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CONTRIBUTING WRITERS
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Kate Wingfield
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4 AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014
Volume 21 / Issue 18
NEWS 6 CHARTING A PATH
by Justin Snow
8 POWER SHUFFLING
by John Riley
10 HISPANIC HERITAGE HONORS
by John Riley
BUSINESS 12 UNWRAPPING THE TRICKBOX
by John Riley
18 COMMUNITY CALENDAR
FEATURES 22 ALFRED MOLINA
by Randy Shulman
24 JOHN LITHGOW
by Randy Shulman
26 IRA SACHS
by Doug Rule
OUT ON THE TOWN 30 TRIBAL TUNES
by Doug Rule
33 GLIMPSES OF GAY CHINA
by Doug Rule
GEARS 36 E-GOLF
by Rhuaridh Marr
GEARS 39 GAME OFF
by Rhuaridh Marr
PETS 41 FOSTER THE PETS
by Doug Rule
NIGHTLIFE 45 NUMBER NINE
photography by Christopher Cunetto
SCENE 52 BEARRACUDA AT COBALT
photography by Ward Morrison
54 LAST WORD
5 METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014
6 AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
Charting a Path
After months of administrative inaction, a new report provides a battle plan
for achieving Transgender Military Service
Hagel
by Justin Snow
M
ORE THAN THREE
months after Defense Sec-
retary Chuck Hagel and
the White House voiced
support for a review of the military’s ban
on transgender service, a new report finds
the Pentagon could immediately open the
armed services to transgender Americans
in a way that is consistent with military
readiness and core values.
According to a nine member commis-
sion consisting of three retired U.S. mili-
tary generals and convened by the Palm
Center, “formulating and implementing
inclusive policy is administratively fea-
sible and neither excessively complex
nor burdensome.” The report, released
Monday, outlines ideal administrative
practices for adopting an inclusive policy
while maintaining readiness, as well as
offering administrative guidance to help
the military prepare for the “inevitable
updating of current policy” in 14 areas
concerning transgender military service,
such as gender marker changes, privacy
and nondiscrimination statutes. Those
recommendations were drawn from the
experiences of 18 foreign nations that
allow transgender personnel to serve
openly as well as experiences with in-
tegration of groups previously excluded
from the U.S. military.
In a joint statement, the three retired
generals on the commission — Major
General Gale S. Pollock, former acting
Surgeon General of the U.S. Army; Briga-
dier General Clara Adams-Ender, former
Chief of the U.S. Army Nurse Corps; and
Brigadier General Thomas A. Kolditz, a
Yale University professor and Professor
Emeritus at the U.S. Military Academy at
West Point, where he led the Department
of Behavioral Sciences and Leadership —
said the report demonstrates there is no
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reason for delay.
“We spent three months serving on a
research commission that investigated
administrative aspects of transgender
military service, with a view toward
maintaining readiness and alignment
with core military values of dignity and
respect,” the generals stated. “Our con-
clusion is that allowing transgender
personnel to serve openly is administra-
tively feasible and will not be burden-
some or complicated. Three months have
passed since Defense Secretary Hagel
announced a willingness to review the
military’s ban on transgender service, an
effort the White House indicated it sup-
ports. Our new report shows that imple-
mentation could proceed immediately
and will be successful in its execution.”
Although gay, lesbian and bisexual
Americans have been able to serve openly
since the repeal of “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell”
(DADT) in September 2011, with no nega-
tive consequence, a medical regulatory
ban still prohibits transgender military
service. But unlike DADT, the ban is not
a federal statue and the ability to lift it
lies not with lawmakers on Capitol Hill,
but leaders at the Pentagon. While imple-
menting an inclusive policy would require
effort and resources, the report notes that
discharging members of the military for
being transgender does as well. An esti-
mated 15,500 transgender personnel cur-
rently serve in the armed forces.
The report comes as the movement for
transgender military service gathered in-
creased momentum after Defense Secre-
tary Chuck Hagel told ABC News’ Martha
Raddatz in an interview that aired May 11
that the military’s transgender ban should
be “continually reviewed” and stated he
is open to such a review. “I go back to the
bottom line — every qualified American
who wants to serve our country should
have an opportunity if they fit the qualifi-
cations and can do it,” he said. “This is an
area that we’ve not defined enough.”
During a flight en route to Saudi Ara-
bia a few days later, Hagel expanded upon
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Metro Weekly, always online, will return to
newsstands with our Fall Arts Preview on Sept. 11.
Happy Labor Day!
7 METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014
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8
environments as anyone else,” Minter
said in a statement. “It is essential for the
Department of Defense to begin to review
its ban on transgender military service
now, and to replace it with fully inclusive
policy. Today’s report provides a com-
prehensive roadmap of the steps that are
needed for the full implementation of an
inclusive approach, and further establish-
es to the Administration that a new policy
will be successfully executed.”
Allyson Robinson, policy director of
Service Members, Partners, Allies For Re-
spect and Tolerance For All (SPARTA),
told Metro Weekly that the report demon-
strates what SPARTA’s 250 actively serv-
ing transgender members have always
known: “there is no justification for DoD’s
obsolete regulations and no reason not
to update them immediately.” Moreover,
Robinson said the speed at which the Pen-
tagon reviews and revises such regula-
tions ultimately depends on one man.
“Secretary Hagel has stated he sup-
ports a review of the regs; when I last
checked, the decision to initiate that re-
view was his to make. It’s time for him
either to do so, or to state why he won’t,”
Robinson said in an email. “It’s time for
him to lead.”
The report is the second in a series
commissioned by the Palm Center at
San Francisco State University evaluat-
his remarks, stating that the Pentagon
should continue to evaluate the ban.
“I’ve not asked for a specific task
force,” he said. “I’ve not asked for a spe-
cific study. I would want to hear more
from individuals who are close to this
issue, know this issue, who I would
value their judgment and their direc-
tion on.” And then on May 16, the White
House signaled their support for such a
review. “I would certainly point you to
what Secretary Hagel said and we cer-
tainly support his efforts in this area,”
White House press secretary Jay Carney
said in response to questions from Metro
Weekly. Such statements illustrate a dra-
matic shift in tone by the Pentagon and
Obama administration on transgender
military service, but according to Penta-
gon spokesperson Lt. Cmdr. Nate Chris-
tensen, no review has yet been ordered.
The White House declined to comment
for this article.
Shannon Minter, legal director of the
National Center for Lesbian Rights and
co-chair of the commission that authored
the latest report, said evidence is mount-
ing for the Obama administration to act.
“In an earlier study, the former US
Surgeon General, along with retired Gen-
eral and Flag Officers, concluded that
transgender personnel are as fit to serve
and as ready for deployment to austere
ing transgender military service as well
as questions related to readiness, mo-
rale, welfare, personnel requirements
and management. The first, released in
March, found no compelling medical ra-
tionale for banning transgender people
from serving in the American military.
The Palm Center’s Transgender Mili-
tary Service Initiative was launched in
2013 after $1.35 million grant from the
Tawani Foundation, which was founded by
Jennifer Pritzker. A retired lieutenant col-
onel who served 11 years in the Army and
16 years in the National Guard, Pritzker
became the world’s first transgender bil-
lionaire when she came out last September.
The commission concludes that al-
lowing transgender Americans to serve
would reflect “the core values and prin-
ciples that all military personnel should
serve with honor and integrity; all per-
sons capable of serving their country
should be allowed to do so unless there is
a compelling reason for prohibiting their
service; and the military should not need-
lessly separate personnel who are willing
and able to serve.” Moreover, the mili-
tary would “better live up to its ideal of
reflecting the diversity of the nation it is
responsible for defending.”
Read the commission’s full report online at
metroweekly.com. l
AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
Power Shuffling
Despite Republicans regaining control of Virginia’s
upper chamber, LGBT bills may still gain traction
by John Riley
V
IRGINIA REPUBLICANS
seized control of the state sen-
ate on Tuesday, Aug. 19, giving
them complete power over
the operations of the state’s General As-
sembly and further thwarting Gov. Terry
McAuliffe’s (D) legislative agenda, after
Del. Ben Chafin (R-Dickenson, Russell,
Washington, Wise counties) defeated
Democrat Mike Hymes and left-leaning
independent Rick Mullins in a special
election for an open seat in Southwest-
ern Virginia.
Although this gives the GOP a 21-18 edge
in the Senate for the next year — widely ex-
pected to be a 21-19 edge following another
special election in the Richmond area on
Nov. 4, as no Republican has yet filed to
run for that seat — Republican control
does not damn the hopes of LGBT rights
bills for next year’s legislative session. In
fact, the reshuffling of committees places
Democrats in charge of a key Senate com-
mittee poised to hear one of those bills.
During the past few years’ legislative
sessions, the party in power of the Senate,
whether Democrat or Republican, has
stacked key committees like Finance or
Commerce and Labor with its own mem-
bers, giving them a 9-6 or 10-5 edge while
most other committees are split 8-7 in the
almost-always closely divided Senate. In
exchange, the party in power has typi-
cally given the minority party more seats
on a “minor” committee that does not
deal with controversial issues, such as the
budget or a proposed expansion of Med-
icaid, for example. As a result, the com-
mittee most often “given” to the minor-
ity party in sheer numbers, even though
a Republican remains chair, has been the
Committee on Rehabilitation and Social
Services, which now, due to Republican-
led reshuffling, stands 8-7 in favor of the
Democrats. It is that committee, specifi-
cally, that will take up a bill that would al-
low second-parent adoption, in which an
adult, whether gay or straight, who is not
the legally recognized spouse of a parent
would be able to adopt the children they
are raising together.
Earlier this year, in January, SB 336,
a bill patroned by Sen. Janet Howell
(D-Arlington, Fairfax counties), which
sought to allow second-parent adoptions
in Virginia, was defeated in the Commit-
tee on Rehabilitation and Social Services.
However, the bill was heard when some
Republicans who have been friendlier to
the commonwealth’s LGBT community
were not present, and prior to the seating
of two key committee members, Sen. Jen-
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LGBTNews
10
mittee been seated.”
Parrish believes next year’s session —
after a year filled with four special elec-
tions that kept the balance of power in the
state in question — could be more favor-
able to his organization. While any bill
that passed the Senate, even with bipar-
tisan support, would face an uphill climb
in the Republican-dominated House of
Delegates, Parrish hopes that if the or-
ganization can get several Republicans
to vote for the bill, it will create enough
momentum to at least apply pressure to
House lawmakers and force them on re-
cord as opposing or supporting it.
“We have measured expectations that
both the nondiscrimination and second-
parent adoption bills will receive floor
votes,” he said. “And we expect bipartisan
support.”
While no other senators co-patroned
Howell’s bill on second-parent adoption
in January, all 19 Democrats — includ-
ing Del. Rosalyn Dance (D-Petersburg,
Hopewell, Dinwiddie, Chesterfield,
Prince George counties), the presumptive
favorite to win November’s special elec-
tion — are thought to be supportive, leav-
ing the organization with only one more
nifer Wexton (D-Loudoun, Fairfax coun-
ties) and Lynwood Lewis (D-Norfolk,
Virginia Beach, Northampton, Mathews,
Accomack counties), who had both won
special elections but whose victories had
not been recognized by the body at that
time, as they eventually tipped control of
the Senate temporarily to the Democrats.
James Parrish, executive director of
LGBT rights organization Equality Vir-
ginia, says that second-parent adoption is
“definitely” a priority for next year’s legis-
lative session, scheduled to start in Janu-
ary. Throughout the months of July and
August, Equality Virginia has been posting
blog entries dealing with second-parent
adoption and the problems associated with
denying health insurance benefits to same-
sex partners of state employees — another
bill championed by the organization — in
order to educate people about the issue and
rally them to support the cause.
“It’s a no-nonsense bill,” Parrish says
of the second-parent adoption measure.
“It’s straightforward, and Virginia al-
ready recognizes the parental rights of
those who have legal out-of-state adop-
tions and then move to Virginia. It would
have passed last year, had that full com-
vote needed to force a tie that could then
be broken by Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam (D),
an LGBT rights supporter. Some of the
Republican senators who could provide
additional votes include the chamber’s
four “moderate” members, or those who
represent “swing” districts where Presi-
dent Obama either won or narrowly lost
in 2012 and where voters are not as so-
cially conservative.
As for a proposed employment non-
discrimination bill, Sen. Jill Holtzman
Vogel (R-Winchester, Frederick, Clarke,
Loudoun, Fauquier, Culpeper, Stafford
counties) has been a consistent vote for
the legislation over the past few sessions,
and sits on the committee in charge of the
bill. Three other Republican members
— Senate President Tommy Norment
(R-James City, New Kent, King William,
King and Queen, Gloucester, York, Po-
quoson, Suffolk, Hampton, Isle of Wight,
Surry counties); Sen. Frank Wagner
(R-Virginia Beach, Norfolk); and John
Watkins (R-Richmond City, Powhatan,
Chesterfield counties) — have previously
voted in favor of nondiscrimination pro-
tections in sessions when the bill has re-
ceived a floor vote. l
AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
Hispanic
Heritage Honors
Upcoming annual celebration recognizes the
contributions of LGBTQ Latinos in the D.C. area
by John Riley
T
HE LATINO GLBT HISTORY
Project (LHP), a local non-
profit dedicated to preserving
and educating the public about
the history and contributions of D.C.’s
LGBTQ Latino community, is ramping up
for its annual Hispanic LGBTQ Heritage
Awards celebration, now in its ninth year,
on Sept. 12.
The awards reception occurs annually
as part of the run-up to the dual celebration
of Hispanic Heritage Month, which spans
from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15, and LGBTQ History
Month, which runs through the month of
October. The event features a wine recep-
tion with appetizers, entertainment and
networking opportunities with 100 of D.C.’s
leading LGBTQ Latino leaders from the na-
tional and local government, nonprofit, and
corporate sectors.
Each year, LHP honors three leaders
who have made a substantial impact on
the local LGBTQ and Latino communi-
ties. This year’s honorees are: Gabriela
Garcia, a health educator with NovaSalud,
who will receive the Sophia Carrero Com-
munity Award; Ruben Gonzales, the chief
development officer at United Cerebral
Palsy, who will receive the Jose Ramirez
Leadership Award; and Lena Hernandez,
an associate with D&P Creative Strate-
gies, who will receive the Latina Leader-
ship Award.
Also featured at this year’s reception
will be a digital showcase of 90 commis-
sioned black-and-white photographs by
Kevin Kenner featuring more than 20
LGBTQ Latino and Latina community
members engaged in advancing social
justice and cultural understanding of the
Washington-area Latino and LGBT com-
munities, complete with their biogra-
phies, known as the Heroes Latinos LG-
BTQ exhibition. The full exhibit will be
featured online from Sept. 15 to Oct. 31. A
poster featuring a sample preview of some
of the photographs in the exhibit will be
on display during the Heritage Awards
ceremony, and will also be featured in
various public spaces throughout Wash-
ington during the months of September
and October.
The 9th Annual Hispanic LGBTQ Heritage
Awards will be held Friday, Sept. 12, from
6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Human Rights
Campaign Equality Forum, 1640 Rhode
Island Ave. NW. Tickets are $30 per per-
son for general admission, though spon-
sorship packages are available at Latino-
GLBTHistory.org or call 202-670-5547.
Organizations interested in hosting
part of the poster exhibit should contact
Jesus Chavez at
JChavez@LatinoGLBTHistory.org. l
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Unwrapping the TrickBox
Dan Snyder hopes to make his new store a go-to place for D.C.’s fetish community
Snyder
by John Riley
I
T’S ONLY 700 SQUARE FEET OF
space on the top floor of a second-
floor walk-up in D.C.’s Woodridge
neighborhood, but to Dan Snyder,
Jr., it’s a dream come true.
Snyder, the owner of TrickBox, a new-
ly-opened “fetish-gear” store focusing on
novelty items ranging from wrestling sin-
glets to BSDM gear, previously worked
as a hairstylist in Northern Virginia for
18 years before leaving to open a shop fo-
cused on selling sports gear, jockstraps,
and various other items for adult play.
“I’m a fan of fetish gear, and I felt like
D.C. certainly had a community that war-
ranted having something here in town,”
Snyder says. “Folks could come out and
check out stuff, and actually see it, try it
on, and, so far, it’s worked out. There’s a
need for it. We’re tired of ordering things
online or having to wait for a major event
like MAL to come to town so we can do
our shopping.”
Snyder, who lives in the nearby Brook-
land neighborhood with his husband,
Rory Austin, had been saving up for about
10 years before making the decision to fi-
nally purchase his store earlier this year.
“It has just been a dream for some
time, and my husband encouraged me to
go for it,” Snyder says. “Prior to his doing
so, I just treated it more as a wish. That’s
when I thought, ‘Yes, why not?’”
Initially, Snyder had hoped to open a
store in the city’s H Street NE corridor,
but every place he found was either too
large or too expensive, bringing him well
over his planned budget. With the help
of a real estate agent, Snyder began look-
ing at other up-and-coming areas where
space might be cheaper, including the
Georgia Avenue corridor in the city’s Pet-
worth neighborhood. Then, one day, he
ran across a two-block long commercial
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strip near the 2300 block of Rhode Island
Avenue NE.
“I happened to be rolling by this strip
here,” says Snyder. “I found a number,
called, came and checked it out. It was the
perfect size. I was shooting for something
that was under 1000 square feet. I wanted
it in an area where it was convenient for
folks coming into town to see us, and also,
just something I could afford. This met all
of the requirements.”
With the help of Friends of Rhode
Island Avenue, a local chamber focusing
on the revitalization of traditional busi-
ness districts, the couple was able to se-
cure a small business grant through the
Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. The
money from that grant pays the cost of a
consultant, who is working with Snyder
to develop a marketing plan for the store.
