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chas
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J
OYT
HEBAKER
HOMEMADEDECADENCE
atoneoft
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er
et
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er
s
:

CLARKSON POTTER

contents

introduction 8

brunch 10
cookies, brownies & bars 72
pies, crumbles & cobblers 124
layer cakes, cupcakes & skillet cakes 176
ice cream social 222
acknowledgments 266
index 268

introduction
You should see my oven. You really should. It’s a tiny apartmentsize oven made to complement the tiny apartment-size refrigerator, inside
the tiny apartment-size kitchen, housed in the very tiny bungalow in which I
live and work, located in Venice, California.
By the looks of the oven and the mini baking sheets I’ve had to buy to
accommodate it, you’d probably say that I have no business at all in the
baking world. Thankfully, it’s not the size of one’s oven that makes a baker;
it’s the amount of butter in one’s fridge and passion in one’s heart.
My food blog, JoytheBaker.com, was born out of such passion (and butter,
let’s be real). I started the site in early 2008, during that weird time on the
Internet when AOL chat rooms were uncool and Instagram didn’t exist yet.
I started it on a borrowed laptop, with a borrowed Internet connection, in a
friend’s kitchen. It was all very haphazard, but it was a place for me to scream
into the void by way of sharing recipes, photos, and stories. Food blogs were
just starting to emerge, authored by people utterly obsessed with food, and
with Joy the Baker I found myself in humble but really enthusiastic company.
The Internet can teach us some pretty invaluable lessons (beyond how
to tie a tie and poach an egg). It has taught me that people love to connect
around food. We love to share recipes, gawk at pictures of chocolate chip
cookies, and share our kitchen successes and occasional failures. In the past
few years, Joy the Baker has grown from a solitary endeavor to a community
of butter-loving bakers eager to share and learn together every day.
I’m a self-taught baker. Fueled by an unreasonable love of sweets and
my parents’ fondness for store-bought whole wheat fig bars, I taught myself
how to bake as a survival skill. And yet I learned the heart of baking from my
parents. My dad, who has a healthy appreciation for pies, taught me the art
of a perfect pie crust; my mom, a cake enthusiast, imparted the importance
of completely cooled cake layers in cake decorating. I may not put on a

8

pastry chef coat every morning, but knowledge and confidence in the kitchen
don’t always come from a fancy uniform. Sometimes all you need is a great
recipe and a trusty spatula.
In Joy the Baker Homemade Decadence, I’m diving deep into the edible
wonders I explore every day in my kitchen and on Joy the Baker. I’m
reaching beyond what we might need to get down to the nitty-gritty of what
we really want. My wants generally include boozy brunches, chewy chocolate
cookies, three-tiered cakes, and caramel in my ice cream. No shame! There’s
no such thing as out-of-bounds when it comes to dessert desires. My needs
(as opposed to my wants) generally include shelter, sustenance, and a fork.
Not as extravagant and severely lacking in caramel.
Let’s talk about how to get more salty pretzels into our cakes, like in the
Chocolate–Peanut Butter Pretzel Layer Cake (page 190). I’ve found a way
to make ice cream taste like cheesecake! I call it Strawberry Cheesecake Ice
Cream (page 245), and it’s a revelation. We can totally have pizza for brunch,
too, with Sausage and Blackberry Breakfast Pizza (page 59). And don’t even
get me started with the Apple Pie with Cheddar–Bacon Crust (page 135). It’s
beyond!
Decadent desserts shouldn’t be reserved for fancy date nights at
expensive restaurants. The recipes in this book are designed to make you
look like a hero at the brunch table or neighborhood potluck. More than
that, though, I want these sweet recipes to feel special. I know the biggest
indulgence these days is having the time to make a pie crust from scratch
and churn your own ice cream. Time is such a luxury, and for you
to spend those precious moments making something truly
wonderful for yourself and those you love is a big deal.
I honor that.
I want you to feel confident in the kitchen. I want
you to make scones for the first time, dust off that
ice cream maker you got as a wedding present,
and conquer your fear of meringue. I think you’ll
find that the time involved and love exuded will
make a tasty, tasteful difference. I believe we can all
use a little extra love and caramel in our treats these
days. It can all be ours, no matter the size of our ovens.

