough air to breathe


2. Please, thank you and sorry
3. The mother dog may be around and it may bite
4. May, June, July and August
5. Things (natural and man-made), people and conditions
6. Milk
7. To see animals from different parts of the world
8. It causes cough, breathing problems, irritation of the eyes and other serious illnesses.
D. 1. YES

2. NO

3. NO

4. YES

5. NO

F. 1. wild

2. air

3. eggs

4. wax

5. weather

G. 1. cow

2. lion

3. bear

4. tomato

128

6. herb

TEACHERS MANUAL

TERM 2
GENERAL KNOWLEDGE
ANSWER KEY TO LESSONS IN COURSE BOOK
2. ANIMAL TALK
a. moos
f. howls

b. quacks
g. squeaks

c. mews
h. clucks

d. gibbers
i. brays

e. bleats

3. WHAT DO THESE ANIMALS EAT?


a. P

b. A

c. P

d. A

e. B

f. B

g. B

h. P

i. B

b. C

c. R

d. R

e. S

f. C

g. C

h. R

i. S

4. SHAPES
a. R

5. LITTLE SCIENTIST
a. sour/sweet
f. sweet

b. bitter
g. sour

c. sweet/sour
h. sour

d. sour
i. sweet

e. spicy

6. FLOWERS

a.
b.
c.
d.
e.
f.
g.
h.
i.
j.

rose
hibiscus
jasmine
lily
marigold
sunflower
tulip
lotus
aster
daisy

7. NO ELECTRICITY? NO PROBLEM
b, d, f, h, i, k
129

FUSION

8. FAMOUS PEOPLE
a. Sir M Visveswaraiah, he was the chief engineer of Krishnaraja Sagara dam.
b. Sonia Gandhi, she is the President of the Indian National Congress.
c. Lata Mangeshkar, she is the playback singer who has sung in over 36 regional Indian languages.
d. Sir C V Raman, he discovered the Raman effect.
e. Vandana Shiva, she founded the Research Foundation for Science, Technology and Ecology.
f. Priyanka Chopra, she won the Miss India and Miss World titles in 2000.
g. Rabindranath Tagore, he is the writer of the National Anthem of India and Bangladesh.
h. Azim Premji, he is the Chairman of Wipro Limited.
i. Saina Nehwal, she won the Bronze medal in badminton singles at the London Olympics in 2012.

9. STORY MATCH
b - i : The lion and the mouse

c - iii : The monkey and the crocodile

d - ii : The fox and the grapes

e - iv : The hare and the tortoise

f - v : The ant and the grasshopper

10. LETS DANCE


I. a. Manipuri

b. Bharatanatyam

c. Odissi

d. Kathakali

e. Yakshagana

f. Kathak

II. 1. c

2. f

3. a

4. b

5. e

6. d

130

TEACHERS MANUAL

TERM 3
ENGLISH

131

132

Locating
words
Filling in
blanks
Word
formation
Word power
Clozed test
adapted

4. Kashmir

Animal
words

Locating
words
Filling in
blanks
Grouping

3. Don
Quixote
and the lion

Two little
kittens

School
words

Replacing
words
Classification

2. True
Friendship

Frogs at
school

Locating
words
Cricket words
Filling in
blanks
Word power
Sports quiz

Vocabulary

1. Cricket

Lesson

Short answer
questions
Rhyming
words

Whquestions

Rearranging
sentences
Whquestions

Short answer
questions
Whquestions

Rearranging
sentences
Whquestions
True or false

Whquestions

Lengthening
an utterance
with the right
stress

Stress
pattern

Vowel
sounds

Rhyming
words

Comprehension Pronunciation

Guided
composition
(describing
a place )

Describing
an animal
Writing in
first person

Short
paragraph

Guided
composition

Composition

Confusables

Confusables

Missing
letters

Spelling

Full stops
and question
mark

Capitals

Punctuation

Asking for
information
Giving long
replies

Asking for
help and
replying

Role-play
(dialogue)
Asking for
permission

Role-play
(dialogue)
Asking for
preference

Function

Language and
grammar

May
(permission)
A little, a lot of
Opposites
Use of will
and wont

Choosing
the correct
meaning

General
present
(revision)
Manya lot
of,
Not onlybut
also,
More
prepositions
Adjectives

Matching
Articles-a,
contexts with
an, the
word meaning Simple future
(revision)
something,
anything,
nothing
Opposites

Choosing
the correct
meaning

Choosing the Articles


right meaning
a, an
Made of,
A piece of etc.
(uncountables)
One (pronoun)

Dictionary
Skill

FUSION

SCHEME OF LESSONS

TEACHERS MANUAL

LESSON PLANS
1. CRICKET
Learning objectives
Students will be able to

know more about the game of cricket

listen to the text and scan details

read the lesson with proper pronunciation

learn new words and use them in different contexts

learn to use different language functions

learn to converse politely

understand how to use vowels

join sentences

learn to use a dictionary

Introduction
Ask the students whether they like the game of cricket or not. Have them name a few famous cricketers
and ask them if they have ever been to a stadium to see a game of cricket.
Tell them about the game in brief and how it is played. If possible, have the class play a game of cricket
for a better understanding of it.
Teaching suggestions
Reading
Ask the students to read the lesson silently. Next, give each student a chance to read aloud a part of
the lesson while the others listen. List the glossed words on the board while the students read the
lesson. After the students have finished reading the lesson, you may read the lesson slowly laying
stress on the new and difficult words.
Teaching questions
Factual comprehension
1. Which game did the children of England play many years ago?
2. How did they play the game?
3. Which game was an early form of cricket?
4. Name a few countries in which the game of cricket is popular.
5. How many members does a cricket team have?
6. What is a cricket ball made up of?
7. When does a batsman score four runs?
8. When does a batsman score six runs?
9. How many umpires are there in a game of cricket these days?
10. What does the third umpire do?
11. What does an umpire do when the batsman scores four runs?
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FUSION

12. What does an umpire do when the batsman scores six runs?
13. What does an umpire do when the batsman is out?
14. What information does the scoreboard give?
15. Which team wins?
Inferential comprehension
1. How was stoolball different from the game of cricket that is played today?
2. To which team do the wicket-keeper and the bowler belong?
3. Why are umpires important to a game of cricket?
4. How many umpires would you find on the field in a game of cricket?
Critical thinking comprehension
1. Name a few famous Indian cricketers.
2. Why does the umpire signal the events of the game using his body parts?
Vocabulary
1. Most often, words are given to the students to find out the meaning. In the given exercise, meanings
of the words are given and the students will have to find out the words from the lesson. This kind
of exercise helps the students understand the words and their meanings better.
2. You can help the students to fill in the appropriate words in the blanks. Let students find out the
contextual meanings. Explain to them the meaning of the word separately and not just in the context
of the sentence in which the word is used.
3. The exercise will serve two purposes. Firstly it will have the students guessing the meaning of the
sentence and secondly it will test their spelling skills. Drop hints relating to the missing word and
let the children guess. After they have guessed the correct word, have them fill the missing alphabets
in the blanks provided.
Pronunciation
Read the rhyming words given in the list slowly and clearly. Let the students repeat after you and give
more such examples.
Listening and speaking
Read out the situations given in the exercise. Draw the attention to the polite words given in the list.
Tell them the use of please as a polite word. Let them use the given hints to converse in a manner
similar to what is given.
In this exercise one is used as a pronoun and which, as an adjective.
Language and grammar
1. Punctuation: The use of capital letters follows certain rules:
a. Begin the first letter of the first word of a sentence in capital letter.
b. I is always written in capital.
c. Proper nouns, days of the week, months of the year and names of festivals always begin with
a capital letter.
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TEACHERS MANUAL

2. The words a, an and the are called articles. A and an are called indefinite articles as they leave
the person or the thing spoken of as indefinite. The is called definite article as it points out some
particular person or thing.
These articles are very commonly used in talking and written English and therefore their usage must
be clearly explained to the students.
3. It is often cumbersome to repeat the noun of the text more than once or twice. For this reason, the
noun is often replaced with other words like one as given in the exercise. Help students understand
how and when such words can be used to make spoken and written English easy.
Dictionary skills
Demonstrate to students how to use a dictionary. A word may have more than one meaning and
you may have to explain to the students that the same word may be used in different contexts in
different situations.
Project
Encourage students to do the project forming groups. You can also have the students prepare a class
collage using the pictures brought by the students.