Because TrickBox opened with little
fanfare, Snyder hopes to have a “grand
opening” event, possibly partnering with
some of the local leather or fetish clubs
and organizations to help display his busi-
ness’s wares. For now, Snyder is relying
largely on social media, as well as word-
of-mouth referrals from former custom-
ers, to garner publicity for his business,
but is talking with local leather, fetish,
and BDSM organizations about hold-
ing alternative lifestyle parties or other
events. Snyder also plans to launch a line
of neoprene and rubber items, and hopes
to hire additional staff and expand the
store’s hours and days of operation.
“We don’t want to get fixed on any one
thing,” Snyder says of his store’s offerings.
“We want to take more of a boutique ap-
proach, where we can really turn things
over, bring in some new stuff, keep it fun.”
TrickBox is located at 2300 Rhode Island
Ave. NE and is open from 1 to 8 p.m. on
Wednesdays and Thursdays, 1 to 9 p.m. on
Fridays and Saturdays and 1 to 6 p.m. on
Sundays. For more information, call 202-
248-1192 or visit trickboxdc.com. l
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13 METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014
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lesbians and gays. Handicapped accessible from
Phelps Place gate. Hearing assistance. quakersdc.org.
INSTITUTE FOR SPIRITUAL DEVELOPMENT,
God-centered new age church & learning center.
Sunday Services and Workshops event. 5419 Sherier
Place NW. isd-dc.org.
LUTHERAN CHURCH OF REFORMATION invites
all to Sunday worship at 8:30 or 11 a.m. Childcare is
available at both services. Welcoming LGBT people for
25 years. 212 East Capitol St. NE. reformationdc.org
METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH OF
WASHINGTON, D.C. services at 9 a.m. (ASL
interpreted) and 11 a.m. Children’s Sunday School at
11 a.m. 474 Ridge St. NW. 202-638-7373, mccdc.com.
RIVERSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH, a Christ-centered,
interracial, welcoming-and-affirming church, offers
service at 10 a.m. 680 I St. SW. 202-554-4330,
riverside-dc.org.
UNITARIAN CHURCH OF ARLINGTON, an
LGBTQ welcoming-and-affirming congregation,
offers services at 10 a.m. Virginia Rainbow UU
Ministry. 4444 Arlington Blvd. uucava.org.
UNIVERSALIST NATIONAL MEMORIAL
CHURCH, a welcoming and inclusive church. GLBT
Interweave social/service group meets monthly.
Services at 11 a.m., Romanesque sanctuary. 1810 16th
St. NW. 202-387-3411, universalist.org.
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 1
ADVENTURING outdoors group hikes 6 miles from
Old Town Alexandria across the Wilson Bridge
to National Harbor development in Maryland,
followed by optional ride on the new Capital Wheel.
Bring beverages, lunch, $2 trip fee, $15 if you want
to ride the Capital Wheel, and $8 for water taxi ride
back to Alexandria. Hike begins at 10 a.m. at King
Street Metro Station. Craig, 202-462-0535. Visit
adventuring.org.
WEEKLY EVENTS
HAPPY LABOR DAY, ENJOY!
The DC Center hosts COFFEE DROP-IN FOR THE
SENIOR LGBT COMMUNITY. 10 a.m.-noon. 2000
14th St. NW. 202-682-2245, thedccenter.org.
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 2
The HISPANIC LGBTQ HERITAGE AWARDS
holds its VOLUNTEER PLANNING MEETING.
6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at The DC Center, 2000 14th
St. NW. For more info and to RSVP, contact Jesus
Chavez, JChavez@LatinoGLBTHistory.org or 202-
670-5547.
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3
BOOKMEN DC, an informal men’s gay-literature
group, discusses Mario Vargas Llosa’s novel, The
Dream of the Celt, about the gay Irish nationalist
Roger Casement. 7:30 p.m. Tenleytown Library,
4450 Wisconsin Ave NW. All welcome.
bookmendc.blogspot.com.
WEEKLY EVENTS
BRAZILIAN GLBT GROUP, including others
interested in Brazilian culture, meets. For location/
time, email braziliangaygroup@yahoo.com.
DC FRONT RUNNERS running/walking/social
club welcomes all levels for exercise in a fun and
supportive environment, socializing afterward.
Meet 9:30 a.m., 23rd & P Streets NW, for a walk; or
10 a.m. for fun run. dcfrontrunners.org.
DC SENTINELS basketball team meets at Turkey
Thicket Recreation Center, 1100 Michigan Ave. NE,
2-4 p.m. For players of all levels, gay or straight.
teamdcbasketball.org.
GAY LANGUAGE CLUB discusses critical
languages and foreign languages. 7 p.m. Nellie’s,
900 U St. NW. RVSP preferred. brendandarcy@
gmail.com.
SUNDAY, AUGUST 31
CHRYSALIS arts & culture group tours 1864
Civil War battlefields near Winchester, Va. Bring
beverages, lunch, bug spray, sunscreen, and
about $15 for fees. Carpool at 9 a.m. from Vienna
Metro North Parking lot. Craig, 202-462-0535.
craighowell1@verizon.net.
THE MILITARY PARTNERS AND FAMILIES
COALITION volunteers with the National Park
Service in cleaning the Korean War Veterans
Memorial. 6:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. 900 Ohio Dr. SW.
For more information and to RSVP, contact Eric
Perez at eric.perez@thedccenter.org or
202-682-2245.
WEEKLY EVENTS
LGBT-inclusive ALL SOULS MEMORIAL
EPISCOPAL CHURCH celebrates Low Mass at 8:30
a.m., High Mass at 11 a.m. 2300 Cathedral Ave. NW.
202-232-4244, allsoulsdc.org.
DIGNITY WASHINGTON offers Roman Catholic
Mass for the LGBT community. 6 p.m., St.
Margaret’s Church, 1820 Connecticut Ave. NW.
All welcome. Sign interpreted. For more info, visit
dignitywashington.org.
FRIENDS MEETING OF WASHINGTON meets for
worship, 10:30 a.m., 2111 Florida Ave. NW, Quaker
House Living Room (next to Meeting House on
Decatur Place), 2nd floor. Special welcome to
THURSDAY, AUGUST 28
GAYS AND LESBIANS OPPOSING VIOLENCE
(GLOV), a group combating violence directed
against LGBT individuals, holds its monthly
meeting at The DC Center. 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. 2000
14th St. NW, Suite 105. For more information, visit
thedccenter.org or glovdc.org.
The DC Center and the Campbell Center hold a six-
week introductory MINDFULNESS MEDITATION
CLASS at The DC Center. Bring cushions if
necessary. 5:30-6:30 p.m. 2000 14th St. NW, Suite
105. For more information, visit thedccenter.org.
FRIDAY, AUGUST 29
WEEKLY EVENTS
GAY DISTRICT holds facilitated discussion for
GBTQ men, 18-35, first and third Fridays. 8:30 p.m.
The DC Center, 2000 14th St. NW, Suite 105. 202-
682-2245, gaydistrict.org.
GAY MARRIED MEN’S ASSOCIATION (GAMMA)
is a peer-support group that meets in Dupont Circle
every second and fourth Friday at 7:30 p.m. gay-
married.com or GAMMAinDC1@yahoo.com.
PROJECT STRIPES hosts LGBT-affirming social
group for ages 11-24. 4-6 p.m. 1419 Columbia Road
NW. Contact Tamara, 202-319-0422, layc-dc.org.
SMYAL’S REC NIGHT provides a social
atmosphere for GLBT and questioning youth,
featuring dance parties, vogue nights, movies and
games. More info, catherine.chu@smyal.org.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 30
ADVENTURING outdoors group hikes 10 strenuous
miles with 2500 feet of elevation gain to see
waterfalls and swim in pools in Shenandoah
National Park. Bring beverages, lunch, bug spray,
sunscreen, sturdy boots, swimsuit & towel, and
about $20 for fees. Carpool at 8:30 a.m. from East
Falls Church Metro Kiss & Ride lot. Craig, 202-462-
0535. adventuring.org.
Metro Weekly’s Community Calendar highlights important events in
the D.C.-area LGBT community, from alternative social events to
volunteer opportunities. Event information should be sent by email to
calendar@MetroWeekly.com. Deadline for inclusion is noon
of the Friday before Thursday’s publication. Questions about
the calendar may be directed to the Metro Weekly office at
202-638-6830 or the calendar email address.
LGBTCommunityCalendar
marketplace
19 METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014
Sunday. 11 a.m. 1701 11th Street NW, near R in
Shaw/Logan neighborhood. lincolntemple.org.
LUTHERAN CHURCH OF REFORMATION invites
all to Sunday worship at 8:30 or 11 a.m. Childcare is
available at both services. Welcoming LGBT people for
25 years. 212 East Capitol St. NE. reformationdc.org
METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH OF
WASHINGTON, D.C. services at 9 a.m. (ASL
interpreted) and 11 a.m. Children’s Sunday School at
11 a.m. 474 Ridge St. NW. 202-638-7373,
mccdc.com.
RIVERSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH, a Christ-centered,
interracial, welcoming-and-affirming church, offers
service at 10 a.m. 680 I St. SW. 202-554-4330,
riverside-dc.org.
UNITARIAN CHURCH OF ARLINGTON, an
LGBTQ welcoming-and-affirming congregation,
offers services at 10 a.m. Virginia Rainbow UU
Ministry. 4444 Arlington Blvd. uucava.org.
UNIVERSALIST NATIONAL MEMORIAL
CHURCH, a welcoming and inclusive church. GLBT
Interweave social/service group meets monthly.
Services at 11 a.m., Romanesque sanctuary. 1810 16th
St. NW. 202-387-3411, universalist.org.
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 8
THE DC CENTER’S YOUTH WORKING GROUP
holds its monthly meeting on the second Monday of
a.m. from East Falls Church Metro Kiss & Ride lot.
Jay, 415-203-7498. adventuring.org.
BURGUNDY CRESCENT, a gay volunteer
organization, volunteers today for Food &
Friends and Lost Dog & Cat Rescue Foundation
at Falls Church PetSmart. To participate, visit
burgundycrescent.org.
CHRYSALIS Arts & Culture group and
ADVENTURING outdoors group co-sponsor
walking tour of Antietam Battlefield in Sharpsburg,
Md., with several miles of easy walking over rolling
terrain. Bring beverages, lunch, sunscreen, bug
spray, and about $15 for fees. Carpool at 9 a.m. from
Grosvenor-Strathmore Metro. Craig, 202-462-0535.
craighowell1@verizon.net.
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7
WEEKLY EVENTS
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL UNITED CHURCH OF
CHRIST welcomes all to 10:30 a.m. service, 945 G
St. NW. firstuccdc.org or 202-628-4317.
HOPE UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST welcomes
GLBT community for worship. 10:30 a.m., 6130 Old
Telegraph Road, Alexandria. hopeucc.org.
Join LINCOLN CONGREGATIONAL TEMPLE –
UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST for an inclusive,
loving and progressive faith community every
THE TOM DAVOREN SOCIAL BRIDGE CLUB
meets for Social Bridge. No reservation and partner
needed. All welcome. 7:30 p.m. Dignity Center, 721
8th St. SE. 301-345-1571 for more information.
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 4
The DC Center and the Campbell Center hold a six-
week introductory MINDFULNESS MEDITATION
CLASS at The DC Center. Bring cushions if
necessary. 5:30-6:30 p.m. 2000 14th St. NW, Suite
105. For more information, visit thedccenter.org.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 5
GAY DISTRICT, a community-based organization
focused on building an understanding of gay culture
and personal identity, community events and civil
rights for GBTQQI men between ages 18-35, holds
a monthly meeting at The DC Center. 2000 14th St.
NW, Suite 105. Visit thedccenter.org.
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 6
ADVENTURING outdoors group hosts a strenuous
8.3-mile circuit hike in Shenandoah National Park
with 2200 feet of elevation gain, nine waterfalls,
and an optional dip in a pool. Bring beverages,
lunch, bug spray, sunscreen, sturdy boots, swimsuit
and towel, and about $25 for fees, plus funds for
dinner and/or ice cream afterwards. Carpool at 9
20
LGBTCommunityCalendar
AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
each month. 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. 2000 14th St. NW,
Suite 105. For more information, visit thedccenter.org.
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 9
DC BI WOMEN, a group of The DC Center, meets
on the second Tuesday of each month at Dupont
Italian Kitchen in the upstairs room. 7-9 p.m.
1637 17th St. NW. For more information, visit
thedccenter.org.
The LATINO LGBT TASK FORCE discusses survey
results from last December’s Ama tu Salud event
and plans events for Latino Heritage Month. 3:30
p.m. to 5 p.m. 2000 14th St. NW, Suite 105. For
more information, visit thedccenter.org.
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10
BIG GAY BOOK GROUP meets to discuss The
Art of Fielding by Chad Harbaugh. 7 p.m. 1155 F
St. NW, Suite 220. For more information, email
biggaybookgroup@hotmail.com. Newcomers
arealways welcome.

THE LAMBDA BRIDGE CLUB meets for Duplicate
Bridge. No reservation needed. All welcome. 7:30
p.m. Dignity Center, 721 8th St. SE. 703-407-6540 if
you need a partner.
RAINBOW RESPONSE, focusing on combating
intimate partner violence in the LGBT community,
holds its monthly meeting at The DC Center.
6-7 p.m. 2000 14th St. NW, Suite 105. For more
information, visit thedccenter.org. l
21 METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014
FOR MORE CALENDAR LISTINGS
PLEASE VISIT
WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM
22 AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
T
HE LAST TIME ALFRED MOLI-
na played a gay man, the role was
based on a real-life person – the
obsessive, neurotic Kenneth Hal-
liwell, partner to the late, great British
playwright Joe Orton. Of course, it was
Halliwell who caused the death of Orton,
in a fit of jealous rage, brutally reenacted in
Stephen Frears’ bracing 1987 film, Prick Up
Your Ears.
“You wonder if Ken Halliwell and Joe
Orton actually did love each other at all,”
says Molina during a recent phone conver-
sation. “Whether it was a relationship built
on something way too sour and dysfunc-
tional, whether it was a relationship that
was actually destructive from the start.”
Twenty-seven years later, the actor is
playing gay again, but this time the role
is far more loving, warm, and tender. As
George in Ira Sach’s Love Is Strange, the
younger half of a 39-year-strong gay couple
who, days after they finally, blissfully say
their wedding vows, find themselves in a difficult situation, one that puts a strain on
not just them, but on the the family and friends who choose to help them, Molina
gives a career-defining performance in a long, stunning career.
And what a career — from a mechanical-tentacled mad scientist to a trigger-happy
‘70s drug dealer to a tempestuous husband of a noted Mexican artist to a stint on the
fabled Law & Order franchise, it’s no understatement to say Molina has done a bit of
it all. And yet, when you watch him in Love Is Strange, those other roles melt away,
as George – and his plight – takes hold of our hearts. It is the measure of a brilliant
performance, one that brings hope to an increasingly hopeless situation.
METRO WEEKLY: Though its two central characters are gay, I don’t feel it’s fair to classify
Love Is Strange as a gay film. It seems much more like a film that happens to have at its
core two gay characters in a relationship. Now, neither you nor John Lithgow are gay,
but I’m curious how an actor finds the key that unlocks the ability to create something
that feels so indelible, real and authentic?
ALFRED MOLINA: I think it’s a question of collective experience. Any actor who has had
any experience with a long-term relationship could play those roles with a degree of
authenticity because, ultimately, as you said, it’s not about being gay. Gay men and
women fall in love in exactly the same way as straight men and women. Love is love,
wherever you find it, regardless of who’s doing the loving, or who’s being loved. And
your instincts, your concerns, your anxieties, the joy you find in it, the heartbreak you
find in it – it’s all the same, regardless of one’s sexuality. Gay or straight, we all fall in
love in the same way. We’re all thrilled by it, uplifted by it, hurt by it, all in the same
Love
is
Love
The last time Alfred Molina played
a gay man, he was obsessive
and jealous. This time, he’s the
perfect husband.
Interview by Randy Shulman
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23 METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014
way. There’s no difference.
MW: What was it that drew you to this particular role?
MOLINA: It was the interesting journey that we go on with these
two characters. And it was also the fact that very often in rela-
tionship movies, it’s usually about people at the younger end of
the age spectrum — particularly anything with a gay theme. It’s
usually young men or women in the throes of finding each other,
finding themselves, making their way in the world, finding their
place in that world. Whereas, here we’ve got two characters in
the autumn of their years, a relationship that’s been going on for
the better part of four decades, suddenly doing something the
rest of us take for granted — exercising their basic human right
to get married.
And suddenly their world gets completely turned upside
down through the church’s decision to fire George using their
so-called religious freedom to bypass the law
of the state. [I was drawn to] the ordinari-
ness of these two men. They weren’t flam-
boyant, theatrical gay men who were making
a huge human cry about being gay — they
weren’t politically motivated. This film is not
polemic in any way, and I thought that was
very interesting. It becomes a story about a
relationship rather than anything to do with
them being gay.
MW: It’s must be incredibly painful to be sepa-
rated from one’s partner of so long – a point
punctuated by the scene where George visits
Ben, after they’ve been living apart for a spell,
and fully breaks down. Later, he admits to not
being able to get used to sleeping without Ben
by his side.
MOLINA: It’s something anybody in a long-
term relationship can relate to, whether
you’re straight or gay. The familiarity, the
intimacy that develops over a long period of
time, the sensation of your partner’s body
next to you in bed — or the lack of it —
becomes crucial. It becomes part of your
sleep pattern. And when it’s denied you....
MW: There’s a lovely, subtle thing you do at the
very beginning. You’re getting ready for the
wedding, dressing, and Ben walks by and you
just shoot him this sweet, halting smile. It instantly reveals every-
thing that you need to know about their lives together.
MOLINA: Yes. That’s part of that physical language that you have
with your partner when you’ve been together a long, long time.
