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Central Coast

September 2014
Central Coast Family
Free!
Inside

Community ........................... 2
Library Voice ......................... 4
Child Development ...... 6
Fun & Games ........................ 8
Money ......................................... 10
Local History ....................... 12
Wordmonger ..................... 14
Calendar .................................. 17
Family Events ..................... 18
Local Resources ............. 20
Maker Movement ........... 22
Peace / Depression / Sleep Safety / SLO Founders / SLO Maker Movement / Aikido of SLO Pg2
Central Coast Family • September 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 2
Central Coast Family
TM
PO Box 6424, Los Osos, CA 93412
Phone: (805) 528-0440 Fax: (805) 439-0798
Our goal is to connect Central Coast families with the resources they need to thrive!

Central Coast Family

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PUBLISHER
David Vogel
ccfamilypb@gmail.com
EDITOR
Patrice Vogel
ccfamilyed@gmail.com
ASSOCIATE EDITOR
Claire Vogel
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Inquiries:
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DISTRIBUTION MANAGER
Eric Woodards
CONTRIBUTING WRITERS
Kristen Barnhart, Jennifer Best, Guy Crabb, Kerrin Edmonds,
Molly Peoples, CS Perryess, Walter Reil, Steven Smith, David Vogel
GRAPHIC DESIGN
Out of the Blue
CCF
Community
Cover Photo:
Youth Class at Aikido of SLO
© Sullivan Studios
www.sullivanstudios.biz
Aikido of SLO
The group is in utter chaos –
or so it seems. Boys and girls
are running in all directions,
miraculously avoiding collisions
as they jump, spin, whirl, and dash
around erratically. Suddenly the
entire room is still! Every single
child has stopped on a dime and
turned to face the same direction,
looking completely calm, focused,
aware, and alert. A smiling white-
haired woman says, “OK, go for it
again!” The group abruptly bursts
into another round of apparent
mayhem.
This time, after a repeat of their
astonishing shift from chaos to
calm at the sound of one clap, she
says, “Follow Luna,” and a young
girl begins her turn at leadership,
confident her classmates will
file in behind her and copy her
spontaneous movements. And
so it continues with each child
having a turn.
Do these children understand
the significance of their ability
to instantly shift from one body
state to another? Perhaps some
do. But most of them are really
just too busy having fun as they
develop what their parents
know are important life skills.
As Erin O’Donnell, Luna’s mom
explains, “Luna is learning to take
a leadership role and grow her
self-confidence. She is learning
cooperation, caring, and self-
calming.” For her part, five-year-
old Luna sees it this way: “I like
demonstrating Aikido moves and
playing games!” As eight-year-old
Devon puts it, “When I do Aikido,
I feel good inside.”
Aikido (“eye-key-doe”) is a
peace-oriented martial art based
on principles of harmonious
relationship—within self, with
others, and with life itself. There
are no contests or tournaments,
so children never have to ‘defeat’
their classmates or worry about
losing. “Everything taught here
is about peaceful power,” says
instructor Mary Tesoro. “As a
martial art, Aikido has many
aspects, so it can be taught
in many ways, depending on
what people want to focus
on. In this class, we focus on
helping children learn that their
true self-worth comes from an
internal sense of power, not from
outperforming others. We switch
the emphasis from winners and
losers to cooperative learning,
with everyone sharing the goal of
achieving their own highest level
of excellence.” This emphasis is
clear in the children’s comments,
which lack reference to whether
they won or lost something. As
six-year old Lila will tell you, “In
Aikido we learn new things. I have
learned backward and forward
rolls. The 2-step is fun to do with
someone else and I have learned
balance!”
Although popular opinion holds
that competition can improve
performance, research indicates
that competition does not help
children develop healthy self-
esteem, achieve their highest
level of excellence, enjoy
themselves, or develop social
skills. Some researchers say that
emphasis on competition and
winning can actually undermine
these goals. “For us,” explains
John Ledesma, “Aikido has been
a great alternative to what might
be considered traditional youth
activities like baseball or soccer.
Our son Zack (age 8) really enjoys
the emphasis on his individual
development while still being able
to work toward the improvement
of the group--–as opposed to
the hyper-competitive, high-
stress environment you see on
some playgrounds and ball fields.
Aikido is ideal for kids who want
to be active, but prefer to do so
in a cooperative and supportive
space.”
As a martial art, Aikido is quite
useful for children - it teaches
them how not to fight. The
physical techniques are designed
to be effective without being
destructive. Many parents
think the most important thing
about the class is how it teaches
young people to deal with
stressful situations and conflict
in a relaxed, non-violent manner.
“They discuss bullies and this
helps my son deal with children at
school who are not so nice,” says
one mother. “I love watching
my daughter learn assertiveness,
especially how to use her voice
and body.” says another.
Aikido of San Luis Obispo has
been in our community for 27
years. It is the school of Safe-SLO
Nonprofit, which provides safety
and empowerment trainings for
children, adults, and agencies.
© Sullivan Studios
Central Coast Family • September 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 3
International Aiki Peace Week
September 15 – 21
“Peace is the wholeness created
by right relationships with oneself,
other persons, other cultures,
other life, Earth, and the larger
whole of which all are a part.”
(Earth Charter, 2000)
Every year on September 21, a 24-
hour Global Ceasefire provides
hope and relief for millions
of civilian children and adults
trapped in zones of war and
conflict. Created by a 1981 United
Nations resolution, the ceasefire
allows relief workers to deliver
food, water, supplies, and medical
attention, including vaccinations
for thousands of children at risk
for polio.
International Day of Peace (also
known as World Peace Day)
has been observed by millions
of people and hundreds of
organizations around the world.
From personal acts of kindness
to global inter-governmental
programs, Peacebuilding activities
flourish. No matter how small,
each contributes to the larger
web of understanding, tolerance,
and cooperation between us
as individuals, communities,
societies, and nations (see www.
internationaldayofpeace.org).
International Aiki Peace Week
was created by Aiki-Extensions,
a nonprofit organization that
promotes “harmony in action”
throughout the world with
events including youth violence
prevention and Middle East peace
programs. (www.aiki-extensions.
org).
During this week, Aikido schools
across the planet offer free Aikido
and Peacemaking classes. Free
classes in San Luis Obispo will
be conducted September 15-21
by Sensei Mary Tesoro at Aikido
of San Luis Obispo’s nonprofit
training center located at 209
Bonetti, off Higuera and Prado
Streets. Call 544-8866 or visit
www.aikidoslo.com for more
information.
Aikido is called the Art of Peace
because it is an embodied practice
of reconciliation, compassion, and
nonviolence. The revolutionary
aspect of Aikido is that it
changes the focus from combat
to reconciliation. International
Somatic Educator, author, and
Aikido instructor Paul Linden
stresses that “Peacemaking is
not an intellectual insight or
commitment. It is an embodied
process of responding to
challenges in a physically peaceful
manner. It takes practice to
overcome old response patterns
and cultivate a new, better habit.”
Aikido is a nonviolent Japanese
martial art. Aiki is the core of Aikido.
Aiki is a practical philosophy of
peace. Martial practice is uniquely
valuable for practicing peace
because attack/defense drills
offer the opportunity to train
oneself to receive an opponent
in an empathic and harmonious
way.
Families interested in finding
out more can find a schedule of
events and free classes at www.
aikidoslo.com, call Aikido of SLO
at 544-8866, or email Mary Tesoro
at sensei@aikidoslo.com.
Convenient Evening & Weekend Hours
Call either location today to take advantage of our
Back to School Special
FREE Childrens Exam
& Necessary X-Rays
New patients only up to age 18 with paid cleaning. Cannot be combined with any other ofer. Exp: 9/30/14
San Luis Obispo Arroyo Grande
544-9440 489-1495
Robert Flores D.M.D.
Robyn Flores D.M.D.
www.rrdentalcare.com
© Sullivan Studios
Community
Central Coast Family • September 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 4
Kristen Barnhart has been telling stories,
recommending books, and stamping little
hands for over 34 years throughout SLO
County. She is currently a Youth Services
Librarian at the San Luis Obispo Library.