2. TRUE FRIENDSHIP
Learning objectives
Students will be able to

understand a popular mythological story

listen to the story and scan details

read the story with proper pronunciation

learn new words and use them in different contexts

fill in suitable words

use describing words

make sentences

learn to request politely

learn to use a dictionary

Introduction
Ask students if they are aware about the friendship and stories of Krishna and Sudama. You can tell
them more about Krishna and his life.
The story is an old mythological tale which can be enacted in the class. The story glorifies the friendship
between Krishna and Sudama and shows how true friends help each other even when one does not
talk about his problems with the other.
Teaching suggestions
Reading
Ask the students to read the lesson silently. Now randomly choose students to read aloud a
paragraph each. Do note that a student should be asked to read a paragraph fully because one full
paragraph contains one thought process or concept. As they read, you may list the glossed words
on the board.
Lay stress on the fact that the students read the dialogue with proper expressions and pronunciation.
135

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Teaching questions
Factual comprehension
1. In whose ashram did Krishna and Sudama live?
2. What did they do in the Ashram?
3. What did Krishna become after growing up?
4. What kind of life did Sudama lead?
5. Why did Sudamas wife want Sudama to go and meet Krishna?
6. What gift did Sudama take for Krishna?
7. What was Krishnas reaction when he heard that Sudama had come to meet him?
8. What did Krishna do that made Sudama feel uneasy?
9. Was Krishna happy after seeing the gift brought by Sudama?
10. Why did Sudama forget to tell Krishna why he had come to him?
11. What did Sudama see when he returned to his village?
12. What did Sudama think when he saw his wife and children again?
Inferential comprehension
1. Why did Sudama feel uneasy when Krishna was washing his feet?
2. Why was Sudama hiding the beaten rice that he had brought as a gift for Krishna?
3. How did Krishna help Sudama?
Critical thinking comprehension
1. What kind of friendship existed between Krishna and Sudama?
Vocabulary
1. You may help the students to find the words whose meanings are given in the exercise. Let
them read the paragraph containing the word and then try to link it with the meanings given in
the exercise.
2. Describing words often help to remember the characteristics of the person, animal or thing. They
help to identify the subject and also differentiate it from the others.
3. Making sentences on their own will help the students understand the meaning of the word more
properly and also relate it to contexts other than those mentioned in the lesson.
Pronunciation
Read the words given in the list slowly and clearly. Let the students repeat after you.
Each pair shows the pronunciation of vowel sound. 1, 3, 6 and 8 show similar pronunciation. 2, 4, 5
and 7 are pairs that are pronounced differently.
Listening and speaking
Read out the situations given in the exercise. Draw the attention to the polite words given in the list.
Being polite while asking and replying involves the use of many words which the students will learn from
this exercise. Have them make pairs and practise the given and more dialogues in class.
May is used for probability and for permission. Here we use may for permission.
136

TEACHERS MANUAL

Language and grammar


1. Writing the opposites of the words in the blanks when the actual words are given will first require
that the students know the meaning of the word given in the sentence (in brackets).
Discuss the meanings of the words and then find out the appropriate one-word opposites for them.
Now have the students fill in the opposite words in the blanks provided.
2. Homophones are words that are pronounced the same but have different meanings and many times
different spellings too. Homophones are used frequently while writing and speaking English.
Dictionary skills
Demonstrate to students how to use a dictionary. Draw their attention to head words. A hyphen (a
short line) is used to join two written words or parts of words, or for dividing a word at the end of a
line of writing.
Project
Encourage students to do the project forming groups. This is an effective tool for formative assessment.

FROGS AT SCHOOL
Learning objectives
Students will be able to

read the poem in rhythm

understand the meaning of new words

learn the habits of frogs

Introduction
Ask students if they have seen a frog and how it looks like. Have them relate the characteristics of frogs
to the ones given in the poem.
You may speak about the poet George Cooper.
George Cooper was a famous poet born in New York in 1840. He also wrote hymns and songs. Many
of his childrens poems have been published in the collection known as School and Home Melodies.
Teaching suggestions
Reading
Read the poem in class laying stress on the required words in each line. Read slowly so that the
students can catch the proper pronunciation of the words. List the glossed words on the board. Have
the students learn the poem and recite it with proper expressions.
Students will enjoy reading this poem about pupil frogs and the teacher frog. It says what the pupil frogs
learn, how they conduct themselves in the classroom, their uniform, the teachers strict nature and how
the students of today become teachers of tomorrow.
Let the class talk about their own experiences at school and compare them with those of the froggies.
Teaching questions
Factual comprehension
1. How many froggies went to school?
137

FUSION

2. What did the froggies wear?


3. What did the Master Bullfrog teach the froggies?
4. Where did the Master Bullfrog sit?
5. What did the froggies do when they grew up?
Inferential comprehension
1. Why did the froggies want to be in time to school?
2. Which lines tell that the Master Bullfrog was a good teacher?
3. List the rhyming words of the poem.
Critical thinking comprehension
1. Do you think froggies really study in schools?
2. Find out more about frogs and their habits.

3. DON QUIXOTE AND THE LION


Learning objectives
Students will be able to

know about a famous character

listen to the story and scan details

read the story with proper pronunciation

learn new words and use them in different contexts

learn to use different language functions

learn to reply politely

understand the use of articles

learn to use a dictionary

Introduction
Ask children about the types of books they like to read. Do they ever imagine themselves as the
character that they find very interesting? Have they ever heard about the character Don Quixote?
Tell them the story in a nut shell. They should know that it is not always wise to behave as the
characters in their books behave.
Teaching suggestions
Reading
Ask the students to read the lesson silently. Now randomly choose students to read a paragraph each.
You can also allot different students to speak the dialogues of each character of the story throughout
the lesson.
Teaching questions
Factual comprehension
1. What was the real name of Don Quixote?
2. Where did he live?
138

TEACHERS MANUAL

3. Why did he want to become a knight?


4. What was Don Quixotes full name?
5. Who agreed to be his attendant?
6. Why did Don Quixote stop the cart?
7. What was in the cart?
8. What did Don Quixote want to do with the lion?
9. Why did the two men carrying the cart not want to open it?
10. How did Sancho try to stop Don Quixote?
11. Did the lion attack Don Quixote?
12. What did the two men say when the lion did not attack Don Quixote?
Inferential comprehension
1. Was Don Quixote an intelligent man?
2. Why did the lion not attack Don Quixote?
Critical thinking comprehension
1. Was Don Quixote a real knight?
2. If Don Quixote had fought the lion, would it have been a real adventure?
Vocabulary
1. It is seen that students at this age tend to write the words as they pronounce them or hear them
being pronounced. Even a change of one alphabet might change the meaning of the word and so
the students need to know the correct spellings of common words and also understand the context
in which they are to be used.
Help the student find out the meanings of both the words given in the sentences and then choose
the word which is more appropriate in the given sentence.
2. Making sentences using words always helps the students to apply the meaning of the word to
different types of sentences and in different ways. Students should not remain limited to making
sentences in contexts similar to what are given in the book.
Encourage them to use the words in different types of sentences and experiment. Check their
sentences and see if they are using the words properly.
3. Writing the opposites of the words will first require that the students know the meaning of the words
given in the exercise.
Discuss the meanings of the words and then find out the appropriate one-word opposites for them.
Now have the students fill in the opposite words in the blanks provided.
4. As a hint, you may read the paragraph of the lesson containing the word whose meaning is given.
If students are finding it difficult to find the proper word, help them narrow down to some words and
then find the correct one.
Pronunciation
A homophone is a word that is pronounced the same as another word but both the words have
different meanings. Homophones may have the same or different spelling but will sound the same
when pronounced.
139

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Read the words given in the list slowly and clearly. Let the students repeat after you. Help the students
understand the meanings of both the words in the pair.
Listening and speaking
Read out the situations given in the exercise. The exercise will help students understand how to deliver
a negative response in a polite way.
Conduct a role play in class; give more situations for students to practise. You could use finger/glove
puppets to make the class interesting.
Language and grammar
1. The words a, an and the are called articles. A and an are called indefinite articles as the leave
the person or the thing spoken of as indefinite. The is called definite article as it points out some
particular person or thing.
These articles are very commonly used in talking and written English and therefore their usage must
be clearly explained to the students.
2. Help the students understand the meanings of both the words given and then use the appropriate
word in the given sentence.
3. Something, anything and nothing are used in different types of sentences.
Something is generally used in affirmative sentences. Affirmative sentences are those which affirm
or confirm something. Anything is generally used in negatives and questions while nothing is a clear
indicator of negatives.
Dictionary skills
A same word when used in different sentences may have the same or also different meanings. This
exercise shows the same thing for the word fine. Students can also use a dictionary to find out the
different meanings of a single word.
Project
Encourage students to do the project forming groups. They can also try to make more objects using
the same technique.