You develop a repertoire of physical language, body language
that often becomes even more eloquent than words because it
tells stories of mutual history and experience. And that was all
in the script. This was what made the film so fascinating and so
attractive — all those beats. Another one was the scene when
we’re clearing up after the family has gathered to talk about our
impending homelessness. There’s a lengthy sequence where Ben
is washing up and George is drying, putting away the cheese,
emptying the trash and so on. And it’s all played at the pace of
life. It’s not leisurely, exactly, but it’s measured, no one’s rush-
ing anywhere. And there’s a little moment in there where I rub
Ben’s back and give him a little kiss on the cheek. That was in the
script, which is why when I read it I was so impressed because
it was so clear and finished. The script was absolutely polished
and complete in terms of the world that we were being asked to
inhabit. It was a beautiful piece of writing.
MW: That scene between you and Charlie Tahan is remarkable.
MOLINA: That scene — and the denouement of that scene when he
leaves the apartment, goes down the stairs and stops in the stair-
well, and there’s that long, fixed frame when he’s on one side — is
almost a moment of banality, but it’s so eloquent in terms of what
it reveals. It’s all so incredibly subtle, but rich with feeling, creat-
ing an extraordinary moment. It’s beautiful filmmaking.
And Charlie Tahan — I predict it now on this interview so
you’ll have it down on record — I predict that he’s going to have
the most extraordinary career as a film actor. Young Charlie is
absolutely the real deal. He’s got serious chops as an actor.
MW: You and John Lithgow seemed to mesh so well.
MOLINA: I found it very easy working with John because we’ve
been friends for a long time. We created a kind of shorthand
that was already there. We didn’t have to spend too much time
getting over any awkwardness or getting to
know each other. We did all that years ago.
It was like putting a hand in a glove. You
know, just perfect.
MW: You meshed in a very different way in
1987’s Prick Up Your Ears. Such a mag-
nificent, ferocious performance — and the
gay chemistry between you and Gary Oldman
was extraordinary. When you look at Love
Is Strange and Prick Up Your Ears, it’s clear
how far the world has come with regard to
the attitude towards gay men. They’re almost
like bookends.
MOLINA: Absolutely. We made Prick Up Your
Ears during the first crisis wave of the AIDS
epidemic — the deaths of certain celebrities
were still very redolent in the news, Freddie
Mercury and Rock Hudson, and so on — and
I remember at the time, having discussions
with serious people, people who I had a
great deal of respect for in terms of their
opinions and their attitudes, and they were
questioning whether playing a gay role was
a good idea for an actor, whether it would
have any repercussions on one’s career. You
wouldn’t dream of suggesting that to an
actor nowadays, you wouldn’t turn around
to a straight actor and say “Are you sure you
want to play a gay role?” So things have changed. Things have
progressed. There’s still a ways to go, but it’s interesting that in
the cultural history that we all share, there has been a big major
shift toward a more accepting, more inclusive society.
There was a time when most gay films were full of dread,
death, crisis, shame, societal despair and disrespect, but now
we’ve got films like Love Is Strange, where you’ve got a more
benign, more inclusive, open-armed, open-hearted attitude
towards it, which I think is fantastic.
MW: You’ve acted in these intimate films and of course, you played
Doc Ock in Spiderman 2. You are forever going to be known as Doc
Ock to a certain subset of society.
MOLINA: That’s fine with me. That movie put two kids through
two very expensive college educations, so I’m not complaining.
MW: You are also in the opening of Raiders of the Lost Ark, as Har-
rison Ford’s guide. How does it feel to be part of one of the most
iconic scenes in film history?
MOLINA: I’m very proud of it. Very proud, and I would never
downplay it because I’ve never been able to separate the work
I’ve done from the situation I happen to have been in at that
“There was a
time when most
gay films were
full of dread,
death, crisis,
shame, societal
despair and
disrespect,
but now we’ve got
gay films where
you’ve got a more
benign, inclusive,
open-armed,
open-hearted
attitude.”
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24 AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
time. When I got cast in Raiders, I’d never done a movie before.
Our daughter was about to be born. I was broke and was working
for some ridiculous amount of money in the theater in London.
Suddenly this movie comes along, and it paid what was to me
an absolutely princely sum. I realize now, of course, in movie
terms, I was as cheap as dirt, but at the time it was like manna
from heaven and it enabled us to have our child in a modicum of
comfort. I’ve thanked Mr. Spielberg many a time, publicly and
privately, about that. So I would never, never, never decry it. The
fact that the movie went on to become so iconic — and that scene
in particular — I’m very proud of it. Very proud.
MW: I feel obliged to ask this of straight actors, but sometimes it
engenders a good story. Do you remember the first time someone
came out to you, and do you remember what your response was?
MOLINA: No, I don’t remember anyone saying it to me personally
that they’d come out, but I do remember having my very, very
first conversation with someone who was openly gay and was
perfectly happy to talk to me and educate me in terms of what it
meant to be gay. I was clearly ignorant at the time — it was when
I was a student. I was at drama school, and I became friends
with a student who was on the music course at my college, so we
didn’t have any classes together, but we socialized a great deal.
He was probably the most openly, flamboyant gay man I’d ever
met. He wasn’t camp, just quite openly homosexual, made no
bones about it.
He started off the conversation by saying, “It’s a shame you’re
not gay.” And I said to him, “What do you mean?” And he said,
“Because you’re very attractive, and if you were gay, I’d probably
ask you out.” And I remember feeling a little bit embarrassed. I was
very young — I was what, 19, 20 years old? — I was a little embar-
rassed and a little shocked, and I must have blushed or something,
and he just put his hand on my arm and said, “Relax, it’s okay. Don’t
worry. I’m not hitting on you.” And we talked a great deal about it.
It was the first time I’d ever sat down with anyone who was openly
and confidently gay, and I’m really glad that we became friends
because it was a huge part of my education.
MW: You know, it’s kind of odd growing up and watching you and
Gary Oldman take on quieter roles. I mean, he was Joe Orton and
Sid Vicious, now he’s Commissioner Gordon. It’s an odd discon-
nect.
MOLINA: We all get older. I’ve reached the age where I’m soon
going to start playing senators and judges. I think someone is
going to stick me in a black robe and put me on the Supreme
Court any minute.
MW: Final question: What is love to you? And why is it strange?
MOLINA: I take the title of the movie literally. But I think of the
word “strange” in the Shakespearean sense as being most won-
drous strange, the idea of something magical and mysterious
and unquantifiable, something that completely defies all logic,
something that takes you by surprise, something that somehow
cannot be answered or contained or quantified, something that
takes you over.
I think it’s the old Italian thing about the thunderbolt — you
get hit by this thunderbolt and you spend the rest of your life
trying to repair the damage. That’s how I imagine love to be. I
don’t think it’s something you can prepare for. I don’t think it’s
something you can plan for. I don’t think it’s something you can
create. I don’t think it’s something you can decide upon. I think,
whatever it is, it chooses you, and I think you wake up one morn-
ing and you kind of go, “Shit, I think I’m in love.” It’s something
that hits you, a slap around the face after the event. Maybe that’s
just me being really romantic, but that’s my experience of it and
that’s what I believe it to be. l
Love
is
Varied
John Lithgow is thrilled to be part of a film that
may help open people’s minds to the idea of
gay marriage
Interview by Randy Shulman
25 METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014
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I
’VE NEVER WORKED WITH A FILMMAKER
quite like Ira Sachs,” marvels John Lithgow.
“Both Fred and I are theater actors — we’re used
to working much harder. But Ira didn’t want us
working harder. He wanted it to come very easily.”
Effortless springs to mind watching Lithgow por-
tray Ben, the older half of a displaced couple in Love
Is Strange. It’s a heartbreaking performance, as Ben
copes with being an increasingly unwelcome guest in
the home of his nephew, Elliott (Darren E. Burrows).
He’s an irritant to Elliott’s wife (Marissa Tomei) and
a bane to his sullen, adolescent great-nephew, Joey
(Charlie Tahan), whose bunk bed he’s obliged to
share. More to the point, he longs to be back in the
embrace of his beloved husband, George. And the
forced separation strains their hearts but not their
relationship.
Lithgow, of course, is well-known for his whacked-
out, Emmy-winning stint in the giddy ‘90s sitcom, 3rd
Rock from the Sun, as well as his killer, Emmy-winning
turn on the series Dexter. But think back to 1982.
Lithgow literally stole the screen from co-star Robin
Williams and Glenn Close in the screen-adaptation
of John Irving’s The World According to Garp. His
portrayal of transgender Roberta Muldoon scored
him the first of two Oscar nominations. With Love Is
Strange, he may very well be looking at his third.
The film’s title comes from a Mickey and Sylvia
song from 1956. Originally, George and Ben were to
sing the song at their wedding party.
“We were allowed the rights to either the song
or the title, but not both,” says Lithgow. “Ira, by that
time, had fallen in love with the title, so we had to find
a different song to play.” Like Molina, Lithgow thinks
the phrase is meant to be viewed in a Shakespearean
sense. “There’s something magical about how varied
love can be,” he says. “It just takes so many forms in
so many different generations of people.”
METRO WEEKLY: There is such a natural feel to the acting
in Love Is Strange. It almost feels effortless. How was
that achieved?
JOHN LITHGOW: Ira’s modus operandi is that he doesn’t
rehearse, he just sort of consults. I was working in
Alberta, Canada on another film, and he came out
and spent two days with me on my days off just to
talk through the script, talk through Ben’s backstory,
to tell me an awful lot about him and his life, and to
learn a lot about mine. He really wanted to know me.
He took a separate trip that spent the same amount
of time with Fred Molina. He was eager to hear
what my own history and own sensibility could do to
inform the character and their relationship. So, when
we finally arrived to work, we just started doing the
scenes. It didn’t even feel like we were acting.
MW: You and Alfred Molina share such great chemistry.
LITHGOW: Fred and I were good friends, which was an
enormous help. We’ve known each other for 20 years
and we share a lot of characteristics — we’re both
character actors and we’ve both worked in England
and America, we’ve both worked movies and theater
and TV, we’ve both done sitcoms. And we are both
men whose marriages have been over 30 years long, so
we know about the vicissitudes of a long-term rela-
tionship. We brought all those things to the table,
but didn’t even need to talk about it a lot. The script
was there to support us so beautifully. We both had
the instinct to dignify these characters with respect,
but also to play with them with humor and reality
and all the quirks and crankiness and discord of a
genuine relationship. It almost amazes me how
little actual spadework we did. It just simply sort of
happened.
MW: I don’t want to give too much away but there is an
interesting dialogue between them where your char-
acter, Ben, alludes to past indiscretions. It’s a small
yet potent moment.
LITHGOW: Well, you have the sense that this is some-
thing that they’ve both been through and dealt with
many, many years before. I think he was talking
about the first half of their 40 years together when
he was probably a more reckless guy. When he says,
“I’m sorry I can’t say the same to you, George,” you
get the feeling that George already knows that. You
know? They really have dealt with and survived
these things. And that’s not all they survived. They
survived AIDS. They survived the loss of scores of
friends and survived living a life of second-class
citizenship, accepting that trade-off just so that they
could be together.
MW: The film starts off on such a high note for them,
but very quickly puts the mechanism in place to kind
of tear them apart.
LITHGOW: Yeah. It is just awful under those circum-
stances. And although the movie is not about this,
it’s perfectly typical. I mean this is happening so
often. Men getting married and one of them getting
fired by the Catholic Church. There was even a big
story about this in Chicago just a week ago when
Ira was there to promote the film. Our film is hope-
ful, though. Our film makes you feel that ten years
from now this will not be happening anymore. Even
John Cullum, in his lovely performance as the priest
who fires George, gives you the feeling that he hates
the fact that he has to do this, and that the Catholic
Church is beginning to look ridiculous, the fact that
they do this to human beings.
MW: The film also deals with aging in an interesting
way, particularly in the way Ben interacts with the
family’s son. Their journey becomes a parallel narra-
tive thread.
LITHGOW: Yeah, and Ira was very lucky to find Char-
lie Tahan to play the grandnephew because he just
expresses everything, that boy. It’s so wonderful
that he takes this journey. His great uncle is a big
irritant to him, he’s a big imposition. He is very cruel
to him when he says, “You’re a bad artist, otherwise
you wouldn’t be sleeping in your nephew’s bunk
bed.” And yet, it [eventually] dawns on him just
how important this old man has been to him. It’s
one of my favorite aspects of the film. This notion
of a young boy who knows so little about himself,
so unformed, receiving the strongest lessons in life
from this old man.
MW: I need to touch on The World According to Garp.
I may be wrong about this, but I’m pretty sure you
26 AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
were the first Hollywood star to take on a significant transgender
role in a major motion picture. I can’t think of another.
LITHGOW: I’ve never heard it put that way, but I think you’re
probably right. The beautiful thing about playing that role was
all the facts of Roberta Muldoon were the stuff of comedy —
transsexual ex-professional football player. Even the position
Roberta played – tight-end — was a certain dirty joke. And yet,
in the film, she’s disarmingly real and serious. She’s the kind-
est person, the sympathetic heartbeat of that film. The first
scene she had has about two or three big laughs in it when she
introduces herself to Garp. The very next scene she’s sobbing
because the one thing she can’t do as a transsexual woman
is have a baby. It’s a very serious scene, a very sad scene. I
love that we took the character beyond a comic cliché almost
immediately. In fact, she was never a cliché, it’s just that our
responses to her were clichéd.
MW: At the time, did you have any trepidation taking on the role?
Did you get any advice not to take on the role?
LITHGOW: No, I was dying to play that role. I loved the character
in the novel long before I even knew there would be a movie.
And I not only loved the role but I thought I was perfect for it.
I thought I combined just the qualities that the role needed —
a great big strapping guy with a certain little girl sensibility. It
was a marvelous duality. Duality is what I always look for.
MW: You worked with Robin Williams in Garp. What memories
do you have of him?
LITHGOW: Well, I loved Robin, of course, and I thought he
was a genius. I did see up close and personal his sad side. We
worked together for many weeks, and were all sequestered
on an island off New London, Connecticut. You can only be
with an entertainer for so long — I mean, an entertainer who
simply won’t stop entertaining. It was very hard for Robin to
just simply calm down and be himself and have a serious con-
versation. He was very, very reserved and almost morose in a
one-on-one conversation, but when one other person walked
up, he would suddenly start performing like crazy. And when
you’re all together as a little social organism for a month and
a half, eventually people started to steer clear of him. And I
found that so sad. He suddenly seemed like a kind of solitary
figure and a sad one. I mean, it was in a period when he was a
serious coke addict. He did recover and got himself out of that
terrible fix, but he never escaped depression. I saw instances
of it back then.
MW: Given that the protagonists in Love Is Strange finally marry
after 39 years, I’m curious: how do you feel about the incredible
surge toward same-sex marriage we’re currently seeing in this
country?
LITHGOW: I knew it was coming. I remember about 10 or 12 years
ago, I was in San Diego doing Dirty Rotten Scoundrels before it
came to Broadway, and I did a radio interview and some gay
marriage ban had been enacted in some state. I can’t remember
the specifics, but the radio interviewer asked me what I thought
of this. And I said, “I think it’s wrong and it’s unjust and it’s
against the Constitution.” And I said, “But you know what? Ten
years from now we’ll look back at this and think, ‘How did we
ever outlaw this?’” And by God, it’s happened.
This is why I say ten years from now the Catholic Church
will no longer be firing gay choir directors. At a certain point,
these people look medieval. They look ridiculous in the mod-
ern age. And it makes me feel awfully good that our film, even
though it’s not a polemic, might just contribute a little bit to
opening people’s minds, broadening their consciousness on
the subject. l
27 METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014
Love
is
Strange
F
OUR YEARS AGO IRA SACHS MADE A SHORT,
simple, powerful film, a sort-of requiem to New York
and the generation who came before him. Last Address
features exterior shots of buildings still standing that
previously housed artists, from Keith Haring to Robert Map-
plethorpe to David Wojnarowicz — all of whom were lost, far
too soon, to AIDS.
“To me, arriving in New York in 1988 and seeing all of the
people that I might have been mentored by die was something
that is a deep part of me,” says Sachs, a 48-year-old who moved
to New York from his native Memphis. “We lost most of that
generation.”
It’s easy to overlook and hard to overstate the toll the AIDS
epidemic took on people like Sachs, who were young and
impressionable at the time and are still standing today, healthy
and outwardly unscathed. But those early years in New York col-
ored Sachs’s world, and he concedes that only in recent years has
he been able to fully come to terms with it. Sachs sees his latest
film, Love Is Strange, his fifth feature-length, as another kind of
elegy to the previous gay generation — but one offering hope and
a brighter outlook. The film focuses on the marriage of a long-
term gay couple, played by John Lithgow and Alfred Molina (see
interviews, page 22 and 25), and the strong supportive “family”
— both by blood and by community — they’ve cultivated.
“Generationally, for many, the possibility for a sustained
Through his work and in his
life, filmmaker Ira Sachs has
strived to create a sense of
community and mentorship
Interview by Doug Rule
Photography by Todd Franson
28 AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
romantic relationship is not what we were born into,” says
Sachs, who is raising two-year-old twins with his partner of
seven years Boris Torres, who has since become his husband of
almost three. In his work and in his own communal family in
Manhattan, Sachs has striven to create a sense of community —
and even more, a sense of mentorship.
The goal is to give people “a sense of how people live their
lives…and what they can gain from that knowledge, sharing that
knowledge.”
METRO WEEKLY: Like so many of your previous films Love Is
Strange touches on key aspects in your life.
IRA SACHS: All of my films are personal, to be honest. They’re not
autobiographical, but I come at being a filmmaker from a place
of trying to share with the audience things that I know very
intimately. So I try to make intimate films. And I think for that
reason they’re very personal.
MW: Is there any one way you would describe Love Is Strange to
gay readers specifically?
SACHS: It’s a love story. It’s about two men who’ve been together
for years, who’ve faced a dramatic obstacle together. And the
film reveals really the depths of their love. As such I think it’s a
very romantic movie.