introduction

9

introduction
You should see my oven. You really should. It’s a tiny apartmentsize oven made to complement the tiny apartment-size refrigerator, inside
the tiny apartment-size kitchen, housed in the very tiny bungalow in which I
live and work, located in Venice, California.
By the looks of the oven and the mini baking sheets I’ve had to buy to
accommodate it, you’d probably say that I have no business at all in the
baking world. Thankfully, it’s not the size of one’s oven that makes a baker;
it’s the amount of butter in one’s fridge and passion in one’s heart.
My food blog, JoytheBaker.com, was born out of such passion (and butter,
let’s be real). I started the site in early 2008, during that weird time on the
Internet when AOL chat rooms were uncool and Instagram didn’t exist yet.
I started it on a borrowed laptop, with a borrowed Internet connection, in a
friend’s kitchen. It was all very haphazard, but it was a place for me to scream
into the void by way of sharing recipes, photos, and stories. Food blogs were
just starting to emerge, authored by people utterly obsessed with food, and
with Joy the Baker I found myself in humble but really enthusiastic company.
The Internet can teach us some pretty invaluable lessons (beyond how
to tie a tie and poach an egg). It has taught me that people love to connect
around food. We love to share recipes, gawk at pictures of chocolate chip
cookies, and share our kitchen successes and occasional failures. In the past
few years, Joy the Baker has grown from a solitary endeavor to a community
of butter-loving bakers eager to share and learn together every day.
I’m a self-taught baker. Fueled by an unreasonable love of sweets and
my parents’ fondness for store-bought whole wheat fig bars, I taught myself
how to bake as a survival skill. And yet I learned the heart of baking from my
parents. My dad, who has a healthy appreciation for pies, taught me the art
of a perfect pie crust; my mom, a cake enthusiast, imparted the importance
of completely cooled cake layers in cake decorating. I may not put on a

8

pastry chef coat every morning, but knowledge and confidence in the kitchen
don’t always come from a fancy uniform. Sometimes all you need is a great
recipe and a trusty spatula.
In Joy the Baker Homemade Decadence, I’m diving deep into the edible
wonders I explore every day in my kitchen and on Joy the Baker. I’m
reaching beyond what we might need to get down to the nitty-gritty of what
we really want. My wants generally include boozy brunches, chewy chocolate
cookies, three-tiered cakes, and caramel in my ice cream. No shame! There’s
no such thing as out-of-bounds when it comes to dessert desires. My needs
(as opposed to my wants) generally include shelter, sustenance, and a fork.
Not as extravagant and severely lacking in caramel.
Let’s talk about how to get more salty pretzels into our cakes, like in the
Chocolate–Peanut Butter Pretzel Layer Cake (page 190). I’ve found a way
to make ice cream taste like cheesecake! I call it Strawberry Cheesecake Ice
Cream (page 245), and it’s a revelation. We can totally have pizza for brunch,
too, with Sausage and Blackberry Breakfast Pizza (page 59). And don’t even
get me started with the Apple Pie with Cheddar–Bacon Crust (page 135). It’s
beyond!
Decadent desserts shouldn’t be reserved for fancy date nights at
expensive restaurants. The recipes in this book are designed to make you
look like a hero at the brunch table or neighborhood potluck. More than
that, though, I want these sweet recipes to feel special. I know the biggest
indulgence these days is having the time to make a pie crust from scratch
and churn your own ice cream. Time is such a luxury, and for you
to spend those precious moments making something truly
wonderful for yourself and those you love is a big deal.
I honor that.
I want you to feel confident in the kitchen. I want
you to make scones for the first time, dust off that
ice cream maker you got as a wedding present,
and conquer your fear of meringue. I think you’ll
find that the time involved and love exuded will
make a tasty, tasteful difference. I believe we can all
use a little extra love and caramel in our treats these
days. It can all be ours, no matter the size of our ovens.

introduction

9

Any dish consisting of roasted potatoes and fried eggs is automatically breakfast, even
if we call it “nachos.” This is a modified rendition of the traditional fried egg and hash
brown breakfast. By adding fresh tomato, avocados, jalapeños, and cheese sauce, we’re
transforming hash browns into an all-out breakfast-nacho situation. Heck, yes, it’s as
good as it sounds.

roasted-potato

breakfast nachos
nachos
1½ teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon freshly
cracked black pepper
½ teaspoon garlic powder
½ teaspoon cayenne
pepper
2½ pounds (about 5 small
to medium) russet
potatoes
3 tablespoons olive oil
3 Italian sausages (about
1 pound), casings
removed
1 small onion, chopped
2 garlic cloves, minced
¼ teaspoon crushed
red pepper flakes
(optional)
2 tablespoons unsalted
butter
1 tablespoon all-purpose
flour
2 cups whole milk,
warmed

