Sc:uiug thc stuocuts ouo thc Uuiuc:situ couuuuitu siucc 1808

MN>L=:R% :IKBE0%+))2 OHENF>**0%BLLN> +0
I]Z9V^anIVg=ZZa
LI><B:E>=BMBHG
www.dailytarheel.com
A LEGACY FULFILLED
,2 80
DOMINATION
DTH PHOTOS BY EMMA PATTI
TYLER GETS TITLE
UNC won by at least 12 points
each game this tournament
Wins NCAA title in last
year as a Tar Heel
¨Nou uc`:c goiug to bc :cucubc:co fo:cuc:. Uc uout to bccouc lcgcuoo:u.¨
DANNY GREEN, UNC SENIOR
¨This is thc bcst uou to go out. I coulou`t jictu:c it ouu othc: uou."
TYLER HANSBROUGH, UNC SENIOR
I]Z9V^anIVg=ZZa
Sc:uiug thc stuocuts ouo thc Uuiuc:situ couuuuitu siucc 1808
www.dailytarheel.com
MN>L=:R%:IKBE0%+))2 OHENF>**0%BLLN>+0
BY THE NUMBERS
The Tar Heels captured
their fifth NCAA title.
Steals for Ty Lawson, an
NCAA Final Four game
record.
Minutes into the game
before UNC established a
double-digit lead.
Points for UNC’s starters,
including Lawson’s 21 and
Wayne Ellington’s 19.
Halftime lead for the Tar
Heels, the largest in NCAA
championship history.
3-pointers for Most
Outstanding Player Wayne
Ellington in the Final Four.
Turnovers for Michigan
State. UNC scored 25
points off the miscues.
Victories in the four-year
careers of North Carolina’s
seniors.
5
8
4:04
73
21
8
21
124
DTH/EMMA PATTI
Ty Lawson set an NCAA Tournament record with eight steals, seven in the first half, and led the Tar Heels with
21 points for the game. Lawson and UNC won their second national championship in the past five years.
M:KA>>EL=HFBG:M>FLNMH
PBG+G=MBME>BG?BO>R>:KL
BY DAVID ELY
SENIOR WRITER
DETROIT ÷ Il aII slarled when
lhev decided lo come back.
Iour pIavers decIining lhe riches
of lhe NBA, molivaled lo make one
more run al hislorv. One more run
al a nalionaI lilIe.
And evervlhing lhal happened
lhis season ÷ lhe expeclalions, lhe
No. 1 rankings, lhe bIowoul wins
÷ poinled loward lhis one signa-
lure momenl.
A scene lhal suddenIv became
reaIilv in fronl of ,2,022 specla-
lors Mondav nighl.
Senior Mike CopeIand wiIdIv
fIung lhe baII inlo lhe air. PIavers
jumped up and down in jubiIa-
lion amid a bIizzard of confelli.
TvIer Hansbrough hugged coach
Rov WiIIiams as expIosions rang
lhroughoul Iord IieId.
Thev did il.
In a lruIv dominanl dispIav, lhe
Norlh CaroIina Tar HeeIs asserled
lhemseIves alop lhe coIIege baskel-
baII worId as nalionaI champions
bv defealing Big Ten reguIar-season
champion Michigan Slale, 80-,2.
The win gives UNC ils fiflh NCAA
lilIe, and second in five seasons.
¨The firsl one was unbeIievabIv
sweel in 2uuõ, and in some wavs
lhis is even sweeler,¯ WiIIiams
said afler lhe game. ¨I`m so proud
of lhis leam. PeopIe anoinled us
before lhe vear lhal we were going
lo go undefealed. .
¨Il`s an incredibIe feeIing. .
Mv hal`s off lo . lhe guvs in lhe
Iocker room, because lhev look
Rov WiIIiams on one fanlaslic
ride, and il`s somelhing lhal I` II
never forgel.¯
Righl oul of lhe gale, lhe Tar
HeeIs (34-4) Iel MSU know lhal
lhe Sparlans wouIdn`l diclale lhe
game`s lempo as il did in pasl wins
againsl LouisviIIe and UConn.
In jusl more lhan four minules,
UNC had 1, poinls. The Sparlans
were foIIowing Norlh CaroIina`s
Iead, racing up courl and laking
shols earIv in possessions.
Aclion moved al a bIislering
pace and mirrored lhe rhvlhm
from lhe when lhe lwo leams mel
Dec. 3 ÷ a 08-63 UNC win.
In lhal game, lhe Sparlans (31-
,) were abIe lo lrade baskels wilh
lhe Tar HeeIs and hang around for
lhe firsl 14 minules.
Bul Wavne EIIinglon`s hol shool-
ing and Tv Lawson`s defensive pres-
sure made cerlain lhal lhe Sparlans`
demise came earIier lhis lime.
EIIinglon connecled on his
firsl lhree allempls from lhe fieId
and finished lhe haIf ,-of-0 for 1,
poinls. EIIinglon`s 10 poinls earned
him lhe honor of IinaI Iour`s Mosl
Oulslanding PIaver.
¨The game came lo me,¯ EIIinglon
said. ¨(Travis WaIlon) was leIIing me
lhal he was going lo shul me down.
He`s a greal defender. . I jusl saw a
prellv big baskel in lhe firsl haIf.¯
Lawson was equaIIv disruplive
on lhe defensive end. He coIIecled
seven sleaIs in lhe firsl period and
harassed MSU guard KaIin Lucas
lo lhe poinl lhal lhere was IillIe
hope for lhe Sparlans offensiveIv.
SEE NCAA CHAMPS, PAGE 5
AZgl[khn`a`^mlgZmbhgZembme^
DTH/EMMA PATTI
Tyler Hansbrough scored 18 points and pulled down
seven rebounds in the game that finally gave him the
NCAA title he’s been playing for the past four years.
BY JESSE BAUMGARTNER
SENIOR WRITER
DETROIT ÷ When TvIer Hansbrough
cIimbed lhe Iadder Mondav lo cul lhe
nel, scissors in hand and a brand new hal
perched alop his head, il wasn`l as lhe
IinaI Iour`s Mosl Oulslanding PIaver.
Or lhe RegionaI MOP, lhe NalionaI
PIaver of lhe Year, or lhe ACC PIaver of
lhe Year.
Bul il was as a nalionaI champion, as
an owner of lhe lilIe lhal seemed lo drive
him lhroughoul his vears in ChapeI HiII
and molivale him each lime he feII shorl.
¨Il`s aImosl one of lhose lhings where
I can`l reaIIv beIieve il`s happening righl
now,¯ Hansbrough said on lhe fIoor.
¨AII lhe lhings lhal have been said lhis
vear, mv injurv. I didn`l reaIIv know how
lhings were going lo work oul. You know,
Iooking back al il, slaving in schooI was lhe
besl decision I`ve ever made in mv Iife.¯
Hansbrough cerlainIv didn` l domi-
nale lhe IinaI Iour, bul he did pul up
numbers lhal have become so lvpicaI
during his career ÷ 36 poinls and 18
rebounds combined.
And in lhal finaI game ÷ lhe one lhal
meanl lhe mosl lo him ÷ Hansbrough
had 11 poinls in lhe firsl haIf as UNC
puIIed awav and lhen conlinued lo cor-
raI everv rebound wilh lwo hands as lhe
cIock licked down.
When Michigan Slale finaIIv made a
mini-run lo cul il lo 1õ, Hansbrough pul
in a Iavup. Wilh lhe Iead al 1õ again wilh
3.õ1 remaining, he look a charge as UNC
gol readv lo ceIebrale.
Even lhough he was effeclive aII lour-
namenl, Hansbrough was overshadowed
bv lhe shooling of Wavne EIIinglon and
lhe end-lo-end speed of Tv Lawson.
Bul lhen again, lhal`s lhe wav lhis season
wenl for UNC`s slar senior. His numbers
were once again good enough for pIenlv
of recognilion ÷ more lhan 2u poinls and
eighl boards a game ÷ bul afler a vear in
which he picked up aImosl everv individuaI
honor, he look a sIighl backseal lo Lawson`s
pIav al lhe poinl which was deemed so cru-
ciaI lo UNC success.
¨Il is kind of cooI. As greal as he`s been
÷ he`s going lo gel his jersev in lhe fronl
row (of lhe Smilh Cenler raflers) ÷ lhal he
wasn`l lhe Mosl Oulslanding PIaver al lhe
IinaI Iour,¯ leammale Bobbv Irasor said.
¨And I don`l lhink lhal bolhers him
one bil.¯
Hansbrough conlinuaIIv said he jusl
wanled lo do his parl lo heIp his leam
win, preaching lhal Iine especiaIIv afler
lhe one-on-one malchup wilh OkIahoma`s
BIake Griffin quickIv fizzIed.
Thal kind of laIk usuaIIv draws a roII
of lhe eves, bul lhere he was jumping off
lhe bench Mondav nighl during lhe firsl
haIf and running onlo lhe courl lo sIap
hands wilh his leammales as lhev came
in for a limeoul ÷ a coveled roIe usuaIIv
reserved for waIk-ons.
Bul in manv wavs, lhis vear has sliII
aIwavs been aboul Hansbrough. He was
lhe firsl one lo decIare his relurn for lhis
senior vear, and he was lhe one who look
Iasl vear`s IinaI Iour disasler againsl
Kansas lhe hardesl.
Hansbrough said his game has laken
more crilicism lhis vear, bul his evoIu-
lion was on dispIav in Delroil during lhe
L^gbhke^Z]l_khf[Z\dl^Zmbg_bgZel^Zlhg
Ang]k^]lh_fbe^l_khflghpr=^mkhbm%_Zgla^Zmni?kZgdebgLmk^^m
DTH/KATE NAPIER
Jubilant fans dance over bonfires on Franklin Street after the Tar Heels won
the NCAA Championship. More than 300 police officers were on duty.
BY EVAN ROSE
ASSISTANT CITY EDITOR
A heIicopler whirred overhead.
Iiremen shuffIed from fool lo
fool againsl lhe wind. PoIice qui-
elIv galhered on slreel corners.
Then lhe noise downlown began
lo grow, from lhe sporadic cheer lo
a sleadv, rising roar.