MW: But it’s a love story and a romance that touches
on some of today’s hot-button issues, be it religious
discrimination or the lack of a social safety net.
SACHS: That’s true. But those were not the compel-
ling initiatives of the story. I wanted to make a film
about a couple — I knew a couple, two men, my
great uncle and his partner, who were together for
45 years. And my great uncle’s partner was a man
named Ted Rust. And he was a sculptor, who died
at the age of 99. He lived a fully creative life, in a
way that I cherish. And there’s a generation of gay
men that I know, that I admire. And I’m grateful for
those who survived, that I’ve had the experience to
know them. This film is an elegy to that generation,
and to this precious group of people who grew up
with very different opportunities as gay men than
we do today. And also, in New York, were men who
lived very creative and artistic lives and created a
culture that I’m so lucky to be a part of.
MW: In a sense this film, in contrast to your short Last
Address, is about those older gay men we did not lose to AIDS.
SACHS: Yeah, I think this film is in some ways about those who
survived. You say it’s a timely film, and I would agree because of
the issues involved. But more so, I personally couldn’t have made
a happy gay movie five years ago myself, because that’s not some-
thing I knew. And I think the lightness of the film is one that is
very much of this time. This is a great time of possibility for gay
people, and I think this film speaks to that.
MW: It’s also a film that presents a gay couple and gay people at
an age that, frankly, we don’t see culturally as often as we should.
SACHS: Well, we don’t see it with straight people, either. [Laughs.]
We don’t see any films about people in their sixties and seven-
ties. You know, this is also a film about generations. It’s a film
centered on this older couple, but it’s got Marisa Tomei, it’s got
Cheyenne Jackson, it’s got this kid, the wonderful Charlie Tahan
— it’s a film about generations.
MW: In the film Cheyenne Jackson plays a gay cop in a relationship
with another cop, and both are neighbors to Alfred Molina’s char-
acter George. How did you come up with that angle?
SACHS: I thought Cheyenne Jackson would be a perfect gay cop,
which he is. A perfect kind-of combination of Rock Hudson good
looks with totally open sexuality. And I know two gay cops. My
husband, Boris Torres, lived in a house in the West Village — on
one floor was a man in his seventies who owned the house, Boris
lived on the second floor, and on the third floor were two gay
cops. And that kind of communal family was one that I wanted
to put into the movie.
MW: And by extension you’re presenting life in an urban environ-
ment, especially in Manhattan, which becomes a character itself.
SACHS: Yeah, I wanted to make my own Manhattan. You know
Woody Allen’s film was certainly influential to us, but I wanted
to make a film with a similar sense of the music of the city, but
also with the diversity of the city, which is something that I feel
is very much part of my own life.
MW: You’re originally from Memphis. When did you move to New
York?
SACHS: I had my first job in New York the summer of 1984, and
I moved there full time in January of 1988 — so at the end of the
eighties. I came to New York at the time of ACT UP and when
the AIDS epidemic was in full force. And also a time when art-
ists were not having the same sort-of expectations that they do
now. It was a less bourgeois time, to be honest, as a city. There
was a kind-of hunger to create and to
make marks on culture that was very
influential.
My first feature was a film called
The Delta, which was about a young
gay teenager growing up in Mem-
phis. And I then did not have a gay
character in a film of mine for about
12 years. I’m very interested in why,
as gay artists, it is so difficult to make
paying and sustained careers where
we tell stories about gay lives. And
it is difficult. There’s very little eco-
nomic support, and there’s very little
cultural support on some level. So
in my 40s, I think what I’ve done
— because I’ve now made two films
that are explicitly gay in their stories
— is that I’ve had to remind myself
of when I first moved to New York,
when to be an artist was to take a lot
of risks and not to try to play it safe. And to be as open as possible.
MW: And will that be the focus of your work going forward as well?
SACHS: Well, I’m working on a film about two boys in New York,
who are 10 and 11. And it’s the first in a trilogy that my co-writer
Mauricio Zacharias and I have planned. It’s actually about real
estate and friendship and the birth of a kind of gay sensibility in
one child.
MW: You’re now rooted in New York. Would you ever move back
to Memphis?
SACHS: No. I’ve never for a minute thought about living any-
where else but New York. I ended up making two films in
Memphis, The Delta and Forty Shades of Blue. And I have a rich
personal life there, of friends and family. I just spent two weeks
there with my family this summer. So it’s a part of me, but I’ve
been an inhabitant of New York for 25 years. And my husband
grew up in New York, and I think — it’s still exciting. I still find it
personally stimulating. And I’m excited now to share it with my
kids. And in my movies even more. I feel like I wasn’t ready to
make a film about New York until it was in my blood, it was deep.
Now I feel like I understand the energy of New York pretty well.
I couldn’t have
made a happy gay
movie five years
ago, because that’s
not something I
knew. I think the
lightness of the film
is one that is very
much of this time.
This is a great
time of possibility
for gay people.”
29 METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014
MW: Did you grow up in a big family?
SACHS: I came from an upper-middle class Jewish family in
Memphis that was extended — lots of cousins, in a very warm,
embracing family. And I’m very close to my family now. And
I think that’s a lot of what Love Is Strange is about — what is
our responsibility to each other as family, whether that means
by definition biological, or communal? I feel like I live in a very
communal family in New York. And I’m interested in how we
live in groups, and the distinction between being an individual,
being a couple, or being part of a community.
MW: How long have you and your partner Boris been together?
SACHS: We have been together for seven years. We got married in
January of 2012 — seven days before
we had twins. So we had what I
call a gay shotgun wedding, to make
sure we were legal before the kids
arrived.
My husband has been very
involved in my work. He did a bunch
of paintings for Keep The Lights On,
they were in the opening credits
of that film. And he did the paint-
ings for John Lithgow’s character in
Love Is Strange. So we’ve kind of got
a creative and fertile relationship.
[Laughs.]
MW: How did you have the twins, Eva
and Felix?
SACHS: We are raising the kids with
their mom, who is a documenta-
ry cinematographer and lives next
door to us.
We don’t get into the biologi-
cal details. They’re our kids, period.
We’re a three-parent family in two apartments. It’s really been
wonderful.
MW: I would imagine 10 years ago children might not have been
something you thought would be in your future.
SACHS: Well, I was actually trying for about 10 years to have kids.
It’s something that I always wanted. But I think — you don’t tend
to do things until you see other people doing them. That’s where
culture changes. I was not going to be the vanguard. And, also, I
was a mess in my thirties, to be honest. I think it was well-timed
for me, to wait until I was a bit older. But I also think the culture
wasn’t ready. There weren’t many gay people having kids, at
least gay men.
MW: Do you anticipate creating a film featuring gay parents, based
on your experiences now?
SACHS: That may be down the road, yeah. I think of being gay
as just one element of who I am. And I think that’s what I try
to do in my movies — gayness doesn’t define my characters, any
more than their race or their gender fully defines them. It’s an
element of their personality that I try to be attentive to. But I get
these comments — ‘Wow, your gay characters aren’t clichés of
gay people.’ And I’m always like, ‘Yeah.’ As if the expectation is
because they’re gay that I’m going to write them badly. [Laughs.]
It so underestimates the potential for what is possible in repre-
sentation of gay lives.
MW: Speaking of queer representation, you organize a Queer/Art/
Film series at the IFC Center in New York, and you’ve also cre-
ated an affiliated Queer/Art/Mentorship program. What is that
program?
SACHS: We’re in our fourth year of Queer/Art/Mentorship. We
pair and support mentorship between established queer art-
ists and emerging queer artists in five disciplines [literary, film,
performing arts, visual and curatorial arts]. All of this commu-
nal work, for me, came out of actually working on the Obama
campaign — I was very involved in the 2008 campaign. Which
just meant that I was good at organizing my friends. I wasn’t
involved in any way other than as a grassroots organizer. And I
have taken that as a way of living. I think without that I wouldn’t
have been able to make Love Is Strange. It wouldn’t have existed
without the support of the LGBT/queer community. Twenty-
five individuals paid for Love Is Strange — 23 of them are LGBT,
and 20 of those are lesbian businesswomen.
MW: Is it fair to say mentoring is something you feel
compelled to help foster now in part because you
missed out on that yourself due to the AIDS epidemic?
SACHS: For me, there was an absence of any sense
of mentorship — both people I might have known
and also people I might have watched, because their
lives were cut short. And I have felt this huge gap.
You know, I think any artist actually has to forge his
own way, but we can collectively make it easier for
each other in some way. I was on stage with John
Lithgow in New York at a Q&A recently, and I was
talking about my great uncle’s partner Ted Rust and
how inspiring he had been to me, and the influence
he had on [the character of] Ben. And then I’m look-
ing at John Lithgow, who this summer has been
doing King Lear for Shakespeare in the Park [in New
York]. He’s about to do an Albee play on Broadway.
He’s opening this movie. And I thought, he is inspir-
ing, that at this point in his life he’s taking such risks,
creatively. That he isn’t sitting back and saying, “I
made a lot of money on 3rd Rock from the Sun and
I’m going to hang out by my pool.”
This movie is a form of mentorship. I think that’s what the
character of Joey gets from living with Ben, which is a sense
of how people live their lives and what they can gain from that
knowledge, sharing that knowledge.
MW: Each month your Queer/Art Film series invites an artist to
present a work that inspired or influenced his or her work. What
work would you pick?
SACHS: Oh. I mean I used to think I would pick the 1983 film
l’Homme blesse [The Wounded Man], which I recommend, by
Patrice Chéreau. It’s about an obsessive gay man who’s pursu-
ing another guy at a train station in France. But I don’t relate to
that film personally as much as I used to. Recently, I thought of
Grease. So clearly something has shifted. [Laughs.]
MW: You haven’t done a musical yet.
SACHS: No, but I love musicals. And I’m working on turning Love
Is Strange into a musical. Because I think it’s written as one. I
think it hits all the emotional high points. It’s got everything that
I love in a good musical.
MW: Finally, I wanted to ask about a little case of title trivia. You
had a 2005 movie called Forty Shades of Blue, and while I know
it’s an inspired twist on an old Irish phrase and a Johnny Cash
song, still, you can’t help but think of E.L. James’s book Fifty
Shades of Grey — which came out six years after your film.
SACHS: Oh yeah. I just wish I was getting some residuals.
[Laughs.] You know, all art is inspired by other art. So I don’t feel
like I was robbed.
Love Is Strange opens Friday, Aug. 29, at area theaters. Visit
fandango.com. l
“For me, there
was an absence
of any sense of
mentorship — both
people I might have
known and also
people I might have
watched, because
their lives were cut
short. And I
have felt this
huge gap.”
30 AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
SPOTLIGHT
BEAUTY AND THE BEASTS:
TORPEDO FACTORY’S CERAMIC ANIMALS
The Scope Gallery, the ceramics co-op arm of Alex-
andria’s Torpedo Factory, displays the latest works
from the Kiln Club, “Beauty and the Beasts.” The
focus is on decorative and functional handmade pot-
tery with an animal theme, everything from sculp-
tures of birds, pandas and elephants, to a creamer
and sugar set with painted chicken, to dog or nut
bowls with painted squirrels. “All the dishware is
microwave/dishwasher/oven/food-safe. This is to-
be-used pottery,” says the gallery’s Tracie Griffith.
“We take great pains to fire those pots at 2,000
degrees.” Opens Monday, Sept. 1, at 10 a.m. To Sept.
28. Scope Gallery of Torpedo Factory Art Center, 105
North Union St. Alexandria. Call 703-548-6288 or
visit torpedofactory.org.
Compiled by Doug Rule
Tribal Tunes
Natalia Zukerman revels in her musical tribe of
‘weirdos’
I
HAVE MY FANTASIES OF OPENING FOR LUCINDA
Williams or Bonnie Raitt. That would be stupendous,”
Natalia Zukerman says. “But I have to say, I’ve gotten
to play music with some of my absolute heroes.” From open-
ing for Ani DiFranco and Shawn Colvin, to playing in Susan
Werner’s band, Zukerman has solidly established herself in
the women’s indie-folk community. Her forthcoming strong,
stirring solo album, Come Thief, Come Fire, features a couple
more of the scene’s leading ladies, including Erin McKeown
and Meghan Toohey. All are part of what Zukerman jokes is
“a tribe of other weirdos.”
Although Zukerman grew up in Manhattan to parents who
were both professional musicians, it took her a while to find
that tribe. “I studied classical music as a kid, and it just didn’t
really resonate with me.” So while her sister Arianna Zuker-
man became a famous opera singer who now teaches voice
at Catholic University, it took Natalia some work to unearth her style. The real trigger happened once she picked up the slide
guitar as a student at California’s North Indian Classical-minded Ali Akbar College of Music. “I just kind of migrated, started
listening to a lot of old country/blues,” she says.
Zukerman will soon make her debut at the Birchmere, opening for another leading member of the tribe, Melissa Ferrick, who
she recently supported at the Michigan Womyn’s Music Festival.
And who knows, maybe there’ll be another surprise performance during the show, similar to the time when Zukerman
played at the Stone Pony in Asbury Park, N.J. “It’s a real down and dirty club,” Zukerman explains, “and my sister got up there
and sang true lyric soprano for a couple standards. And in the bar you could hear a pin drop.
“We’ll see if we can lure her to the beautiful Birchmere.” — Doug Rule
Natalia Zukerman performs Friday, Sept. 12, at 7:30 p.m., at The Birchmere, 3701 Mount Vernon Ave., Alexandria. Tickets are
$25. Call 703-549-7500 or visit birchmere.com or nataliazukerman.com.
BOB MOULD, RICH MOREL
Legendary gay punk rocker and former D.C. resi-
dent Bob Mould is nothing if not prolific. In June,
he released his fourth solo album in only the past
six years (and 11th solo set in a 31-year-career that
includes additional releases as part of three bands).
And just as every time before, Mould hits the 9:30
Club as part of a national tour — only this outing,
promoting Beauty and Ruin with his bandmates bass-
ist Jason Narducy and drummer Jon Wurster, won’t
end with a round of Blowoff. But dancing bears, take
heart: that very night, Mould’s former partner-in-
Blowoff Rich Morel offers another iteration of his
Hot Sauce party in the downstairs Backstage space
at the Black Cat. Surely Mould will stop by too — and
maybe Morel will even let him have a spin at the
turntable. Mould performs Saturday, Sept. 6. Doors at
6 p.m. Nightclub 9:30, 815 V St. NW. Tickets are $25.
Call 202-265-0930 or visit 930.com. Rich Morel’s Hot
Sauce is Saturday, Sept. 6. Doors at 10 p.m. Black Cat
Backstage, 1811 14th St. NW. Tickets are $5. Call 202-
667-4490 or visit blackcatdc.com.
COLBIE CAILLAT
The most recent singer-songwriter to sign on to the
Human Rights Campaign’s Americans for Marriage
Equality campaign, Colbie Caillat returns to Wolf
Trap after performing a double-bill of sunny, sweet,
teen-flavored pop-rock in 2012 with Gavid DeGraw.
Caillat first gained notice years ago via MySpace —
remember that site? — but her success has been a
slow, steady boil, one that appears to be reaching a
new level with her inspiring single and popular video
“Try,” the first from her forthcoming studio set Gypsy
Heart. Meanwhile, Alex & Sierra, the jazzy-pop duo
that won season 3 of Fox’s The X Factor, opens for
the Wolf Trap show. Sunday, Sept. 7, at 8 p.m. The
Filene Center at Wolf Trap, 1551 Trap Road, Vienna.
Tickets are $30 to $50. Call 877-WOLFTRAP or visit
wolftrap.org.
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AUGUST 28 - SEPTEMBER 11, 2014
31 METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014
32
CONGRESSIONAL CEMETERY’S
DAY OF THE DOG FESTIVAL
Known as one of the best places on Capitol Hill to
walk your dog, the historic Congressional Cem-
etery typically only allows dog-walking privileges
to members of the K-9 Corps. But Day of the Dog
opens the grounds to the public and their pups.
The event features contests, games, demonstrations,
plus representatives from pet adoption agencies and
shelters with dogs and cats ready for adoption. There
will also be vendors for pets — and their owners,
including brews from Port City Brewing Company
and Atlas Brew Works and grub from various food
trucks. Saturday, Aug. 30, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Congressional Cemetery, 1801 E St. SE. Free. Visit
congressionalcemetery.org.
INDIGO LOVE & THE RENAISSANCE TRIO
“’Sassy’: Celebrating Sarah Vaughan” is a tribute to
the great jazz vocalist, dubbed the “Divine One,”
who got her start in 1942 winning the famed Ama-
teur Night at the Apollo Theater. Singer Indigo
Love performs a scripted show about the classy and
sophisticated artist and enhanced with photography,
costumes and the Zezeh Brazil Dance Troupe. Kevin
Anthony joins Love and company at this return
engagement to the Howard Theatre, less than six
months after the last performance. Tuesday, Sept.
9, at 7:30 p.m. The Howard Theatre, 620 T St. NW.
Tickets are $20 to $40. Call 202-588-5595 or visit
thehowardtheatre.com.
MJ DAY 2014: 5TH ANNUAL
MICHAEL JACKSON DANCE PARTY
In the five years since the King of Pop’s pass-
ing, Dominic Redd aka DJ Dredd has offered an
annual dance party tribute, covering most of the
hits, remixes, rare cuts and videos by pop’s biggest
Thriller — don’t stop till you get enough. Assisting
Dredd in putting on the extravaganza this year is DJ
Stylus — The Vibe Conductor, host Grap Luva and
a video mix by O’s Cool. Friday, Aug. 29. Doors at 9
p.m. Nightclub 9:30, 815 V St. NW. Tickets are $15.
Call 202-265-0930 or visit 930.com.
NATIONAL BOOK FESTIVAL
The Library of Congress has moved up its annual
book festival, both on the calendar and in geography.