4. KASHMIR
Learning objectives
Students will be able to

learn more about Kashmir

read the lesson with proper pronunciation

learn new words and use them in different contexts

learn to use different language functions

learn to reply using proper words

match adjectives with nouns

join sentences

use punctuation marks

use a dictionary

140

TEACHERS MANUAL

Introduction
Ask students whether they have ever been to or heard about Kashmir and what they know about
the place.
On a map of India, show them the location of Kashmir. Now tell them about the special things we get
from Kashmir. Describe the climate of the place. You may also share some facts about the recent
happenings in Kashmir.
Teaching suggestions
Reading
Ask the students to read the lesson silently. Now randomly choose students to read aloud a paragraph
each. Do note that a student should be asked to read a paragraph fully because one full paragraph
contains one thought process or concept. As they read, you may list the glossed words on the board.
Teaching questions
Factual comprehension
1. What did the Mughal emperor Jehangir say to describe Kashmir?
2. Which lake is most famous in Kashmir?
3. The bridge on the lake connects the parts of which city?
4. What are houseboats?
5. Which fruits grow most in Kashmir?
6. What is saffron?
7. What is papier mache?
8. What do the people of Kashmir make?
Inferential comprehension
1. Where is Kashmir located in India?
2. On a map of India, mark the location of Kashmir.
Critical thinking comprehension
1. Describe the scenery of Kashmir.
2. Find out about the present situation of Kashmir.
Vocabulary
1. As a hint, you may read the paragraph of the lesson containing the word whose meaning is given.
If students are finding it difficult to find the proper word, help them narrow down to some words and
then find the correct one.
2. Making sentences using words always helps the students to apply the meaning of the word to
different types of sentences and in different ways. Students should not remain limited to making
sentences in contexts similar to what are given in the book.
Encourage them to use the words in different types of sentences and experiment. Check their
sentences and see if they are using the words properly.
3. Choosing the correct facts from the options given will help the students to increase their knowledge.
141

FUSION

Listening and speaking


Read out the situations given in the exercise. Draw the attention to the polite words given in the list.
Tell them that we use these words to express gratitude. Conduct a role play in class; give more
situations for students to practice. You could use finger/glove puppets to make the class interesting.
The use of Have you eaten apples? is experiential. The meaning is different from that of have in the
sentence I have finished the work.
Language and grammar
1. Noun: a noun is a word used as the name of a person, animal, place, thing or idea. It is
a naming word.
Adjective: An adjective is a word used to add something to the meaning of the noun.
An adjective may be used for one or more nouns but the students will have to mark the most
appropriate ones in the exercise given.
2. Conjunctions may be of various forms and are basically used to join two sentences together.
Punctuation
The following rules of punctuation are used in the exercise:
1. Commas are used to separate a number of things or phrases in a list. They are also used in
direct quotes.
2. A question always ends in a question mark.
Dictionary skills
Demonstrate to students how to use a dictionary.
Project
Students who might have gone to the same place for vacation can share this activity. Help them to use
new words while describing the pictures.

TWO LITTLE KITTENS


Learning objectives
Students will be able to

read the poem in rhythm

recite the poem by learning it

learn new words and use them in different contexts

know more about the habits of cats

Introduction
Ask the students if they have seen a cat and its kittens. Ask them about the behavior of cats and how
they love catching mice. You may remind them of the famous cartoon characters Tom and Jerry and
recall how they keep fighting.
You may speak about the poetess Jane Taylor.
Jane Taylor was an English poet born in 1783 in London. She and her elder sister wrote many poems
for children. One of Janes famous compositions is Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star, which she wrote at the
age of 23.
142

TEACHERS MANUAL

Teaching suggestions
Reading
Read the poem in class laying stress on the required words each line. Read slowly so that the students
can catch the proper pronunciation of the words. List the glossed words on the board. Have the students
learn the poem and recite it with proper expressions. You may play some background music to make
the recital of the poem interesting.
Teaching questions
Factual comprehension
1. When did the kittens begin to quarrel?
2. Why did the kittens begin to fight?
3. What did the old woman do with the sweeping broom?
4. How did the kittens become wet?
5. What did the kittens find better to do in the end?
Inferential comprehension
1. What was the relation between the kittens?
2. What did the kittens lose?
3. List the rhyming words of the poem.
Critical thinking comprehension
1. Describe the weather the night the kittens quarreled and fought.
2. What else do the cats like to do other than catching mice?

143

FUSION

TESTS

TEST
1

CRICKET
A.

Study the scoreboard given below and answer the questions that follow.
Scoreboard
England (1st Innings)
India (1st Innings)
V Sehwag
S Tendulkar
G Gambhir
Y Singh
M S Dhoni (C) (W)
Y Pathan
V Kohli
H Singh
Z Khan
P Chawla
M Patel

515
C.
C.

Prior
Yardy

C.
C.
C.

Bell
Yardy
Swann

B.
B.
B.
B.
B.
B.
B.
LBW B.
Run Out
Run Out
Not Out

Bresnan
Anderson
Swann
Yardy
Bresnan
Bresnan
Bresnan
Bresnan
Prior
Anderson
Extras
Total (All Out)

1.

Which two countries played this match?

2.

How many runs did England score in the first innings?

3.

How many runs did India score in the first innings?

4.

Who was the best Indian batsman in this match?

5.

Why do you say he was the best?

6.

How many batsmen were bowled out?

7.

How many batsmen were caught out?

8.

What does lbw stand for?

Students Name:
144

Class

Sec

Date:

2
31
217
54
51
40
31
8
7
17
6
44
508

TEACHERS MANUAL

TEST
2

TRUE FRIENDSHIP
A.

Fill in the blanks using the opposites of the words given in brackets.
(much) money.

1.

The king had very

2.

Sudama and his wife lived a

3.

Sudama felt

4.

Krishna was very

(easy) life.
(sad) on meeting Krishna.
(poor) while Sudama was very

(rich).

B.

5.

Sudama

6.

Sudama lived a

7.

Krishna

8.

Krishna lived

(proudly) took out the small bundle.


(sad) and

(discontented) life.

(forgot) his old friend Sudama.


(sadly) in a palace in Dwaraka.

Match the beginnings with their endings and write six sentences in the space given. Start
with a capital letter and end with a full stop or a question mark. Do not forget that names
of people also begin with capital letters.
1.

anu woke up

2.

i ate

3.

today is

4.

are you

5.

which is

6.

my best friend

Students Name:

sleeping
sunday
your favourite storybook
a chapati
in the morning
is rohan

Class

Sec

Date:
145

FUSION

TEST
3

DON QUIXOTE AND THE LION


A.

B.

Write the opposites of the following:


1.

Morning

2.

Agree

3.

Happy

4.

Shut

5.

Honest

6.

Near

Fill in the blanks with a, an or the


1.

Alonso lived in

village in Spain.

2.

Sancho Panza,

honest villager was his attendant.

3.

The leader had sent

4.

Don Quixote and Sancho saw

5.

Don Quixote asked

gift.

men to prod

lion.

men.

Answer the questions given below.


1.

Which did Alonso want to be a night or a knight?

2.

Which do we eat meet or meat?

3.

Which is a fruit a pear or a pair?

4.

Which has sixty minutes our or an hour?

5.

Which do we do to colour cloth die or dye?

6.

Which do ships sail on the sea or see?

Students Name:
146

lion as

cart with two men.

lion roared at

6.
C.

King of Spain

Class

A knight

Sec

Date:

TEACHERS MANUAL

TEST
4

KASHMIR
A.

B.

C.

Put in (.) or (?) at the end of the following sentences.


1.

The flowers look beautiful

2.

Kashmir has many lakes

3.

Have you eaten Kashmiri apples

4.

When do tourists come in large numbers

5.

Do you use saffron

6.

The fields are green

7.

Why do tourists go to Kashmir

8.

The Dal Lake is very well known

Which word in each set does not belong to Kashmir?


1.

saffron

pear

plum

mango

2.

mountains

seas

meadows

gardens

3.

snow

ice

water

cactus

4.

lakes

rivers

deserts

forests

5.

carpets

shawls

silk sarees

jute bags

Write a describing word for each of the following. Choose from the list.
1.

mountains

2.

meadows

colourful
sweet-smelling
purple

3.

gardens

delicious

4.

flowers

green
smooth

5.

apples

6.

silk sarees

7.

carpet

8.

bridges

Students Name:

long
snow-capped

Class

Sec

Date:
147

FUSION

ANSWER KEY TO TESTS


TEST 1
A. 1. India and England played this match.
2. England scored five hundred and fifteen runs in the first innings.
3. India scored five hundred and eight runs in the first innings.
4. G Gambhir was the best batsman in this match.
5. He was the best because he scored maximum runs.
6. Two batsmen were bowled out.
7. Five batsmen were caught out.
8. LBW stands for leg before wicket.
TEST 2
A. 1. Less
5. Timidly