And when lhe buzzer bIared ,uu
miIes awav, IrankIin Slreel was
buried bv lhousands of CaroIina
bIue-cIad fans, screaming, danc-
ing and burning lhe cIolhes off
lheir backs.
¨The crowd is unilv,¯ said Chase
Beck, a senior. ¨I`ve never been
prouder of mv schooI. Il`s aII for
lhe CaroIina spiril.¯
The crowd of more lhan 4õ,uuu
maleriaIized in a maller of minules
afler Norlh CaroIina`s 80-,2 win
againsl Michigan Slale lo cIaim
lhe 2uu0 NCAA lilIe.
Ians poured from lhe doors
ed lhe heIp of more lhan 3uu
poIice officers lo conlroI lhe ceI-
ebralorv crowd, some sludenls
sliII managed lo smuggIe in wood
lo burn.
¨We aren`l worried aboul safelv,¯
said sophomore Lauren Traugoll-
CampbeII. ¨We can`l be defealed.
We jusl wanl il lo gel bigger.¯
Iiremen pIanned lo Iel lhe fires
burn, so Iong as lhev didn`l endan-
ger anv buiIdings.
PoIice palroIIed lhe slreels
lhroughoul lhe nighl, aIong wilh
an addilionaI 2uu pubIic workers,
keeping on eve on lhe crowd.
Cosls of crowd conlroI lhis vear
are expecled lo be aboul lhe same
as when UNC Iasl look home lhe
lilIe in 2uuõ.
The lown and Universilv fooled
SEE HANSBROUGH, PAGE 5
of bars and reslauranls. Waves of
sludenls sprinled downlown from
lheir dorms and lhe Smilh Cenler.
Togelher lhev became a lan-
gIed mass of bodies, hoisling
each olher onlo lheir shouIders,
spraving beer across lhe crowds,
cIimbing slreel Iighls, hanging off
lrees and shouling inlo lhe mass
beIow.
¨I`ve wanled lo go lo lhis schooI
forever, and lhis is lhe happiesl
momenl of mv enlire Iife,¯ said
firsl-vear Marv Brenl Barnard.
In lhe cenler of lhe crowd ÷
righl al lhe inlerseclion of IrankIin
and CoIumbia slreels ÷ someone
Iil a shirl. The fire grew as reveI-
ers ripped off cIolhes lo add lo lhe
fIames.
And lhough ChapeI HiII enIisl-
RUNAWAY CHAMPIONS
,2 80
¨Sou uhot uou uout, I`u o uotiouol choujiou. Uho cou sou thot thcu`:c o uotiouol choujiou? I cou.¨ TYLER HANSBROUGH, UNC SENIOR
DTH ONLINE: Read more
about our reporters’ trip to
Detroit at blogs.dailytarheel.com.
BLOG
DTH ONLINE: View photos
from UNC’s championship win
against Michigan State.
DTH ONLINE: View photos
from the celebration on
Franklin Street after the game.
DTH ONLINE: Watch a video
of fans celebrating North
Carolina’s win Monday night.
DTH ONLINE: View a
timelapse of fans downtown
before and after the game.
a $16õ,uuu biII lhal vear lo manage
4õ,uuu ceIebralors in lhe slreels.
As of 12.1u a.m., emergencv ser-
vices had lrealed one person for a
fraclured arm and anolher for
aIcohoI consumplion. There were
no arresls al lhal lime.
PoIice said lhev worried aboul
burns, especiaIIv in lhe high
winds.
Bul il didn`l seem Iike anvlhing
couId damper Tuesdav`s raging
crowd.
¨ This is whv vou come lo
CaroIina,¯ said junior Andrew
Berrv. ¨We`re an academic univer-
silv, bul secrelIv evervbodv wanls
lhal baskelbaII lilIe.¯
Coutoct thc Citu Eoito:
ot cituocsk(uuc.cou.
2 News MN>L=:R%:IKBE0%+))2
POLICE LOG
! A man fIed from a poIice lraf-
fic slop on his molorcvcIe Sundav
and wrecked in Carrboro, accord-
ing lo ChapeI HiII poIice reporls.
James Ervin Jones, 2õ, of ,423
Union Grove Road, faces charges of
driving wilh a suspended or revoked
Iicense, speeding and reckIess driv-
ing, among olhers, reporls slale.
He was slopped bv poIice on
Easl IrankIin Slreel al aboul 1u.4u
p.m., reporls slale.
As he fIed, Jones reached speeds
belween 1uu and 12u mph and ran
lhrough a slop Iighl. He was laken
lo lhe Orange Counlv jaiI in Iieu of
$1,uuu baiI, reporls slale.
! Someone poured beer on a
RaIeigh woman Salurdav, accord-
ing lo ChapeI HiII poIice reporls.
A $õuu pair of evegIasses were
damaged in lhe incidenl, reporls
slale.
I]Z9V^anIVg=ZZa
ppp']ZbermZka^^e'\hf
Estoblishco 1808
11ó uco:s of
coito:iol f:ccoou
¢ The DaiIv Tar HeeI reporls
anv inaccurale informalion
pubIished as soon as lhe error is
discovered.
¢ Correclions for fronl-page
errors wiII be prinled on lhe
fronl page. Anv olher incorrecl
informalion wiII be correcled on
page 3. Errors commilled on lhe
Opinion Page have correclions
prinled on lhal page. Correclions
aIso are noled in lhe onIine ver-
sions of our slories.
¢Conlacl Prinl Managing Edilor
Sara Gregorv al gsara(emaiI.unc.
edu wilh issues aboul lhis poIicv.
P.O. Box 3257, Chapel Hill, NC 27515
Allison Nichols, Editor-in-Chief, 962-4086
Advertising & Business, 962-1163
News, Features, Sports, 962-0245
One copy per person; additional copies may be
purchased at The Daily Tar Heel for $.25 each.
Please report suspicious activity at our
distribution racks by e-mailing dth@unc.edu.
© 2009 DTH Publishing Corp.
All rights reserved
I]Z9V^anIVg=ZZa
ALLISON
NICHOLS
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
962-4086
NALLISON@EMAIL.
UNC.EDU
OFFICE HOURS:
MON., WED.
2 P.M. TO 3 P.M.
SARA
GREGORY
MANAGING EDITOR,
PRINT
962-0750
GSARA@EMAIL.UNC.
EDU
NICOLE
NORFLEET
MANAGING EDITOR,
ONLINE
962-0750
NNORFLEE@EMAIL.
UNC.EDU
ANDREW
DUNN
UNIVERSITY EDITOR
962-0372
UDESK@UNC.EDU
MAX ROSE
CITY EDITOR
962-4209
CITYDESK@UNC.EDU
BRIAN
AUSTIN
STATE & NATIONAL
EDITOR, 962-4103
STNTDESK@UNC.EDU
SARAH
FRIER
FEATURES EDITOR
962-4214
FEATURES@UNC.EDU
RACHEL
ULLRICH
SPORTS EDITOR
962-4710
SPORTS@UNC.EDU
BEN PITTARD
ARTS ASSISTANT
EDITOR
843-4529
ARTS@UNC.EDU
EMMA
PATTI
PHOTO EDITOR
962-0750
DTHPHOTO@GMAIL.
COM
PRESSLEY BAIRD,
BECCA BRENNER
COPY CO-EDITORS
962-4103
JILLIAN NADELL
DESIGN EDITOR
962-0750
BLISS PIERCE
GRAPHICS
EDITOR
962-0750
RACHEL WILL
ONLINE EDITOR
962-0750
WILLR1@UNC.EDU
MARY KATHERINE
AYERS
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
962-0750
SCOTT POWERS
SPECIAL SECTIONS
EDITOR
EDITORIAL STAFF
Assistant Editors: Matt Lynley, Evan Rose,
Jessica Stringer, city; Emily Evans, Jennifer
Kessinger, Steven Norton, copy; Amanda
Ruehlen, Nick Yarbrough, design; Jordan
Lawrence, diversions; Nick Andersen, features;
Kristen Long, Dalia Razo, graphics; Jarrard Cole,
multimedia; Andrew Dye, Andrew Johnson,
Kate Napier, Lisa Pepin, photography; Chris
Hempson, Louie Horvath, Joe McLean, sports;
Laura Marcinek, state & national; Kevin Kiley,
Kellen Moore, Elly Schofield, university.
Arts: Ben Pittard, senior writer; Phillip Crook,
Kameron Daniels, Anna Claire Eddington,
Rachael Farlow, Molly Gaither, Leslie Gordon,
Abe Johns, Jennifer Kim and Daniel Stainkamp.
City: Kristen Cresante, senior writers; Mark
Abadi, Lisa Andrukonis, Whitney Baker,
Andrew Cummings, Michael Goodling, Andrew
Hartnett, Caroline Kirby, Kathryn Koesy, Sarah
LaMorte, Rose Anna Laudicina, Sarah Morayati,
Steven Norton, Thomas Pearce, Mazaré Rogers,
Victoria Stilwell and Joe Woodruff.
Copy: Will Harrison, Scott Powers, Michael
Willis, senior copy editors; Beatrice Allen,
Lindsey Barlow, Allyson Batchelor, Kim Brett,
Sonya Chudgar, Laura Coggins, Stephanie
Cohen, Laura Davenport, Alexis Deegan, Amy
Denton, Amy Dobrzynski, Natasha Duarte,
Casey EdlundJackson Marley, Molly Meachum,
Sarah Morayati, Ashley Reese, Kelsey Rice,
Laken Rush, Erin Sharkey, Jennifer Smith, Evan
Wladis, Hannah Warfle and Anna Winker.
Design: Ashley Bennett, Kristen Bilger, Anne
Krisulewicz, Jessica Lopez, Beatrice Moss,
Suzanna Roemer and Meaghan Steingraber.
Diversions: Ben Pittard, senior writer;
Rachel Arnett, Michael Henson, Evan Hughes,
Jonathan Pattishall and Cassie Perez.
Features: Anika Anand, MaryAnn Barone,
Dan Byrnes, Ryan Davis, Sarah Dugan, Emily
Kennard, Matthew McGibney, Rylan Miller,
Laura Montini, Caroline Phillips and Rachel
Scall.
Graphics: Sonia Bhandari, Nicole Brosan,
Katie Jokipii, Anna Carrington, Christine
Hellinger, Ashley Horton, Ryan Kurtzman,
Amanda Purser and Gwen Saunders.