The 14th edition takes place a month early, over
Labor Day weekend, and sets up shop at the Conven-
tion Center, and not on the National Mall, as with all
previous incarnations. The move allows the festival
to hold evening hours, expanding programming
to include a poetry slam, a “Great Books to Great
Movies” session and a “super-session” for graphic-
novel enthusiasts, and even inspiring this year’s
theme, “Stay Up With A Good Book.” Kai Bird, Kate
DiCamillo, Francisco Goldman, Alice McDermott,
U.S. Reps. John Lewis (D-Ga.) and John Clyburn
(D-S.C.), George Packer, Richard Moe and Lynn
Sherr are among those authors at this year’s free
festival, which features special pavilions by genre,
this year expanding to include science, the culinary
arts and small press/international. Saturday, Aug.
30, from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Walter E. Convention
Convention Center, 801 Mt. Vernon Pl. Call 202-
249-3000 or visit loc.gov/bookfest for more details
and a full schedule.
NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA’S
LABOR DAY CONCERT
Steven Reineke leads the orchestra in this annual
tradition on the West Lawn of the U.S. Capitol. This
year’s program explores American music from TV
shows, movies and Broadway musicals, and features
actress and singer Nicole Parker, best known for her
work in comedy via MADtv but currently starring
as Elphaba in the national tour of Wicked, and actor
and singer Christopher Johnstone, who regularly
performs opera and showtunes. Sunday, Aug. 31, at 8
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Glimpses
of Gay China
Film Festival offers uncensored look into LGBT China
W
HAT’S IT LIKE TO BE LGBT IN CHINA? “I WOULD SAY IN BIG
cities, like Beijing and Shanghai, people are more open. But in small
towns, people are not,” says Echo Xie, a native of Beijing who has
lived in D.C. since moving here a few years ago to study at American University.
As deputy director of the DC Chinese Film Festival, Xie, in charge of pro-
gramming, has essentially made it her mission to offer a window into her culture
that is rarely seen. “There are a lot of really good independent Chinese films but
they don’t have a lot of opportunities to be shown here in the U.S.,” she says.
“The main films that people get to see here…[reveal] very little about contempo-
rary China, or what lives are like nowadays in China.”
The festival was started two years ago as “completely community orga-
nized,” without any funding from the Chinese government. As a result, DCCFF,
now in its second year and set for the weekend of Sept. 5, shows films and
offers programs the homophobic communist government wouldn’t allow. For
example, the program “LGBT Spotlight: Exploring Gay China On/Off Screen”
(9/6, 10 p.m.) features two short films, one exploring public attitudes about
same-sex marriage in Beijing and the other the challenges of coming out in
small-town China. After the films screen at Silo Restaurant near Chinatown, a
panel, including Stephen Leonelli, former director of the Beijing LGBT Center,
and Sam Zhao, founder of the first lesbian magazine in China, will discuss the
country’s broader LGBT concerns.
The festival opens Thursday, Sept. 4, at 8 p.m., with another film of LGBT
interest, Golden Gate Girls. Hong Kong filmmaker Louisa Wei’s documentary
pays tribute to an unsung American filmmaker, Esther Eng. “She was the first
Chinese female filmmaker in Hollywood in the ‘30s and ‘40s, and she was also
openly lesbian,” Xie says.
Xie is dedicated to the medium of film, having also volunteered with other
local festivals, from FilmFest DC to the Asian/Pacific-American-focused DC
APA Film Festival. “I always think watching films is the best way to learn about
culture — and foster cross-cultural communication.” — Doug Rule
The DC Chinese Film Festival opens Thursday, Sept. 4, at 8 p.m., and runs to
Sunday, Sept. 7. Various locations. Tickets are $10 for each program, except for
$15 for opening-night film and party, with passes for one day or full weekend $20
to $66. Call 202-467-4600 or visit dccff.org.
AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
New Beijing, New Marriage
33 METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014
34
STAGE
13TH ANNUAL PAGE-TO-STAGE FESTIVAL
Every Labor Day weekend more than 40 theater
companies from the area present free staged read-
ings, workshops and rehearsals of new works at the
Kennedy Center as part of its Page-to-Stage Festival.
The festival has become a way for the public to get
a preview of upcoming shows. For example, next
fall, 50 area theaters will participate in the Women’s
Voices Theater Festival by each producing a world-
premiere play by female dramatists — and many of
them are represented at this year’s Page-to-Stage,
which showcases works by over 30 female play-
wrights. 1st Stage Theater, Adventure Theatre-MTC,
dog & pony dc, MetroStage, Pinky Swear Produc-
tions, Scena Theatre, Synetic Theater and Theater J
are just some of the participating companies at this
year’s festival, which also features theater depart-
ments from area universities including Catholic,
Gallaudet, Georgetown and the University of Mary-
land. Saturday, Aug. 30, through Monday, Sept. 1,
at the Kennedy Center. Free. Call 202-467-4600 or
visit kennedy-center.org for more information and a
performance calendar.
BELLEVILLE
Artistic director David Muse opens Studio Theatre’s
new season by directing another Amy Herzog (4,000
Miles) play Belleville, which the New York Times
raved was “thrillingly good” and confirmed “her
reputation as one of the brightest new talents in
the theater.” Gillian Williams plays Abby and Jacob
Knoll is Zack, an American couple who move to
Paris for Zack’s job with Doctors Without Borders
and seem to have it all — until Abby comes home
early one afternoon and uncovers a few surprises.
Maduka Steady and Joy Jones round out the small
cast. Opens in previews Wednesday, Sept. 3, at 8
p.m. To Oct. 12. Studio Theatre, 14th & P Streets NW.
Tickets are $20 to $68. Call 202-332-3300 or visit
studiotheatre.org.
COLOSSAL
Olney Theatre presents the first of four stops on a
National New Play Network Rolling World Premiere
for Andrew Hinderaker’s Colossal as directed by
Will Davis. The show is structured like a football
game, with four quarters, a pre-show training ses-
sion and a half-time show, and tells the story of a col-
lege football player who took a hit in a game that left
him paralyzed from the waist down. Michael Patrick
Thornton of ABC’s Private Practice opens Wednes-
day, Sept. 3, at 7:45 p.m. To Sept. 28. Olney Theatre
Center, 2001 Olney-Sandy Spring Road, Olney, Md.
Tickets are $43.50 to $63.50. Call 301-924-3400 or
visit olneytheatre.org.
DIRTY DANCING:
THE CLASSIC STORY ON STAGE
After years of lying largely dormant save for a few
shows for a few weeks every year, the National
Theatre kicks off a relatively full season with the
kickoff stop on a new national tour of Dirty Dancing.
Yes, it’s a show based on the hit movie featuring the
songs familiar from that 1987 film starring Patrick
Swayze and Jennifer Grey. In the past decade the
show has circled the U.S. and even the globe, with-
out once landing on Broadway — and to date there
are still no plans for the Great White Way. Now to
Sept. 14. National Theatre, 1321 Pennsylvania Ave.
NW. Tickets are $48 to $98. Call 202-628-6161 or
visit nationaltheatre.org or dirtydancingontour.com.
FOOL FOR LOVE
To kick off its new season the Round House Theatre
Company offers a revival of what is considered one
of the best works by Sam Shepard, the man who is
as well known for his acting in Hollywood film (The
p.m. U.S. Capitol Building, West Lawn. (Or Kennedy
Center’s Concert Hall, in case of inclement weather.)
Free. Call 202-467-4600 or visit
kennedy-center.org/nso.
STAR-SPANGLED SPECTACULAR FESTIVAL
Baltimore plays host to a free weeklong festival start-
ing Wednesday, Sept. 10, celebrating the 200th anni-
versary of the U.S. national anthem. The Maryland
War of 1812 Bicentennial Commission has organized
“O’ Say Can You See? Star-Spangled Spectacular,”
which will draw tall ships, Navy gray hulls and the
Blue Angels to the city’s Inner Harbor, where his-
tory demonstrations and activities for the whole
family will be on tap alongside food and beverages
celebrating the Chesapeake region. But the chief
draw comes Saturday, Sept. 13, when there’ll be a
fireworks display over Fort McHenry and the Inner
Harbor, and a patriotic concert co-hosted by John
Lithgow and Jordin Sparks that features perfor-
mances by a smorgasbord of America’s best musi-
cians, including Melissa Etheridge, Kenny Rogers,
Train, Smokey Robinson, Kristin Chenoweth, Little
Big Town, Denyce Graves-Montgomery, Penatonix,
the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and Off Broad-
way’s Stomp. For more information and full details
call 410-767-6974 or visit starspangled200.com.
YENTL
Theater J opens its new season with a familiar trans-
gender story. Originally staged on Broadway in 1975,
Yentl is based on Isaac Bashevis Singer’s short story
“Yentl, the Yeshiva Boy,” about a 19th century girl
who disguises herself as a boy to study the Talmud —
only to fall in love with another boy. The story gained
wider fame when Barbra Streisand turned it into a
1983 film that ultimately worked best as a promotion
for Streisand as a quadruple threat — writer, direc-
tor, producer and actor. (“Streisand is always pres-
ent while poor Yentl is absent,” Singer critiqued.)
Now Singer’s original stage adaptation with Lean
Napolin is revived in a production featuring new
music and lyrics by the original “I Kissed A Girl”
singer-songwriter Jill Sobule, with additional music
by Robin Eaton. Theater J’s Shirley Serotsky directs
Shayna Blass, Aaron Bliden and Joe Brack leading a
large cast in a production at the Goldman Theater.
Opens in previews Thursday, Aug. 28, at 7:30 p.m.
To Oct. 5. The Aaron and Cecile Goldman Theater,
Washington, D.C.’s Jewish Community Center, 1529
16th St. NW. Tickets are $45 to $65. Call 202-518-
9400 or visit washingtondcjcc.org.
FILM
LOVE IS STRANGE
In Ira Sachs’s film Love Is Strange, John Lithgow
and Alfred Molina star as a 39-year-old couple who
draw on a tight-knit community of family and friends
both to celebrate their love and help them through
a post-wedding hardship. See this week’s cover
story, including interviews with Sachs, Lithgow and
Molina. Opens Friday, Aug. 29. Area theaters. Visit
fandango.com.
THE LAST OF ROBIN HOOD
Kevin Kline stars as Errol Flynn, the swashbuckling
Hollywood star and notorious ladies man in Richard
Glatzer and Wash West’s film about the desire for
fame and the price it exacts. Susan Sarandon stars
as the fame-obsessed mother of an aspiring actress
with whom Flynn has an affair that spills out into the
public spotlight. Opens Friday, Sept. 5. Landmark’s
Bethesda Row Cinema, 7235 Woodmont Ave. Call
301-652-7273 or visit landmarktheatres.com.
Right Stuff) as for writing several Tony-nominated
plays. Round House’s Ryan Rilette directs Katie
deBuys, Tim Getman, Thomas Keegan and Marty
Lodge in this explosive tale of love, hate and the
dying myths of the Old West, as set in a seedy motel
on the edge of the Mojave Desert. Opens in previews
Wednesday, Sept. 3, at 7:30 p.m. To Sept. 27. Round
House Theatre, 4545 East-West Highway, Bethesda.
Tickets are $50 to $60. Call 240-644-1100 or visit
roundhousetheatre.org.
MOLLY
D.C.’s internationally-minded company Scena The-
atre presents a repertory of two new Irish plays —
Conor McPherson’s Shining City (see separate entry)
and this, a world premiere by George O’Brien, a pro-
fessor emeritus at Georgetown University. Danielle
Davy stars as Molly Allgood, the young mistress to
esteemed Irish playwright J.M. Synge, who was also
a leading lady of the historic Abbey Theatre in Dub-
lin. Now to Sept. 21. Atlas Performing Arts Center,
1333 H St. NE. Tickets are $35. Call 202-399-7993 or
visit scenatheatre.org.
PAGEANT
The Richmond Triangle Players brings back a new
production of one of its most-requested shows, the
drag-queen musical with book and lyrics by Side
Show’s Bill Russell and Frank Kelly, with music
by Albert Evans. Originally conceived by director
Robert Longbottom, Pageant features six “beauty
queens” singing, dancing and camping it up in a
contest for the title of Miss Glamouresse, decided by
nine judges from the audience. Closes this Saturday,
Aug. 30. Richmond Triangle Players, 1300 Altamont
Ave. Richmond. Call 804-346-8113 or visit
rtriangle.org.
PINKALICIOUS
Carl Menninger helms a musical adaptation for
the children’s theater-based company Adventure
Theatre MTC of the book “Pinkalicious,” about
a girl who can’t stop eating pink cupcakes until
she develops “pinkititis” and turns pink. Authors
Elizabeth Kann and Victoria Kann wrote the show’s
book and co-wrote the song lyrics with composer
John Gregor. Closes Sunday, Aug. 31. Adventure
Theatre MTC, 7300 MacArthur Blvd., Glen Echo,
Md. Tickets are $19. Call 301-634-2270 or visit
adventuretheatre-mtc.org.
SHE KILLS MONSTERS
Known for ambitious staging of eccentric, or just
plain out-there, fantasy tales, Rorschach Theatre has
seemingly done it again with Qui Nguyen’s She Kills
Monsters, set in a Dungeons & Dragons-inspired
mysterious world created by one suburban American
teenager as her way to cope with and escape from
high school. But when she dies, her sister struggles
to keep the fantasy world turning. Randy Baker
directs a cast including Claire Aniela, Tori Boutin,
Louis E. Davis, Joshua Dick and Robert Pike. To
Sept. 14. Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St.
NE. Tickets are $30. Call 202-399-7993 or visit ror-
schachtheatre.com.
SHINING CITY
D.C.’s internationally minded company Scena The-
atre presents a repertory of two new Irish plays
— George O’Brien’s Molly (see separate listing) and
this, the latest by Ireland’s legendary, modern play-
wright, Conor McPherson. Shining City examines
the relationship between a fledgling therapist and
one of his patients, who’s convinced he’s being
haunted by his dead wife’s ghost. Lee Ordeman,
Ron Litman and Ellie Nicol star in a play that the
New York Times called “as close to perfection as
contemporary playwrighting gets.” Opens Thursday,
Aug. 28, at 8 p.m. To Sept. 21. Atlas Performing Arts
Center, 1333 H St. NE. Tickets are $35 to $40. Call
202-399-7993 or visit atlasarts.org.
AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
SWEENEY TODD-PROG METAL VERSION
Yes, Stephen Sondheim really did give the quirky
and risqué Landless Theatre Company permission
to adapt the score of his most commercially success-
fully musical as a prog-metal piece, leaving the lyrics
and Hugh Wheeler’s book intact. What is prog-met-
al, you might ask? “Prog-metal is actually a very com-
plex, a very precise, almost classically based metal,”
Landless’s Melissa Baughman explained to Metro
Weekly last year when she directed a prog-metal
adaptation of Richard Campbell’s Frankenstein. “It’s
really intricate [with] emotional highs and lows. It’s
not just, ‘Let me rock your face off.’” Nonetheless,
the Sweeney cast features a bevy of vocalists from
local metal and rock bands, led by Nina Osegueda as
Mrs. Lovett. Landless’s Andrew Baughman, who had
the prog-metal idea in the first place, plays the title
character. To Aug. 31. Warehouse, 645 New York
Ave. NW. Tickets are $25. Call 202-783-3933 or visit
landlesstheatre.com.
THE SHOPLIFTERS
Arena Stage opens its new season with a biting,
world-premiere comedy about the common bonds
between society’s haves and have-nots. Jayne Hou-
dyshell, last seen in the Kennedy Center’s Tony-
nominated production of Follies, plays a “career
shoplifter” whose life of petty crime is halted by an
overzealous rookie security guard and his ambiva-
lent mentor in this oddball-driven comedy written
and directed by Morris Panych. Opens in previews
Friday, Sept. 5. Runs to Oct. 19. Arena Stage — Mead
Center for American Theater, 1101 6th St. SW. Call
202-488-3300 or visit arenastage.org.
MUSIC
AFROLICIOUS & ZONGO JUNCTION
Tropicalia, the 14th and U venue with the incredible
sound system and warm, relaxed vibe, has lined up
a double-bill of American-styled Afrobeat bands:
The San Francisco-based Afroloicious, whose latest
release features production by the Thievery Corpo-
ration’s Rob Garza, and the Brooklyn-based psyche-
delic dance act Zongo Junction. Friday, Sept. 5, at 8
p.m. Tropicalia, 2001 14th St NW. Tickets are $10 in
advance or $13 day-of show. Call 202-629-4535 or
visit tropicaliadc.com.
ALL THINGS GO FALL
CLASSIC MUSIC FESTIVAL
The Virgin Mobile FreeFest may have been can-
celled this year, but to the rescue comes a smaller,
hipper and possibly better alternative — especially
since the inaugural All Things Go Fall Classic is
based near the heart of the city. Union Market’s
Dock5 plays host to this festival from the influential
music promotion company All Things Go and fea-
turing several of the most buzzed-about indie-pop
bands in hipster circles, chiefly Baltimore’s new
wave-inspired Future Islands, new Swedish electro-
pop starlet Tove Lo and former Sweetlife Festival
electro-pop act Haerts. U.S. Royalty, Bear Hands,
Panama Wedding and Young Summer also perform
at this festival, with food from Toki Underground’s
Erik Bruner-Yang, Takorean, the Bespoke Kitchen,
Dolcezza and Crunkcakes. Saturday, Sept. 13, fro 12
p.m. to 10 p.m. Dock 5 at Union Market, 1309 5th St.
NE. Tickets are $50 in advance or $60 day-of. Call
800-680-9095 or visit unionmarketdc.com.
BLEACHERS
Jack Antonoff recently formed this side project
to his work in the indie rock band fun., recruiting
top-notch producers John Hill (MIA, Empire of the
Sun) and Vince Clarke from Erasure, among other
collaborators on the debut album Strange Desire,
released earlier this summer. Tuesday, Sept. 2, and,
Wednesday, Sept. 3. Doors at 7 p.m. Nightclub 9:30,
815 V St. NW. Tickets, remaining only for Tuesday,
are $20. Call 202-265-0930 or visit 930.com.