52

homemade decadence

1. Put a rack in the center of the oven and preheat the oven to 425°F. Line
2 baking sheets with aluminum foil.
2. In a small bowl, combine the salt, black pepper, garlic powder, and
cayenne pepper.
3. Using a mandolin or a knife, thinly slice the potatoes into ½-inch-thick
rounds. Put them on the prepared baking sheets in a single layer. Drizzle
with the olive oil and sprinkle with half of the seasoning blend. Bake the
potatoes, turning halfway through, until golden brown and crispy, 25 to
30 minutes.
4. Meanwhile,

heat a 9- or 10-inch cast-iron skillet over medium heat. Put
the sausages in the skillet and cook, using a wooden spoon to break up any
lumps, until browned, about 5 minutes. Add the onion and garlic and cook
until the onion is translucent, about 3 minutes. Add the red pepper flakes,
if using. Reduce the heat to low and cook for 2 more minutes. Transfer to a
bowl or plate.
5. In the same skillet, set over medium heat, melt 1 tablespoon of the butter.
Sprinkle in the flour and whisk for a few seconds. While whisking constantly,
slowly pour in the warmed milk. Season with the remaining seasoning
blend and cook, whisking constantly, until the sauce has thickened slightly,
about 6 minutes. Turn off the heat and whisk in the cheese until completely
melted and smooth.

6. In

a clean small nonstick skillet set over medium heat, melt the
remaining 1 tablespoon butter. Crack in as many eggs as people you’re
serving and fry for 3 minutes, cover the pan with a lid, and cook until
whites are cooked through and yolks are still soft, about 4 minutes.

2 cups shredded Irish
Cheddar cheese (or
white Cheddar cheese)

7. Transfer the potatoes to a platter or individual bowls. Top with the
cheese sauce and then the sausage mixture. Sprinkle with the toppings as
you desire. Top with the fried eggs and serve immediately.

toppings
1 tomato, chopped

serves 4 to 6

4 to 6 large eggs

2 scallions, sliced
¹⁄³ to ½ cup sliced pickled
jalapeños
2 avocados, peeled,
pitted, and smashed
with a squeeze of fresh
lime juice
Sour cream
Fresh cilantro

Any dish consisting of roasted potatoes and fried eggs is automatically breakfast, even
if we call it “nachos.” This is a modified rendition of the traditional fried egg and hash
brown breakfast. By adding fresh tomato, avocados, jalapeños, and cheese sauce, we’re
transforming hash browns into an all-out breakfast-nacho situation. Heck, yes, it’s as
good as it sounds.

roasted-potato

breakfast nachos
nachos
1½ teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon freshly
cracked black pepper
½ teaspoon garlic powder
½ teaspoon cayenne
pepper
2½ pounds (about 5 small
to medium) russet
potatoes
3 tablespoons olive oil
3 Italian sausages (about
1 pound), casings
removed
1 small onion, chopped
2 garlic cloves, minced
¼ teaspoon crushed
red pepper flakes
(optional)
2 tablespoons unsalted
butter
1 tablespoon all-purpose
flour
2 cups whole milk,
warmed

52

homemade decadence

1. Put a rack in the center of the oven and preheat the oven to 425°F. Line
2 baking sheets with aluminum foil.
2. In a small bowl, combine the salt, black pepper, garlic powder, and
cayenne pepper.
3. Using a mandolin or a knife, thinly slice the potatoes into ½-inch-thick
rounds. Put them on the prepared baking sheets in a single layer. Drizzle
with the olive oil and sprinkle with half of the seasoning blend. Bake the
potatoes, turning halfway through, until golden brown and crispy, 25 to
30 minutes.
4. Meanwhile,

heat a 9- or 10-inch cast-iron skillet over medium heat. Put
the sausages in the skillet and cook, using a wooden spoon to break up any
lumps, until browned, about 5 minutes. Add the onion and garlic and cook
until the onion is translucent, about 3 minutes. Add the red pepper flakes,
if using. Reduce the heat to low and cook for 2 more minutes. Transfer to a
bowl or plate.
5. In the same skillet, set over medium heat, melt 1 tablespoon of the butter.
Sprinkle in the flour and whisk for a few seconds. While whisking constantly,
slowly pour in the warmed milk. Season with the remaining seasoning
blend and cook, whisking constantly, until the sauce has thickened slightly,
about 6 minutes. Turn off the heat and whisk in the cheese until completely
melted and smooth.

6. In

a clean small nonstick skillet set over medium heat, melt the
remaining 1 tablespoon butter. Crack in as many eggs as people you’re
serving and fry for 3 minutes, cover the pan with a lid, and cook until
whites are cooked through and yolks are still soft, about 4 minutes.