Kristen can be reached at (805) 781-5775 or
kbarnhart@slolibrary.org.
Libraries will get you
through times with no money,
better than money will get
you through times with no
Libraries! 
Library Voice
The merest whiff of an
experience-laden fragrance, or
even three notes from a beloved
song can whip you back to a
life-defining moment in time.
Robin Williams left such a vivid
impression on our lives that the
sound of his voice can bring us
back to the whos, whats, and
wheres when we first heard
him.
“Nanu Nanu” whisks me right
into my friend Patty’s living-
room where we gathered
weekly to watch this crazy alien
light up the only TV screen in my
world. I was new to the area,
managing two little one-woman
libraries, culture-shocked after
moving from the rich diversity
of Berkeley and feeling a bit
alien myself.
When the news broke of
Robin’s death, there was Mork,
and I could almost smell the
ever-present cloud of Benson
& Hedges menthol cigarettes
mixed with ocean breeze that
was Patty.
I found more friends with
televisions, and then VCRs
appeared so we could customize
our watching and build more
memories. My “little brother”
Jeff and I must have watched
the one-man show from the
Met over a dozen times in
his little house on Bridge St,
waiting for his wife Karen to
come home from cooking at
Robin’s across the street. The
smell of Tandoori spices that
rose from the food she brought
home became the conductor
for memories of Robin Williams’
manic antics.
That home, which sheltered so
many Cambria friends, is gone,
Robin’s Restaurant moved
over to Burton, Jeff and Karen
moved away then apart, yet
the memories keep those times
alive. I am so sad that Robin
Williams couldn’t stay as alive
as our memories.
You’ve Got Dragons written by
Kathryn Cave and illustrated
by Nick Maland, is the best
exploration of depression for
children of all ages that I have
found. The dragons are worries,
which we know can grow...
They come out of nowhere.
You don’t deserve them.
You try to ignore them, but they
won’t go away.
Ben, the child with dragons,
offers some good tips on dealing
with dragons:
1. Give your dragon attention,
they get bigger when they’re
ignored.
2. Get to know it, name it, draw
a picture of it.
3. If you make it laugh, it might
get smaller. Try telling it
jokes.
4. Talk with someone about
your dragon and get plenty of
hugs.
The gift of this book is hope, but
not a false hope. Once you’ve
got dragons, you have them in
their many forms and the trick
is to learn from them and to try
and remember:
No dragon is more powerful than
YOU.
Robin Williams’ dragon got the
best jokes ever, he tried to give
it enough attention and talk and
hug, but his YOU got too small
and forgot its power. I don’t
know why some dragons win,
but I do know this one was
well-fought and perhaps even
embraced at the end, for they
had been on this quest together
for a lifetime.
Our quest is to empower our
children and ourselves, so that
we keep our dragons small.
When we watch Robin’s films,
we see every character he plays
wrestle that dragon, and we
can laugh with him, cry with
him, heal with him, and cheer
him on with loving kindness.
Our children grew up with his
Batty and Genie, Mrs Doubtfire,
and Peter Pan. As they move
into adulthood, our children
will learn poetry, that “it’s not
their fault,” that laughter can
heal, and they will experience
Robin’s divine madness.
My last memory of Robin
Williams is sitting in a salon
getting a pedicure with my
daughter as we heard the news,
gasped, held hands, and wept
together knowing, but not yet
ready to believe, that our friend
had truly left the planet... “Nanu
Nanu.”
by Kristen Barnhart
Nanu Nanu
Suicide Prevention
Mental Health and
Emotional Support
Free
Confidential
24 hours of every day
A program of Transitions Mental Health Association
Central Coast Family • September 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 5
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Call (805) 544-4243 to Register Now!
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Central Coast Family • September 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 6
Keeping babies safe is of utmost
importance to any parent. But
what is the best way to ensure
their safety during sleep? Most
newborns thrive. However, for
every 1,000 babies born, six die
during their frst year. Infant
deaths during sleep usually result
from unsafe sleep environments.
Some are caused by entrapment,
sufocation, and strangulation.
Sudden infant death syndrome
(SIDS) is the leading cause of
death among babies between
one month and one year of
age. Fortunately, research has
found ways for parents to keep
their sleeping baby safe. These
recommendations are helpful
for reducing the risk of SIDS and
all other sleep related accidents,
injuries, and deaths.
Make sure your baby is sleeping
on a frm fat surface with only
a ftted sheet. If you are using
a crib, make sure it is a safety-
approved crib* and has not been
recalled. Do not use a drop side
crib or one with broken or missing
parts.
Do not use pillows, blankets, etc.
in your baby’s sleeping area. If
your baby needs extra warmth,
use a sleep sack.
Keep all toys, stufed animals,
positioners, and bumper pads,
out of your baby’s sleeping area.
Make sure there is nothing on
your baby’s head.
Your baby should not sleep in an
adult bed, couch, chair, etc. with
you or alone. If possible, give
Safe Sleep
Child Development
Kerrin Edmonds is a Certifed Infant & Child
Sleep Consultant, and the Founder of Meet you
in Dreamland.
by Kerrin Edmonds
Exhausted and overwhelmed from sleepless nights?
Face to Face, Phone, & Email Consultations
.
Local group classes
www.meetyouindreamland.com
contact@meetyouindreamland.com (805) 296-2149
your baby a sleep area in the same
room as you. Room sharing—
keeping baby’s sleep area in the
same room and next to where you
sleep—is recommended by the
AAP. If you bring your baby into
bed with you to feed, put her back
in a separate sleep area, such as a
safety-approved crib, bassinet, or
portable play yard, next to where
you sleep when fnished.
Place your baby to sleep on their
back. Babies up to 1 year of age
should always be placed on their
backs to sleep during naps and
at night. However, if your baby
has rolled from his back to side
or stomach on his own, he can
be left in that position if he is
able to roll from tummy to back
and back to tummy. If your baby
falls asleep in a car safety seat,
stroller, swing, infant carrier, or
infant sling, move him to a frm
sleep surface as soon as possible.
If you can, breastfeed. This can
produce a healthier baby and can
help soothe a fussy newborn. A
recent meta-analysis found that
breastfeeding reduces the risk of
sudden infant death syndrome.
Do not smoke or let anyone
smoke around your baby.
Do not let your baby get too
hot. Keep the room where your
baby sleeps at a comfortable
temperature, between 68-70° F.
In general, dress your baby in no
more than one extra layer than
you wear. Your baby may be too
hot if she is sweating or if her
chest feels hot. If you are worried
that your baby is cold, use infant
sleep clothing designed to keep
babies warm without the risk of
covering their heads.
Give your baby interactive tummy
play-time. This should never be in
a bed. A good place for this is on a
play mat on the foor. Never leave
him on his stomach unattended.
Play with him as he does baby
push-ups.
If you take your baby to daycare or
leave him with a sitter, provide a
copy of this list to them. Make sure
they follow all recommendations.
If your child is sleeping in a
toddler or regular bed, make sure
they are old enough to follow
rules. Sleeping in a “big kid
bed” is a privilege and should be
accompanied by big kid behavior.
If your child is in a toddler bed,
make sure all furniture that can be
climbed is fastened to a wall.
Consider placing a gate at the
bedroom door if your child is in a
toddler bed. A young child who
can wander around the house
unattended at night is not safe.
Make sure you discuss safe sleep
practices with your pediatrician.
Because of the USA “Back to
Sleep” campaign, SIDS has been
signifcantly reduced. Hopefully,
in our lifetime we can see it
become a thing of the past!
* To confrm the safety of your baby’s mattress
or crib contact the Consumer Product Safety
Commission at 800-638-2772 or www.cpsc.gov.
Fern R. Hauck, MD, MS, et al. Breastfeeding
and Reduced Risk of Sudden Infant Death
Syndrome: A Meta-analysis. PEDIATRICS Vol.
128 No. 1 July 1, 2011 pp. 103 -110.
For more information, visit the American
Academy of Pediatrics website www.aap.org
or www.healthychildren.org.