CHAISE LOUNGE
This D.C.-based jazz and swing band has been a sta-
ple at hip bars around the area, along with more sto-
ried venues such as the Kennedy Center and Blues
Alley — and now, the arts center in the former D.C.
prison. Having performed with Natalie Cole and
Dizzy Gillespie, Chaise Lounge performs swing stan-
dards as well as original tunes, including those from
last year’s album Dot Dot Dot martini. Saturday, Aug.
30, at 8 p.m. Workhouse Arts Center, at the former
D.C. Correctional Complex, 9518 Workhouse Way.
Lorton, Va. Tickets are free. Call 703-584-2900 or
visit workhorsearts.org or chaiseloungenation.com.

CHRIS ISAAK
The “Wicked Game” singer-songwriting hunk is still
out supporting the 2011 set Beyond The Sun, a collec-
tion of songs recorded by Sun Records artists Elvis
Presley, Johnny Cash, Roy Orbison and Jerry Lee
Lewis. With classics including “Ring of Fire,” “Great
Balls of Fire,” “Can’t Help Falling in Love” and
“Pretty Woman” – to name a mere four – no wonder
people just can’t get enough. Tuesday, Sept. 9, and
Wednesday, Sept. 10, at 7:30 p.m. The Birchmere,
3701 Mount Vernon Ave., Alexandria. Tickets are
$89.50. Call 703-549-7500 or visit birchmere.com.
35 METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014
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nedy Center Terrace Theater. Tickets are $60. Call
202-467-4600 or visit kennedy-center.org.
THE COOLOTS
A regular PhaseFest act, the CooLots is an eclectic
D.C.-based rock/soul band whose style, as heard on
the new self-titled EP, merges influences as varied as
N.E.R.D., Meshell Ndegeocello, Sade, Staind, Erykah
Badu, Kanye West and System of a Down. The same
night at Black Cat ushers in Rich Morel’s Hot Sauce
party downstairs, meaning you can be assured both
the “hot” boys and “coolot” girls — and the full LGBT
spectrum — will be drawn to this now hip block of
14th Street. Saturday, Sept. 6. Doors at 9 p.m. Black
Cat, 1811 14th St. NW. Tickets are $10 for The Coo-
lots. Call 202-667-4490 or visit blackcatdc.com.
THE VICTORIAN LYRIC OPERA COMPANY
John Philip Sousa’s rarely heard operetta The Char-
latan is presented in a semi-staged concert produc-
tion with live orchestra by this Rockville-based
opera company led by Joseph Sorge, who says Sou-
sa’s music here “is just as energetic and toe-tapping
as his most famous marches.” The farce, directed by
Elaine Kass, follows the fortunes of a comical cast of
characters, including a crafty magician who manages
to set up his own daughter with the gallant prince.
Noted Sousa scholar Patrick Warfield offers a free
lecture an hour before the Saturday performance.
Friday, Sept. 5, and Saturday, Sept. 6, at 8 p.m., and
Sunday, Sept. 7, at 2 p.m. F. Scott Fitzgerald Theatre
at the Rockville Civic Center, 603 Edmonston Dr.
Rockville. Tickets are $24. Call 240-314-8690 or
visit vloc.org.
DANCE
ADRIANE FANG
Grains is the latest work by this University of Mary-
land-based choreographer, a 2014 recipient of the
Kennedy Center’s Local Dance Commissioning Proj-
ect (LDCP) and presented as part of the august
venue’s free Millennium Stage programming series.
Adriane Fang performs this work exploring the sub-
ject of time and the connection of the shared human
experience through movement, lighting, organic
materials and a score by Jeffrey Dorfman. Thursday,
Sept. 4, and Friday, Sept. 5, at 6 p.m. Kennedy Center
Millennium Stage. Tickets are free. Call 202-467-
4600 or visit kennedy-center.org.
CIRQUE DREAMS
Cirque Productions, popularly known as Cirque
Dreams, is not affiliated with Cirque du Soleil — in
fact, over a decade ago the better-known Montreal-
based global conglomerate unsuccessfully sued this
and other companies for use of the “Cirque” name.
But performing feats of wonder are the name of the
game across the cirque spectrum, and one review
of this 21-year-old Florida-based company assures
that, “If you’ve ever enjoyed a performance by a
Cirque du Soleil company, you’ll be very satisfied
by Cirque Dreams’ Jungle Fantasy.” Friday, Sept.
5, at 8 p.m., and Saturday, Sept. 6, at 7:30 p.m. The
Filene Center at Wolf Trap, 1551 Trap Road, Vienna.
Tickets are $25 to $50. Call 877-WOLFTRAP or visit
wolftrap.org.
JANE FRANKLIN DANCE
Cute Animals is a practice and performance project
for dogs and their owners, in which professional
dancers will perform with amateur dogs. Three
Monday night practices culminate in a final per-
formance. Wednesday, Sept. 10, at 7 p.m. Beatley
Library, 5005 Duke St. Alexandria. Call 703-933-1111
or visit janefranklindance.com.
DEMI LOVATO
X Factor judge and mentor Demi Lovato, who has
also appeared as a guest star on Glee, continues her
The Neon Lights Tour, which included a detour
in late June to perform at New York Pride’s Pier
Dance. Christina Perri and MKTO open. Baltimore
Arena, 201 West Baltimore St., Baltimore. Tickets
are $19.50 to $79.50. Call 410-727-7811 or visit bal-
timorearena.com.
DIXIE POWER TRIO
Birthed over two decades ago in Fredericksburg, Va.,
this rock-and-roll-steeped Dixieland band merges
New Orleans jazz, zydeco, Cajun and other influ-
ences. The group offers an almost-hometown show
at the Kennedy Center as part of the venue’s Mil-
lennium Stage programming. Meaning, yes, it’s free.
Wednesday, Sept. 3, at 6 p.m. Kennedy Center Mil-
lennium Stage. Tickets are free. Call 202-467-4600
or visit kennedy-center.org.
ED SHEERAN
Yet another twenty-something British star, whose
strong new album X and especially the single “Sing”
finds this erstwhile folkie rapping and singing in
falsetto as if he were the British version of Justin
Timberlake. We’ll take it! Budding new British band
Rudimental opens. Saturday, Sept. 6. Doors at 6 p.m.
Merriweather Post Pavilion, 10475 Little Patuxent
Parkway, Columbia, Md. Tickets are $40 to $55. Call
800-551-SEAT or visit merriweathermusic.com.
JAMIE XX
Jamie Smith from the hot British indie-pop band the
XX drops by the 9:30 Club to DJ a show, presented
by U Street Music Hall, expected to be filled with
haunting electronica, and including a couple new
tracks by Smith himself. Friday, Sept. 5. Doors at 10
p.m. Nightclub 9:30, 815 V St. NW. Tickets are $20.
Call 202-265-0930 or visit 930.com.
PRINCE ROYCE
Celebrated as the most successful breakout Latin act
in recent years, the 25-year-old Bronx-born Geoffrey
Royce Rojas, who goes by the name Prince Royce,
is what the Miami Herald calls “a teen girl’s dream
of a baby-brown-eyed heartthrob whose sweet and
soulful renditions of pop- and R&B-flavored bachata
have proved irresistible to young Latinos who share
his bicultural identity.” Expect many screaming
young Latinas when Royce debuts at Wolf Trap for
a concert with an opening set by Sofia Reyes, an
up-and-coming Mexican teenager signed to Royce’s
own label. Friday, Aug. 29, at 8 p.m. Filene Center at
Wolf Trap, 1551 Trap Road, Vienna. Tickets are $35
to $75. Call 877-WOLFTRAP or visit wolftrap.org.

SANDARAA
As part of its free nightly Millennium Stage program-
ming series the Kennedy Center welcomes one of
the most interesting bands on the New York music
scene. This collaboration between Pakistani vocalist
Zebunnisa “Zeb” Bangash and klezmer clarinetist
Michael Winograd was formed two years ago at the
Pakistani Embassy in D.C. Monday, Sept. 8, at 6 p.m.
Kennedy Center Millennium Stage. Tickets are free.
Call 202-467-4600 or visit kennedy-center.org.
STEPHEN COSTELLO, AILYN PEREZ
The Washington National Opera presents two of
today’s most exciting young opera singers, this
husband-and-wife duo who co-starred in WNO’s
The Elixir of Love. The tenor Costello, whom Opera
News has pegged for “potential greatness,” and Perez,
whom the New York Times says has “the makings of
a major soprano,” promise a wonderfully charming
evening of stories and song accompanied on piano by
Danielle Orlando. Wednesday, Sept. 10, at 7 p.m. Ken-
OKINAWAN PERFORMING ARTS
As part of its free Millennium Stage series, the
Kennedy Center welcomes Japanese performers of
Ryukyu traditional dance, traditional karate and so-
saku Eisa, all presented by the Okinawa Culture and
Spirit Promotion project and in cooperation with the
Embassy of Japan. Saturday, Sept. 6, at 6 p.m. Ken-
nedy Center Terrace Theater. Tickets are free. Call
202-467-4600 or visit kennedy-center.org.
COMEDY
BILL MAHER
The politically incorrect HBO comic returns to
D.C. for two nights of shows — the second of which
will be double as both a special taping of his show
Real Time with Bill Maher followed by a live airing
of his new standup routine. Wednesday, Sept. 10,
at 8 p.m. and Friday, Sept. 12, at 9:30 p.m. Warner
Theatre, 513 13th St. NW. Tickets are $63 to $117.
Call 202-783-4000 or visit warnertheatredc.com or
billmaher.com.
CHARLIE MURPHY
You may know him as Eddie Murphy’s older brother
(as well as screenwriting partner), but Charlie Mur-
phy is probably most famous for his integral role
on Chappelle’s Show. Since sharing scandalous tales
about Rick James and others via the sketch “Charlie
Murphy’s True Hollywood Stories” on the show,
Murphy has spent the past few years sharing more
funny stories and asides as a sellout standup sensa-
tion. He returns to the Howard Theatre for a run of
comedy the first full weekend in September. Satur-
day, Sept. 6, and Sunday, Sept. 7, at 7 p.m. and 9:30
p.m. The Howard Theatre, 620 T St. NW. Tickets
are $30 to $55. Call 202-588-5595 or visit thehow-
ardtheatre.com.
READINGS
JOSHUA WOLF SHENK
Powers of Two: Finding the Essence of Innovation in
Creative Pairs debunks the myth of the lone genius
and draws on new research showing how the pair
is the embodiment of ingenuity — from the Beatles’s
John Lennon and Paul McCartney to South Park’s
Trey Parker and Matt Stone, to Warren Buffett with
Charlie Munger, to even Martin Luther King Jr.’s
inspiration from Ralph David Abernathy. Shenk is a
freelance writer and essayist whose work has chiefly
appeared in The Atlantic, which co-presents this dis-
cussion. Monday, Sept. 8, at 7 p.m. Tickets are $12, or
$28 for two tickets and one book. Call 202-408-3100
or visit sixthandi.org or shenk.net.
SENATOR KIRSTEN GILLIBRAND
Off The Sidelines: Raise Your Voice, Change the World
documents the personal journey into public service,
spurred on by Hillary Rodham Clinton, of a wife and
mother of two who would go on to succeed Clinton
as senator from the Empire State. Politics and Prose
co-presents this discussion and book signing by
Senator Gillibrand. Wednesday, Sept. 10, at 7 p.m.
Sixth & I Historic Synagogue. 600 I St. NW. Tickets
are $15, $30 for one ticket and one book, or $40 for
two tickets and one book. Call 202-408-3100 or visit
sixthandi.org.
GALLERIES
BEYOND BOLLYWOOD:
INDIAN AMERICANS SHAPE THE NATION
Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center presents
this ambitious and colorful exhibition on the second
AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
continues on page 38
37 METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014
Surcharged
An all-electric Golf is a
tempting idea, but does the cost
outweigh the benefit?
T
HE HUMBLE VOLKSWAGEN GOLF IS SOME-
thing of a jack-of-all-trades. It’s well made, comfort-
able, reliable, practical, spacious and good fun on a
twisty back road. It’s German, carries the Volkswa-
gen badge — which looks a little better than the average Japanese
or Korean brand on your driveway — and it’s been steadily re-
fined across seven generations by the folks (Volks?) in Germany
to be one of the finest compacts on the market.
In GTI trim it’s a legitimate hot hatch, capable of producing
big smiles as its 210 horsepower, two-liter turbocharged engine
rockets it along. Get it with one of VW’s clean diesel engines and
it’ll return an estimated 43 mpg and let you drive up to 550 miles
on a tank. The best part about the Golf, though? Its price. Starting
at $17,995 and rising to $30,590 for a top spec GTI model, the Golf
is an affordable way to get into something that will provide years
of hassle-free, enjoyable motoring. Think of it as a cheaper Audi
A3 – Audi is part of the Volkswagen group, and both cars share
the same platform underneath – and you get a sense of why it’s
such a steal.
That’s why, then, the final pricing of the 2015 VW e-Golf
may provide more than a little sticker shock. The e-Golf is
Volkswagen’s response to the small pool of electric vehicles,
such as Nissan’s Leaf, currently available in the U.S., though
a rival to Tesla’s Model S this is not. For starters, the e-Golf
will only be available in ten states – those that have zero emis-
sions vehicle rules, such as California. Under the bodywork re-
sides what VW claims to be “the most versatile electric vehicle
in its class.” To back up those claims, the e-Golf only comes
in one trim, SEL Premium, which brings all-LED headlights
(a first for VW in America), touchscreen satellite navigation,
V
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by RHUARIDH MARR
38 AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
dual-zone climate control, keyless entry,
heated seats, parking camera and a host
of other standard features, as well as the
“largest interior space in a compact EV”
at 93.5 cubic feet.
Powering the e-Golf is a 115 horsepow-
er electric motor with 199 pounds-feet of
torque, which VW estimates will give be-
tween 70 and 90 miles on a charge — more
than you’d find in Nissan’s Leaf, which
has an EPA estimated 84-mile range. A 7.2
kW charger is standard on the e-Golf —
again, more powerful than either option
available for the Leaf — which should im-
prove charging times. Volkswagen claims
the on-board system is capable of deliver-
ing 80 percent charge in 30 minutes from
an appropriate charging outlet. So, it’s
relatively fast, has a relatively good range,
a decent amount of standard specifica-
tion and is otherwise the same Golf that
Americans are warming to and Europe-
ans have loved for the better part of three
decades.
So what’s the catch? Unsurprisingly,
it’s the price. Volkswagen is asking a
slightly eye-watering $35,455 for the e-
Golf, with an $820 destination charge.
The e-Golf will qualify for federal tax
credits of up to $7,500, but that’s still over
$28,000 for a car that’s only capable of
driving about 80 miles before needing re-
charged. Nissan’s Leaf can be climbed into
for around $21,500 after tax savings, albeit
without the same level of standard speci-
fication as the e-Golf.
There’s no getting around the fact that
electric vehicles are more expensive than
their internal combustion counterparts,
but potential buyers of the e-Golf need
to be sure that the fuel savings and clean
driving are enough to offset the high en-
try price and range anxiety. A clean diesel
Golf in SEL trim starts at $28,000 and, for
the average driver, it’ll be the better op-
tion, offering low emissions, high mile-
age and the option to go on extended trips
without having to worry about running
out of juice once you’ve left the city. Or,
buy the GTI, forget about frugality, and
have the most fun possible on your daily
commute. l
Out on the Town continued from page 36
floor of the National Museum of Natural History,
exploring the heritage, daily experiences and diverse
contributions of Indians and Indian Americans, far
beyond winning the spelling bee, driving cabs or
founding tech companies, not to mention introducing
Buddhism and yoga to the U.S. Now to Aug. 16, 2015.
National Museum of Natural History, 10th Street and
Constitution Avenue NW. Call 202-633-1000 or visit
mnh.si.edu or smithsonianapa.org.
LARRY MCNEIL AND WILL WILSON:
INDELIBLE PHOTOGRAPHS
Indelible: The Platinum Photographs of Larry McNeil
and Will Wilson is an exhibition at the Nation-
al Museum of the American Indian featuring two
Native photographers whose work purposefully sub-
verts the traditional fuzzy, romanticized look of
Native-American imagery created by using platinum
paper. Works on platinum by these artists also chal-
lenge Western conceptions of portraiture in general
and call attention to the manufactured nature of all
photography. To Jan. 5. National Museum of the
American Indian, Independence Avenue at 4th Street
SW. Call 202-633-1000 or visit nmai.si.edu.
MARS UP CLOSE
The National Geographic Society offers a free virtual
trip to the red planet in this new exhibition featuring
the latest images taken by the Curiosity rover, plus
full-scale models of the family of rovers that have
gone to Mars. Now to Nov. 30. National Geographic
Museum, 1145 17th St. NW. Free. Call 202-857-7700
or visit nglive.org.
REGIONAL JURIED EXHIBITION
Hill Center Galleries offers this exhibition featuring
works in various mediums and subjects by over 50
artists from the region. This year’s juror is Philip
Kennicott, the art and architecture critic for the
Washington Post. Through Sept. 28. Hill Center, Old
Navy Hospital, 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. Call 202-
549-4172 or visit HillCenterDC.org.
ABOVE AND BEYOND
NOVA PRIDE’S LGBTUESDAYS AT IOTA
As one measure to drum up ideas and interest in
the first annual Northern Virginia Pride Festival
scheduled for Oct. 5, the organization Nova Pride has
recruited the Iota to set aside one day every week
to explicitly serve LGBT residents and allies in the
Clarendon community. Every Tuesday starting with
a Smasher Lunch at 11 a.m., and including a Happy
Hour from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. that kicks off with Mikey’s
“Bar A” Video Wall at 7 p.m. Iota Club and Café, 2832
Wilson Blvd., Arlington. No cover. Call 703-522-8340
or visit iotaclubandcafe.com or novapride.org.