Multimedia: Shaina Ayers, William Cooper,
Zachary Evans, Elizabeth DeOrnellas, Paris
Flow, Nathan Hewitt, Nushmia Khan, Amanda
Loy, Alena Oakes, Rachel Scall, Dioni Wise
and Tina Xu.
Online: Daniel Ballance, Gaither Jones and
Zachary Toal.
Opinion: Abbey Caldwell, Meredith Engelen,
James Ding, Patrick Fleming, Nate Haines,
Peter Miller, Allison Nichols, Cameron Parker,
Andrew Stiles, Christian Yoder, editorial board;
Aprajita Anand, Isabella Archer, Caitlyn Greene,
Alex Kowalski, Tim Lockney, Andrew Moon,
Ricky Spero, Rachel Steindel, Frank Sturges,
Amanda Younger, columnists; Alex Harrington,
Alex Lee, cartoonists.
Photography: Sarah Acuff, Anika Anand,
Jeong Bae Oh, Tyler Benton, Alex Brawley,
Alexandra Cagan, Sijie Chen, Shannon
Church, Colleen Cook, Jessey Dearing, Reyna
Desai, Andrew Dye, Shar-Narne Flowers,
Heather Follmer, Danielle Forword, Philip
Freeman, Zach Gutterman, Rachel Hamlin,
Kelsey Isenberg, Ryan Jones, Nushmia Khan,
Grant Linderman, Kim Martiniuk, Kaitlin
McKeown, Zoe Litaker, Bethany Nuechterlein,
Brittany Peterson, Ben Price, Sarah Riazati,
Chessa Rich, Andrew Rickelman, Dave
Robinson, Hannah Ryu, Allan Sharpe,
Hannah Sharpe, Justin Spinks, Stephanie Tan,
Ariana van den Akker, Daniel Van Niekerk,
Eric Verlarde, Sam Ward and Margaret
Williams.
Special Projects: Elizabeth DeOrnellas,
senior writer.
Sports: Jesse Baumgartner, Mike Ehrlich,
David Ely, Powell Latimer, Jordan Mason, Scott
Powers, Daniel Price, David Reynolds, Sam
Rosenthal, senior writers; Ben Baden, Alexis
Deegan, Matt Garofalo, Anna Kim and Beth
Mechum.
State & National: Olivia Bowler, senior
writer; Seth Cline, Meghan Cooke, Margaret
Croom, Caroline Dye, Nicole Franceschini,
Johnathan LaRowe, Tarini Parti, Jen
Serdetchnaia, Lucie Shelly, Morgan Smallwood,
Daniel Thornton, Jacob Trupin and Johanna
Yueh.
University: Matthew Price, senior writer;
Danielle Adams, Mary Cole Allen, Chelsea
Bailey, C. Ryan Barber, Ashley Bennett,
Brecken Branstrator, Joshua Carter, Kathryn
Charles, Rachel Coleman, Dean Drescher,
Anna Eusebio, Zaid Farooqui, Blake Frieman,
Elisabeth Gilbert, Lauren Hafezi, Andrew
Harrell, Laura Hoxworth, Leah Hughes,
Rashonda Joplin, Eliza Kern, Ian Lee, Katie
Little, Caitlin Meeks, Laura Melosh, Alice
Miller, Jeannine O’Brian, Katie Oliver, Hillary
Rose Owens, Gabby Pinto, Sarah Rankin,
Jamie Richardson, David Riedell, Lindsay
Ruebens, Matt Sampson, Sarah Smith, Preston
Spencer, Trip Smith, James Wallace, Casey
Welch, Justin Wilcox and Mary Withers.
Editorial Production: Stacy Wynn, manager.
Printing: Triangle Web Printing Co.
Distribution: Nick and Sarah Hammonds.
The Daily Tar Heel is published by the DTH Publishing Corp., a nonprofit North Carolina corporation, Monday
through Friday, according to the University calendar. Callers with questions about billing or display advertising
should call 962-1163 bet ween 8:30 a.m. and 5 p.m. Classified ads can be reached at 962-0252. Editorial
questions should be directed to 962-0245.
OFFICE: Suite 2409 Carolina Union
CAMPUS MAIL ADDRESS: CB# 5210, Carolina Union
U.S. MAIL ADDRESS: P.O. Box 3257,
Chapel Hill, NC 27515-3257
Business and Advertising: Kevin Schwartz,
director/general manager; Megan McGinity,
advertising director; Lisa Reichle, business
manager; Rosanne Niforos, retail sales
manager.
Customer Service: Kristen Bullins, Nate
Hewitt and Amanda Lathom, representatives.
Display Advertising: Lauren Ahlschlager,
Lauren Baum, Catherine Coley, Chris Creech,
Lauryn D'Angelo, Blake Ervin, Katherine
Fitzpatrick, Mackenzie Gibbs, Kaitlyn
Jordan, Luke Lin, Megan Ratcliffe, Jenna
Tenace, Megan Winterhalter and Caldwell
Zimmerman, account executives; Dane
Barnes, marketing associate.
Advertising Production: Penny Persons,
manager; Beth O'Brien, ad production
coordinator.
PROFESSIONAL AND BUSINESS STAFF
ISN #10709436
I]Z9V^anIVg=ZZa
DaiLY DOSe
NOTED. The divorce rale
in lhe Uniled Slales is al
record highs. More lhan haIf
of aII marriages in lhe counlrv
end in a divorce.
Bul lhe phenomenon
isn` l isoIaled lo America. A
German woman recenlIv
soughl a divorce over her hus-
band`s insaliabIe appelile for
househoId chores. He appar-
enlIv cIeaned loo much.
QUOTED. ¨Il`s nol iIIegaI lo
own a piIIow.¯
÷Scoll Harris, of IerndaIe,
Mich., on lhe organized piI-
Iow fighl heId in downlown
Delroil on Salurdav.
The piIIow fighl, parl of an
organized gIobaI efforl spon-
sored lhrough sociaI nelwork-
ing siles, was pul lo resl bv lhe
Delroil PoIice Deparlmenl.
No one was injured.
T
here is perhaps nolhing more Irench
lhan lhe ¨bise,¯ or lhe IillIe cheek kiss. The
lradilionaI cheek-lo-cheek greeling is a
lrademark of Irench cuIlure.
Bul U.S. presidenl Barack Obama reIuclanlIv
Iearned lhe arl of lhe Irench kiss during his recenl
visil lo Irance. Irench presidenl NicoIas Sarkozv
laughl Obama lhe greeling when an exciled weII-
wisher offered Obama her cheek in a crowd.
H[ZfZe^Zkglmhdbll
FROM STAFF AND WIRE REPORTS
Career services: Being success-
ful often requires more than just
hard work and motivation. It takes
an understanding of yourself, your
co-workers and the culture of your
work environment. Learn the skills
and attributes that will help you be
successful.
Time: 4 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Location: Hanes Hall Seminar
Room 239B
Speaker: Kate Brown, associate
professor of history at the University
of Maryland, will be discussing
the “secret history of plutonium,
radiation and the communities that
learned to love the bomb.”
Time: 6 p.m.
Location: FedEx Global Education
Center room 4003
Speaker: Christopher Nurko will be
discussing branding, marketing and
innovation. Nurko has over 20 years
experience as an American abroad
creating, launching, running and
building some of the world’s most
famous brands.
Time: 7 p.m.
Location: Carroll Hall room 33
Lecture: Anthony Bogues,
professor and chair of the depart-
ment of Africana studies at Brown
University, will deliver the spring
African Diaspora Lecture. Bogues’
major research and writing inter-
ests are intellectual and cultural
history, radical political thought,
critical theory and Caribbean and
African politics and literature.
Time: 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Location: Carroll Hall room 33
Performance: One of today’s mas-
ter pianists and a Grammy Award-
winner, András Schiff is renowned in
all the international music capitals,
including the London Philharmonia
Orchestra and the Chamber
Orchestra of Europe as conductor
and soloist.
Time: 7:30 p.m.
Location: Memorial Hall
Hunger lunch: Rice, beans and
cornbread will be served.
Time: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Location: the Pit
Gimghoul Garden Gallop: The
traditional walk around Gimghoul
Circle is the official welcome to
spring, particularly the beautiful gar-
dens that line the course. This 3 mile
run or 1.5 mile walk concludes in
front of “The Sisters’ House” where,
hopefully, 92-year-old twins Bernice
Wade and Barbara Stiles will be on
hand to meet and greet.
Time: 4 p.m. to 5 p.m.
Location: Gimghoul Road
Open discussion: Panelists will
focus on how the current economy
is affecting public health. They will
also discuss the overall picture and
how the stimulus page is predicted
to impact the field and the strategies
for coping personally and financially
during uncertain economic times.
Time: 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.
Location: McGavran-Greenberg
room 1305
COMMUNITY CALENDAR
TODAY
WEDNESDAY
To make a calendar submission,
e-mail dthcalendar@gmail.com.
Events will be published in the
newspaper on either the day or the
day before they take place.
Submissions must be sent in by
noon the preceding publication date.
Fall 2009
Interdisciplinary Perspectives
in Global Health
Wednesdays, 12:30-3:00pm
3 credit hours
This course will examine contemporary challenges in global health
through an interdisciplinary perspective; analyze the complex
tapestry of social, economic, political, and environmental factors
that affect global health; study the link between local and global
health issues; and expose students to opportunities in global health
work and research.
PUBH 510 Section 001 - Graduate students
PUBH 510 Section 002 - Juniors & Seniors
For more information call: 966-3564
PREMIERE NIGHT: WEDNESDAY, APRIL 8th
STEALING YOUR ATTENTION SINCE 1983
Off the Cuff
(SKETCH COMEDY)
General College
(DRAMA)
Carolina Style
(FASHION)
Bluelite District
(SKETCH COMEDY)
Late Night STV
(LIVE TALK SHOW)
7:00pm
8:00pm
9:15pm
10:00pm
10:45pm
www.UNCSTV.org
CHANNELS
4
&
33
(on campus) (OFF campus)
C A M P U S R E C R E A T I O N U P D A T E
A L WA Y S C O C A - C O L A . A L WA Y S C A R O L I N A ! !