Central Coast Family • September 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 7
115 East Branch Street in Arroyo Grande
Call or Stop By...
Toni & Toni (805) 489-5100
Can you spell
HAI RCUT?
Yes, School is in!
Central Coast Family • September 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 8
Fun & Games
S
U
D
O
K
U
Fill empty cells with numbers between 1 and 9 (1 number per cell).
A number should appear only once in each row, column, and region.
Why didn’t the Teddy Bear eat lunch? He was stuffed!
What’s the ratio of a pumpkin’s circumference to its diameter?
Pumpkin Pi!
J ack’s J okes
Autumn
Word Search
Help
the
Squirrel
fi nd the
Acorns
Central Coast Family • September 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 9
Central Coast Family • September 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 10
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have a pretty good chance of
“smoothing out” the efects of
market volatility over time. As
a bonus, you’ll be far less likely
to concern yourself over day-
to-day price fuctuations.
• Work to review your progress.
Along with your fnancial
advisor, consistently review
your progress toward your
goals. Your investment
professional should establish
your portfolio review frequency
and meet with you to discuss
your investments at least once
a year.
So, there you have it; some ideas
on how you can work to be a
better investor.
Money
Become
a
Better
Investor
by Molly Peoples
Molly Peoples is a fnancial advisor at Edward
Jones in San Luis Obispo. She can be reached
at (805) 784-9013. © 2014 Edward Jones. All
rights reserved. Member SIPC.
On September 1, we observe
Labor Day, a celebration of the
American worker. Of course,
you work hard at your own job,
but, when you think of it, every
worthwhile endeavor in life
requires signifcant efort. That’s
certainly the case with investing.
The harder you work at it, the more
likely you are to make progress
toward your goals. So as you
think about investing, consider
the following areas in which you
will need to apply yourself:
• Work to identify your goals. It’s
important that you know just
why you’re investing. Do you
want to send your children (or
grandchildren) to college? Do
you want to retire early? What
sort of retirement lifestyle do
you envision? What kind of
legacy do you want to leave?
Identifying your fnancial goals
is the necessary frst step
toward achieving them.
• Work to know your own risk
tolerance. It’s essential that
you know your own investment
personality, that is, how much
risk you can comfortably
handle. If you think you can
handle a relatively high level
of risk, but you fnd yourself
worrying excessively over
every drop in the market, you
may need to re-evaluate your
risk tolerance and adjust your
investment habits. Conversely,
if you believe yourself to be
highly risk-avoidant, but you
fnd yourself frustrated over
the relatively low returns
you get from conservative
investments, you may need to
revise your thinking and your
actions.
• Work to avoid bad habits. Many
investors chase after “hot”
stocks or try to “time” the
market. However, hot stocks
can cool of quickly, while
eforts to predict market highs
and lows are doomed to fail
because no one can accurately
forecast those points. You will
want to be especially diligent
about learning to look past the
headlines and beyond short-
term price movements in the
fnancial markets because too
many people overreact to
these events. If you can avoid
these bad investment habits,
you’ll be doing yourself a favor.
• Work to follow a consistent
investment strategy. If you
invest over the course of
several decades, you are going
to see a lot of ups and downs
in the fnancial markets. When
the markets get choppy, you
may be tempted to take a “time
out” from investing. But if you
do this repeatedly, you will
certainly interrupt the progress
you need to make toward
your fnancial goals. If you
can develop the discipline to
follow a consistent investment
strategy and keep investing
in all types of markets, you
Central Coast Family • September 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 11
Central Coast Family • September 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 12
Each summer, I spend at least two
or three days walking through
some of our local cemeteries. I
know it sounds kind of creepy,
but it becomes an interesting
journey through history. My frst
adventure in a local cemetery
occurred about 20 years ago when
my youngest daughter Kasey
and I went in search of the grave
of Franklin Riley, who was the
founder of the great city of Morro
Bay. I taught in Morro Bay for many
years, and when I taught at Morro
Elementary, I would take my class
on a tour of downtown Morro Bay.
I knew Morro Bay didn’t and still
does not have a public cemetery.
The closest cemetery is in Cayucos,
so our search began there. The
Cayucos Cemetery is full of great
history. Many of the founding
fathers of Morro Bay and other
coastal towns are buried there.
We found the graves of Franklin
and his wife Hannah.
This summer, I was in search of
Thomas (Tomas) Higuera and other
members of the San Luis Obispo
founding families. San Luis Obispo
has at least two cemeteries on
Higuera. We had other cemeteries
in town, but they somehow were
relocated to other places. I’m not
sure how this was done. My guess
is that bodies were exhumed
and reburied. Mission San Luis
Obispo once had a cemetery like
most missions, but the cemetery
is no longer at its original location,
which would have been directly
next to the mission walls. In 1870,
there was a cemetery on Marsh
Street near Carmel Street as well.
Early one sunny morning, I arrived
at the Old Mission Cemetery
to begin my annual walk. This
summer, I had a purpose and I very
slowly began walking down one
side of the road staring intently
at each headstone. Within in a
few feet of my journey, I noticed
a very large stone with the name
Wineman on it. The Wineman
family owned (and are still part
owners of) the Wineman Hotel
in downtown San Luis Obispo.
Edward Wineman bought the
Higuera/Chorro Street property
from the Goldtree brothers on
Oct. 10, 1902 for about $27,000.
The property measured 150 feet
on Higuera and 120 feet on Chorro
Street with a 10 foot wide alley
from Higuera to Marsh Street.
As I continued to walk, I spotted
one founding family after another.
During years of research, I have
become familiar with many names
of the families that lived in SLO for
over 100 years. My next stop was
at the grave of Pedro Quintana.
Pedro owned a very large store on
the corner of Chorro and Monterey
Streets. The Quintana family
owned land from San Luis Obispo
to Morro Bay. They donated land
in the 1930s for the local school
district to build Morro Elementary
School. Quintana Road, which
runs parallel to Highway 1, is
named for them. Many Quintana
family members are buried at the
old cemetery.
My annual surprise was seeing the
stone of Miguel Avila. He lived in
and owned property in the area
named after his family. Miguel
was born in 1796, and in 1824,
Miguel became a mission guard at
Mission San Luis Obispo. He then
transferred to Monterey where
he met his wife Ynocenta (aka
Inocenta), who was a member
of the Pica family. Because of his
rich wife’s family, it was easy for
him to acquire a land grant for the
area now known as Avila Beach.
Miguel served as an Alcalde during
the Mexican period and was also a
successful cattle rancher. In 1863
through 1865, there was a drought
very similar to the current one, and
most of Avila’s cattle died from
lack of water. In 1867, to help get
money for the family, one of Don
Miguel’s sons laid out a plan to
develop the area into a town. They
started selling lots and chunks of
land to settlers and businessmen.
One of the frst people to purchase
land from Avila was John Hartford.
John built the long pier in Avila Bay,
which had narrow gauge railroad
tracks running down the middle of
the pier. The train received cargo
from steam ships that came into
Avila to drop of goods for the
growing city of San Luis Obispo.
When you take the Avila lighthouse
tour, your trolley ride takes you on
a road with a great view of the bay.
It is easy to imagine living in a little
house on the beach and enjoying
a very peaceful life. Miguel died in
1871 at the age of 75 years.
Another name I have known for
many years is Luigi Marre. His
stone at the cemetery is very
large and one of the most ornate.
Luigi was born in 1840, and went
to college in his native Italy. In
1854, Luigi set out for California
to seek his fortune in the gold
felds and streams. He arrived in
San Francisco on May 26, 1854,
and spent three years in the gold
felds with little to show for his
back-breaking work. For the next
several years, Marre was in the
merchandise business. He came
to San Luis Obispo County in 1879
and leased land for cattle. Marre
soon became known as “The
Cattle King of the Central Coast”
and became one of the wealthiest
men in the county. He also built
a large hotel on the land near the
end of Hartford Pier in Avila, which
is no longer there. Marre was a
very unique and special person.
I highly recommend a historical
walk through one of San Luis
Obispo County’s public cemeteries.