SPEAKEASYDC:
HAZED: STORIES ABOUT INITIATIONS…
Hazed: Stories about Initiations and Rites of Passage
is the theme of the September SpeakEasyDC event in
which two handfuls of storytellers, both first-timers
and regulars, share their often heartfelt and humor-
ous experiences. One of the most well-known and
respected storytelling organizations in the country,
the LGBT-friendly SpeakEasyDC sets itself apart
from other similar outfits with a focus on congenial
camaraderie, not competition — no judged “Story
Slams” here. Tuesday, Sept. 9, at 8 p.m. Town Dance-
boutique, 2009 8th NW. Tickets are $15. Call 202-
234-TOWN or visit towndc.com or speakeasydc.com.
THE CAPITAL CITY SHOWCASE’S
THE DMV ROAST
Producers of the local variety show Capital City
Showcase offer the latest installment of its DMV
Roast, held the first Tuesday of every month at the
Brixton. This time out the organization trains its lens
on Congress, with some of the area’s funniest comics
roasting America’s elected body of government as
one poor “comic stand-in” — Dylan Meyer — plays
the part of Congress, grinning and bearing the abuse.
The show is part of the Brixton’s “Tuesdays with
Funnie” programming. Tuesday, Sept. 2, at 8 p.m.
The Brixton, 901 U St. NW. Free, but donations for
the comedians welcome. Call 202-431-4704 or visit
capitalcityshowcase.com. l
39 METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014
Game Off
Amid bomb threats and purported
links to terrorisms, the Internet
troll has established itself as one
of gaming’s biggest problems
W
hen you think of terrorism, many images will
come to mind. We associate it with terrific
damage, large-scale loss of life, and scenes of
tragedy and destruction. It’s a tool utilized
by the cowardly to strike fear into populations they seek to
influence. It’s a threat all too real in our modern world. It’s not
something we typically joke about, nor is it something most sane
people would wish to associate themselves with. But that’s just
what one group wish to do following a series of attacks on some
of gaming’s biggest names.
This past Sunday, Sony reported that the PlayStation Net-
work (PSN), which supports multiplayer gaming and the pur-
chase of games, apps, films and TV shows on its PS3, PS4 and
PS Vita consoles, was forced offline in an attack by cyber crimi-
nals. John Smedley, President of Sony Online Entertainment,
tweeted that a “large scale DDoS” attack was being fought by
Sony employees, which resulted in disruption to the PSN and its
services. DDoS, or distributed denial-of-service, attacks involve
a group of computers specifically targeting an online service,
saturating the service with external requests from the comput-
ers targeting it. The service is unable to cope with the sudden
increase of traffic, or responds too slowly to work properly given
the saturation of requests it is receiving, and thus is rendered
inoperable for normal users.
DDoS attacks are considered some of the most unsophisti-
cated in the world of hacking, requiring limited technical knowl-
edge to accomplish. Sony is no stranger to hacking, as three years
ago it was the subject of a massive “external intrusion” (i.e. hack)
games
by RHUARIDH MARR
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that led to the PSN being offline for three
weeks and the personal details of 77 mil-
lion PlayStation Network users being sto-
len by the hackers. It was, and remains,
one of the largest data security breaches
in history, with Sony later fined in the
United Kingdom for putting its users’
personal and financial data at risk with
its relatively lax security. A DDoS attack,
in comparison, is a relatively mild affair.
However, the circumstances sur-
rounding the attack are what have drawn
the most attention from the media and
law enforcement. Four hours after Smed-
ley tweeted about the DDoS attack, he
notified followers that he was “Going
offline for 3 hours… Flying back to SD.”
Then, three hours later, he tweeted again,
this time with a more troublesome mes-
sage: “Awesome. Flight diverted to Phoe-
nix for security reasons.”
After another three hours, and men-
tions of problems with security and the
plane’s cargo, Smedley tweeted for the
final time that day, stating, “Yes. My plane
was diverted. Not going to discuss more
than that. Justice will find these guys.” The
“guys” in question are a group known as
Lizard Squad, who sent a tweet to Ameri-
can Airlines asking them to investigate the
flight Smedley was on, as they had “been
receiving reports that [it] has explosives
on-board,” adding “please look into this.”
The threat was a hoax. No explo-
sives were found on board and the pas-
sengers of the flight, including the Sony
executive, were allowed to disembark
and continue their travels from Phoenix.
As media outlets looked into the group
responsible for causing American Air-
lines to divert the flight, it became clear
that Lizard Squad were claiming respon-
sibility not only for the Sony attack earlier
in the day, but also attacks on other gam-
ing services that weekend, including ones
on Microsoft’s Xbox Live service and
Activision Blizzard. Microsoft declined
to comment on the disruption, stating that
Xbox One owners had experienced “serv-
er unavailability issues,” while Activision
Blizzard’s Battle.net game services con-
firmed a DDoS attack and stated they
were working to “improve the situation
and currently are seeing more stability.”
On Sony’s front, Sid Shuman, PlaySta-
tion’s senior manager for social media,
blogged that they had “seen no evidence
of any intrusion to the network and no
evidence of any unauthorized access to
users’ personal information.”
If the point of the attacks wasn’t to
steal personal information – as had been
the case with Sony back in 2011 – why
were Lizard Squad claiming to have start-
ed the DDoS attacks? Further confusion
was caused by a series of tweets claiming
links to ISIS, or Islamic State, the group
responsible for the horrific slaughter of
thousands of men, women and children
in Iraq and Syria and the murder of jour-
nalist James Foley, which captured the
world’s attention last week. One tweet
carried a photo of the ISIS black flag, stat-
ing “Today we planted the ISIS flag on
@Sony’s servers.” Another attempted to
clarify the reason for the attacks: “Kuffar
[a slur used to reference non-believers]
don’t get to play videogames until bomb-
ing of the ISIL stops.” Lizard Squad were
painting themselves as an extension or
support wing of Islamic State – and the
threat is serious enough that the FBI has
launched an investigation into the bomb
threat and DDoS attacks.
Of course, there’s one element that
many media outlets have failed to con-
sider: that of the Internet troll. Trolling
on the Internet has existed almost as
long as the Internet itself, whereby cer-
tain users seek to spoil the fun of others
by deliberately misusing it or attacking
others for attention, or even just for fun.
Lizard Squad’s first tweet occurred on
August 18, stating “League of Legends NA
#offline.” Any reference to ISIS or ISIL
or any extremist agenda was absent until
a few days later during the Sony attacks
– up until then, it justified its attacks on
various other games, including popular
online RPG Runescape, because “Multi-
million dollar companies aren’t spending
your money to ensure your game has
good service.” If that sounds familiar, it’s
because it’s the same language used by
Anonymous and various other hacking
groups in their justification for targeting
large companies. Indeed, an Anonymous
hacker has also claimed responsibility for
the recent attacks on several high profile
titles, and none have been able to prove
definitively that they were the original
instigators, the BBC reports.
Of course, this raises the question as
to why the owner or owners of the Lizard
Squad Twitter account are deliberate-
ly baiting authorities with references to
extremist groups and committing felony
acts such as falsely reporting a bomb on
John Smedley’s plane. The relative ano-
nymity of the Internet only stretches so
far, and if Lizard Squad exists just to troll
people, it has caused real-world danger
with its bomb scare. In the days follow-
ing the DDoS attacks, the account has
repeatedly tweeted that they are beyond
prosecution. “You think I’m scared of
the FBI?” or some variation is a common
statement. Smedley himself dismisses the
group as lacking any real threat, tweeting
after the bomb scare that he wished news
outlets “would stop letting these DDoS
trolls’ occasional use of the ISIS crap be
taken seriously,” later adding “those ISIS
guys are pure evil and shouldn’t be con-
flated with trolls.”
While it was correct for American
Airlines to take the bomb threat seriously
– after all, it would be unwise to mistake a
troll for the real deal – there is definitely
a lesson to be learned in all of this. Why,
in 2014, are some of the biggest names
in online gaming, which handle millions
of gamers and billions of transactions,
able to be brought down by a simple
DDoS attack? Given Sony faced months
of embarrassment in the wake of its last
hacking scandal, why has it left itself open
to the crudest form of digital interrup-
tion? As one of the hackers who claimed
responsibility for this latest attack stated
in a video – now removed – on YouTube,
“You apparently didn’t solve a thing when
you went down for a month. I hope you
think twice next time.” If a troll can bring
down a global service with relative ease,
that’s the part of this story on which we
should all be focusing. l
41 METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014
Foster the Pets
Providing temporary home to
a pet isn’t just a rewarding
experience, it’s critical to the
whole rescue process
T
HOSE WHO CAN’T, FOSTER.
A twist on the old adage about teaching doesn’t
fully capture the pet fostering phenomenon any bet-
ter than the original captures what makes for a great
teacher. But there are undeniable similarities. Chief among them,
just as some teachers are active in the fields in which they give
instruction, many pet fosters are active in the broader pet rescue
and adoption process too. In fact, fosters are likely more active in
this sector of the pet industry than the average pet adopter. Or,
at least, they become more active once they get the fostering bug.
“I got this email about the organization needing foster homes
for puppies, these puppies that were coming in from West Vir-
ginia,” says Colleen Learch, who pleaded with her husband. “We
ended up fostering two ridiculously cute puppies who we loved
and we found a great home for…and we decided to do more of it.”
That’s how Learch got involved with the Arlington-based Lost
Dog and Cat Rescue Foundation seven years ago. She now serves
as the all-volunteer organization’s outreach and communica-
tions coordinator, as well as part of its network of foster families.
In its simplest definition, a pet foster is one who provides
a temporary home for a dog and cat, and works with a rescue
organization to find a permanent home with an adopter. It’s
more than just a rewarding experience; it’s critical to the whole
rescue process.
“We can’t save dogs without foster home — it’s that simple!”
pets
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by DOUG RULE
Cosmo, Lily
& Drake
“Cosmo was given to me as a puppy in Southeast. The girl who gave
her to me said she was a mastiff. If so, she’s the tiniest one ever. Lilly
is from Lost Dog and Cat. She’s the family princess. Drake was a three-
time rescue that survived a flood, and he can open door knobs.”
Sylvan & Dawnita’s mutts
P
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42 AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
City Dogs Rescue says bluntly on its website. Fosters help the
nonprofit organization, an offshoot of City Dogs daycare and
boarding facility, learn about a rescued dog’s personality and
training needs, which are critical in helping them find a “forever
home.”
“It is really rewarding to see that animal go to a good home,”
Marika Bell of the Washington Humane Society says, “and to
know that you’re saving, not only the life of the animal that
you’re bringing into your home, but you’re opening up space in
the shelter so that another animal can come in. So you’re saving
at least two lives when you become a foster. And then the more
times you foster…”
Of course, not everyone can be a foster — and not everyone
can part with that cute little creature they bonded with over the
course of a couple weeks or a couple months. “I don’t think any
foster would tell you it’s easy,” Bell says, “because you do get
attached to the animal.” Of course, if you can make it work, most
rescue organizations allow you to keep the animal you foster.
But even if you could, Laura Goodman, of the Feline Foundation
of Greater Washington Inc., encourages every new foster to look
at the bigger picture, viewing the whole process as a quest to find
a pet “soul mate.” “Save room in your family for your soul mate
kitty,” she says. “Don’t keep that wonderful kitty who has blos-
somed to the point of being ready to meet their soul mate…just to
spare them the discomfort of moving to a new home.”
“Fostering is a wonderful way to discover whether you like
the companionship of a kitty,” Goodman continues, quickly add-
ing, “It does require some commitment, though,” ideally foster-
ing a cat until Goodman can find an adopter.
Bell says the Washington Humane Society often has need for
more dedicated, long-term fosters to help with bottle-feeding
by ??????
43 METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014 43 METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014
kittens, or providing other kinds of care. The organization will
provide all the basic training you need. And all rescue organiza-
tions cover the expenses associated with fostering pets.
In addition to fostering directly, WHS also recently launched
a website through a pilot program of the American Society for
the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, fosteradcpet.com. “It’s
almost like a social network for fosters,” Bell says. “If somebody
is looking for short-term care for their animal, but none of their
friends and family can do that,” she explains, “they can go to
fosteradcpet.com, join that club — it’s free — and let people know
that this animal needs fostering for a certain period of time.”
The goal, of course, is to improve pet retention and decrease
the number of animals who wind up in the shelter or in homes
where they’re neglected or treated poorly.
And ultimately, that’s the whole goal of fostering. l
NIGHT
LIFE
45 METROWEEKLY.COM
t
THURS., 08.28.14
9 1/2
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, sports • Expanded
craft beer selection • No
Cover
ANNIE’S/ANNIE’S
UPSTAIRS
4@4 Happy Hour, 4pm-7pm
• $4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Happy Hour: $6 Call
Martini, $3 Miller Lite,
$4 Rail, $5 Call, 4-9pm •
$3 rail drinks, 9-11pm •
Ripped Hot Body Contest at
midnight, hosted by Sasha
J. Adams and Ba’Naka
• $200 Cash Prize • DJs
Sean Morris and Mike
Babbitt • Free entry
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
JR.’S
$3 Rail Vodka Highballs, $2
JR.’s drafts, 8pm to close
• Throwback Thursday
featuring rock/pop retro hits
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy Hour
— $2 (5-6pm), $3 (6-7pm),
$4 (7-8pm) • Buckets of
Beer $15 • Drag Bingo
NUMBER NINE
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • No Cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
Karaoke in the lounge
• Half-price breakfast
sandwiches, 4-8pm
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
Shirtless Thursday • DJ
Tim-e in Secrets • 9pm •
Cover 21+
LISTINGS
46 AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
JR.’S
Buy 1, Get 1,
11pm-midnight • Happy
Hour: 2-for-1, 4-9pm • $5
Coronas, $8 Vodka Red
Bulls, 9pm-close
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
DJ Matt Bailer • Videos,
Dancing • Beat The Clock
Happy Hour — $2 (5-6pm),
$3 (6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour: 2
for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm •
No Cover
PHASE 1
DJ Styalo • Dancing •
$5 cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
Drag Show in lounge •
Half-price burgers and fries
TOWN
Drag Show starts at
10:30pm • Hosted by Lena
Lett and featuring Tatianna,
Shi-Queeta-Lee, Jessica
Spaulding Deverreoux
FRI., 08.29.14
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• Friday Night Videos with
resident DJ Shea Van Horn
• VJ • Expanded craft beer
selection • No cover
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis • Upstairs open
5-11pm
COBALT/30 DEGREES
All You Can Drink Happy
Hour • $15 Rail &
Domestic, $21 Call &
Imports, 6-9pm • Free Rail
Vodka, 11pm-Midnight •
$10 cover 10pm-1am, $5
after 1am
DC BEAR CRUE
@Town • Bear Happy
Hour, 6-11pm • $3 Rail,
$3 Draft, $3 Bud Bottles •
Free Pizza, 7pm • Hosted
by Charger Stone • No
cover before 9:30pm • 21+
and Ba’Naka • DJ Wess
upstairs, BacK2bACk
downstairs • Doors open
at 10pm • For those 21 and
over, $5 from 10-11pm and
$10 after 11pm • For those
18-20, $10 all night • 18+
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
Ladies of Illusion with host
Kristina Kelly, 9pm • DJ
Tim-e in Secrets • DJ Don
T. in Ziegfeld’s • Cover 21+
SAT., 08.30.14
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,
5-9pm • $5 Absolut &
Tito’s, $3 Miller Lite after
9pm • Expanded craft beer
selection • No Cover
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Happy Hour: $3 Miller Lite,
$4 Rail, $5 Call, 4-9pm •
Naughty Schoolboy Party
with DJ Tim-e and DJ
Twin, 10pm-3 am • $5 Rail
Cocktails, $3 PBR, $8 Red
Bull & Vodka • $6 Cover
• 18+
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Diner Brunch, 10am-3pm
• Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Freddie’s Follies Drag Show
8 pm-10pm, 10pm-1am
Karaoke
JR.’S
$4 Coors, $5 Vodka
highballs, $7 Vodka Red
Bulls
NELLIE’S
Guest DJs • Zing Zang
Bloody Marys, Nellie Beer,
House Rail Drinks and
Mimosas, $4, 11am-5pm •
Buckets of Beer, $15
NUMBER NINE
Doors 5pm • Happy Hour: 2
for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm •
No Cover
PHASE 1
Dancing, 9pm-close
PW’S SPORTS BAR
Karaoke in the lounge
• Charity Bingo with
Cash Prizes 3rd Sat. of
Every Month • Half-price
cheesesteaks and fries,
4-8pm
TOWN
Drag Show starts at
10:30pm • Hosted by Lena
Lett and featuring Tatianna,
Shi-Queeta-Lee, Jessica
Spaulding Deverreoux
and Ba’Naka • DJ Wess
downstairs • Cover $8 from
10-11pm, $12 after 11pm
• 21+
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
Men of Secrets, 9pm •
Ladies of Illusion with
host Ella Fitzgerald, 9pm
• DJ Don T. in Secrets •
DJ Joey O in Ziegfeld’s •
Doors 8pm • Cover • 21+
SUN., 08.31.14
9 1/2
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, sports • Expanded
craft beer selection • No
Cover
COBALT/30 DEGREES
$4 Stoli and Miller Lite all
day • Homowood Karaoke,
10pm-close
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Champagne Brunch Buffet,
10am-3pm • Crazy Hour,
4-7pm • Karaoke 8pm-1am
JR.’S
Sunday Funday • Liquid
Brunch • Doors open at
1pm • $2 Coors Lights &
$3 Skyy (all flavors), all day
and night
NELLIE’S
Drag Brunch, hosted by
Shi-Queeta-Lee, 11am-3pm
• $20 Brunch Buffet •
House Rail Drinks, Zing
Zang Bloody Marys, Nellie
Beer and Mimosas, $4,
11am-close • Buckets of
Beer, $15
NUMBER NINE
Pop Goes the World with
Wes Della Volla at 9:30
pm • Happy Hour: 2 for
1 on any drink, 5-9pm •
No Cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
Sunday Brunch, 11am-3pm
• Bottomless Mimosas •
$15 per person • Ladies
Night • Happy Hour all
night
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
Decades of Dance • DJ
Tim-e in Secrets • Doors
8pm • Cover 21+
47
t
METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014
scene
scan this tag
with your
smartphone
for bonus scene
pics online!