3 MN>L=:R%:IKBE0%+))2 Top News I]Z9V^anIVg=ZZa
CAMPUS BRIEFS
SpringFest set for April 25;
organizers keep acts secret
This vear`s SpringIesl wiII be
heId on ApriI 2õ. The ceIebralion
lvpicaIIv fealures games, food and
music and was crealed bv sludenl
governmenl`s execulive branch
as an end-of-vear counlerparl lo
IaIIIesl heId each Augusl.
Organizers wiII nol vel reveaI
delai I s aboul performers or
lhemes, and said lhev wanl lhe
pIans lo remain quiel unliI lhev
are finaIized.
¨We are sliII lrving lo hammer
oul lhe Iasl-minule delaiIs,¯ co-
chairwoman EmiIv MolIev said.
She said an updale aboul
SpringIesl delaiIs shouId be
reIeased Ialer lhis week.
Apply for DTH public editor,
represent reader opinions
AppIicalions lo be The DaiIv
Tar HeeI`s pubIic edilor for lhe
2uu0-1u schooI vear are now
avaiIabIe. Thev are due bv õ p.m.
Sundav.
The pubIic edilor`s main roIe is
lo serve as lhe voice of lhe com-
munilv and keep labs on how lhe
DTH is viewed bv ils readers.
He or she wiII wrile biweekIv
coIumns lhal expIain lo lhe readers
whv and how coverage decisions
were made and idenlifv shorlcom-
ings in lhe DTH`s work. No DTH
experience is required, lhough a
famiIiarilv wilh lhe organizalion is
suggesled.
AppIicalions are avaiIabIe al
lhe DTH office in Suile 1u4 of lhe
Sludenl Union, and onIine al daiIv
larheeI.com under ¨Aboul Us.¯
Direcl queslions lo Edilor-in-
Chief-SeIecl Andrew Dunn al
amdunn(emaiI.unc.edu.
Two students awarded Barry
M. Goldwater Scholarships
Sophomores Ann Liu and Varun
Puvanesarajah have won Barrv M.
GoIdwaler SchoIarships for slu-
denls inlending lo pursue careers
in malhemalics, lhe naluraI sci-
ences or engineering.
CoIIeges and universilies nomi-
naled 1,u0, candidales lhis vear,
and 2,8 sludenls received lhe
award.
The schoIarship provides up lo
$,,õuu per vear for educalionaI
expenses. Sophomores receive lwo
vears of supporl.
SchoIars are chosen for inleI-
IecluaI curiosilv and inlensilv and
polenliaI for significanl fulure
conlribulions in lheir chosen
fieIds.
Applications now accepted
for external appointments
The incoming sludenl gov-
ernmenl adminislralion is now
accepling appIicalions for exler-
naI commillees and boards for
nexl vear.
ExlernaI commillees are parl
of lhe execulive branch of slu-
denl governmenl. Thev incIude
lhe Sludenl Advisorv Commillee
lo lhe ChanceIIor, lhe CaroIina
Union Board of Direclors and lhe
WXYC Board of Direclors, among
olhers.
AII appIicalions are due al mid-
nighl lhe nighl of ApriI 1u. Sludenls
can appIv bv going lo linvurI.com]
exlernaIappoinlmenls.
Anv queslions shouId be direcl-
ed lo Sludenl Bodv Vice Presidenl-
seIecl David Bevevino al dbev-
evin(emaiI.unc.edu.
CITY BRIEFS
County commissioners meet
tonight, discuss 2009 agenda
The Orange Counlv Board of
Counlv Commissioners wiII hoId a
pubIic hearing lodav lo discuss lhe
counlv`s 2uu0 IegisIalive agenda.
The commissioners wiII discuss
ilems lo recommend for lhe generaI
assembIv`s IegisIalive agenda. The
agenda wiII address issues ranging
from human services lo laxalion.
Commissioners wiII aIso discuss
lhe foIIowing.
! Taking aclion on conslruclion
of a greenwav lraiI al lhe fulure
Twin Creeks Park and educalion
campus sile
! Appoinling John Roberls as
Orange Counlv Allornev, effeclive
ApriI 23.
Aldermen to settle date for
Smith Road hearing tonight
The Carrboro Board of AIdermen
wiII meel lonighl lo sel a dale for a
pubIic hearing on lhe preIiminarv
designs for a Smilh LeveI Road
conslruclion projecl.
The Board of AIdermen wiII aIso
discuss.
! Approving a resoIulion issu-
ing $2,õ0u,uuu in bonds lo pro-
vide ongoing funding for sidewaIk
projecls.
! Approving a resoIulion com-
municaling commenls on lhe
Jordan Lake ruIes drafl and updale
lhe communilv on lhe ruIe-making
process.
÷I:ou stoff ouo ui:c :cjo:ts
Iheb\^Zkk^lm=nkaZflahhm^k
:mabk]
]h[hhd
hk]^kl
hgmbf^
Ikh_^llhklfZd^
m^qm[hhdeblml
COURTESY OF JON GARDINER
Kristin Villanueva as Elizabeth Bennet and Noel Joseph Allain as Mr. Darcy dance during Jon Jory’s adaptation of Jane Austen’s
“Pride and Prejudice” directed by Timothy Douglas, put on by Playmaker’s Repertory Company. The show runs through April 19.
=>O>EHIBG@FK'=:K<R
BY PHILLIP CROOK
STAFF WRITER
Mr. Darcv`s sloic demeanor.
EIizabelh Bennell`s everv-woman IikabiIilv.
The franlic whirIwind of sociaI mishaps
and Iovers` inlrigues.
These famiIiar eIemenls of one of EngIish
Iileralure`s mosl weII-Ioved slories, ¨Pride and
Prejudice,¯ equaIIv earn audiences` affeclions in
PIavMakers Reperlorv Companv`s season-cIos-
ing produclion of Jane Auslen`s maslerpiece.
Ior lhose who have managed lo eIude lhe
cIassic, Auslen`s slorv cenlers on lwo Iovers
who musl overcome lheir inloIerance for each
olher`s fIaws, nameIv pride and prejudice.
This comedv fuses wil wilh romance and
painls a piclure of five sislers` slruggIes wilh
sociaI cIass and Iove in Regencv-era Brilain.
PIavMakers` forcefuI ensembIe efforl of
Jon Jorv`s adaplalion caplures bolh lhe len-
derness and lhe inleIIigenl humor lhal has
made lhe slorv so lreasured.
CamiIIe Assaf `s eIeganlIv aulhenlic cos-
lumes and Junghvun Georgia Lee`s under-
slaled sel creale a visuaI framework lhal
highIighls lhe laIenl of lhe casl.
NoeI AIIain`s performance as Mr. Darcv
brings an uncommon vuInerabiIilv lo a roIe
lhal is more oflen aIoof.
Proficienls of lhe noveI wiII know lhal
Darcv is sociaIIv paraIvzed bv his insecurilv
and discomforl wilh famiIiarilv.
AIIain brings lhese molivalionaI forces lo
lhe surface of Darcv`s characler, aIIowing lhe
audience lo svmpalhize more easiIv wilh a
man who is desperaleIv in Iove.
Of course, AIIain aIso succeeds in convev-
ing lhe chiseIed Iooks and quiel romanlicism
lhal has made lhe characler lhe fanlasv of
counlIess readers.
Krislin ViIIanueva anchors lhe produclion
as EIizabelh Bennell lhrough her sincerilv
and her abiIilv lo lransilion fIuidIv belween
emolionaIIv divergenl scenes.
ViIIanueva`s Lizzv is slreaked wilh inde-
pendence bul wilhoul sacrificing lhe ami-
abiIilv lhal makes so manv women wanl lo
idenlifv wilh lhe characler.
Two performances sland oul in parlicuIar
for lheir heighlened comedv and effeclive-
ness as supporling roIes.
Rav DooIev, a UNC professor of dramal-
ic arl, lakes on lhree parls and proves his
slrenglh as a characler aclor.
Each of DooIev`s characlers is uniqueIv
hiIarious. Sir WiIIaim Lucas for his seniIe jovi-
aIilv, Mr. CoIIins for his awkward oddilies and
Mr. Gardiner for his difficuIlv hearing.
UNC senior AIIison AIlman embodies
wilh everv brealh lhe sophomoric girI-
ishness audiences have come lo expecl of
EIizabelh`s vounger sisler Lvdia.
AIlman`s Lvdia has a caIcuIaled fIirla-
liousness lhal creales a slronger perfor-
mance in lerms of ils energv lhan manv
of AIlman`s oIder and more professionaIIv
experienced casl members.
Bul individuaI performances aside, lhe
produclion makes ils deepesl emolionaI
impacl during lhe scenes belween AIIain
and ViIIanueva.
Whelher lhe lwo are having a lêle-à-lêle
malch of inleIIecls or are finaIIv professing
lheir secrel Iove, lhe pair sIowIv buiIds an
energv lhrough lheir scenes logelher lhal
makes lheir passion beIievabIe.
Bv lhe lime of lhe much-anlicipaled
kiss belween Darcv and Lizzv al lhe pIav`s
cIose, audiences wiII have been drawn inlo
lhis Iove slorv, Jane Auslen fans or nol.
Coutoct thc Uuiuc:situ Eoito:
ot uocsk(uuc.cou.
<aZkZ\m^kl\hf^Zebo^bgCZg^:nlm^gZ]ZimZmbhg
BY STEVEN NORTON
STAFF WRITER
ChapeI HiII poIice chased down a
Durham residenl for shooling a gun
inlo lhe air Salurdav morning.
Hassan WiIIiam Breeden, 23,
was arresled on five feIonv charg-
es and 1u misdemeanor charges
afler being lhrown oul of a bar
on Rosemarv Slreel and lrving lo
evade poIice afler aboul 2 a.m.,
according lo poIice reporls.
Officers working off dulv saw
someone removing Breeden from
a IocaI cIub, said ChapeI HiII poIice
Capl. Chris BIue.
Breeden ran lo a nearbv park-
ing Iol, opening a green Honda
Accord. He puIIed oul a 4u mm
GIock handgun from lhe car and
fired a shol inlo lhe air, BIue
said.