2 cups shredded Irish
Cheddar cheese (or
white Cheddar cheese)

7. Transfer the potatoes to a platter or individual bowls. Top with the
cheese sauce and then the sausage mixture. Sprinkle with the toppings as
you desire. Top with the fried eggs and serve immediately.

toppings
1 tomato, chopped

serves 4 to 6

4 to 6 large eggs

2 scallions, sliced
¹⁄³ to ½ cup sliced pickled
jalapeños
2 avocados, peeled,
pitted, and smashed
with a squeeze of fresh
lime juice
Sour cream
Fresh cilantro

There’s just something about chocolate chip cookies that always feels like a treat. They
make you feel thought of, cared for, and special—even if you’re just making a big batch
for yourself. They’re the chicken soup of cookies.
This version of the classic chocolate chip cookie is elevated to dream-status.
It’s packed with dark chocolate chunks and salty roasted pistachios, and topped
with smoked sea salt. The smoky salt enhances the flavor of the dark chocolate
and balances the sweetness of the cookie—it’s seriously good, so don’t skip it. The
pistachios add a soft crunch and pretty green flecks throughout the cookie.
This is a treat-yo’self cookie. You’re worth it. Every bit.

dark chocolate, pistachio &

smoked sea salt cookies
½ cup (1 stick) unsalted
butter, at room
temperature

1. Put

racks in the center and upper third of the oven and preheat the oven
to 350°F. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper.

½ cup granulated sugar

2. In

½ cup packed light brown
sugar

the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat
the butter and sugars until pale and fluffy, about 4 minutes. Add the egg
and beat for about 1 minute. Add the vanilla and beat until incorporated.

1 large egg

3. In

1 teaspoon pure vanilla
extract
1¼ cups all-purpose flour
½ teaspoon baking soda
¼ teaspoon salt
1½ cups dark chocolate
chips
1 cup shelled pistachios,
coarsely chopped
Smoked sea salt, for
sprinkling

a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, baking soda, and salt. Add
this mixture all at once to the butter mixture. Beat on low speed until just
incorporated. Beat in the chocolate chips and nuts.
4. Scoop the cookie dough, about 2 tablespoons per cookie, onto the
prepared baking sheets, leaving about 2 inches in between each cookie.
Sprinkle generously with smoked sea salt.
5. Bake until just golden brown, 10 to 12 minutes. Let the cookies cool
on the pans for 5 minutes before transferring them to wire racks to cool
completely. The cookies will last, well wrapped, at room temperature for up
to 4 days . . . as if they’ll last that long.

makes about 24 cookies

80

homemade decadence

There’s just something about chocolate chip cookies that always feels like a treat. They
make you feel thought of, cared for, and special—even if you’re just making a big batch
for yourself. They’re the chicken soup of cookies.
This version of the classic chocolate chip cookie is elevated to dream-status.
It’s packed with dark chocolate chunks and salty roasted pistachios, and topped
with smoked sea salt. The smoky salt enhances the flavor of the dark chocolate
and balances the sweetness of the cookie—it’s seriously good, so don’t skip it. The
pistachios add a soft crunch and pretty green flecks throughout the cookie.
This is a treat-yo’self cookie. You’re worth it. Every bit.

dark chocolate, pistachio &

smoked sea salt cookies
½ cup (1 stick) unsalted
butter, at room
temperature

1. Put

racks in the center and upper third of the oven and preheat the oven
to 350°F. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper.

½ cup granulated sugar

2. In

½ cup packed light brown
sugar

the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat
the butter and sugars until pale and fluffy, about 4 minutes. Add the egg
and beat for about 1 minute. Add the vanilla and beat until incorporated.

1 large egg

3. In

1 teaspoon pure vanilla
extract
1¼ cups all-purpose flour
½ teaspoon baking soda
¼ teaspoon salt
1½ cups dark chocolate
chips
1 cup shelled pistachios,
coarsely chopped
Smoked sea salt, for
sprinkling

a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, baking soda, and salt. Add
this mixture all at once to the butter mixture. Beat on low speed until just
incorporated. Beat in the chocolate chips and nuts.
4. Scoop the cookie dough, about 2 tablespoons per cookie, onto the
prepared baking sheets, leaving about 2 inches in between each cookie.
Sprinkle generously with smoked sea salt.
5. Bake until just golden brown, 10 to 12 minutes. Let the cookies cool
on the pans for 5 minutes before transferring them to wire racks to cool
completely. The cookies will last, well wrapped, at room temperature for up
to 4 days . . . as if they’ll last that long.

makes about 24 cookies

80

homemade decadence

how to make
perfect buttermilk pie crust
(aka you can totally do this!)