Number Nine
Friday, August 15
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
CHRISTOPHER CUNETTO
MON., 09.01.14
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• Multiple TVs showing
movies, shows, sports
• Expanded craft beer
selection • No Cover
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Happy Hour: $2 Rail, $3
Miller Lite, $5 Call, 4-9pm
• Monday Night’s A Drag,
10pm-close • $6 You Call It
on All Call Liquor
FREDDIE’S
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
JR.’S
Happy Hour: 2-for-1, 4-9pm
• Showtunes Songs &
Singalongs, 9pm-close •
DJ Jamez • $3 Drafts
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy Hour
— $2 (5-6pm), $3 (6-7pm),
$4 (7-8pm) • Buckets of
Beer $15 • Poker Texas
Hold’em, 8pm
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour: 2
for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm •
No Cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
Buzztime Trivia competition
• $1 off all beer • Half-
price chicken tenders,
4-8pm
TUES., 09.02.14
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• Multiple TVs showing
movies, shows, sports
• Expanded craft beer
selection • No Cover
ANNIE’S
Happy Hour, 4-7pm • $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Happy Hour: $2 Rail,
$3 Miller Lite, $5 Call,
4-9pm • Service Industry
Night, 10pm-close • Half
Price Cocktails all night
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
JR.’S
Underground (Indie Pop/Alt/
Brit Rock), 9pm-close • DJ
Wes Della Volla • 2-for-1,
all day and night
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy Hour
— $2 (5-6pm), $3 (6-7pm),
$4 (7-8pm) • Buckets of
Beer $15 • Karaoke
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour: 2
for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm •
No Cover • Safe Word: A
Gay Spelling Bee, 8-11pm
• Prizes to top three
spellers • After 9pm, $3
Absolut, Bulleit & Stella
PW’S SPORTS BAR
Martini Night, $5 Martinis,
$2 off top shelf • Half-price
quesadillas, 4-8pm

WED., 09.03.14
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• Multiple TVs showing
movies, shows, sports
• Expanded craft beer
selection • No Cover
48 AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
ANNIE’S
Happy Hour, 4-7pm • $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Happy Hour: $2 Rail, $3
Miller Lite, $5 Call, 4-9pm
• Karaoke, 10pm-close •
$6 Stoli & Flavors
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm • Drag
Bingo, 8pm • Karaoke,
10pm
JR.’S
Trivia with MC Jay Ray,
8pm • The Queen, 10-11pm
• $2 JR’s Drafts & $4
Vodka ($2 with College I.D./
JR’s Team Shirt)
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy Hour
— $2 (5-6pm), $3 (6-7pm),
$4 (7-8pm) • Half-Price
Burger Night • Buckets
of Beer $15 • SmartAss
Trivia, 8pm
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour: 2
for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm •
No Cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
Free Pool • Rum Night, $5
Rum Doubles, $2 off top
shelf • Half-price wings,
4-8pm
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
New Meat Wednesday DJ
Don T. • Shirtless Night,
10-11pm, 12-12:30am •
Military Night, no cover
with military ID • 9pm •
Cover 21+
THURS., 09.04.14
9 1/2
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, sports • Expanded
craft beer selection • No
Cover
ANNIE’S/ANNIE’S
UPSTAIRS
4@4 Happy Hour, 4pm-7pm
• $4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Happy Hour: $6 Call
Martini, $3 Miller Lite,
$4 Rail, $5 Call, 4-9pm •
$3 rail drinks, 9-11pm •
Ripped Hot Body Contest at
midnight, hosted by Sasha
J. Adams and Ba’Naka
• $200 Cash Prize • DJs
Sean Morris and Mike
Babbitt • Free entry
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
JR.’S
$3 Rail Vodka Highballs, $2
JR.’s drafts, 8pm to close
• Throwback Thursday
featuring rock/pop retro hits
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy Hour
— $2 (5-6pm), $3 (6-7pm),
$4 (7-8pm) • Buckets of
Beer $15 • Drag Bingo
NUMBER NINE
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • No Cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
Karaoke in the lounge
• Half-price breakfast
sandwiches, 4-8pm
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
Shirtless Thursday • DJ
Tim-e in Secrets • 9pm •
Cover 21+
FRI., 09.05.14
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• Friday Night Videos with
resident DJ Shea Van Horn
• VJ • Expanded craft beer
selection • No cover
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis • Upstairs open
5-11pm
COBALT/30 DEGREES
All You Can Drink Happy
Hour • $15 Rail &
Domestic, $21 Call &
Imports, 6-9pm • Free Rail
Vodka, 11pm-Midnight •
$10 cover 10pm-1am, $5
after 1am
DC BEAR CRUE
@Town • Bear Happy
Hour, 6-11pm • $3 Rail,
$3 Draft, $3 Bud Bottles •
Free Pizza, 7pm • Hosted
by Charger Stone • No
cover before 9:30pm • 21+
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
JR.’S
Buy 1, Get 1,
11pm-midnight • Happy
Hour: 2-for-1, 4-9pm • $5
Coronas, $8 Vodka Red
Bulls, 9pm-close
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
DJ Matt Bailer • Videos,
Dancing • Beat The Clock
Happy Hour — $2 (5-6pm),
$3 (6-7pm), $4 (7-8pm) •
Buckets of Beer $15
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour: 2
for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm •
No Cover
PHASE 1
DJ Styalo • Dancing •
$5 cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Drag Show in lounge •
Half-price burgers and fries,
4-8pm
TOWN
Drag Show starts at
10:30pm • Hosted by Lena
Lett and featuring Tatianna,
Shi-Queeta-Lee, Jessica
Spaulding Deverreoux
and Ba’Naka • DJ Wess
upstairs, BacK2bACk
downstairs • Doors open
at 10pm • For those 21 and
over, $5 from 10-11pm and
$10 after 11pm • For those
18-20, $10 all night • 18+
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
Ladies of Illusion with host
Kristina Kelly, 9pm • DJ
Darryl Strickland in Secrets
• DJ Don T. in Ziegfeld’s •
Cover 21+
SAT., 09.06.14
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy
Hour: 2 for 1 on any drink,
5-9pm • $5 Absolut &
Tito’s, $3 Miller Lite after
9pm • Expanded craft beer
selection • No Cover
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Happy Hour: $3 Miller
Lite, $4 Rail, $5 Call,
4-9pm • Rumba Latina by
Johny Vasquez presents
Jungle Fever, 10pm-3am
• DJ Willie and DJ Andre,
featuring Divas de la
Rumba Jamaica Rouge,
Sylvanna Duvel and Jordan
Sinclair • Porn stars Steve
Pena and Casey Everett
• 21+
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Diner Brunch, 10am-3pm
• Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Freddie’s Follies Drag Show
8 pm-10pm, 10pm-1am
Karaoke
JR.’S
$4 Coors, $5 Vodka
highballs, $7 Vodka Red
Bulls
NELLIE’S
Guest DJs • Zing Zang
Bloody Marys, Nellie Beer,
House Rail Drinks and
Mimosas, $4, 11am-5pm •
Buckets of Beer, $15
NUMBER NINE
Doors 5pm • Happy Hour: 2
for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm •
No Cover
PHASE 1
Dancing, 9pm-close
PW’S SPORTS BAR
9855 Washington Blvd. N
Laurel, Md.
301-498-4840
Karaoke in the lounge
• Charity Bingo with
Cash Prizes 3rd Sat. of
Every Month • Half-price
cheesesteaks and fries,
4-8pm
TOWN
DC Rawhides host Town
& Country: Two-Step, Line
Dancing, Waltz and West
Coast Swing, $5 Cover to
stay all night • Doors open
6:45pm, Lessons 7-8pm,
Open dance 8-10:30pm
• Funkytown: Music of
the ‘70s, ‘80s and ‘90s,
featuring DJ Ed Bailey •
Doors Open 10pm • Drag
Show starts at 10:30pm
• Hosted by Lena Lett
and featuring Tatianna,
Shi-Queeta-Lee, Jessica
Spaulding Deverreoux
and Ba’Naka • DJ Wess
downstairs • Cover $8 from
10-11pm, $12 after 11pm
• 21+
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
Men of Secrets, 9pm •
Ladies of Illusion with
host Ella Fitzgerald, 9pm
• DJ Don T. in Secrets •
DJ Joey O in Ziegfeld’s •
Doors 8pm • Cover • 21+
SUN., 09.07.14
9 1/2
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, sports • Expanded
craft beer selection • No
Cover
COBALT/30 DEGREES
$4 Stoli and Miller Lite all
day • Homowood Karaoke,
10pm-close
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Champagne Brunch Buffet,
10am-3pm • Crazy Hour,
4-7pm • Karaoke 8pm-1am
JR.’S
Sunday Funday • Liquid
Brunch • Doors open at
1pm • $2 Coors Lights &
$3 Skyy (all flavors), all day
and night
NELLIE’S
Drag Brunch, hosted by
Shi-Queeta-Lee, 11am-3pm
• $20 Brunch Buffet •
House Rail Drinks, Zing
Zang Bloody Marys, Nellie
Beer and Mimosas, $4,
11am-close • Buckets of
Beer, $15
NUMBER NINE
Pop Goes the World with
Wes Della Volla at 9:30
pm • Happy Hour: 2 for
1 on any drink, 5-9pm •
No Cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
Sunday Brunch, 11am-3pm
• Bottomless Mimosas •
$15 per person • Ladies
Night • Happy Hour all
night
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
Decades of Dance • DJ
Tim-e in Secrets • Doors
8pm • Cover 21+
49 METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014
MON., 09.08.14
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• Multiple TVs showing
movies, shows, sports
• Expanded craft beer
selection • No Cover
ANNIE’S
4@4 Happy Hour, 4-7pm •
$4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Happy Hour: $2 Rail, $3
Miller Lite, $5 Call, 4-9pm
• Monday Night’s A Drag,
10pm-close • $6 You Call It
on All Call Liquor
FREDDIE’S
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
JR.’S
Happy Hour: 2-for-1, 4-9pm
• Showtunes Songs &
Singalongs, 9pm-close •
DJ Jamez • $3 Drafts
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy Hour
— $2 (5-6pm), $3 (6-7pm),
$4 (7-8pm) • Buckets of
Beer $15 • Poker Texas
Hold’em, 8pm
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour: 2
for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm •
No Cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
Buzztime Trivia competition
• $1 off all beer • Half-
price chicken tenders,
4-8pm
TUES., 09.09.14
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• Multiple TVs showing
movies, shows, sports
• Expanded craft beer
selection • No Cover
ANNIE’S
Happy Hour, 4-7pm • $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Happy Hour: $2 Rail,
$3 Miller Lite, $5 Call,
4-9pm • Service Industry
Night, 10pm-close • Half
Price Cocktails all night
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
JR.’S
Underground (Indie Pop/Alt/
Brit Rock), 9pm-close • DJ
Wes Della Volla • 2-for-1,
all day and night
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy Hour
— $2 (5-6pm), $3 (6-7pm),
$4 (7-8pm) • Buckets of
Beer $15 • Karaoke
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour: 2
for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm •
No Cover • Safe Word: A
Gay Spelling Bee, 8-11pm
• Prizes to top three
spellers • After 9pm, $3
Absolut, Bulleit & Stella
PW’S SPORTS BAR
Martini Night, $5 Martinis,
$2 off top shelf • Half-price
quesadillas, 4-8pm

WED., 09.10.14
9 1/2
Open at 5pm • Happy Hour:
2 for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm
• Multiple TVs showing
movies, shows, sports
• Expanded craft beer
selection • No Cover
50 AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
ANNIE’S
Happy Hour, 4-7pm • $4
Stella Artois, $4 House
Wines, $4 Stolichnaya
Cocktails, $4 Manhattans
and Vodka Martinis
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Happy Hour: $2 Rail, $3
Miller Lite, $5 Call, 4-9pm
• Karaoke, 10pm-close •
$6 Stoli & Flavors
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm • Drag
Bingo, 8pm • Karaoke,
10pm
JR.’S
Trivia with MC Jay Ray,
8pm • The Queen, 10-11pm
• $2 JR’s Drafts & $4
Vodka ($2 with College I.D./
JR’s Team Shirt)
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy Hour
— $2 (5-6pm), $3 (6-7pm),
$4 (7-8pm) • Half-Price
Burger Night • Buckets
of Beer $15 • SmartAss
Trivia, 8pm
NUMBER NINE
Open 5pm • Happy Hour: 2
for 1 on any drink, 5-9pm •
No Cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
Free Pool • Rum Night, $5
Rum Doubles, $2 off top
shelf • Half-price wings,
4-8pm
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
New Meat Wednesday DJ
Don T. • Shirtless Night,
10-11pm, 12-12:30am •
Military Night, no cover
with military ID • 9pm •
Cover 21+
THURS., 09.11.14
9 1/2
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • Multiple
TVs showing movies,
shows, sports • Expanded
craft beer selection • No
Cover
ANNIE’S/ANNIE’S
UPSTAIRS
4@4 Happy Hour, 4pm-7pm
• $4 Small Plates, $4 Stella
Artois, $4 House Wines,
$4 Stolichnaya Cocktails,
$4 Manhattans and Vodka
Martinis
COBALT/30 DEGREES
Happy Hour: $6 Call
Martini, $3 Miller Lite,
$4 Rail, $5 Call, 4-9pm •
$3 rail drinks, 9-11pm •
Ripped Hot Body Contest at
midnight, hosted by Sasha
J. Adams and Ba’Naka
• $200 Cash Prize • DJs
Sean Morris and Mike
Babbitt • Free entry
FREDDIE’S BEACH BAR
Crazy Hour, 4-7pm •
Karaoke, 9pm
JR.’S
$3 Rail Vodka Highballs, $2
JR.’s drafts, 8pm to close
• Throwback Thursday
featuring rock/pop retro hits
NELLIE’S SPORTS BAR
Beat The Clock Happy Hour
— $2 (5-6pm), $3 (6-7pm),
$4 (7-8pm) • Buckets of
Beer $15 • Drag Bingo
NUMBER NINE
Happy Hour: 2 for 1 on any
drink, 5-9pm • No Cover
PW’S SPORTS BAR
Karaoke in the lounge
• Half-price breakfast
sandwiches, 4-8pm
ZIEGFELD’S/SECRETS
All male, nude dancers •
Shirtless Thursday • DJ
Tim-e in Secrets • 9pm •
Cover 21+ l
51 SEE MORE PHOTOS FROM THIS EVENT AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE
52 SEE MORE PHOTOS FROM THIS EVENT AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE
scene
Bearracuda
Saturday, August 23
Cobalt
PHOTOGRAPHY BY
WARD MORRISON
scan this tag
with your
smartphone
for bonus scene
pics online!
53 SEE MORE PHOTOS FROM THIS EVENT AT WWW.METROWEEKLY.COM/SCENE

This is for all of the
hundreds of thousands of artists who have passed from
HIV/AIDS since 1981.
Your memory and your passion burns on in us.

— RYAN MURPHY, accepting the Emmy for Outstanding Television Movie for The Normal Heart. The director called out the play’s
author, who, although noticeably frail, gleefully took the stage with the rest of the HBO-produced movie’s cast and producers.
“We’re only here because of one person, and that’s Mr. Larry Kramer. We did this for him,” said Murphy. He then asked for “young
people watching to become Larry Kramers, to find a cause you believe in, that you will fight for, that you will die for.”
(NBC)
“We should not allow prejudice to stand
in the way of progress
for our children or for our wider society.

— DAVID CAMERON, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, in a speech to Britain’s Royal College of General Practitioners. Mr.
Cameron called for more gay couples to adopt children, stating “there are children in need of a loving family, and gay couples
[have] so much love to give.” The Prime Minister strongly supported same-sex marriage in
England and Wales, which became legal in March of this year.
(Gov.uk)

What on earth is in it
that so horrifies the MPAA?”
— Film critic STEPHEN WHITTY, in a column titled “Why the MPAA thinks all gay people should be rated ‘R’.” Whitty wrote it in
response to the ‘R’ rating attributed to Love Is Strange, a film featuring Alfred Molina and John Lithgow as an elderly gay couple
forced to move in with friends and family. The film features no nudity, sex or violence, but was given the rating, which prevents
those under 17 from viewing the film without a parent or guardian, for the language used. Whitty
believes the decision was “just plain homophobic.”
(New Jersey Star-Ledger)

Regardless of how you were made or who you love,
you should be able to get married.”
— Emmy and Tony Award winning performer KRISTIN CHENOWETH, speaking in a video for the Human Rights Campaign series
“Americans for Marriage Equality.” Despite her Christian upbringing and strong faith, Chenoweth has long championed and
supported her gay fans and the LGBT community, adding, “I’ll keep speaking out until marriage is an equal right nationwide.”
(HRC)

The government-sanctioned widespread scale up of PrEP appears to be
a public health disaster in the making.”
— AIDS Healthcare Foundation president MICHAEL WEINSTEIN. The AHF opposes the increasing emphasis placed on PrEP (Pre-
Exposure Prophylaxis), which the CDC called “a powerful HIV prevention tool.” The AHF believe that PrEP, which involves a
daily dose of the antiretroviral drug Truvada, provides a false sense of security and will increase the spread of
HIV and other sexually transmitted infections.
(AHF)
54 AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014 METROWEEKLY.COM
55 METROWEEKLY.COM AUGUST 28 / SEPTEMBER 4, 2014

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