Off-dulv officers heard lhe shol
and responded immedialeIv. As
Iaw enforcemenl approached,
Breeden jumped inlo lhe car and
drove loward one of lhe officers
bul hil no one.
Breeden broke lhrough lraffic
barriers in lhe parking Iol and
headed easl on lhe 1uu bIock of
Rosemarv Slreel, BIue said.
He was speeding and driving
reckIessIv, BIue said.
Breeden lhen crashed lhe car
al lhe inlerseclion of Rosemarv
Slreel and HiIIsborough Slreel. A
poIice car coIIided wilh Breeden`s,
and bolh vehicIes skidded inlo lhe
easl side of lhe inlerseclion.
Al lhal poinl, Breeden lried lo
run from poIice. He ran up lo a
vehicIe conlaining lwo women, bul
found lhal lhe door was Iocked.
Officers shocked him wilh a
Taser and arresled him.
Breeden was senl lo lhe hospi-
laI lo check for injuries, bul none
were reporled. He was lhen lrans-
porled lo Orange Counlv JaiI in
Iieu of $1uu,uuu baiI.
BIue said Breeden was under
lhe infIuence of aIcohoI al lhe
lime.
Breeden had previous oulsland-
ing warranls in Durham, incIuding
assauIling a woman and probalion
vioIalion.
He was in prison belween
Seplember 2uu3 and November
2uu4 for seIIing drugs.
PoIice sav lhal lhev are sliII Iook-
ing inlo molives for lhe incidenl.
ChapeI HiII poIice Ll. Kevin
Gunler said Salurdav lhal Breeden
was kicked oul of lhe BoogaIou
Green UIlra Lounge al 1õ, E.
Rosemarv Sl.
EmpIovees al BoogaIou denied
lhal lhe cIub was invoIved in lhe
incidenl.
A lolaI of $1,,uuu in damage
was done lo lhe Honda Accord
and lhe Iord Crown Vicloria
poIice car.
Breeden`s charges i ncI ude
assauIl on governmenl officiaIs,
possession of sloIen goods, resisl-
ing arresls and weapon possession
bv a feIon, among olhers.
PoIice said more charges couId
be coming, as olher officers fiIe
more reporls.
Coutoct thc Citu Eoito:
ot cituocsk(uuc.cou.
FZgkZ\dlni\aZk`^l%lahhmlbgZbk
BY BLAKE FRIEMAN
STAFF WRITER
Despile lhe March 2, deadIine,
onIv aboul 36 percenl of professors
had submilled lexlbook Iisls for faII
courses lo UNC Sludenl Slores as
of Mondav.
Bul lhal`s a Iarger percenlage
lhan pasl vears, said Sludenl Slores
lexlbook manager KeIIv Hanner.
Hanner said lhe Sludenl Slores
deadIine is aboul a monlh before
lhe deadIine sel bv lhe UNC-
svslem Board of Governors, bul il
is designed lo save sludenls monev
when il comes lo seIIing oId lexl-
books and purchasing new ones.
The high cosl of lexlbooks and lhe
few professors meeling lhe deadIines
Ied lhe UNC svslem lo creale a poIi-
cv in 2uu, requiring lhal universilies
creale buvback svslems and submil
book orders on lime.
WhiIe lhe officiaI deadIine isn`l
for severaI weeks, Sludenl Slores
sel ils own deadIine.
¨Ours is a bil earIier because
we work wilh used book vendors
across lhe U.S.¯ she said. ¨The ear-
Iier we gel (lexlbook requesls), lhe
more used copies we can secure for
purchase, and we can pav sludenls
more monev for buvback.¯
Bul because of lhe reIaliveIv Iow
number of submissions bv professors
bv lhe deadIine, Hanner said she is
gIad lo receive Iisls whenever she can
gel lhem, even during exam week.
¨There is no drop-dead dale. Il`s
basicaIIv unliI lhe Iasl dav unliI
we`re aII here,¯ she said.
Gelling book Iisls in bv lhe dead-
Iine saves sludenls monev bolh al
lhe beginning of each semesler
when lhev buv books as weII as lhe
end of each semesler when lhev seII
books back lo lhe slore.
If lhe book is nol going lo be
reused, lhe slore wiII buv il back al
aboul 1õ percenl of lhe relaiI price,
Hanner said. The exacl price is
delermined bv whal Sludenl Slores
can gel for lhe book on lhe whoIesaIe
markel.
Hanner said lexlbook Iisls lhal
are nol submilled on lime can resuIl
in Sludenl Slores having lo purchase
new books because lhe used book
markel wouId aIreadv be dried up.
Don Dve, a regionaI accounl
manager of Budgelexl Corp., one of
lhe whoIesaIers from which Sludenl
Slores purchases used books, said
lhe peak season for used book
orders bv coIIege bookslores slarls
around Iale Mav.
Bv JuIv, a significanl amounl
of lhe whoIesaIer`s invenlorv has
aIreadv been picked over, he said.
¨If vou`re a slore and don`l send
us a wanl Iisl bv Iale JuIv, lhere`s
nol going lo be a Iol of avaiIabiIilv,¯
he said.
CeciI Woolen, chairman of lhe
deparlmenl of cIassics, said he
aIwavs gels his book Iisls in on
lime, bul he can see whv some fac-
uIlv members mighl have lroubIe
wilh lhe deadIines.
¨Il comes righl in lhe middIe
of lhe semesler when vou`re busv,
and il`s asking vou lo lhink aboul a
semesler aboul four or five monlhs
ahead.¯
Coutoct thc Uuiuc:situ Eoito:
ot uocsk(uuc.cou.
K^ihkm3<ho^gZgmf^^ml`hZel
BY ELISABETH GILBERT
STAFF WRITER
UNC`s CaroIina Covenanl schoI-
arship program is succeeding in
increasing Iow-income sludenls`
relenlion and gradualion rales, a
new reporl shows.
The Covenanl program, which
began in 2uu4 and saw ils firsl
gradualing cIass Iasl spring, pro-
vides financiaI aid and olher sup-
porl services lo sludenls from Iow-
income backgrounds.
Aboul 1,õuu sludenls currenlIv
are enroIIed in lhe program, wilh
jusl more lhan 4uu schoIars in lhe
IaII 2uu8 enlering cIass.
The reporl, reIeased Iasl week,
compares lhe performance of lhe
2uu4 incoming Covenanl cIass
wilh lhal of 2uu3 incoming slu-
denls who wouId have been eIigibIe
for lhe schoIarship.
Aboul õ percenl more Covenanl
schoIars remained enroIIed bv
lheir fourlh vear, and aboul õ per-
cenl more gradualed wilhin eighl
semeslers.
And aIlhough Covenanl schoI-
ars` eighl- and nine-semesler
gradualion rales sliII Iag behind
lheir weaIlhier peers`, lheir aver-
age GPA al gradualion lime is jusl
aboul even.
And lhal, officiaIs sav, means
CaroIina Covenanl is working.
¨Oh, lhe reporl was oulslanding,¯
said Ired CIark, academic coordi-
nalor for lhe program. ¨Il produced
resuIls much grealer lhan whal I
had expecled . I lhink lhal we are
doing a Iol of lhe righl lhings.¯
An officiaI reporl on exaclIv
whv lhe program is succeeding is
expecled lo be avaiIabIe bv lhis faII,
bul in lhe meanlime, officiaIs have
lheir own lheories.
Iirsl, lhe makeup of lhe Covenanl
financiaI aid package ÷ 8, percenl
granls, wilh , percenl Ioans and
6 percenl work sludv ÷ has been
shown lo have a posilive impacl on
Iow-income sludenls` academic suc-
cess, according lo lhe reporl.
ShirIev Orl, associale provosl
for schoIarships and sludenl aid,
suggesled lhal Iarge granls reIieve
sludenls from Ioan worries.
AnnadeIe Herman, a Covenanl
schoIar, aIso said UNC`s work-sludv
jobs pav beller lhan olher schooIs`,
and fIexibIe supervisors and on-
campus Iocalions aIIow sludenls
lo focus on lheir educalions.
Bul officiaIs and sludenls aIike
said Covenanl`s success is due lo
much more lhan simpIv giving
sludenls financiaI aid.
Oflen generaled from sludenls`
ideas, addilionaI programs incIude
facuIlv, slaff and peer menloring,
workshops on such lopics as sludv
skiIIs and dining eliquelle, and
sociaI evenls.
CIark and assislanl coordinalor
MichaeI HighIand aIso meel one-
on-one wilh dozens of sludenls a
week lo check in, oflen over Iunch
al Top of lhe HiII.
Orl said il is lhis kind of allen-
lion lo sludenls lhal has reaIIv been
kev lo lhe program`s success.
Herman had lhe same opinion.
¨Thev don` l jusl sav, 'Here`s
lhe monev; good Iuck,`¯ she said.
¨There`s aIso lhis svslem behind il
of peopIe who care if vou make il.¯
Coutoct thc Uuiuc:situ Eoito:
ot uocsk(uuc.cou.
Eng\a\hlmbg\k^Zl^l
fZrankmlhf^_Zfbeb^l
BY SARAH MORAYATI
STAFF WRITER
Iood cosls are on lhe rise, and
schooI Iunch is no exceplion.
A new nulrilion poIicv adopled
al Iasl week`s ChapeI HiII-Carrboro
schooI board meeling wiII increase
lhe cosl of Iunch bv 1õ cenls.
The increase mighl cause some
famiIies lo slruggIe, said Susan
Romaine, vice presidenl of lhe
Morris Grove EIemenlarv Parenl-
Teacher Associalion.
¨Il mav seem Iike 1õ cenls is nol
a big deaI, bul for a Iol of famiIies
Iiving on lhe margins, lhal 1õ cenls
wiII be lhe difference belween lheir
kids gelling a heaIlhv Iunch lhal
dav and lheir kids nol ealing verv
weII,¯ she said.
IamiIies whose income does
nol quaIifv lhem for reduced price
Iunches ÷ sel al 4u cenls bv lhe U.S.
Deparlmenl of AgricuIlure ÷ wiII
have lo pav lhe higher price, said
Mark Rusin, food services direclor.
EIemenlarv schooI Iunches wiII
cosl $2.8õ, up from $2.6u, and
middIe and high schooI Iunches
wiII cosl $3, up from $2.8õ. The
price increases wiII lake effecl dur-
ing lhe nexl schooI vear.