INGREDIENTS:
cold unsalted butter • salt and granulated sugar • all-purpose flour • cold buttermilk
I cannot let you step away from this book without instilling in you a deep love for
homemade buttermilk pie crust. This pie crust is generous, forgiving, and, best of
all, it’s rooting for you. It’s the kind of pie crust that wants to do a good job for you.
It wants to be your soldier.
If you keep your butter chilled and your buttermilk cold, this crust will be the new
love of your life. It bakes up supremely buttery and wildly flaky. I adore this crust with
Lemon-Buttermilk Pie (see page 140) and Lemon-Blueberry Pie (see page 139).
cold unsalted butter W 
hy are bakers so
specific about the flavor and temperature
of their butter? Butter is everything. When
we step into the kitchen to make a pie
crust, we’re essentially deciding what to do
with our butter.
You want to use unsalted butter
because you want to be able to control the
amount of salt that goes into the crust.
Different companies use different amounts
of salt for their salted butters, so if we start
with unsalted butter, we know exactly what
we’re getting ourselves into when we add
1 teaspoon of salt.
Cold butter is absolutely essential to a
successful pie crust. When broken down
into the dry ingredients, it creates flaky
pockets of flavor. You just won’t get the

128

homemade decadence

same effect with mushy, room-temperature
butter (save that for the cake chapter). The
science: The water in the butter will quickly
evaporate when the chilled crust (with all
its butter pockets) hits the oven. The water
evaporation will cause the crust to rise and
create a flaky and layered crust.
If our butter is cold and stays cold, I
promise we’re halfway to success!

balancing flavor, enhancing both the butter
and the flavors of the pie.

all-purpose flour A 
s with most recipes
in this book, my pie crust recipes call for
all-purpose flour. My favorite brand is
King Arthur Flour. I keep my flour stored
in a large jar, tightly sealed, and at room
temperature. When measuring, I fluff the
flour with a large spoon, lightly spoon
it into a measuring cup, and, using a
butter knife, level the flour flush with the
measuring cup.

2½ cups all-purpose
flour
2 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup (2 sticks) cold
unsalted butter,
cut into cubes
½ cup plus
1 tablespoon cold
buttermilk

cold buttermilk I’ve already lectured you
about the importance of cold butter, and
the same thing goes for buttermilk. We
want cold on cold buttermilk.
I also love using buttermilk because it
adds yet another layer of flavor. Buttermilk
adds a creamy tang to our pie crusts.
The hint of acid in the buttermilk will
also help the texture. If you’re fresh out
of buttermilk, you can also use ice-cold
water. The results will be delicious. I
promise.

1. In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, sugar, and salt. Add

the butter and, using your fingers or a pastry cutter, quickly work the
butter into the flour mixture until some butter pieces are the size of
oat flakes and some are the size of peas. Make a well in the mixture,
pour in the buttermilk, and using a fork, stir until a dough forms.
Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured counter. It will be moist and
shaggy. Divide the dough in 2 and gently knead each half into a disk.
Wrap each disk in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 1 hour.
2. To roll out the pie crust, on a well-floured counter, roll the bottom

crust until it is 1⁄8 inch thick and about 12 inches in diameter.
Occasionally move the crust around the floured counter during rolling
to ensure that it’s not sticking to the counter. Transfer it to a pie
dish and trim the edges. For a single pie crust, fold the edges under
and crimp with your fingers or a fork. Cover with plastic wrap and
refrigerate for at least 30 minutes and up to 3 hours.

salt and sugar L 
et’s flavor this crust! We’re

3. For a double-crusted pie, roll out the top crust in the same

relying on butter to do a major amount
of the heavy lifting when it comes to the
crust. Pie crust should be a simple base
to accompany the flavors of the pie. The
pie crust should be simple, but not entirely
tasteless. That’s where salt and sugar
come in! The salt and sugar will add a

manner. Fill the pie and top with the second crust. Fold
both layers of pie dough under and crimp with a fork or
your fingers. Cover loosely with plastic wrap and chill in the
refrigerator for 30 minutes before baking.

makes one 9-inch double pie crust

pies, crumbles & cobblers

129

how to make
perfect buttermilk pie crust
(aka you can totally do this!)

INGREDIENTS:
cold unsalted butter • salt and granulated sugar • all-purpose flour • cold buttermilk
I cannot let you step away from this book without instilling in you a deep love for
homemade buttermilk pie crust. This pie crust is generous, forgiving, and, best of
all, it’s rooting for you. It’s the kind of pie crust that wants to do a good job for you.
It wants to be your soldier.
If you keep your butter chilled and your buttermilk cold, this crust will be the new
love of your life. It bakes up supremely buttery and wildly flaky. I adore this crust with
Lemon-Buttermilk Pie (see page 140) and Lemon-Blueberry Pie (see page 139).
cold unsalted butter W 
hy are bakers so
specific about the flavor and temperature
of their butter? Butter is everything. When
we step into the kitchen to make a pie
crust, we’re essentially deciding what to do
with our butter.
You want to use unsalted butter
because you want to be able to control the
amount of salt that goes into the crust.
Different companies use different amounts
of salt for their salted butters, so if we start
with unsalted butter, we know exactly what
we’re getting ourselves into when we add
1 teaspoon of salt.
Cold butter is absolutely essential to a
successful pie crust. When broken down
into the dry ingredients, it creates flaky
pockets of flavor. You just won’t get the