You may be surprised by what you
can learn about our area and the
people who lived here. Oh, by the
way, I never did fnd the grave of
Tomas Higuera. I found his wife’s,
but I could not fnd his gravestone.
The search continues…
Guy Crabb teaches at Charles E. Teach
Elementary School in San Luis Obispo. He
graduated from Cal Poly SLO and has been
teaching for 30 years. Guy was a Teacher of
the Year in 2006 and currently teaches at a
National Blue Ribbon School. Reach him at
crabbx5@charter.net.
Local History
by Guy Crabb
Founding Families
Central Coast Family • September 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 13
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Central Coast Family • September 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 14
Education
CS Perryess writes for teens, narrates audio
books, and ponders the wonder of words
in a foggy little town on California’s central
coast. Find more of his blog posts at http://
csperryess.blogspot.com, or reach him at
csperryess@gmail.com.
CS Perryess
writes
about words
SChool
At this time of year in the
northern hemisphere, students
and teachers are heading back to
school. Let’s take a look at some
of the words we associate with
school.
A student is one who studies,
though in modern American
culture, not every student fts the
defnition of study established in
the early 1100s, to strive toward,
devote oneself, cultivate, or
show zeal for. Of note is the fact
that study’s mother word from
Proto-Indo-European was (s)teu-
. Its meaning may ft another
percentage of the modern
student population, to push, stick,
knock, or beat. Then again, it’s
possible that pushing, knocking,
and beating may be a fgurative
reference to the parents and
teachers “encouraging” those
students who aren’t naturally
showing zeal for their education.
The frst English form of the word
teach was tæcan, which meant to
show, point out, declare, direct,
warn, persuade, or demonstrate. It
came from Proto-Indo-European
and is related to the words diction,
dictionary, dictate, and token.
The word education came to
English in the 1400s from the
Latin verb educare/educere, to
rear, educate, train, nourish, or
support, made of the word parts
ex + ducere, and meaning to lead
out or draw forth.
Old English’s leornian, to get
knowledge, be cultivated, study or
read, gave us our modern word
learn, which came from the Proto-
Indo-European word leis, to follow
or fnd the track or furrow.
And last, the word school showed
up in Old English through Latin
from the Greek word skhole,
meaning spare time, leisure, rest,
ease, or idleness, because one
didn’t engage in such things as
learning until the work of surviving
was done. Given that, I fnd it
fascinating that skhole comes
from the Proto-Indo-European
word segh, which meant to hold
in one’s power.
PEaCE
I would like thoughts of peace to
be on my mind always, but I often
let life get in the way. Recent
events, though, have brought
my ever-present (if sometimes
buried) hopes for peace to the
forefront.
The word peace came to English in
the 1100s, meaning freedom from
civil disorder. It came to English
through Old French from the Latin
word pacem or pax. Our modern
word pact more closely refects
the initial meaning of peace’s
Proto-Indo-European root, pag or
pak, which meant to make frm, to
join together, to agree.
Ah, that we humans of the world
might join together and frmly
agree on peace.
Some modern synonyms for
peaceful include:
placid, an undisturbed and
unrufed calm
calm, a total absence of agitation
or disturbance
tranquil, a more intrinsic and
permanent peace than the peace
suggested by the word calm
serene, an exalted tranquility
harmonious, musical agreement
or settled governmental order
I’m hoping we can all bring
peaceful thought and action to
the forefront, and maybe, just
maybe (with all due respect to
Margaret Meade) a small group
of thoughtful word nerds can
change the world for the better.
graSP / EnCloSE
A fascinating construct of
linguists is the proto-language, a
language we have no direct proof
of. Linguists study the earliest
languages they can access, fnd
similar words and structures in
the languages in a region, and
then propose the mother tongue
that may have given birth to the
tongues spoken in that region.
It’s tricky business. One of the
most-cited and least questioned
proto-languages is Proto-Indo-
European, and this week’s post
takes a look at the apparent
descendants of Proto-Indo-
European’s proposed word-part
gher- , to grasp or enclose.
It’s easy to imagine a word
meaning to grasp or enclose
turning into the Old English word
gyrdel, a belt, sash, or cord worn
around the waist, and gyrdel
morphing into girdle, initially
meaning to cut of a belt of bark
around a trunk to kill a tree (1665),
and moving from there to mean
an elastic corset (1925). I’ll leave
comparison of the intent of those
two words to my readers with
more direct experience than I.
Gher- also seems to have been
responsible for the birth of the
Old English word geard, a fenced
enclosure. From geard come the
words yard, and garden. Our
modern word orchard was original
ortgeard and/or wortgeard, a
compound word referring to a
geard flled with wort (wort being
vegetables, fruits and roots).
When those tricky Old English
speakers flled a geard with
kinder (children), they called it a
kindergarten.
It also appears that gher- made
its way to Greece, where people
danced in an enclosure, inspiring
the word khoros, which became
our modern word chorus, which on
its way through France, referred
to the enclosure in church where
people sang, chouer, the parent
of our word choir.
Gher- also made its way into Latin,
where it referred to the king’s
enclosure and residence, cohors.
In time, cohors grew to label
the enclosure itself, the court
(which makes our word courtyard
redundant). Court also began to
refer to the folks within it, both
court and cohort. When one of
the individuals in that group
expressed marital interest, he was
said to be courting, and doing so
in a gentlemanly fashion earned
him the label, courteous.
All this from grasping and
enclosing? I’d love to hear your
comments on any of this, in
particular, the darker twists and
shadows etymology throws upon
words we typically see as positive.
My thanks go out to sources: OED, Merriam
Webster, Wordnik, Webster’s New World
Dictionary, 1959, and Etymonline.
Central Coast Family • September 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 15
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Central Coast Family • September 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 17
SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY
31
FARMERS MARKET:
10:00am-2:00pm SLO, 3889 Long St
11:30am-2:30pm Nipomo Monarch Club
3:00-6:00pm Grover Bch Ramona Park
1
FARMERS MARKET:
2:00-4:30pm Los Osos, 2nd & Santa Maria
LABOR DAY
2
FARMERS MARKET:
8:00-11:30am Pismo, 555 Five Cities Dr
3:00-6:00 pm Paso Robles City Park
3:00-6:00 pm SLO, 2880 Broad St
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:10 SLO
DOC BURNSTEIN’S READING LAB
3:30-4:15pm AG
3
FARMERS MARKETS:
8:30-11am AG, 1464 E Grand Ave
12:30-4:30pm Santa Maria Town Ctr
3:00-6:00pm AT, El Camino & Curbaril
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 AT,
10:30 AG, 11:00 NI
4
FARMERS MARKETS:
2:30-5:00pm Morro Bay, 2650 Main St
6:00-9:00pm Downtown SLO
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:00 MB,
10:10 SLO, 10:15 CAM,10:30 AT, 10:30
AG,10:30 LO, 11:00 CAY, 11:30 SMG
5
BINGO VETS HALL MB - 1st FRI 5:00pm
FARMERS MARKETS:
10:00am-12:30pm Cayucos Vets Hall
2:30-5:30pm Cambria, 1000 Main St
4:00-8:00pm Avila Beach Promenade
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 LO
NATIONAL
CHEESE PIZZA DAY
6
FARMERS MARKETS:
8:00-10:30am SLO, 325 Madonna Rd
9:00am-12:30pm Templeton City Park
9:00am-1:00pm Shell Bch Dinosaur Caves
9:00am-1:00pm Paso Downtown Park
12:00-2:30pm AG Village Gazebo
2:30-6:00pm Morro Bay, 800 Main St
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 11:00 AG
SLO CO GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY
1st SAT 12:30am IOOF Hall SLO
READ
A
BOOK
DAY
7
FARMERS MARKET:
10:00am-2:00pm SLO, 3889 Long St
11:30am-2:30pm Nipomo Monarch Club
3:00-6:00pm Grover Bch Ramona Park
NATIONAL
GRANDPARENTS DAY
8
FARMERS MARKET:
2:00-4:30pm Los Osos, 2nd & Santa Maria
INTERNATIONAL
LITERACY DAY
9
FARMERS MARKET:
8:00-11:30am Pismo, 555 Five Cities Dr
3:00-6:00 pm Paso Robles City Park
3:00-6:00 pm SLO, 2880 Broad St
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:10 SLO
DOC BURNSTEIN’S READING LAB
3:30-4:15pm AG
TEDDY BEAR DAY
10
FARMERS MARKETS:
8:30-11am AG, 1464 E Grand Ave
12:30-4:30pm Santa Maria Town Ctr
3:00-6:00pm AT, El Camino & Curbaril
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 AT,
10:30 AG, 11:00 NI
11
FARMERS MARKETS:
2:30-5:00pm Morro Bay, 2650 Main St
6:00-9:00pm Downtown SLO
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:00 MB,
10:10 SLO, 10:15 CAM,10:30 AT, 10:30
AG,10:30 LO, 11:00 CAY, 11:30 SMG
PATRIOT DAY
MAKE YOUR BED
DAY
12
FARMERS MARKETS:
10:00am-12:30pm Cayucos Vets Hall
2:30-5:30pm Cambria, 1000 Main St
4:00-8:00pm Avila Beach Promenade
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 LO
13
FARMERS MARKETS:
8:00-10:30am SLO, 325 Madonna Rd
9:00am-12:30pm Templeton City Park
9:00am-1:00pm Shell Bch Dinosaur Caves
9:00am-1:00pm Paso Downtown Park
12:00-2:30pm AG Village Gazebo
2:30-6:00pm Morro Bay, 800 Main St
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 11:00 AG
POSITIVE
THINKING DAY
14
FARMERS MARKET:
10:00am-2:00pm SLO, 3889 Long St
11:30am-2:30pm Nipomo Monarch Club
3:00-6:00pm Grover Bch Ramona Park
15
FARMERS MARKET:
2:00-4:30pm Los Osos, 2nd & Santa Maria
MAKE A HAT DAY
NATIONAL HISPANIC
HERITAGE MONTH
(through October 15)
16
FARMERS MARKET:
8:00-11:30am Pismo, 555 Five Cities Dr
3:00-6:00 pm Paso Robles City Park
3:00-6:00 pm SLO, 2880 Broad St
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:10 SLO
DOC BURNSTEIN’S READING LAB
3:30-4:15pm AG
NATIONAL WORKING
PARENTS DAY
STEPFAMILY DAY
MAYFLOWER DAY
NATIONAL
PLAY-DOH DAY
17
FARMERS MARKETS:
8:30-11am AG, 1464 E Grand Ave
12:30-4:30pm Santa Maria Town Ctr
3:00-6:00pm AT, El Camino & Curbaril
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 AT,
10:30 AG, 11:00 NI
CITIZENSHIP DAY
18
FARMERS MARKETS:
2:30-5:00pm Morro Bay, 2650 Main St
6:00-9:00pm Downtown SLO
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:00 MB,
10:10 SLO, 10:15 CAM,10:30 AT, 10:30
AG,10:30 LO, 11:00 CAY, 11:30 SMG
19
FARMERS MARKETS:
10:00am-12:30pm Cayucos Vets Hall
2:30-5:30pm Cambria, 1000 Main St
4:00-8:00pm Avila Beach Promenade
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 LO
TALK LIKE A
PIRATE DAY
20
FARMERS MARKETS:
8:00-10:30am SLO, 325 Madonna Rd
9:00am-12:30pm Templeton City Park
9:00am-1:00pm Shell Bch Dinosaur Caves
9:00am-1:00pm Paso Downtown Park
12:00-2:30pm AG Village Gazebo
2:30-6:00pm Morro Bay, 800 Main St
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 11:00 AG
21
FARMERS MARKET:
10:00am-2:00pm SLO, 3889 Long St
11:30am-2:30pm Nipomo Monarch Club
3:00-6:00pm Grover Bch Ramona Park
INTERNATIONAL
DAY OF PEACE
WORLD
GRATITUDE DAY
22
FARMERS MARKET:
2:00-4:30pm Los Osos, 2nd & Santa Maria
ICE CREAM CONE
INVENTED (in 1903)
23
FARMERS MARKET:
8:00-11:30am Pismo, 555 Five Cities Dr
3:00-6:00 pm Paso Robles City Park
3:00-6:00 pm SLO, 2880 Broad St
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:10 SLO
DOC BURNSTEIN’S READING LAB
3:30-4:15pm AG
FIRST DAY
OF AUTUMN
CHECKERS
DAY
24
FARMERS MARKETS:
8:30-11am AG, 1464 E Grand Ave
12:30-4:30pm Santa Maria Town Ctr
3:00-6:00pm AT, El Camino & Curbaril
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 AT,
10:30 AG, 11:00 NI
NATIONAL
PUNCTUATION DAY
25
FARMERS MARKETS:
2:30-5:00pm Morro Bay, 2650 Main St
6:00-9:00pm Downtown SLO
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:00 MB,
10:10 SLO, 10:15 CAM,10:30 AT, 10:30
AG,10:30 LO, 11:00 CAY, 11:30 SMG
26
FARMERS MARKETS:
10:00am-12:30pm Cayucos Vets Hall
2:30-5:30pm Cambria, 1000 Main St
4:00-8:00pm Avila Beach Promenade
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 LO
JOHNNY APPLESEED’S
BIRTHDAY (Born in 1774)
NATIVE AMERICAN
DAY
27
FARMERS MARKETS:
8:00-10:30am SLO, 325 Madonna Rd
9:00am-12:30pm Templeton City Park
9:00am-1:00pm Shell Bch Dinosaur Caves
9:00am-1:00pm Paso Downtown Park
12:00-2:30pm AG Village Gazebo
2:30-6:00pm Morro Bay, 800 Main St
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 11:00 AG
CRUSH A CAN DAY
28
FARMERS MARKET:
10:00am-2:00pm SLO, 3889 Long St
11:30am-2:30pm Nipomo Monarch Club
3:00-6:00pm Grover Bch Ramona Park
GOOD
NEIGHBOR DAY
29
FARMERS MARKET:
2:00-4:30pm Los Osos, 2nd & Santa Maria
30
FARMERS MARKET:
8:00-11:30am Pismo, 555 Five Cities Dr
3:00-6:00 pm Paso Robles City Park
3:00-6:00 pm SLO, 2880 Broad St
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:10 SLO
DOC BURNSTEIN’S READING LAB
3:30-4:15pm AG
SAFETY PIN
INVENTED
1
FARMERS MARKETS:
8:30-11am AG, 1464 E Grand Ave
12:30-4:30pm Santa Maria Town Ctr
3:00-6:00pm AT, El Camino & Curbaril
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 AT,
10:30 AG, 11:00 NI
2
FARMERS MARKETS:
2:30-5:00pm Morro Bay, 2650 Main St
6:00-9:00pm Downtown SLO
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:00 MB,
10:10 SLO, 10:15 CAM,10:30 AT, 10:30
AG,10:30 LO, 11:00 CAY, 11:30 SMG
3
FARMERS MARKETS:
10:00am-12:30pm Cayucos Vets Hall
2:30-5:30pm Cambria, 1000 Main St
4:00-8:00pm Avila Beach Promenade
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 10:30 LO
4
FARMERS MARKETS:
8:00-10:30am SLO, 325 Madonna Rd
9:00am-12:30pm Templeton City Park
9:00am-1:00pm Shell Bch Dinosaur Caves
9:00am-1:00pm Paso Downtown Park
12:00-2:30pm AG Village Gazebo
2:30-6:00pm Morro Bay, 800 Main St
LIBRARY STORYTIME: 11:00 AG
NEW MOON
FULL MOON
September 2014 Free Ongoing Events
September is:
Baby Safety Month
Better Breakfast Month
Library Card Sign-Up Month
National Honey Month
National School Success Month
Women of Achievement Month
National Courtesy Month
Classical Music Month
Birthstone: Sapphire
Flower: Aster
Central Coast Family • September 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 18
Family Events
SAT AUG 23-SUN SEP 21 (times
vary): SONG OF THE CANYON
KID, and THE SHAUGHRAUN at
The Great American Melodrama,
1863 Front St, Oceano. The
Shaughraun follows the
adventures of a lovable rogue
named Conn O’Kelly who attempt
to free his wrongfully imprisoned
master and rescue a beautiful
heroine from the villainous Corry
Kinchela. Cost: $18-24. Contact:
americanmelodrama.com or 489-
2499.