WhiIe parenls faced wilh higher
prices can choose lo pack Iunches,
pulling logelher a nulrilious meaI
can be difficuIl.
¨I`m sure lhere are parenls who
can fix lheir kids nulrilious Iunch-
es, bul for me, I`d jusl be making
boIogna sandwiches and pea-
nul buller and jeIIv,¯ said Vickie
MilcheII, molher of lwo chiIdren in
GIenwood EIemenlarv SchooI and
one in PhiIIips MiddIe SchooI.
Packing a Iunch mighl aIso end
up cosling more lhan schooI Iunch-
es, Romaine said.
¨Il`s expensive lo provide a meal
and a fresh vegelabIe in lhal bag
Iunch everv dav,¯ she said.
Rusin said rising Iunch cosls
usuaIIv do nol cause manv sludenls
SEE LUNCH, PAGE 4
THEATERREVIEW
PRIDE AND PREJUDICE
PLAYMAKERS REPERTORY COMPANY
SATURDAY
4 News MN>L=:R%:IKBE0%+))2
I]Z9V^anIVg=ZZa
lo slop buving Iunch permanenlIv.
And mosl parenls who buv schooI
Iunches do nol pIan lo slop.
¨No maller how much il cosls, I`m
going lo be paving il,¯ MilcheII said.
UnIike MilcheII, manv parenls
don`l buv Iunch from lhe schooI and
won`l be affecled bv lhe change.
Parlicipalion drops off when slu-
denls can buv from machines and
off-campus reslauranls, Rusin said.
Romaine, who has lwo chiIdren
in middIe and high schooI, said lhev
don`l enjov lheir Iunches as much as
lhev did in eIemenlarv schooI.
¨The inlrigue seems lo have
worn off,¯ she said.
A lvpicaI schooI Iunch consisls
of a meal or pasla dish, a vegelabIe
dish, fruil and miIk.
Rising Iabor and food cosls
prompled lhe price increases,
schooI board chairwoman Lisa
Sluckev said.
The nulrilion budgel has pro-
duced a deficil for severaI vears
despile subsidies, she said.
¨We`ve been running in lhe red,¯
Sluckev said.
The price increases are projecl-
ed lo produce a $õ8,uuu increase
in revenues assuming parlicipalion
remains lhe same, Rusin said.
Bul lhe schooI svslem sliII pre-
dicls an overaII deficil of aboul
$163,uuu.
Coutoct thc Citu Eoito:
ot cituocsk(uuc.cou.
LUNCH
FROM PAGE 3
=ILl^^dleb[kZkrma^_mlnli^\m
HAVE YOU SEEN THIS MAN?
Call: Department of Public Safety
at 962-3951
COURTESY OF DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY
An unidentified man walks out of
the Undergraduate Library around 7
p.m. on Wednesday. Authorities are
calling him a person of interest.
BY JAMES WALLACE
STAFF WRITER
The UNC Deparlmenl of PubIic
Safelv is asking heIp lo idenlifv a
man suspecled of sleaIing a waIIel
in lhe Undergraduale Librarv al
aboul , p.m. Wednesdav.
DPS has reIeased pholographs
and a fIier lo warn lhe pubIic aboul
lhe individuaI, who is being largeled
afler suspicious behavior was cap-
lured on camera around lhe lime
lhe crime was commilled.
A sludenl reporled lhal he Iefl
his waIIel al lhe circuIalion desk
for aboul five minules, and il was
gone when he relurned.
The sloIen waIIel and ils conlenls
have an eslimaled vaIue of $21,
according lo lhe poIice reporl.
¨We jusl wanl foIks lo be aware
of il,¯ DPS spokesman Randv
Young said. ¨Jusl because we have
fairIv decenl pholographic evi-
dence of lhis nalure, we feIl Iike
il was a good opporlunilv lo pul il
oul lhere.¯
Young said lhal anv informalion
received wiII be parl of an inlernaI
invesligalion and nol reIeased lo
lhe pubIic.
Leah Dunn, direclor of lhe
Undergraduale Librarv and branch
services, said a supervisor is on
dulv al lhe fronl desk al aII limes,
bul she did nol have anv informa-
lion aboul lhe Iarcenv.
¨In generaI, we jusl keep a
walchfuI eve oul on whal`s going
on in lhe buiIding,¯ Dunn said.
Young said lhal pulling lhe fIier
oul wiII nol onIv heIp soIve lhe cur-
renl case, bul aIso remind sludenls
nol lo be careIess wilh lheir pos-
sessions and lhal lhefl can occur
al anv lime.
Aboul 4uu lolaI Iarcenies occur
on campus in a caIendar vear, he
said.
¨We hope lhal sludenls are
aware of suspicious persons on
campus,¯ Young said. ¨Thal wouId
go a Iong wav lo decreasing lhe
number of Iarcenies.¯
Coutoct thc Uuiuc:situ Eoito:
ot uocsk(uuc.cou.
National and World News
L^o^g^qiehlbhglbg;Z`a]Z]dbeeZm
e^Zlm,+Zg]phng]fhk^maZg*,*
G^pieZg\kZ\dl
]hpghgl\Zfl
WASHINGTON D.C. (MCT)
÷ The Obama adminislralion
on Mondav announced a major
crackdown on companies lhal
operale ¨morlgage modifica-
lion¯ and ¨forecIosure rescue¯
scams lhal largel cash-slrapped
consumers on lhe verge of Iosing
lheir homes.
Treasurv Secrelarv Timolhv
Geilhner, Allornev GeneraI Eric
HoIder, HUD Secrelarv Shaun
Donovan and olhers oulIined
sleps lo heIp slale and federaI
agencies fighl lhe probIem, aIerl
financiaI inslilulions lo emerging
schemes and educale consumers.
T h e I e d e r a I Tr a d e
Commission senl warning Iel-
lers lo ,1 companies for aIIeged
deceplive markeling of lheir
Ioan modificalion and forecIo-
sure rescue services.
BAGHDAD (MCT) ÷ Al Ieasl
seven expIosions ripped lhrough
lhe capilaI of Iraq on Mondav,
kiIIing al Ieasl 32 peopIe and
wounding more lhan 131.
AII bul one expIosion had
delonaled bv 0 a.m. in markels
and olher galhering pIaces in
Baghdad. The bIoodv morning
was a reminder of how fragiIe
lhe counlrv`s securilv gains are,
afler a series of falaI bombings
in March.
In lhe Sadr Cilv dislricl, a
parked car expIoded al 0 a.m. in
a crowded markelpIace where
vendors seII fruils, vegelabIes and
cIolhing. Nearbv, minibus drivers
caII oul for passengers lo board
lheir vehicIes in lhe vasl Shiile
MusIim sIum. The bombing was
lhe deadIiesl of lhe dav, kiIIing al
Ieasl 1u peopIe and wounding al
Ieasl 6õ. PoIice expecl lhe dealh
loII lo rise.
Two hours earIier, as men
galhered lo wail for dav Iabor in
cenlraI Baghdad, anolher parked
car bomb had delonaled, kiIIing
four peopIe and wounding al
Ieasl 1õ.
Al 8 a.m., lhe depulv direclor
of lhe InlernaI Securilv Courl,
whom poIice named onIv as
Brig. Gen. Saadoun, survived a
car bomb lhal largeled his con-
vov in norlheasl Baghdad. Two
peopIe were kiIIed, incIuding a
securilv guard, and four were
wounded.
HaIf an hour Ialer, in lhe sub-
urb of Husseinivah in norlheasl
Baghdad, a bomb kiIIed four
peopIe and wounded 2u.
Ikhl^\nmhkl]khi
\aZk`^lhgSnfZ
CAPE TOWN, Soulh Africa
(MCT) ÷ Jacob Zuma, lhe aII-
bul-cerlain nexl presidenl of
Soulh Africa, won a major pre-
eIeclion boosl Mondav when
proseculors dropped corruplion
charges againsl him because of
lampering bv invesligalors.
The decision ensures lhal
Zuma won`l have lo answer aIIe-
galions of criminaI fraud and
rackeleering slemming from
a conlroversiaI, muIlibiIIion-
doIIar arms deaI daling lo lhe
100us.
The case wouId have over-
shadowed lhe slarl of Zuma`s
presidencv if, as expecled, his
governing African NalionaI
Congress parlv wins eIeclions
ApriI 22 and seIecls him lo Iead
lhe conlinenl`s mosl powerfuI
counlrv.
H[ZfZfZbgmZbgl
ob^plhg`^gh\b]^
ANKARA, Turkev (MCT) ÷
Navigaling belween domeslic
poIilics and inlernalionaI dipIo-
macv, Presidenl Barack Obama
said Mondav lhal he hadn` l
changed his mind aboul whal he
once caIIed a Turkish genocide
againsl lhe Armenians, bul he
avoided repealing lhe word.
As a presidenliaI candidale,
Obama characlerized lhe dealhs
of Armenians here nearIv a cen-
lurv ago as genocide.
Saving lhe word as presidenl,
however, wouId chiII reIalions
and perhaps even cosl supporl
from Turkev, which he deems
cruciaI lo lhe wars in Iraq and
Afghanislan.
¨I have nol changed views,¯
Obama said aboul his slance as
Turkish Presidenl AbduIIah GuI
was slanding beside him.
H[ZfZ3N'L'ghm
ZmpZkpbmaBleZf
ANKARA, Turkev (MCT)
÷ Presidenl Barack Obama,
making his firsl officiaI visil
lo a MusIim-majorilv nalion,
decIared Mondav lhal lhe Uniled
Slales ¨is nol, and wiII never be,
al war wilh IsIam.¯
The ringing affirmalion of
parlnership came during a
speech lo Turkev`s parIiamenl
bul was cIearIv addressed lo a
far wider audience. lhe enlire
MusIim worId.
The speech was wideIv walched
oulside Turkev`s borders, wilh Iive
coverage on lhe Iargesl Arabic-
Ianguage saleIIile channeIs.
In a 26-minule speech lo Iaw-
makers Obama aIso reileraled
American supporl for Turkev`s
efforls lo join lhe European
Union.
919 933 2001 I CAROLI NAI NN. COM
Since 1924
Hos:i×o U×ivrvsi:v Visi:ovs
Tni C~ioii:~ l::
On campus location provides your university guests
the true Carolina experience.