128

homemade decadence

same effect with mushy, room-temperature
butter (save that for the cake chapter). The
science: The water in the butter will quickly
evaporate when the chilled crust (with all
its butter pockets) hits the oven. The water
evaporation will cause the crust to rise and
create a flaky and layered crust.
If our butter is cold and stays cold, I
promise we’re halfway to success!

balancing flavor, enhancing both the butter
and the flavors of the pie.

all-purpose flour A 
s with most recipes
in this book, my pie crust recipes call for
all-purpose flour. My favorite brand is
King Arthur Flour. I keep my flour stored
in a large jar, tightly sealed, and at room
temperature. When measuring, I fluff the
flour with a large spoon, lightly spoon
it into a measuring cup, and, using a
butter knife, level the flour flush with the
measuring cup.

2½ cups all-purpose
flour
2 tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup (2 sticks) cold
unsalted butter,
cut into cubes
½ cup plus
1 tablespoon cold
buttermilk

cold buttermilk I’ve already lectured you
about the importance of cold butter, and
the same thing goes for buttermilk. We
want cold on cold buttermilk.
I also love using buttermilk because it
adds yet another layer of flavor. Buttermilk
adds a creamy tang to our pie crusts.
The hint of acid in the buttermilk will
also help the texture. If you’re fresh out
of buttermilk, you can also use ice-cold
water. The results will be delicious. I
promise.

1. In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, sugar, and salt. Add

the butter and, using your fingers or a pastry cutter, quickly work the
butter into the flour mixture until some butter pieces are the size of
oat flakes and some are the size of peas. Make a well in the mixture,
pour in the buttermilk, and using a fork, stir until a dough forms.
Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured counter. It will be moist and
shaggy. Divide the dough in 2 and gently knead each half into a disk.
Wrap each disk in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 1 hour.
2. To roll out the pie crust, on a well-floured counter, roll the bottom

crust until it is 1⁄8 inch thick and about 12 inches in diameter.
Occasionally move the crust around the floured counter during rolling
to ensure that it’s not sticking to the counter. Transfer it to a pie
dish and trim the edges. For a single pie crust, fold the edges under
and crimp with your fingers or a fork. Cover with plastic wrap and
refrigerate for at least 30 minutes and up to 3 hours.

salt and sugar L 
et’s flavor this crust! We’re

3. For a double-crusted pie, roll out the top crust in the same

relying on butter to do a major amount
of the heavy lifting when it comes to the
crust. Pie crust should be a simple base
to accompany the flavors of the pie. The
pie crust should be simple, but not entirely
tasteless. That’s where salt and sugar
come in! The salt and sugar will add a

manner. Fill the pie and top with the second crust. Fold
both layers of pie dough under and crimp with a fork or
your fingers. Cover loosely with plastic wrap and chill in the
refrigerator for 30 minutes before baking.

makes one 9-inch double pie crust

pies, crumbles & cobblers

129

Let’s do backflips in the park, pull some stunts on the jungle gym, sit on a blanket in
the backyard, sprinkle heaps of salted pretzels on top of our peanut butter pie, and
make the world the most perfect place it can be.

peanut butter

cream pie

filling
1½ cups heavy cream
1 (8-ounce) package
cream cheese, at room
temperature
¼ cup packed light brown
sugar
¼ teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon pure vanilla
extract
1 cup smooth all-natural
peanut butter
Graham Cracker Crust
(page 132) or Chocolate
Cookie Crust (page 132)
whipped cream topping
1½ cups heavy cream
¼ cup confectioners’ sugar
optional garnish
½ cup coarsely chopped
peanut butter cups
½ cup coarsely chopped
salted pretzels
2 ounces dark chocolate,
melted

152

homemade decadence

1. For

the filling, in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the whisk
attachment, beat the cream until it holds soft peaks, 4 to 5 minutes.
Transfer to a medium bowl.
2. In the same bowl of the electric mixer (you don’t have to rinse it out)
fitted with the paddle attachment, beat the cream cheese on medium
speed until smooth and pliable, about 3 minutes. Add the brown sugar,
salt, and vanilla extract and beat well. Beat in the peanut butter until
smooth. Remove the bowl from the mixer and gently fold in a quarter of
the whipped cream. Gently fold in another quarter of the whipped cream.
Repeat twice with the remaining whipped cream until the mixture is well
incorporated but still fluffy. Spoon the filling into the prepared crust.
3. For

the whipped cream topping, in the clean bowl of an electric mixer
fitted with the whisk attachment, beat the cream and confectioners’
sugar until it holds soft peaks, 4 to 5 minutes. Top the pie with the
whipped cream mixture. Cover lightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate for
at least 4 hours before serving.
4. Just before serving, generously sprinkle with the chopped peanut
butter cups or salted pretzels, or drizzle with melted chocolate.
5. The

pie will last, well wrapped in the refrigerator, for up to 4 days.