THU AUG 28 1:00 pm:
UNDERSTANDING MEDICARE
at Luis Oasis Senior Center,
420 Soares Ave, Orcutt. This
seminar is sponsored by The
Health Insurance Counseling and
Advocacy Program (HICAP). Cost:
free. Contact: oasisorcutt.org or
937-9750.
THU AUG 28-TUE SEP 2: REGISTER
FOR THE THINKERY! at San Luis
Obispo Children’s Museum,
1010 Nipomo St. Registration
is now open for The Thinkery
– a museum-based preschool
enrichment program that kicks of
Sept. 2. Perfect for 2 and half to 5
year-olds. Cost: $240 per month.
Contact: slocm.org or 545-5874.
THU AUG 28-SUN SEP 28 (times
vary): PCPA THEATERFEST at
Severson, Allan Hancock College,
800 S College, Santa Maria. The
San Patricios enjoys its world
premiere Aug 28 through Sep 7 at
the Solvang Festival Theater. 36
Views shows Sep 11 through 28.
Cost: $30-38. Contact: pcpa.org or
922-8313.
SAT AUG 30 7:00 am: 23rd Annual
AFS PINEDORADO 5K FUN RUN
at Coast Union High School, 2950
Santa Rosa Creek Rd, Cambria.
7:00 am: On-site registration. 7:45
am: Race begins. Proceeds beneft
the foreign exchange program at
CUHS. Cost: $20 with t-shirt; $15
without. Contact: coastusd.org or
995-1432.
SUN AUG 31 1:00-3:00 pm:
FESTIVAL OF BOOKS at Santa
Maria Town Center East (second
level), Main Street and Broadway.
Altrusa International of the
Central Coast presents the annual
“Festival of Books” giving free
books to adults and kids. Cost:
free. Contact: 448-6268.
SUN AUG 31 2:30 pm: POPS BY
THE SEA at Avila Beach Golf
Resort, 6464 Ana Bay Rd, Avila
Beach. SLO Symphony features
Inga Swearingen and Superstar
Jon Anderson, the Voice of YES,
performing his chart topping
hits. Cost: Kids $5; Adults $15-90.
Contact: slosymphony.org or 543-
3533.
MON SEP 1 12:00-4:00 pm: Labor
Day BIRTH AND BABY FAIR at
Sukha Wellness Center, 6615 Bay
Laurel Place, Avila Beach. Meet
local birth professionals that can
help you navigate the journey
of pregnancy. Gain access to
important local resources and non-
proft organizations that provide
services and support for pre-natal
and postnatal care and recovery.
Kids activities ofered outside.
Strollers welcome. Cost: free.
Contact: sukhawellnesscenter.
com or 801-8088.
FRI SEP 5: BE BIGGER THAN A
BULLY at Chuck E. Cheese, Santa
Maria. This event will include
Chuck E. Cheese donating 15%
of sales generated by you/your
group to the North County Rape
Crisis and Child Protection Center,
includes an extra 25 free tickets
with food purchase. Cost: varies.
Contact: 922-2994.
FRI SEP 5-SUN SEP 7 (times
vary): DOG SPLASH DAYS OF
TEMPLETON at Templeton
Community Pool, Corner of 6th
St. and Old County Rd. Dogs can
celebrate the end of summer
with a swim at the 8th Annual
Dog Splash Days. Dogs only are
allowed in the pool. See website
for info on swim times for small,
senior, and all dog swim sessions
and to make prepaid reservations.
Cost: $20. Contact: parks4pups.
org or 239-4437.
FRI SEP 5-SUN SEP 21 (times vary):
GOOD PEOPLE at Santa Margarita
Ranch, 9000 Yerba Buena Ave.
SLO Little Theatre presents the
award winning play by David
Lindsey-Abaire. Cost: $15-26.
Contact: slolittletheatre.org or
786-2440.
SAT SEP 6 & SUN SEP 7 10:00 am-
4:oo pm: INSPIRED HOME EXPO
at Paso Robles Event Center, 2198
Riverside Rd. Inspired Home Expo
of Paso Robles features over 100
local home improvement and
garden professionals, live cooking
demonstrations, and wine and
gourmet food tasting. The Expo
ofers resources, tips, and ideas
on building and decorating. Cost:
free. Contact: 772-4600.
SAT SEP 6 11:00 am-5:oo pm:
GREEN GOODS OPEN HOUSE-
HEALTHY BUILDING SOLUTIONS
at Green Goods Showroom, 111
South St, SLO. Workshops include
clay plaster, fooring install,
laundry to landscape greywater
and green design. Cost: free.
Contact: slogreengoods.com or
300-2805.
SAT SEP 6 1:00-4:00 pm: THE
SANTA MARIA CIVIC BALLET
AUDITIONS at Severson, Allan
Hancock College, 800 S College,
Santa Maria. The Everybody Can
Dance Studio holds auditions
for its fall performance of
Nutcracker. Cost: free. Contact:
everybodycandance.webs.com or
598-7191.
SAT SEP 6: FORE AUTISM at Paso
Robles Golf Club, 1600 Country
Club Dr. You are invited to play
in the Central Coast Autism
Spectrum Center’s Second annual
fundraiser golf tournament,
FORE Autism: The Tournament
LABOR DAY WEEKEND
SUNDAY, AUGUST 31, 2014
AVILA BEACH GOLF RESORT
GATES OPEN 2:30PM · CONCERT AT 4PM
FOR TICKETS CALL 543-3533 OR
VISIT SLOSYMPHONY.ORG
SAN LUIS OBISPO SYMPHONY
MICHAEL NOWAK, MUSIC DIRECTOR
LUCIA CLEVELAND & PAUL VANDEYDEN
JOE & PEGGY LITTLE · JIM & BEVERLY SMITH
Central Coast Family • September 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 19
Family Events
on Sept. 6. Proceeds from this
event are used to support CCASC
operations. Cost: $100. Contact:
autismspectrumcenter.com or
763-1100.
SUN SEP 7 6:00 pm: A NIGHT OF
HISTORIC THEATRE at History
Center of San Luis Obispo County,
888 Morro St, SLO. Local history
comes to life in Readers Theatre
productions, Do You Believe in
Fairies?, Ella Young, Mystic of the
Dunes, Gold Rush in Oceano?,
and The Story of El. Dessert and
cofee will be served. Cost: $25-
50. Contact: historycenterslo.org
or 543-0638.
TUE SEP 9 5:30-7:00 pm: HERBAL
LABORATORY at SLO Botanical
Garden, 3450 Dairy Creek Rd.
Join an informational and hands-
on class about the history,
identifcation methods, and
uses of herbs currently growing
in the garden. This class will
increase herbal knowledge, self-
sufciency, and environmental
appreciation for adults and older
students. Limited class size. Cost:
$5 members/$10 public. Contact:
slobg.org/HerbLab or 541-1400 x
304.
THU SEP 11 6:00-8:00 pm: A
PARENT WORKSHOP at Abel
Maldonado Community Youth
Center, Santa Maria. Cost: free.
Contact: cityofsantamaria.org.
SAT SEP 13 12:00-5:00 pm:
TEEN BOAT REGATTA at Abel
Maldonado Community Youth
Center, Santa Maria. This event is
for kids ages 12 to 18 and in grades
7 to 12 and involves building a boat
out of cardboard and duct tape
and racing it across a pool. Cost:
free. Contact: cityofsantamaria.
org.
SAT SEP 13 1:00-3:00 pm:
BOTANICAL ILLUSTRATIONS at
SLO Botanical Garden, 3450 Dairy
Creek Rd. Discover the art of
observing and depicting nature
structurally and aesthetically
while enjoying the fresh air.
Join artist Barbara Renshaw,
stroll through the garden, and
sketch your favorite plants. No
experience necessary. Bring a
sketchbook and watercolors,
colored pencils, or pastels. Meet
at the purple entrance bridge.