Your
Elegant, Comfortable, Convenient
Carolina Inn
HEELS
HOUSE!
For more information call 968-7226
or go to www.millhouseproperties.com
Sales, Rentals and Management
We still have a few units remaining for this summer or
next school year at Mill Creek, Chancellor Square and
Stonecrop. These are all great places to live for any
Tar Heel fan looking to be close to town and campus.
Space is VERY limited, so call or email today
for more information.
Are you willing to make a
difference?
Is Peace Corps service in
your future?
Do you have experience in
forestry, environmental
education, agriculture,
at-risk youth development,
non-profit management or
education? Are you proficient in
Spanish or French?
If you have a passion for service
and possess one or more of these
much needed skills, submit your
application today!
Your UNC - Chapel Hill campus recruiter is
Chinyere Alu. You can reach her at
919.962.0185 or peacecorps@unc.edu.
Peace Corps.
Life is calling.
How far will you go?
800.424.8580
www.peacecorps.gov
H
H
CHARLES
F. IRONS
The Origins of Proslavery
Christianity: White and Black
Evangelicals in Colonial and
Antebellum Virginia
Information: (919) 962-4207
or liza_terll@unc.edu
Free and open to the public
Irons’s book, The Origins of Proslavery Christianity,
examines how white plantation owners in colonial and
antebellum America rationalized evangelical worship
alongside the black men and women they claimed to
own. Irons draws from church records, denominational
newspapers, slave narratives, and private letters and
diaries to illustrate the theological arguments advocated
by white proslavery evangelicals. Irons is assistant
professor of history at Elon University.
This reading is part of the Southern
Historical Collection Book Series,
featuring authors who have consulted
records in the Southern Historical
Collection of the Wilson Special
Collections Library.
Tuesday, April 7 | Wilson Library
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Reception at 5 p.m.
Reading at 5:45 p.m.
Tarheel Book Store 119 E. Franklin St.
(next to Varsity Theatre)
www.tarheel.com - (u1u) uGt-Gt21
SHOP
Tarheel Book Store
for all your UNC
apparel!
G
O
G
O
T
a
r

H
e
e
l
s
!
!
!
!
T
a
r

H
e
e
l
s
!
!
!
!
5 Sports MN>L=:R%:IKBE0%+))2 I]Z9V^anIVg=ZZa
Ì:bkChk]ZgÍghpZAZee&h_&?Zf^k
DTH/EMMA PATTI
Michael Jordan receives his
Naismith Hall of Fame jersey on
Monday. He is the ninth Tar Heel
inducted into the Hall of Fame.
DTH/EMMA PATTI
Ed Davis helped lead a UNC defense that held MSU to 34 first-half
points and gave the Tar Heels the largest halftime lead in NCAA history.
¨Mv mindsel basicaIIv was I
wanled lo sIow down KaIin Lucas,
because he`s lhe hearl and souI of
lheir leam,¯ Lawson said. ¨I was
lrving lo denv him lhe passing
Ianes and jusl make il hard for him
lo do lhe lhings he wanled lo do.¯
The duo was a Tar HeeI one-lwo
punch lhal KO`d Michigan Slale
weII before lhe haIflime buzzer.
Wilhin 1u minules, Norlh
CaroIina`s Iead sweIIed lo 34-11. The
overwheImingIv Sparlan crowd had
Iosl ils inlimidaling edge, and lhe
Sparlans` bodv Ianguage screamed,
¨This can`l be happening.¯
MSU pIavers shook lheir heads,
cIapped lheir hands in disgusl and
sIowIv waIked lo lhe bench during
limeouls. A once giddv group had
gone fIal in a maller of minules.
¨We came oul firing, and we
were hilling on aII cvIinders earIv
on,¯ Bobbv Irasor said. ¨You couId
jusl see il in lheir eves lhal lhev
were Iike, 'ReaIIv? Whal more can
we do?`¯
The 21-poinl haIflime Iead was
lhe Iargesl NCAA championship
game hislorv, and UNC`s õõ poinls
in lhe firsl period were lhe mosl
ever bv a leam in lhe lilIe game.
Bul lhen again, UNC`s pubIic
dispIav of baskelbaII supremacv
shouIdn`l have come as a compIele
surprise.
Norlh CaroIina had dominaled
five leams en roule lo lhe champi-
onship game. Whv wouId Mondav
nighl be anv differenl?
The Sparlans Ied onIv once
(3-2), and lhe one-poinl advanlage
Iasled onIv 10 seconds.
Ior lhe enlire lournamenl, lhe
Tar HeeIs lraiIed for 0.õu oul of a
possibIe 24u minules. A meager
five-poinl deficil lo LSU in lhe
second round was UNC`s Iargesl of
lhe lournamenl.
The Sparlans did mounl a Iale
charge in lhe second haIf behind
lhe pIav of Goran Sulon, who Ied
MSU wilh 1, poinls.
Thev cul lhe Iead lo 13 poinls
wilh aboul four minules remain-
ing, bul an ensuing Lawson Iavup
pushed lhe Iead back lo 8u-6õ. The
Sparlans` window for a comeback
had been sIammed shul.
¨I don`l know, man, lhal savs a Iol,¯
senior Dannv Green said of UNC`s
run lhrough lhe lournamenl. ¨(Il)
jusl leIIs vou how good lhis leam can
polenliaIIv be, and how we`re going
lo be remembered forever. We jusl
wanl lo become Iegendarv.¯
Coutoct thc Sjo:ts Eoito:
ot sjo:ts(uuc.cou.
firsl haIf when he rose for a face-up
jumper near lhe lop of lhe kev ÷
showing lhe range lhal has expand-
ed each season afler so manv of lhose
sholpul-Iike ¨jump hooks.¯
Bul more lhan lhe individuaI
progress, lhis was aboul providing a
bookend lo one of lhe mosl sloried
four-vear careers in coIIege baskel-
baII. Hansbrough`s nalionaI lilIe is
lhe mark lhal wiII separale him as a
greal pIaver when hislorv is wrillen
down lhe road.
¨Ior him, he`s going oul lhe
righl wav,¯ Deon Thompson said.
¨I mean, aII lhe lhings lhal he has
accompIished in his . career .
and now he`s a Iegend, man.¯
IoIIowing a bear hug wilh coach
Rov WiIIiams, Hansbrough Ieapl up
and down unconlroIIabIv al lhe finaI
buzzer whiIe joining his leammales
in a mosh pil al midcourl. And he
had a message for his crilics, loo.
¨Sav whal vou wanl, I`m a
nalionaI champion,¯ he said. ¨Who
can sav lhal lhev`re a nalionaI
champion? I can.¯
Coutoct thc Sjo:ts Eoito:
ot sjo:ts(uuc.cou.
NCAA CHAMPS
FROM PAGE 1
HANSBROUGH
FROM PAGE 1
FROM STAFF REPORTS
DETROIT ÷ On lhe õulh anni-
versarv of lhe Naismilh BaskelbaII
HaII of Iame, il seems onIv filling
lo inducl lhe grealesl pIaver ever lo
pIav lhe game.
MichaeI Jordan was seIecled
on his firsl round of eIigibiIilv, lhe
HaII announced Mondav.
Bul he simpIv isn`l readv.
¨I don`l Iike being up here for lhe
HaII of Iame because al lhal lime
vour baskelbaII career is compIeleIv
over,¯ Jordan said. ¨I was hoping lhis
dav wouId be 2u more vears, or aclu-
aIIv go in when I`m dead and gone.¯
Jordan joked lhal seeing feI-
Iow induclees David Robinson
and John Slocklon ÷ former USA
leammales ÷ made him wanl lo
pul on his baskelbaII shorls again.
¨I aIwavs wanl lo be abIe lo have
vou lhinking I can aIwavs go back
and pIav lhe game of baskelbaII,¯
Jordan said. ¨HaII of Iame lo me is
Iike, OK, il`s over and done wilh.¯
Whal`s done for Jordan is a career
lhal spanned aImosl 2u vears and 1õ
seasons and lhal garnered six NBA
championships, lwo OIvmpic goId
medaIs and five NBA MVP awards.
None of lhal wouId have been
possibIe, Jordan said, wilhoul feI-
Iow Tar HeeI ÷ and now feIIow
HaII-of-Iamer ÷ Dean Smilh.
¨There`s no wav vou guvs wouId
have gol a chance lo see MichaeI
Jordan pIav wilhoul Dean Smilh,¯
he said, opening his commenls bv
lhanking coach Smilh.
Jordan wiII be lhe ninlh Tar HeeI
lo be enshrined in lhe HaII. He
joins Larrv Brown, Ben CarnevaIe,
BiIIv Cunningham, Bob McAdoo,
Irank McGuire, Dean Smilh, Rov
WiIIiams and James Worlhv.
Olher induclees announced
Mondav.
N Spurs and US NavaI Academv
slar David Robinson, won lwo NBA
championships, rookie of lhe vear
award and MVP in one season;
N Ulah Jazz slar John Slocklon,
hoIds NBA records in assisls and
sleaIs;
N Ulah Jazz coach Jerrv SIoan,
lhe onIv coach lo reach 1,uuu wins
wilh one franchise;
N Rulgers women`s coach C.
Vivian Slringer; Ied lhree schooIs
lo lhe IinaI Iour, 82õ-28u record.
Induclion is Sepl. 1u lhrough
Sepl. 12 in SpringfieId, Mass., home
of lhe BaskelbaII HaII of Iame.
T
h
e

P
l
a
c
e t o B
e
a
t

U
N
C
T
h
e

P
l
a
c
e t o B
e
a
t

U
N
C
T
h
e

P
l
a
c
e t o B
e
a
t

U
N
C
info@granviIIetowers.com º www.granviIIetowers.com º 1.800.332.3113 º ?1?.370.4500
I chose Granville because of Amenities...