makes one 9-inch pie

Let’s do backflips in the park, pull some stunts on the jungle gym, sit on a blanket in
the backyard, sprinkle heaps of salted pretzels on top of our peanut butter pie, and
make the world the most perfect place it can be.

peanut butter

cream pie

filling
1½ cups heavy cream
1 (8-ounce) package
cream cheese, at room
temperature
¼ cup packed light brown
sugar
¼ teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon pure vanilla
extract
1 cup smooth all-natural
peanut butter
Graham Cracker Crust
(page 132) or Chocolate
Cookie Crust (page 132)
whipped cream topping
1½ cups heavy cream
¼ cup confectioners’ sugar
optional garnish
½ cup coarsely chopped
peanut butter cups
½ cup coarsely chopped
salted pretzels
2 ounces dark chocolate,
melted

152

homemade decadence

1. For

the filling, in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the whisk
attachment, beat the cream until it holds soft peaks, 4 to 5 minutes.
Transfer to a medium bowl.
2. In the same bowl of the electric mixer (you don’t have to rinse it out)
fitted with the paddle attachment, beat the cream cheese on medium
speed until smooth and pliable, about 3 minutes. Add the brown sugar,
salt, and vanilla extract and beat well. Beat in the peanut butter until
smooth. Remove the bowl from the mixer and gently fold in a quarter of
the whipped cream. Gently fold in another quarter of the whipped cream.
Repeat twice with the remaining whipped cream until the mixture is well
incorporated but still fluffy. Spoon the filling into the prepared crust.
3. For

the whipped cream topping, in the clean bowl of an electric mixer
fitted with the whisk attachment, beat the cream and confectioners’
sugar until it holds soft peaks, 4 to 5 minutes. Top the pie with the
whipped cream mixture. Cover lightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate for
at least 4 hours before serving.
4. Just before serving, generously sprinkle with the chopped peanut
butter cups or salted pretzels, or drizzle with melted chocolate.
5. The

pie will last, well wrapped in the refrigerator, for up to 4 days.

makes one 9-inch pie

¼ teaspoon salt
2 tablespoon unsalted butter, cut into
½ tablespoons
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1. In a small bowl, combine the espresso

powder and hot water and stir until dissolved.
In a 2-quart heavy saucepan set over
medium heat, combine the cream, corn
syrup, cocoa powder, brown sugar, half of the
chocolate, and salt. Cook, stirring constantly,
until chocolate is melted, about 4 minutes.
Bring the mixture to a low boil and cook,
stirring occasionally, until thoroughly
combined and glossy, about 5 minutes.
2. Remove the pan from the heat, add the

remaining chocolate, the butter, vanilla
extract, and espresso mixture. Stir until
smooth. Let cool slightly before serving. The
sauce will keep in an airtight container in the
refrigerator for up to 1 week. Reheat over low
heat.
Makes about 2 cups

salted caramel sauce C 
aramelized sugar
mixed with cream and butter makes a
dream topping for ultracreamy desserts
like ice cream. I love adding a generous
hint of salt to cut the sweetness. This
sauce is especially over-the-top when
paired with Cookie No-Dough Ice Cream
(page 246) and Rum-Apricot Ice Cream
(page 249).

ice cream

¼ cup light corn syrup
²⁄³ cup heavy cream
4 tablespoons (½ stick) unsalted butter
1 teaspoon sea salt
1. In a medium saucepan set over medium

heat, combine ¼ cup water with the sugar
and corn syrup. Bring to a boil and cook,
stirring once or twice, until the sugar has
melted and turned a medium amber color,
6 to 8 minutes. Remove the pan from the
heat and immediately add heavy cream and
butter. Be careful; the mixture will boil and
foam. Stir well, add the salt, and stir well
again. The caramel may seem thin; that’s ok.
Transfer to a bowl, cover with plastic wrap,
and put in the refrigerator to cool for at least
4 hours (overnight is best).
container in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.
Makes about 2 cups

homemade decadence

blueberry–goat cheese

1 cup sugar

2. The caramel will keep in an airtight

234

Dorie Greenspan—one of my favorite bakers of all time—introduced me to the
wonders of blueberry ice cream in her stellar book Baking. In this homage to
her creation, I’ve added goat cheese, which imparts a mild but distinct tang.
It’s a fancy cheese plate with fresh blueberries and goat cheese brought to life
in an ice cream. It would be my instinct to scoop this beautifully purple ice
cream and drizzle each serving with a touch of honey.