2. Hard

3. Happy

4. Rich, Poor

6. Happy, Contended

7. Remembered

8. Happily

B. 1. Anu woke up in the morning.

2. I ate a chapati.

3. Today is Sunday.

4. Are you sleeping?

5. Which is your favourite storybook?

6. My best friend is Rohan.

TEST 3
A. 1. MorningEvening
5. HonestDishonest
B. 1. a
5. the, the
C. 2. Meat

2. AgreeDisagree

3. HappySad

4. ShutOpen

3. the, a, a

4. a

4. An hour

5. Dye

6. NearFar
2. an
6. The, the
3. A pear

6. Sea
TEST 4
A. 1. The flowers look beautiful.
2. Kashmir has many lakes.
3. Have you eaten Kashmiri apples?
4. When do tourists come in large numbers?
5. Do you use saffron?
6. The fields are green.
7. Why do tourists go to Kashmir?
8. The Dal Lake is very well known.
B. Seas, deserts, Mango, Cactus, Jute bags
C. 1. Snow-capped mountains

148

2. Green meadows

3. Colourful gardens

4. Sweet-smelling flowers

5. Delicious apples

6. Smooth silk sarees

7. Purple carpet

8. Long bridges

TEACHERS MANUAL

ANSWER KEY TO LESSONS IN COURSE BOOK


1. CRICKET
Comprehension
1. Stoolball
2. Eleven players
3. The umpire waves his right hand at shoulder level
4. When the ball flies in the air and hits the ground beyond the boundary line.
Vocabulary
I. 1. favourite

2. bowl

3. boundary line

4. umpire

5. score board

II. 1. fast

2. early

3. crease

4. leather

5. consists

III. 1. harbour

2. umpire

3. mirror

4. grass

5. shade

Language and grammar


I. 2. Delhi is the capital of India.
3. Kolkata, Mumbai, Delhi and Chennai have big airports.
4. The Andaman Islands are in the Indian Ocean.
5. Indira Gandhi was once our Prime Minister.
II. 1. a batsman
4. a cricketer

2. the boundary

3. a team

5. an expert

6. an umpire

III. 2. I like this ball, not that one.


3. Which book is thickthe blue one or the yellow one?
4. This frock is mine; that one is yours.
5. Which pencil is yours the green one or the red one?
IV. b. catch or stop a ball.

2. TRUE FRIENDSHIP
Comprehension
I. 1. Because he was poor and had very little money
2. Sudamas wife asked him to go to his rich friend Krishna and ask for help.
3. Some beaten rice
4. Krishna made a palace in the place of Sudamas small hut. His wife got a lot of jewellery and
his kids got new clothes because of Krishnas kindness.
5. Individual response.
II. True 1, 5
III. 2. His wife asked him to go to his friend Krishna.
3. Sudama went to Krishnas palace with a small bundle of beaten rice.
4. Krishna was very happy to see his friend.
149

FUSION

5. He made him sit on the throne and washed his feet.


6. He enjoyed eating the beaten rice brought by Sudama.
7. Sudama returned home and saw a palace in the place of his hut.
8. Sudama knew Krishna had brought about all this change.
Vocabulary
I. 1. contented

2. empty-handed

3. rose

4. hard

5. gift

II. The words contented, uneasy, poor, hut refer to Sudama. The words rich, joyful, palace, king refer
to Krishna.
Language and grammar
I. 1. happily
5. often
II. 1. rice

2. Many

3. little

6. ordered

7. joy

2. rise

3. knew

4. hard
4. new

III. got up

FROGS AT SCHOOL
Comprehension
1. Beside a rushy pool
2. They looked smart in their little green coats and clean white vests
3. First study and then play
4. To nobly strive, leap, dive, how to say Ker-chog and how to dodge a blow.
Lets enjoy
1. Not one dunce was in the lot, Not one lesson they forgot.
2. They became teachers of other little froggies.
Rhyming words
1. pool

2. strive

3. turn

4. clean

LISTENING TASK 1. THE DOVE AND THE BEE


SPEAKING TASK
1. It fell into a pond
2. Pulled out a leaf and dropped it near the bee
3. Got onto the leaf and reached the shore safely
4. A hunter
5. Hit the dove with his catapult
6. Stung the hunter
7. Ran away
150

5. blow

6. last

TEACHERS MANUAL

3. DON QUIXOTE AND THE LION


Comprehension
I. 1. Sancho Panza, an honest villager.
2. A lion from Africa
3. For adventure
4. He was tired
5. Because the two men told Don Quixote that the lion was afraid of him and had turned away.
II. 4, 2, 3, 5, 1
Vocabulary
I. 1. once

2. line

3. lion

4. place

III. 1. evening

2. sad

3. disagree

4. dishonest

IV. 1. adventure

2. honest

3. coward

4. beast

5. knight

Listening and speaking


It is polite to begin with Im afraid... when one wants to say something unpleasant.
Language and grammar
I. a, a, a, the, the, a, an, a, the
II. 2. tail

3. weight

4. steal

5. pray

III. Something is used in affirmative sentences.


Anything is generally used in questions and negative sentences.
1. nothing
IV. 1. c

2. something, anything
2. a

3. b

4. KASHMIR
Comprehension
1. Because they love the snow-capped mountains, the green meadows and the colourful gardens full
of sweet smelling flowers.
2. Apples, pears, plums and peaches
3. The crocus plants
4. Houseboats are big boats. They are called so because one can live in them for weeks
5. The people of Kashmir make carpets, shawls and things of papier mache of lovely colours and
designs. They weave soft and smooth silk sarees. They are also good at embroidery and woodcarving. In their free time they like to sing and dance.
Vocabulary
I. 1. lake

2. hire

3. delicious

4. bloom

III. north-east, mountains, world, tourists, mountains, flowers, famous, bridges, join, boating, big, hire,
time, bloom, carpet, air
151

FUSION

Language and grammar


I. 1. e

2. d

3. f

4. a

5. e

6. b

II. The utterance after not only should balance with that coming after but also. It is wrong to say
Kashmir is not only famous for apples but also peaches.
The two utterances in italics do not balance.
Kashmir is famous for not only apples but also peaches.
(This is acceptable)
2. Cricket is popular not only in India but also in the England.
3. Those students can speak not only English but also Hindi and Persian.
4. The Chinese used not only candles but also lamps to tell the time.
5. The woodcutter was not only young but also handsome.
III. 1. The flowers look beautiful.
2. Have you eaten Kashmiri apples?
3. When do tourists come in large numbers?
4. The fields are green.
5. Kashmir has many lakes.
IV. other parts

TWO LITTLE KITTENS


Comprehension
1. Over a mouse
2. Stormy
3. The old woman took the sweeping broom and swept the two kittens right out of the room.
4. because it was raining outside and they had nowhere to go
5. They learned not to quarrel and fight.
Lets enjoy
1. Verses 1 and 5.

2. On her sister she fell.

Rhyming words
1. fight, bright

2. that, mat

6. rain, pain

7. go, bow

3. fell, tell

LISTENING TASK 2. CRYING FOR THE MOON


SPEAKING TASK
1. The moon
2. The moon
3. No
152

4. room, groom

5. covered, suffered

TEACHERS MANUAL

4. A tub of water
5. Saw the moon in the tub of water
6. A diamond necklace

ANSWER KEY TO GRAMMAR AND LANGUAGE WORKSHEETS


1. CRICKET
II. 2. a piece of chalk

3. a bag of rice

4. a box of matches

5. a bowl of sugar

6. a cup of tea

7. a bottle of milk

8. a crate of apples

9. a heap of sand

10. an album of stamps

3. basketball

4. football

5. cricket

7. 400-metres race

8. chess

9. long jump

2. unfit

3. unseen

4. unplug
4. unclean

III. 2. hockey
6. table tennis

2. TRUE FRIENDSHIP
I. 1. unclean
5. unpack

6. unlearn

II. 1. unfit

2. unpack

3. unplug

III. 2. a lot of

3. a little

4. a little

V. 2. Yes, I will

3. No I wont

4. No, I wont

5. Im sure I will

3. DON QUIXOTE AND THE LION


I. 1. weapons

2. continents

3. countries

4. cities

5. books

6. cereals

7. insects

8. metals

9. games

10. animals

11. vehicles

12. machines

2. florist

3. flutist

4. vocalist

6. organist

7. typist

8. artist

movement

opener

careful

freedom

childhood

2. careful

3. childhood

6. movement

7. friendship

4. KASHMIR
I. 1. violinist
5. dentist
9. motorist
II. friendship
milkman
III. 1. freedom
5. opener

4. milkman

153

FUSION

TERM 3
MATHEMATICS

154

TEACHERS MANUAL

SCHEME OF LESSONS
Unit
1

Lesson
Division

No. of Periods
18

Contents
Division as Repeated
Subtraction
Properties of Division
Division Facts from
Multiplication Tables
Divide using tables
Division of a 2-digit Number
by a 1-digit Number

Fractions

10

One-half
Quarter or One-fourth
Three-fourths or
Three-quarters

Learning Outcomes
Children will be able to understand that division is repeated
subtraction
Children will be able to recall the terms related to division
Children will be able to recall and apply the properties of division
of a number by 1, itself and zero
Children will be able to deduce division facts from multiplication
tables
Children will be able to divide by recalling multiplication tables
Children will be able to divide a 2-digit number by a 1-digit number
Children will be able to analyse and solve word problems on
division
Children will be able to recall the meaning of one-half and
fraction
Children will be able to identify one-quarter
Children will be able to shade three-fourths
Children will be able to select the correct fraction