Cost: $5 members/$10 public +
$3 County parking fee. Contact:
slobg.org/art or 541-1400 x 304.
SAT SEP 20 & SUN SEP 21 10:00
am-4:oo pm: INSPIRED HOME
EXPO at Alex Madonna Expo
Center, 100 Madonna Rd, SLO.
The Expo features over 100 local
home improvement and garden
professionals and informative
home improvement seminars. The
Home Show ofers resources, tips,
seminars and ideas on building,
decorating, and organizing
your home. Cost: free. Contact:
slohomeimprovement.com or
772-4600.
SAT SEP 20 11:00 am-4:00 pm: 17th
Annual TASTE OF DOWNTOWN at
12th & Spring St, Paso Robles. Over
35 restaurants and wine-tasting
rooms will participate. Tickets
provide samplings at each vendor.
Cost: $25. Contact: 238-4103 or
http://pasoroblesdowntown.org.
SAT SEP 20 2:00 pm: FAMILY
MOVIE at Los Osos Library, 2075
Palisades. Enjoy a family favorite
flm (rated PG). Popcorn provided.
Cost: free. Contact: 528-1862.
SAT SEP 20 at sundown: MOVIES
IN THE PARK: THE MUPPETS
at Pioneer Park, Santa Maria.
Presented by the Santa Maria
Recreation and Parks Department
and PLAY Inc. Cost: free. Contact:
cityofsantamaria.org or 925-0951.
THU SEP 25-SUN SEP 28 11:00 am:
SUNSET SAVOR THE CENTRAL
COAST at Santa Margarita Ranch,
9000 Yerba Buena Ave. A four-day
culinary exploration that invites
you to experience the food,
wine, and lifestyle of the Central
Coast. Cost: varies. Contact:
savorcentralcoast.com or 541-
8000.
FRI SEP 26-SAT SEP 27 (times
vary): TAKE ME OUT at SLO Little
Theatre, 888 Morro St. SLO Little
Theatre’s Ubu’s Other Shoe
Staged Reading series presents
Richard Greenberg’s Tony Award
winning play. Cost: $10. Contact:
slolittletheatre.org or 786-2440.
SAT SEP 27 10:00 am: TEA PARTY at
Los Osos Library, 2075 Palisades.
Come to a Tea Party for children
ages 5 and older. There will be
activities, games, fun, tea, and
treats. Cost: free. Contact: 528-
1862.
SUN SEP 28 1:00 pm: SLOMA
EXHIBITION TOUR at San Luis
Obispo Museum of Art, 1010 Broad
St, SLO. Join SLOMA Curator Ruta
Saliklis for a monthly “Look, Think,
and Respond” tour of exhibitions
in the museum galleries. Cost:
free. Contact: sloma.org or 543-
8562.
Twin Cities Community Hospital
Volunteers, a non-proft providing
support to patients, doctors,
and nurses of the hospital, seek
volunteers to work in the gift shop
and Obstetrics (OB) Dept. AM and
PM 4 hour shifts are available.
Contact: 434-4524.
Last FRI every month at 6:00 pm:
Family Fun at Unity Church, 1165
Stubblefeld St, Orcutt. Contact:
937-3025.
Every THU-FRI 12:00-5:00 pm &
SAT 11:00 am-5:00 pm: Exploration
Station Interactive Science Center
welcomes families at 867 Ramona
Recurring Events
& Resources
Recurring Events
& Resources
Central Coast Family • September 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 20
Local Resources
Ave, Grover Beach. Cost: $2-
3. Contact: 473-1421 or http://
explorationstation.org.
2nd THU of every month 6:00-7:00
pm: Grief Support Group at Central
Coast Hospice, 253 Granada Dr,
Ste D, San Luis Obispo. This free
group is for anyone sufering the
loss of a loved one who is in need
of support. Contact: 540-6020.
2nd SAT of every month FEB-
NOV at 9:00 am: Santa Maria
Recreation and Parks Dept ofers
free docent-led nature walks in
Los Flores Ranch, 6271 Dominion
Rd, Santa Maria. Contact: 925-
0951 x 263.
2nd MON every month 6:30-8:00
pm: Caregiver Support Group
at Cayucos Community Church,
Ocean Ave & S 3rd St. Free
support for caregivers and family
members dealing with long-term
illness, memory loss, dementia,
and Alzheimer’s. Contact: 458-
7484.
Every MON 10:00 am-2:00 pm:
Remain Independent Despite
Vision Loss at Santa Maria Terrace,
1405 E Main St. New ways of
doing daily tasks are taught by
the Braille Institute, such as home
managment, traveling, and using
talking library books. Contact:
462-1225.
2nd & 4th MON every month
at 6:30 pm: MOPS (Mothers of
Preschoolers) meet at Pacifc
Christian Church, 3435 Santa
Maria Way, Santa Maria. Childcare
is provided. Contact: 934-3491 or
www.pacifcchristian.net.
Every TUE 3:00-6:00 pm & FRI
3:00-5:30 pm: Teen Wellness
Program at Arroyo Grande EOC
Health Services Clinic, 1152 E Grand
Ave. Health services, including
reproductive health, in a safe
environment with staf trained
to screen, assess, and to provide
intervention. Appointments are
preferred. Contact: 489-4026.
1st WED every month at 9:00 am:
Community Action Partnership
Senior Health Screening at First
United Methodist Church, 275
N Halcyon Rd, Arroyo Grande.
Free and low-cost services are
ofered for people 50 and older:
blood pressure, pulse, weight,
total cholesterol, screening
for anemia, diabetes, and fecal
blood, nutritional counseling, and
medical referrals. Contact: 481-
2692 or 788-0827.
1st WED every month at 12:00
pm: Disabled American Veterans
luncheon at Veterans Memorial
Bldg, 313 W. Tunnell St, Santa
Maria. Contact: 345-0402.
Every WED 5:30-7:00 pm:
Widowed Support Group at New
Life Church, 990 James Way, Rm
14, Pismo Beach. Arrive 10 min
early for 1st meeting. Ofered by
Hospice of SLO Co. Contact: 544-
2266 or www.hospiceslo.org.
Every TUE at 7:00 pm: Al-Anon
Family Support Group at Luis
OASIS Senior Center, 420 Soares
Ave, Orcutt. Contact: 937-9750.
3rd WED every month at 7:00 pm:
How to Survive Divorce seminar
at the San Luis Obispo Women’s
Community Center, 1124 Nipomo
St, #D in SLO. Practical tips,
pointers, and suggestions for
handling family law issues. $10.00
donation requested for handout
materials and book. Contact: 544-
9313 to register.
4th TUE every month at 5:30 pm:
Legal Clinic for Self-Represented
Litigants at the San Luis Obispo
County Courthouse Law Library,
1050 Monterey St in SLO, #125.
SLO County Bar Assn Family Law
Section & Women’s Community
Center provide one-on-one legal
advice for persons fling divorces
w/o an attorney, and a document
preparer to assist in completing
court-required forms. Min. $40.00
donation. Limit: 12 participants.
Contact: 544-9313.
RISE (formerly Sexual Assault
Recovery and Prevention Center
of San Luis Obispo County)
ofers: Weekly Drop-In Support
Group for Sexual Assault
Survivors; 24 Hour Crisis Line;
Advocacy and Accompaniment;
Peer Counseling; Individual
Clinical Counseling; Prevention
and Education Programs; and
Women’s Empowerment and Self
Defense Workshops. Contact:
545-8888 or www.sarpcenter.
org.
Every SAT 11:00 am-3:00 pm:
ADOPT A PET at Petco, 2051
Theater Dr, in Paso Robles. Cats
are available for adoption through
NCHS. Dogs are available through
Short n’ Sweet Dog Rescue.
Contact: 466-5403.
Every MON 2:00-4:00 pm & WED
3:00-5:00 pm: Jacks’ Adaptive Toy
Lending Library-Jack’s Helping
Hand at Central Coast Gymnastics,
21 Zaca Lane, #100, San Luis
Obispo. Traditional and adaptive
toys for children with all types of
disabilities to check out. In-home
appointments available. Cost:
Free! Contact: 547-1914 or www.
jackshelpinghand.org.