1 cup blueberries, fresh
or frozen (if frozen,
thaw and drain the
berries)
½ cup packed light brown
sugar
Pinch of salt
2 cups heavy cream
1 cup whole milk
1 teaspoon vodka
(optional)
4 ounces goat cheese,
coarsely crumbled

1. In a medium saucepan set over medium heat, combine ¼ cup water with
the blueberries, brown sugar, and salt. Cook until the berries are softened
and begin to burst, about 5 minutes. Transfer to a blender and puree until
smooth. (Actually, it’s okay if a few chunks remain.) Add the cream, milk,
and vodka, if using, and blend well. Add the goat cheese and pulse until
mostly incorporated. Pour the mixture into a bowl, cover with plastic wrap,
and refrigerate until chilled through, about 1 hour.
2. Churn the custard in an ice cream maker according to the
manufacturer’s instructions. Transfer to a freezer-safe container and
freeze for 2 hours before serving.
3. Ice

cream is best served within 5 days of churning.

makes about 4 cups

¼ teaspoon salt
2 tablespoon unsalted butter, cut into
½ tablespoons
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1. In a small bowl, combine the espresso

powder and hot water and stir until dissolved.
In a 2-quart heavy saucepan set over
medium heat, combine the cream, corn
syrup, cocoa powder, brown sugar, half of the
chocolate, and salt. Cook, stirring constantly,
until chocolate is melted, about 4 minutes.
Bring the mixture to a low boil and cook,
stirring occasionally, until thoroughly
combined and glossy, about 5 minutes.
2. Remove the pan from the heat, add the

remaining chocolate, the butter, vanilla
extract, and espresso mixture. Stir until
smooth. Let cool slightly before serving. The
sauce will keep in an airtight container in the
refrigerator for up to 1 week. Reheat over low
heat.
Makes about 2 cups

salted caramel sauce C 
aramelized sugar
mixed with cream and butter makes a
dream topping for ultracreamy desserts
like ice cream. I love adding a generous
hint of salt to cut the sweetness. This
sauce is especially over-the-top when
paired with Cookie No-Dough Ice Cream
(page 246) and Rum-Apricot Ice Cream
(page 249).

ice cream

¼ cup light corn syrup
²⁄³ cup heavy cream
4 tablespoons (½ stick) unsalted butter
1 teaspoon sea salt
1. In a medium saucepan set over medium

heat, combine ¼ cup water with the sugar
and corn syrup. Bring to a boil and cook,
stirring once or twice, until the sugar has
melted and turned a medium amber color,
6 to 8 minutes. Remove the pan from the
heat and immediately add heavy cream and
butter. Be careful; the mixture will boil and
foam. Stir well, add the salt, and stir well
again. The caramel may seem thin; that’s ok.
Transfer to a bowl, cover with plastic wrap,
and put in the refrigerator to cool for at least
4 hours (overnight is best).
container in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.
Makes about 2 cups

homemade decadence

blueberry–goat cheese

1 cup sugar

2. The caramel will keep in an airtight

234

Dorie Greenspan—one of my favorite bakers of all time—introduced me to the
wonders of blueberry ice cream in her stellar book Baking. In this homage to
her creation, I’ve added goat cheese, which imparts a mild but distinct tang.
It’s a fancy cheese plate with fresh blueberries and goat cheese brought to life
in an ice cream. It would be my instinct to scoop this beautifully purple ice
cream and drizzle each serving with a touch of honey.

1 cup blueberries, fresh
or frozen (if frozen,
thaw and drain the
berries)
½ cup packed light brown
sugar
Pinch of salt
2 cups heavy cream
1 cup whole milk
1 teaspoon vodka
(optional)
4 ounces goat cheese,
coarsely crumbled

1. In a medium saucepan set over medium heat, combine ¼ cup water with
the blueberries, brown sugar, and salt. Cook until the berries are softened
and begin to burst, about 5 minutes. Transfer to a blender and puree until
smooth. (Actually, it’s okay if a few chunks remain.) Add the cream, milk,
and vodka, if using, and blend well. Add the goat cheese and pulse until
mostly incorporated. Pour the mixture into a bowl, cover with plastic wrap,
and refrigerate until chilled through, about 1 hour.
2. Churn the custard in an ice cream maker according to the
manufacturer’s instructions. Transfer to a freezer-safe container and
freeze for 2 hours before serving.
3. Ice

cream is best served within 5 days of churning.

makes about 4 cups

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