Money

10

Indian coins
Indian currency notes
Changing Rupees

Children will be able to recognise Indian currency notes and coins


Children will be able to write rupees and paise in words
Children will be able to exchange rupees with equivalent value
of coins
Changing Rupees to Paise Children will be able to change rupees into paise
Convert into Rupees
Children will be able to convert paise into rupees
Children will be able to add the values of coins and write in rupees
and paise

Time and
Calendar

10

Reading the Time When


the Minute Hand is at 12
Reading the Minutes
Reading the Time when the
Minute Hand is not at 12

Children will be able to read the time when the minute hand
is at 12
Children will be able to count in steps of 5 and calculate the minutes
Children will be able to read the time when the minute hand is
not at 12
Children will be able to recall the terms half-past, quarter-past and
quarter-to

Shapes

Sphere
Cylinder
Cone

Children will be able to recognise the curved surface of a sphere


Children will be able to give examples for a cylinder
Children will be able to identify the curved and plane surface
of a cone
Children will be able to match shapes with examples in day
to day life

155

FUSION

LESSON PLANS
1. DIVISION
Previous Knowledge
Multiplication tables till 10 10; 3-digit by 1-digit multiplication.
Teaching Aid
10 pencils, 12 chalk pieces, number and picture cards for word problems.
Concept Development

Arrange the ten pencils into sets of two.

Ask students to recall the related multiplication fact (2 5 = 10).

Tell them the related division fact. (10 2 = 5). Write the multiplication fact and the two related
division facts on the board.

Demonstrate division as repeated subtraction, by dividing 12 chalk pieces equally among any
3 students.

Repeat the activity using the 12 chalk pieces and 4 students.

Write these facts on the board. (12 3 = 4; and 12 4 = 3).

Recall the related multiplication fact (3 4 = 12).

Discuss the examples given in the lesson.

Write the terms dividend, divisor and quotient on the board, and list the relevant numerals for each
of the examples.

Guide students to complete the exercises on page 53.

Discuss the properties of division, and ask students to work out the exercises on page 55.

Demonstrate division on the number line, and help them conclude that division is the opposite of
multiplication, just as subtraction is the reverse of addition.

Let them work out the corresponding exercise.

Divide the class into 3 groups. Ask a student of group A to state a multiplication fact, for which one
student each from groups B and C will give out the corresponding two division facts. Next another
student from group B will state the multiplication fact, and so on, till all students get a chance to state
a fact. Thus they will be equipped to do the exercise on division using tables.

Guide them to complete the exercises on page 59.

Demonstrate the long division method of dividing a 2-digit number by a 1-digit number, and follow
up with the corresponding exercises as given in the lesson, in a graded manner.

While discussing example 12, motivate them to recollect that in step 2, as 1 is in the tens place,
its value is 10. This, plus the 8 in the units place of the original dividend gives 18, which is again
divided by the divisor (6) to get the quotient for this step as 3 units. When the quotient of steps 1
and 2 are combined, the final quotient is 1 ten and 3 units, that is, 13.

Discuss, and help them work out the word problems as discussed for addition, subtraction
and multiplication.

Assessment

156

Test 1

TEACHERS MANUAL

Spotlight

Ensure that students write the numerals neatly and legibly, with reference to their place value, while
doing the steps of division.

Also encourage them to cross-check by multiplication. This will help them identify any mistake.

Use the terms of division (dividend, divisor and quotient) and relate them to the numerals, frequently
during the lesson.

Glossary

Dividend the number that is divided

Divisor the number that divides

Quotient the result obtained when the divisor divides the dividend

2. FRACTIONS
Previous Knowledge
Familiarity with one-half and one-quarter.
Teaching Aid
Paper cut-outs of different regular shapes, which can be folded to show fractions; rectangular strips of
paper of different colours.
Concept Development

Introduce the term fraction. Relate it to the familiar term fracture, meaning the broken bone or the
cut, leading them gradually to a part of the whole.

Recall the meaning of half by folding the shapes and then unfolding them to show the parts.
Emphasise that all the parts must be equal. Deliberately fold a few unequally to show that the parts
formed are not one-half of the whole.

Ask them to do the exercises on page 65. They can pair-up and check their answers.

Repeat the same procedure for quarter and three-fourths.

Conduct the circle game.

Assessment

Test 2 Q. 1, 2

Spotlight

Write the terms half, halves, quarter, on the board so that students will know the correct spellings,
with the singular and plural forms.

Glossary

One-half one out of two equal halves

One-quarter one out of four equal parts

Three-quarters three parts out of four equal parts


157

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3. MONEY
Previous Knowledge
Recognition of currency notes and coins used in India, symbol for rupee and paise.
Teaching Aid
Laminated specimen currency notes, or play money.
Concept Development

Introduce the topic by discussing the need to buy articles. Mention that in earlier days, the barter
system was prevalent, where people would exchange one item for another.

Explain why this is not possible now as our needs are complex.

Recall the prevailing currency notes and coins. Help them recall that one rupee = 100 paise.

Recall the symbol for rupees and paise. Demonstrate how a combination of rupees and paise is
represented by using a dot.

Guide them to work out the exercises on page 71 and 72.

Discuss the example on changing rupees and guide them to work out the exercises on page 74
and 75.

Recall quick multiplication by 10 and 100, and guide them to work out the exercises on page 76.

Show them how to place the dot, and convert paise to rupees. (They will learn the concept of
decimals in higher grades.)

Assessment

Test 2 Q. 3, 4, 5

Spotlight

Depending on the level of exposure of your students, you could also refer to the terms credit card
and debit card, and explain their meaning and use, in a simple manner.

You could discuss the value of money while doing this lesson, and inculcate the idea that it is wise
to spend within ones means.

Project

Find out the currencies used in any two other countries.

4. TIME AND CALENDAR


Previous Knowledge
Familiarity with reading clock half past the hour; days of the week and months of the year.
Teaching Aid
Clock-face, calendar for the current year.
Concept Development

Help students recall the minute and hour hands of a clock and guide them to complete the exercises
on page 78.

Help them recall 5 times table, relate it with the movement of the minute hand and help them
complete the exercises on page 79.

158

TEACHERS MANUAL

Discuss the examples and the exercises on page 80.

Discuss half-past the hour, quarter to and quarter past the hour. Relate these to what they learned
under Fractions.

Ask students to complete the exercises on page 82.

Conduct lab activity on Time and Calendar with reference to the calendar given on page 83 of
the lesson.

Guide them to complete the exercises on page 84.

Assessment

Test 3 Q. 1-4

Spotlight
Make students experience the value of 1 minute.
Instruct students that when you clap your hands once (that is, when the minute hand is at 12), they
have to place their hands on their lap and look at the clock in the classroom. They need to silently,
without any movement, watch the minute hand till you clap next, that is, when it comes back to 12 after
one full round.

5. SHAPES
Previous Knowledge
Familiarity with plane and solid figures.
Teaching Aid
Solid figures cuboid, cube, sphere, cylinder, cone.
Concept Development

Have a quick recall of the solid shapes cuboid and cube, and point out the faces, edges and
vertices.

Show them the sphere and elicit the differences between this and the cube or cuboid.

Similarly discuss the features of a cylinder and cone.

Elicit examples of similar shapes in daily use.

Guide them to complete the exercises.

Conduct lab activity Feel and tell.

Assessment

Test 3 Q. 5, 6

Spotlight

Encourage students to relate the classroom lesson to their daily life for every topic. Let them relate
the lesson to the shapes they see at home and in school. This will indirectly help them develop the
ability to relate facts, which is an essential life-skill. The sense of awareness and observation
inculcated in this young age will help them through their lives.

Glossary
Plane surface: a surface over which the palm can be placed straight without curving
Curved surface: the fingers need to be curled while placing the hand on a curved surface
159

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MATH LAB ACTIVITIESFORMATIVE ASSESSMENT


Activity 1: Large group activity Number Game
Concept: Speed Multiplication, addition and Subtraction
Aim of the activity: To perform quick computation
Things required: 20 Question cards as suggested below (you can use blank visiting cards for this
purpose)
1.

Star card I have 5. Who has this number 6?

2.

I have 30. Who has this number

20?

3.

I have 10. Who has this number

10?

4.

I have 0. Who has this number

3?

5.

I have 3. Who has this number

9?

6.

I have 27. Who has this number

2?

7.

I have 25. Who has this number

10?

8.

I have 15. Who has this number

8?

9.

I have 7. Who has this number

4?

10. I have 28. Who has this number

20?

11. I have 8. Who has this number

5?

12. I have 40. Who has this number

20?

13. I have 20. Who has this number

4?

14. I have 24. Who has this number

2?