Every TUE 2:00-5:00 pm & FRI
4:00-7:00 pm: Jacks’ Adaptive Toy
Lending Library - Jack’s Helping
Hand at Pat’s Place in Nipomo
Recreation Community Rm, 671
W Teft St, Ste 2, Nipomo. Toys
for children with all types of
disabilities to check out. In-home
appointments also available.
Cost-Free! Contact: 547-1914 or
www.jackshelpinghand.org.
Every FRI at 7:00 pm: Senior
Ballroom Dancing at Madonna
Inn. If you are a senior (single
or attached) and like ballroom
dancing, this is the place! Look
left of the bandstand for sign:
Senior Dancers. Dance, chat and
listen to good music. No fees; no
dues; just fun! Contact: 489-5481
or dg17@juno.com.
Literacy Council for San Luis
Obispo County has an ongoing
and urgent need for volunteer
tutors and ofers free training in
SLO. Contact: 541-4219 or www.
sloliteracy.org.
1st THU every month at 6:15 pm:
Commission on the Status of
Women meets at Coast National
Bank, 500 Marsh St, San Luis
Obispo. This ofcial advisory
Women’s Shelter
of San Luis Obispo County
crisis line: 781-6400
business phone: 781-6401
email: info@wspslo.com
www. womensshelterslo.org
Central Coast Family • September 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 21
Local Resources
group to the SLO County Board
of Supervisors identifes issues
of concern to women that
are not currently the focus of
other advocacy or advisory
organizations. Contact: 788-3406.
Every WED 11:00 am-12:00 pm:
Growing With Baby, an infant
feeding ofce for breastfeeding
mothers and their babies (0-
10 mos), ofers a free class on
feeding, crying, and sleep at
1230 Marsh St, San Luis Obispo.
Pediatric nurse practioner and
lactation consultant Andrea
Herron will answer questions.
Dads are always welcome! Call to
reserve a spot. Contact: 543-6988.
Morro Bay Museum of Natural
History ofers Adventures With
Nature & Mind Walks. Find the
schedule at: www.ccnha.org/
naturewalks.html.
Central Coast Commission for
Senior Citizens ofers many free
services: Senior Connection -
connecting callers with local
resources; HICAP (Health
Insurance Counseling and
Advocacy Program) one on
one assistance for Medicare
benefciaries, advise and referrals
for long term care options, and
help with billing and appeals;
Vial of Life magnetized containers
for medication and medical
information; a Senior Resource
Directory for SLO and SB
Counties, and much more.
Contact: 925-9554 or www.
centralcoastseniors.org.
Hospice of San Luis Obispo
County provides free grief
counseling, group support,
counseling, crisis intervention,
and wellness education to those
with a life-limiting illness, their
families, and the bereaved. This
non-proft agency supports the
community in coping with loss
and promoting healing with free
counseling, community education
and volunteer support to those
grieving a death or dealing with
potential end-of-life issues.
Ofces in San Luis Obispo and
Paso Robles. Contact: 544-2266.
Volunteer as a Good Neighbor!
Make a diference in the life
of an older or disabled adult.
Once trained, volunteers
choose services to contribute
and schedule hours at their
convenience. Training is
scheduled monthly at Wilshire
Community Services, 285 South
St, Ste J, SLO. Contact: 547-7025
x 17.
Volunteer at San Luis Obispo
Museum of Art! Stop by at 1010
Broad St (Mission Plaza) or email
volunteer@sloma.org.
San Luis Obispo Senior Center
ofers health screening, legal
services, meals, exercise, bridge,
and bingo at 1445 Santa Rosa St.
Contact: 781-7306.
Central Coast Astronomical
Society sponsors a Dark Sky
Star Party every month at Santa
Margarita Lake KOA Campground
at sunset. CCAS also sponsors
special guest speakers and
public programs periodically.
Find event schedules, weather
updates, and resources at:
www.centralcoastastronomy.
org. Contact: Aurora Lipper at
aurora@centralcoastastronomy.
org.
San Luis Coastal Adult School’s
Parent Participation Program
ofers Core Parenting and
Enrichment classes in SLO,
Morro Bay, and Los Osos. Bring
your child to a parent and child
activity class, or fnd support and
education just for parents. Cost:
$74 for 10 wks. Contact: 549-1222
or http://parentparticipation.org.
lovorganicfarm.com
mail@lovorganicfarm.com
(805) 242 6789
Central Coast Family • September 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 22
Education
What is “The Maker Movement,”
you ask? The Maker Movement
is a grass-roots movement to
reclaim our artisan and industrial
heritage from the ground up. It
celebrates creativity, ingenuity,
building, upcycling and repairing
things, and general craftiness.
It reminds us that there is much
more to be learned than what is
taught sitting at a desk, and that
hands-on experiences allow us to
grow in new and exciting ways.
The Maker Movement has been a
rising force over the last decade,
starting with hackerspaces and
DIY shows, then with Make
Magazine, the San Mateo and
World Maker Faires. Websites like
instructables.com and thingiverse,
coincide with the development
of inexpensive and open
source prototyping platforms
and “making” equipment like
Arduinos and 3D printers.
The Maker culture has already
spawned an incredible amount
of innovation along with a
top-down push for Maker
education in our public schools
through STEAM (Science,
Technology, Engineering, Arts,
and Mathematics) initiatives.
Now we’re seeing the Maker
Movement featured all the way
to the White House, which hosted
it’s frst Maker Faire this past
summer. Many makers believe
that this is just the beginning!
However exciting these cultural
opportunities are, some of the
most inspiring parts of the Maker
Movement are what it brings
to individuals and communities.
Local Maker Spaces, Hacker
Spaces, artist’s cooperatives,
community workspaces, and
tool libraries are popping up in
cities all over the world. Through
these collaborative resources,
communities are nurturing the
Maker Movement, allowing
the development of tools and
partnerships to relearn our
waning industrial skills, helping
students bring theory into real
world applications, and giving
ideas a place to grow into jobs.
In the year that we’ve been
working on SLO MakerSpace,
we’ve had an incredible amount
of support and excitement from
the community. We’re teaching
classes in partnership with local
schools, working with local
businesses, building curriculum
with Cal Poly interns, and starting
a program for hands-on “Maker
Education” job training.
Our academic programs are
expanding with regular classes
on how to use our machines,
such as 3D printers, laser cutter,
CNC router, pottery studio, MIG
welder, and more! We have new
workshops all the time, Maker
Kid’s birthday parties, and our
regular Maker Fridays from 6:00-
8:00 pm have been a hit with kids
as well as parents.
As membership grows, so does
our ability to foster our local
Maker community. This exciting
resource is continually evolving
with new collaborations and
opportunities. Jump into the
Maker Movement by joining
SLO MakerSpace as a Member
or Family, a Private WorkSpace
Member, a Community partner,
or a Corporate Member.
FAQ:
Where can I learn more about the
Maker Movement?
www.makezine.com is an
incredible publication with articles
featuring Makers, the movement,
new technology, and fun projects
to get you started!
Where can I learn more about SLO
MakerSpace?
Go to www.slomakerspace.com
to see our equipment, calendar,
and programs.
How can I get involved?
Come to 3988 Short Street in
SLO for a tour on Mondays
and Wednesdays at 6:30 pm or
Saturdays at 4:30 pm. Show up at
our Maker Friday nights from 6:00-
8:00 pm. Like us on facebook and
join our mailing list to stay up to
date on what we’re making!
SLO MakerSpace CEO Clint Slaughter, MD is
an emergency physician in San Luis Obispo at
French and Arroyo Grande Hospitals and has
been a lifelong maker. He is excited to develop
an advanced educational and innovation
laboratory for the community and for his two
young sons to learn in. Dr. Slaughter can be
reached at (805) 242-1285.
S LO MAKER
MOVEMENT
by Clint Slaughter, MD
Central Coast Family • September 2014 • www.centralcoastfamily.com • Page 23
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