15. I have 22. Who has this number

10?

16. I have 12. Who has this number

3?

17. I have 9. Who has this number

7?

18. I have 63. Who has this number

3?

19. I have 60. Who has this number

30?

20. I have 30. Who has this number

9?

I have 5. Who has


this number 6?

I have 30. Who has


this number 20?

Preparation
Prepare question cards, each card having a question from the box above.
Procedure
a.

Form a large circle with all the students, including teacher.

b.

As there are 20 questions, the game is ideal for 20 people. Some of the students can be paired,
or more questions can be framed.

c.

Distribute one card to each student/pair.

d.

The student with the star card has to start the game

e.

All the students are instructed to listen attentively, work out the answer and look at their cards.

f.

The student who has the answer to the first students question will take over and read what is
written in her card.

160

TEACHERS MANUAL

g.

As each question is answered, the cards are handed over to the teacher.

h.

The game continues till all the cards are collected by the teacher.

Teachers note
i.

There might be some confusion of roles in the first round. The collected cards can be shuffled and
redistributed and the game repeated.

ii.

This number game reinforces basic computational skills, and motivates students to perform quick
mental calculations.

iii.

You could prepare a similar set of question cards including division too.

Activity 2: Individual/Pair activity Calendar Fun


Concept: Time and calendar
Aim of the activity: To develop the ability to read a calendar
Things required: Calendar sheet (given on page 83 of the book), copies of the following worksheet
Procedure:
a. Distribute a copy of the worksheet to each student or student pair.
b. Instruct students to refer to the calendar page of their books and guide them to answer the
questions therein.
Calendar Fun
Look at the calendar for 2014, and answer the following:
1. The date on the first Monday of June:
2. The number of Sundays in September:
3. The number of days in February:
4. Is this a leap year?
5. Complete the following table:
Importance

Date

Day of the week

Gandhi Jayanthi
15th August
Childrens Day
5th September
25th December
Republic Day
National Science Day

February 28th

Your birthday

161

FUSION

Activity 3: Large group activity Feel and tell


Concept: Shapes
Aim of the activity: To develop the skill of recognising and naming shapes without actually seeing
them, and to relate with daily life examples
Things required: cubes, spheres, cylinders, cones, cuboids (empty cartons, tins, pencils, and so on
could be used); a clean towel for blindfolding.
Procedure
a.

Ask two students to come forward; blindfold one


of them

b.

Ask the partner to select any shape and give it


to student 1.

c.

Student 1 will feel the object and say its shape. If she faces difficulty, student 1 can describe
the object.

d.

Student 2 will give a daily life example of that shape.

e.

The activity can be repeated with other student pairs.

Teachers note
i.

162

In class, there is a tendency for the same students to volunteer for all activities. Ensure participation
of other students too. If students know their roll numbers, you could call out the roll numbers of
those students who are usually not very active.

TEACHERS MANUAL

TESTS

TEST
1

DIVISION
1.

Fill in the boxes.


a.

4 7 =

b.

3 9 =

c.

d.

0 5 =

e.

28 4 =

28 7 =

3 = 9

27 9 =

= 1

= 6

2. Divide using the number line.


a.
16

10 11 12 13 14 15 16

10 11 12 13 14 15

b.
12

3.

Divide using multiplication tables.


a.

49 7 =

c.

56 8 =

b.

32 4 =

d.

36 9 =
163

FUSION

4.

Divide, by long division method.


a.

b.
3) 8 1

b.
4) 7 6

6) 7 2

5.

63 stamps are divided equally among 7 boys. How many did each one get?

6.

52 balls are packed equally in 4 boxes. How many balls are there in each box?

7.

36 rose plants were planted equally in 6 rows. How many plants were there in each row?

164

TEACHERS MANUAL

TEST
2

FRACTIONS, MONEY
1. Tick the shapes that are one-quarter shaded.
a.

b.

c.

d.

c.

d.

2. Shade to show the fractions given below each:


a.

b.

3. Write the total value of the following

a.

b.

c.

165

FUSION

4.

5.

166

Convert into paise.


a.

` 6

b.

` 4.25

c.

` 3.50

d.

` 10

Convert into rupees and paise.


a.

125 p

b.

750 p

c.

800 p

d.

575 p

TEACHERS MANUAL

TIME AND CALENDAR, SHAPES


1.

Write the time shown by the following clocks.


a.
b.

2.

Draw the hands in the clocks to show the time given below.
a.

b.

Quarter to three

Quarter past 7

c.

d.

Half past nine


3.

TEST
3

4:40

Match the following:


a. 60 seconds

i.

1 year

b. 24 hours

ii.

1 century

c. 100 years

iii. 1 week

d. 7 days

iv. 1 minute

e. 12 months

v.

1 day
167

FUSION

4.

5.

Complete the following:


a.

4th month of the year

b.

Month with smallest number of days

c.

7th month of the year

d.

Last month of the year

e.

Month in which you were born.

Write the shapes of the following:


b.

a.

6.

c.

Who am I?
a.

I have one curved surface and one flat surface

b.

I have two flat surfaces

c.

I have no corners or edges.

ANSWER KEY TO TEST


Test 1
1. a. 4 7 = 28,
28 4 = 7,
28 7 = 4
b. 3 9 = 27,
27 3 = 9,
27 9 = 3

3. a. 7
c. 7
4. a. 27

b. 8
d. 4
b. 19

4. a. 600 p
c. 12

5. 9

168

b. 3

d. 1000 p

5. a. ` 1.25

b. ` 7.50

c. ` 8.00

d. ` 5.75

b. February
c. July
d. December
5. a. cylinder
c. cube

Test 2
1. a, d
3. a. ` 2

4. a. April

b. sphere

Test 3

7. 6

d. 0 5 = 0

2. a. 4

c. 350 p

6. 13

c. 8 8 = 1
e. 6 1 = 6

b. 425 p

b. ` 15 c. ` 30

1. a. 11.45

b. 2.30

3. a. iv

b. v

d. iii

e. i

c. ii

6. a. cone
b. cylinder
c. sphere

TEACHERS MANUAL

TERM 3
ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

169

FUSION

SCHEME OF LESSONS
Lesson
1. Things
around us

Lesson Contents
Natural things
Man-made things
Environment

2. Water

Aquatic plants
Aquatic animals

Water birds
Marine animals
Uses of water
Safety near water

3. The universe

Moon

Horizon

Things made
of stone

170

Children will be able to recognise that natural things are


the things around them that are part of nature.
Children will be able to identify that things around them
that are not part of nature are man-made things.
Children will be able to infer that all things, people, plants
and animals around them together make the environment.
Children will be able to appreciate the diversity of the
things around us and the need to protect our environment.

Evaluation
Exercise A - Q 1 and 2,
Exercise B (FA)
Exercise A - Q 4,
Exercise B (FA)
Exercise A - Q 3,
Exercise B (FA)

Children will be able to identify some aquatic plants.


Exercise B - Q 1 (FA)
Children will be able to understand that aquatic animals
are the animals that live partially or fully in water.
Children will be able to identify the various aquatic animals. Exercise B - Q 1 and 2 (FA)
Children will be able to recall that the birds which live near Exercise B - Q 4,
the sources of water are called water birds.
Exercise D - Q 1 (FA)
Children will be able to recall that the animals that live in
Exercise D - Q 2 and 3 (FA)
seas and oceans are called marine animals.
Children will be able to appreciate the various uses of water.
Exercise D - Q 4 (FA)
Children will be able to recall the safety rules to be
Exercise D - Q 5 (FA)
followed when they are near water.
Children will be able to recall the composition of the earth.
Children will be able to explain the characteristics of the sun.

Stars

4. The materials
we use

Learning Outcomes

Children will be able to understand why the stars appear


so small and are twinkling in the sky.
Children will be able to infer that the moon does not have
light of its own and shines when the light of the sun
falls on it.
Children will be able to explain the characteristics of the
moon.
Children will be able to identify the horizon and recall that
the sun rises in the eastern and sets in the western horizon.
Children will be able to wonder at the vastness of the universe.

Children will be able to infer that stone is a heavy and


hard material.
Children will be able to identify the various objects made
of stone.
Things made of wood Children will be able to infer that wood is obtained from trees.
Things made
Children will be able to identify the various objects made
of metals
from different materials.
Things made of clay Children will be able to understand that clay is the sticky
and elastic part of the top soil.
Children will be able to recognise the various objects
made of clay.
Things made of cloth Children will be able to identify the different types of
materials used to make cloth.
Things made
Children will be able to infer that plastic is a man-made
of plastic
material.
Children will be able to identify the various types of objects
made out of plastic.

Exercise B - Q 1, D - Q 3 (FA)
Exercise A - Q 1 - 4, B - Q 2
Exercise D - 1, 4 (FA)
Exercise D - Q 6 (FA)
Exercise B - Q 4 (FA)

Exercise A - Q 5, B - Q 6
Exercise D - Q 5 (FA)

Exercise B (FA)

Exercise A, Exercise B,
Exercise C - Q 4 (FA)

Exercise A, Exercise B (FA)


Exercise A, Exercise B (FA)

Exercise A,
Exercise C - Q 2 (FA)

TEACHERS MANUAL

Lesson

5. Our nation

Lesson Contents

Evaluation

Things made
of glass

Children will be able to explain that glass is a material


Exercise C - Q 3 (FA)
made in factories.
Children will be able to identify the various types of objects Exercise A (FA)
made out of glass.
Children will be able to appreciate the variety in the texture,
strength and other properties of the materials that we use.

India
National flag

Children will be able to recall that the capital of India is Delhi.


Children will be able to identify the national flag of India.
Children will be able to understand the meaning of the
different colours in the national flag.
Children will be able to identify the national anthem of India
and recall that it was written by Rabindranath Tagore.
Children will be able to recognise the national emblem of India.
Children will be able to identify the national animal,
national bird and the national flower of India.
Children will be able to develop a sense of national pride.

National anthem
National emblem
Other symbols
of India

6. Our national
festivals

Learning Outcomes

Independence day

Republic day

Gandhi Jayanti

Children will be able to recall that Independence day was


the day India became free from British rule.
Children will be able to recall the various activites related
to the Independence day.
Children will be able to recognise the day on which
Republic day is celebrated.
Children will be able to recall the activities related to
the Republic day.
Children will be able to recognise the day on which
Gandhi Jayanti is celebrated.
Children will be able to recall facts related to
Mahatma Gandhi.
Children will be able to recall activities related to
Gandhi Jayanti.
Children will be able to develop a sense of respect for the
Father of our Nation.
Children will be able to develop a spirit of patriotism.

Exercise A - Q 2 (FA)
Exercise B, Exercise C (FA)
Exercise A - Q 3 (FA)

Exercise A - Q 4
Exercise F (FA)

Exercise A - Q 1, 2, Exercise B,
Exercise C - Q 3 (FA)

Exercise A - Q 1, 3, Exercise B,
Exercise C - Q 1 (FA)
Exercise A - Q 1, 5,
Exercise B (FA)
Exercise A - Q 4,
Exercise C - Q 4 (FA)
Exercise A - Q 6,
Exercise C - Q 2 (FA)

171

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LESSON PLANS
1. THINGS AROUND US
Lesson overview

Teaching suggestions

Play this game outdoors. Children sit around in a circle. One person begins the game asking a riddle.
For example, I use it to write.
What am I? Am I a natural or man-made thing?
All children get a turn to pose the question and ask the rest of the class to find the object in the
environment that they had chosen. Only the last line changes as children give the clue and say if
it is natural or man-made.

172

Spot the differences. Children to get a cutting of the Spot the difference pictures from newspapers.
Each group to look at the things in the picture and spot the differences.

TEACHERS MANUAL

2. WATER
Lesson overview

Teaching suggestions
Explain to children about the different animals that live in water. Let them list the uses of water. Ask
them to list a few water-saving measures they take at home.

If possible, get in a bottle, some pond water with tadpoles in it.

Get an aquatic plant from an aquarium and show how it stays up in water. Leave the plant in class
and let children watch it grow.

Make a chart of all sea animals.

Tell the story of the Monster in the Pond


It was a pretty, little pond in the middle of nowhere. The waters were clean and plenty of white lilies
bloomed in it. The pond was home to many fish and water snakes. It was lush green all around the
173

FUSION

pond. Lots and lots of insects, toads, frogs, snakes, lizards and birds thrived in that environment.
Everything there, was in balance and peaceful.
One day a washerman from the village came down with a big bundle of clothes. He got into the clean
water and started to wash the clothes. The animals were all very upset. They didnt like this intruder
one bit. The man started to come every day. And every day he brought a big bundle of clothes and
a big bar of soap. He washed the clothes in the pond and dried them all around.
Soon the water was so polluted with soap and dirt that the small plants and the very tiny creatures
that lived on the water surface died. Soapy foams were floating all over and even the big fish found
it hard to breathe.
All the creatures were so worried that they got together for a meeting.
We must find a way to drive this man out, they said. Or none of us will be around in another
month. They discussed many ideas but nothing seemed good enough.
Finally, an old frog came up with a clever plan. My plan will succeed only if all the little mollies and
guppies in the pond cooperate. She said. The little fishes were quite excited to hear that. Tell us
what we should do, they said in chorus.
The next day the washerman came to the pond as usual. But when he got into the water he saw
a new animal swimming around. The water was so full of soap bubbles that he could not see the
creature clearly. All he noticed was that it was dark and big and looked like a strange crocodile. He
was so scared that he left his bundle and ran all the way, back to the village.
The villagers heard his story with interest. And they were all curious to see the monster. But since
they had much work to do in the fields, they decided to go over whenever they were free. Thus they
went to the pond at different times.
It looked like a big, dark cloud, said one, with eyes wide with surprise and, hands stretched from
side to side.
No, I went and saw it just yesterday. It was like a long, black snake, said another.
No! It is a giant crocodile insisted another. I saw the snout!
I went early in the morning and didnt see anything. I only saw lots of tiny fish. said another,
puzzled person.
As each one had a different story to tell, the villagers were convinced it was a magical monster; a
monster that could change its shape and even become invisible.
Soon people started making up stories about how they saw the monster pull an eagle down, from
the sky and eat it; and how the pond water sometimes turns red, with the blood of all the animals
that it eats!
The upshot of it all was that after that day, no one dared to go near the pond, let alone wash clothes
in it! And the place became clean and beautiful, once again.
Did you guess what the monster in the pond was? It was a trick by the fish. They all swam together
under water and formed the shape of a huge animal! And from above it did look like here was a
big black monster down! This story also shows that unity is strength.
174

TEACHERS MANUAL

3. THE UNIVERSE
Lesson overview

Teaching suggestions

Plan a visit to the planetarium if there is one in your town/city.

Ask children to get pictures related to the moon landing and other space missions. Let them make
a chart with all pictures.

Tell children why it is cold, dark and silent when one travels out into space. Also speak about things
being weightless in space.

175

FUSION

4. THE MATERIALS WE USE


Lesson overview

Teaching suggestions

In a cloth bag, put together different items like pen, pencil, paper, stone, wooden toy, block, sponge,
chalk, spoon, plastic item, clip, comb, safety pin, etc. Children should be blindfolded and made to
feel and pick out the item that is mentioned within a count of ten.

Make oral lists of things that are made of each of these materials.
Paper (paper cups, plates, books, tissues, papier-mch items, bags, envelopes, cartons etc.)
Cloth (dresses, curtains, sheets, beds, bandage material, tents, nets, etc.)
Mud (cups and saucers, plates, spoons, figures, tiles, brick, flower pots, cooking pots, water
pots, etc.)
Metal (cars, planes, vessels, bell, construction rods, pins, needles, etc.)

176

TEACHERS MANUAL

5. OUR NATION
Lesson overview

Teaching suggestions

Prepare a chart of an outline map of India showing important cities, rivers and mountains.

Get children to bring pictures of important monuments in India. Show them to all.

Get children to make a scrapbook with pictures.

Get children to speak about the places that they have visited. And also show and tell some special
item that was bought in a particular place (like a marble item in Agra or a sandalwood item in
Bengaluru).

177

FUSION

6. OUR NATIONAL FESTIVALS


Lesson overview

Get a video tape of the Republic Day parade and show it to class.

Teach children to sing patriotic songs like Saare jahan se achcha...

178

TEACHERS MANUAL

TESTS

TEST
1

THINGS AROUND US

I.

II.

III.

Encircle the correct option.


1.

Roads, buildings and machines are man-made/natural things.

2.

Rain/Paper is a man-made thing.

3.

Vehicles/Mountains are a part of nature.

Rearrange the letters to form meaningful words.


1.

TUNARE

2.

VNEIRNOMENT

3.

NUOSURRDING

Match the following:


A

1.

Clothes we wear

a.

Environment

2.

The sun and the moon

b.

Man-made

3.

All things around us

c.

Natural

Students Name:

Class

Sec

Date:
179

FUSION

TEST
2

WATER

I.

Fill in the blanks.


1.

Two examples of sources of water are

and

.
2.

The two forms in which we lose water from our body are

and

.
3.

II.

We cannot drink water from the sea or ocean because it is

Write down three tips to save water.


1.
2.
3.

III.

Match the following:


A
1.

Duck

a.

Aquatic plant

2.

Whale

b.

Webbed feet

3.

Lotus

c.

Marine animal

Students Name:
180

Class

Sec

Date:

TEACHERS MANUAL

TEST
3

THE UNIVERSE
I.

II.

III.

Fill in the blanks.


1.

The sun, the moon and the stars are together called

2.

The

is the brightest object in the sky.

3.

The

is the earths nearest neighbour.

Name the following:


1.

The line at which the sky and water appear to meet.

2.

The name given to the moon that appears as a full circle.

3.

The direction in which the sun sets.

Match the following:


A

1.

Earth

a.

Astronaut

2.

The sun

b.

Round

3.

Space craft

c.

Yellowish-orange

Students Name:

Class

Sec

Date:
181

FUSION

TEST
4

THE MATERIALS WE USE

I.

Match the following:


A

II.

1.

Bulb

a.

Terracotta

2.

Baked clay

b.

Metal

3.

Brass

c.

Glass

Fill in the blanks.


1.

The earth is made up of

2.

Wet clay is

and elastic.

Write true (T) or false (F).


1.

Stone and wood are natural materials.

2.

All things are made of man-made materials.

3.

Porcelain crockery is made of wood.

Students Name:
182

is the hardest natural material on earth.

3.

III.

and

Class

Sec

Date:

TEACHERS MANUAL

TEST
5

OUR NATION
I.

II.

Fill in the blanks.


National symbols are symbols of

2.

Saffron colour in our national flag stands for

3.

is the capital of India.

Match the following:


A

III.

1.

1.

Jana Gana Mana

a.

Truth alone triumphs

2.

Ashoka Chakra

b.

Rabindranath Tagore

3.

Satyameva Jayathe

c.

24 spokes

Name the following:


1.

National animal of India.

2.

National bird of India.

3.

National flower of India.

Students Name:

Class

Sec

Date:
183

FUSION

TEST
6

OUR NATIONAL FESTIVALS


I.

Fill in the blanks.


1.

Festivals celebrated by all Indians are known as


festivals.

2.

Our national festivals are

II.

Match the following:


B

1.

Independence Day

a.

2 October

2.

Gandhi Jayanti

b.

26 January

3.

Republic Day

c.

15 August

Give one word answers.


1.

Who is also known as the Father of our Nation?

2.

Who takes the salute of the Republic Day parade?

3.

Who hoists the National Flag at the Red Fort on Independence Day?

Students Name:
184

every year.

Republic Day is celebrated on

III.

Day,

Jayanti.

and
3.

Day,

Class

Sec

Date:

TEACHERS MANUAL

ANSWER KEY TO TESTS


TEST 1
I. 1. Man-made

2. Paper

3. Mountains

II. 1. Nature

2. Environment

3. Surrounding

III. 1. Clothes we wearMan-made

2. The Sun and the moonNatural

3. All things around usEnvironment


TEST 2
I. 1. Ponds and lakes

2. Urine and sweat

3. Salty

II. 1. We should not waste water while brushing our teeth.


2. We should repair leaking taps.
3. We can use the water left in our water bottle after school to water plants.
III. 1. DuckWebbed feet

2. WhaleMarine animal

3. LotusAquatic plant

I. 1. Universe

2. sun

3. moon

II. 1. Horizon

2. Full moon

3. West

III. 1. EarthRound

2. The SunYellowish-orange 3. Space craftAstronaut

TEST 3

TEST 4
I. 1. BulbGlass

2. Baked clayTerracotta

3. BrassMetal

II. 1. land, water

2. sticky

3. Diamond

III. 1. True

2. False

3. False

2. Courage

3. Delhi

TEST 5
I. 1. Freedom

II. 1. Jana Gana ManaRabindranath Tagore


2. Ashoka Chakra24 spokes
3. Satyameva JayatheTruth alone triumphs
III. 1. Royal Bengal tiger

2. Peacock

3. Lotus

TEST 6
I. 1. national
3. 26 January

2. Independence Day, Republic Day and Gandhi Jayanti

II. 1. Independence Day15 August

2. Gandhi jayanti2 October

3. Republic Day26 January

III. 1. Mahatma Gandhi

2. The President of India

3. The Prime Minister


185

FUSION

ANSWER KEY TO LESSONS IN COURSE BOOK


1. THINGS AROUND US
A. 1. Some of the things around us like trees, animals, land, water, mountains, rain, the sun, the moon
and the stars are part of nature. These are natural things.
2. Yes
3. Things, people, plants and animals. All of these together make our environment.
4. Roads, buildings, machines.
B. True 1, 2, 4, 6
C. 1. nature 2. natural

3. environment

2. WATER
A. 1. aquatic

2. lotus

3. frog

4. crocodile

5. turtle

B. 1. algae

2. fish

3. hippopotamus

4. crane

5. duck

6. hippopotamus

C. True 3, 4, 5
D. 1. Crane and stork
2. In seas and oceans
3. Whale, octopus, shark
4. We use water for bathing. We wash clothes and utensils with water. We need water for cooking
and cleaning. We need it to water our plants.
5. No.

3. THE UNIVERSE
A. 1. fire

2. east, west

3. yellowish-orange

4. heat, light

3. Land and water

4. The sun

5. full

B. True 1, 2, 4, 5
D. 1. The sun
5. The moon

2. Light

6. Because they are far away.

4. THE MATERIALS WE USE


A. metal, glass, wood, plastic, clay, wool, silk, cotton
B. 1. heavy

2. wood

3. care

4. clay

5. metal

C. 1. Stone, metal, paper

2. Chair, bucket

3. Glass, plastic

4. Iron, copper.

D. 1. stone

3. metal

4. glass

5. paper

2. wood

6. plastic

5. OUR NATION
A. 1. Indians

2. Delhi

3. Rabindranath Tagore

4. National flag and national anthem

C. 1. Saffron

2. Green

3. Navy blue

4. 24

186

TEACHERS MANUAL

E. 1. India
5. purity
F. 1. mango

2. Indians

3. symbols

4. saffron

6. white

7. green

8. Delhi

2. banyan

3. hockey

4. Vande Mataram

6. OUR NATIONAL FESTIVALS


A. 1. Independence Day, Republic Day and Gandhi Jayanti
2. The Prime Minister
3. 26 January, 1950
4. Mahatma Gandhi
5. Mahatma Gandhi was born on this day
6. In New Delhi
B. January 26, August 15, October 2
C. 1. President

2. Delhi

3. 15th August, 1947

4. non-violent, simple

D. 1. nation

2. independent

3. Republic

4. Gandhi

6. parade

7. freedom

8. flag

5. President

ANSWER KEY TO LETS REVISE


A. 1. sun, tree, water
2. whale, dolphin, shark
3. sun, moon, Earth
4. gold, copper, iron
5. Independence Day, Republic Day, Gandhi Jayanti
6. plastic, glass, paper
B. 1. man-made

2. moon

3. peacock

4. 2nd

5. an aquatic

2. T

3. F

4. F

5. F

6. heavy
C. 1. F
D. 1. 15 August
2. He advised the people of India to be non-violent and simple
3. Things that are not part of nature
4. Diamond
E. 1. wood

2. glass

3. terracotta

4. cloth

5. plastic

2. Tiger

3. Peacock

4. Rajghat

5. clay

6. stone
F. 1. New Delhi

187

FUSION

TERM 3
GENERAL KNOWLEDGE
ANSWER KEY TO LESSONS IN COURSE BOOK
1. FLYING WONDERS
1. a. flamingo
2. d and g

b. kiwi

c. peacock

d. duck

2. ANIMALS IN DANGER
1. a. tiger
2. a. dinosaur

b. panda
b. dodo

c. rhinoceros
c. mammoth

d. orangutan

e. blue whale

3. CAPITALS
1. a. iii
b. viii
2. Anuj
3. a. Puducherry

c. iv

d. v

b. Chandigarh

e. vi

f. ii

g. i

h. vii

c. Kavaratti

4. LANGUAGES OF THE WORLD


d. Hindi and English

5. POPULAR SNACKS
1. a. pani puri
2. a. chola bhatura

b. small, hard puri


b. idli sambar

c. papad
c. puri bhaji

d. Gujarat

e. pav

6. RIVERS
1. a. Sharavati
2. a. Tapi

b. Ganga
b. Kaveri

c. Yamuna
c. Kosi

d. Mahanadi
d. Krishna

e. Hugli
e. Narmada

f. Godavari

7. POLLUTION
Tick b, c, f

Cross a, d, e, g, h, i

8. FAMOUS MUSICIANS
1. a. Hariprasad Chaurasia
3. a. Ustad Bismillah Khan
5. a. Anoushka Shankar

b. flute
b. shehnai
b. sitar

2. a. Shiv Kumar Sharma


4. a. Zakir Hussain
6. a. Palghat Mani Iyer

b. santoor
b. tabla
b. mridangam

9. OUR HERITAGE
1. a. Bijapur
2. b, e, f, g

b. Mumbai

c. Delhi

d. Hyderabad

e. Madurai

f. Sanchi

10. SPORTS STARS


a. football
f. shooting
188

b. badminton
g. cricket

c. tennis
h. athletics

d. weightlifting

e. boxing