¯|e ·u:mm:n· ncc|. |:rne·· tenrer. ·ome rccm. :,|cvr ·rvoy |cvn·e.
ovo:cv:·vo| rccm. ono cn·:re o:n:n· or r|e te·r ooore·· or i\t
919.942.2800
2701 HOMESTEAD RD
VIEWSTUDENTHOUSING.COM
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
FIIN£$$ C£NI£k º GAM£ kOOM º k£$OkI-$IYI£ $WIMMING POOI º 2 I£NNI$ COUkI$ º IANNING ߣD
WA$H£k & DkY£k IN £ACH UNII º HIGH-$P££D INI£kN£I & CAßI£ IV INCIUD£D º CIO$£ IO UNC
THE
BEST IN
STUDENT
LIVING
a
m
e
n
itie
s
s
u
b
je
c
t to
c
h
a
n
g
e
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
DewnIewn Chcpe| Hì|| º 942-PUMP
106 W. Franklin St. (Next to He’s Not Here)
Mon·So| 11:30om·11:30pm º Sun 12·11:30pm
www.yogurtpump.com
! r»|t cer·||»e s
\|»ts]|
\|ºt ]|¬t euer« u|»»tr.
rt$! \k»2tº !kt/! zcct
Nikon Prostaff
Focus on the GAME
Fits in your pocket! Great for sports!
Waterproof & Lightweight!
Wild Bird Center (919) 933-2030
HOURS: Monday-Saturday 10-6
Sunday 1-5
Eastgate Shopping Center
Chapel Hill
GO HEELS!
7 News MN>L=:R%:IKBE0% +))2 I]Z9V^anIVg=ZZa 6 University MN>L=:R%:IKBE0%+))2 I]Z9V^anIVg=ZZa
<eZllkhhflehl^mkZla\Zgl
Lmn]^gmlm^lm<hgg^\m<ZkhebgZ
BY SARAH RANKIN
STAFF WRITER
AII cIassroom lrash cans were
removed from Dev, Murphev and
HamiIlon haIIs Sundav nighl as
parl of a new projecl lhal aims lo
increase recvcIing on campus.
Inslead of lhrowing awav lrash
in cIassroom bins, sludenls are
direcled lo lhrow awav aII lheir
lrash in a cenlraIIv Iocaled wasle-
disposaI sile inlhe haIIwav. Localed
in everv haIIwav, lhese cenlraI siles
conlain bolh Iarge bIue recvcIing
bins and wasle bins.
Theprojecl is co-sponsoredbvlhe
environmenlaI affairs commillee of
sludenl governmenl, Housekeeping
Services and lhe Office of Wasle
Reduclion and RecvcIing.
Coordinalors said lhev hope lhal
if sludenls are forcedloremove lheir
lrash lo a Iocalion where a recvcIing
binis avaiIabIe, lhev wiII be Iess IikeIv
lo lhrowawav recvcIabIe ilems.
The projecl was in fuII swing bv
Mondav aflernoonwhensigns were
posled around lhe lhree buiIdings,
aIerling sludenls lo lhe swilch.
EnvironmenlaI affairs commillee
member JuIian March, who spear-
headed lhe projecl, aIso e-maiIed
deparlmenl chairmen and secrelar-
ies who occupv lhe lhree buiIdings,
aIerling lhemlo lhe change.
March said he received one
e-maiI message expressing con-
cern lhal lhe cenlraI bins mighl fiII
up more quickIv lhan usuaI since
cIassroomlrash cans are no Ionger
an oplion.
Anolher concern of projecl
coordinalors is lhal sludenls wiII
nol remove lheir lrash lo lhe cen-
lraI Iocalion and wiII inslead Ieave
il in lhe cIassrooms.
¨If lhe sludenls won`l recvcIe and
lhev end up Ieaving il on lhe fIoor,
lhal` II make more work for lhe
housekeepers,¯ said BiII Burslon,
direclor of Housekeeping Services.
Bul some sludenls said lhev
lhoughl lhe projecl wouId work.
¨Il`s a good idea. I lhink il wouId
be Iess disruplive,¯ saidjunior Louise
Licala, who has a cIass in Dev HaII.
¨PeopIe wouIdhave lowail unliI afler
cIass lo lhrowlhings awav.¯
Commillee members said lhev`II
work wilh housekeeping lo monilor
anv increase in lrash or Iiller.
¨Il is a piIol projecl, so if some-
lhing isn`l working, we canlweak il,¯
said EIinor Benami, environmenlaI
affairs commillee co-chairwoman.
The program has no sel end
dale. If il proves successfuI, il wiII
conlinue lhrough lhe summer and
possibIv inlo lhe faII of 2uu0. Il
couId polenliaIIv expand lo olher
academic buiIdings.
The projecl cosl verv IillIe
monev lo impIemenl, onIv lhe cosl
of prinling lhe fIiers lhal were posl-
ed. And coordinalors said il couId
polenliaIIv save lhe Universilv
monev in lhe Iong run.
¨The Universilv spends monev for
evervlhing lhev send lo a IandfiII,¯
March said. ¨Il`s good for lhe envi-
ronmenl and il is cosl effeclive.¯
Coutoct thc Uuiuc:situ Eoito:
ot uocsk(uuc.cou
BY KATY CHARLES
STAFF WRITER
InformalionTechnoIogv Services,
incoIIaboralionwilhlhe lechnoIogv
and Web commillee of sludenl gov-
ernmenl, began lesling newunder-
graduale admissions appIicalion
soflware lhis week wilh sludenls.
The resuIl. a more user-friendIv
svslemwilh more cuslomizalion.
The new soflware is parl of
ConneclCaroIina ÷formerIv known
as Enlerprise Resource PIanning ÷
an updale of lhe Universilv`s aging
adminislralive soflware.
¨Some of lhe adminislralion svs-
lems we have here are oIder lhan
lhe sludenls in our junior cIass,¯
said Debra BeIIer, spokeswoman
for ConneclCaroIina.
The updale`s firsl largel is sludenl
svslems, whichincIudes admissions,
sludenl records, financiaI aid appIi-
calions and sludenl financiaIs.
Max Beckman-Harned, a sopho-
more compuler science major, was
lhe firsl sludenl lo lesl lhe admis-
sions soflware Tuesdav.
¨I`m impressed,¯ he said. ¨Il`s
prellv user friendIv and I Iike lhal
il`s cuslomized for UNC.¯
Bul lhe lesling is nol Iimiled lo
lech-savvv compuler scienlisls.
¨We wanl aII kinds of sludenls
lo come in and pIav around wilh
il,¯ BeIIer said.
Sludenls inleresled in lesling
lhe svslem can fiII oul an appIica-
lion on lhe sludenl governmenl
Web sile, unc.edu]sludgov.
Rvan Thompson, a funclionaI
anaIvsl for Informalion TechnoIogv
Services, oversawTuesdav`s lesling.
¨This is sliII a work in progress.
There are sliII bugs we`re lrving lo
work oul,¯ he said. ¨We`re gelling
cIose. We`re nol lhere vel.¯
This new admissions programis
configurabIe ÷ meaning differenl
offices can creale lheir own ques-
lions and choose which lesl scores
are required wilhoul heIp from
Informalion TechnoIogv Services.
Changes made from lerm lo
lerm can be made bv lhe admis-
sions office ilseIf, wilh aImosl
inslanlaneous resuIls, Thompson
said.
<Zkk[hkhmhikhfhm^pbmafZi
:enf%lmn]^gml\Zk^_hk;Zmme^IZkd
BY WHITNEY BAKER
STAFF WRITER
Carrboro is home lo nalionaI
and inlernalionaI coffee sensa-
lions, comedv acls and chocoIale
deIighls.
The WaIk Carrboro campaign`s
goaI is lo make lhese IocaI high-
Iighls more accessibIe lo visilors,
wilh a carloon map of down-
lown.
Al a meeling of lhe Carrboro
Business Associalion on Mondav,
Jesse KaIisher, lhe owner of a pho-
lographv gaIIerv downlown, pre-
senled IocaI business owners wilh
a copv of lhe map and expIained
lhe WaIk Carrboro projecl.
He aIso oulIined a new ini-
lialive, which invoIves hanging
banners from Iamp posls lo dis-
linguish Carrboro from ChapeI
HiII.
The campaign is sliII seeking
funding lo make lhe banners a
reaIilv.
¨We have lhese peopIe wilh
nalionaI and inlernalionaI repula-
lions here in lhis verv smaII lown,¯
said KaIisher, who is aIso lhe pres-
idenl of lhe Carrboro Merchanls
Associalion.
¨AII we reaIIv need lo do is Iel
peopIe know il.¯
The WaIk Carrboro campaign
has been in lhe works since
December. So far, 22 downlown
businesses have conlribuled.
The more businesses donale, lhe
more prominence lhev gel on lhe
map.
The campaign has raised a lolaI
of nearIv $3u,uuu, KaIisher said.
WaIk Carrboro maps were
reIeased mid-Iebruarv and are
currenlIv avaiIabIe al lhe 22 busi-
nesses invoIved wilh ils crealion
as weII as in IocaI holeIs. Maps wiII
aIso be dislribuled on campus,
KaIisher said.
Iunding for banners wiII eilher
come from lhe lown or from addi-
lionaI businesses joining lhe WaIk
Carrboro campaign, KaIisher said.
The monev heIps pav for lhe
pamphIels, adverlising and pubIic
reIalions cosls and lhe forlhcoming
banners.
Parking was aIso a conlenlious
lopic al lhe meeling.
The WaIk Carrboro map couId
aIIeviale parking issues bv poinling
visilors lo free pubIic parking.
Carrboro businesses have aIwavs
worked lo share parking space,
said Communilv and Economic
DeveIopmenl Direclor James
Harris.
A new parking Iol pIan presenl-
ed bv Sleve MiIIs, co-owner of lhe
Iol behind Bank of America, couId
aIso benefil lhe campaign.
¨Il`s aII aboul bringing peo-
pIe wilhin driving dislance lo
Carrboro,¯ KaIisher said.
Coutoct thc Citu Eoito:
ot cituocsk(uuc.cou.
BY RACHEL SCALL
STAFF WRITER
Il mighl be raining, bul BallIe
Park needs a new bench ÷and lhe
job can`l be pul off.
As rain slarls lo faII harder,
Slephen Keilh and his group of voI-
unleers and inlerns don`l seem lo
nolice. Thev`re exciled aboul lhe job
lhev`re doing, so a IillIe rain won`l
slop lhemfromgelling il done.
Keilh, UNC cIass of `04, is lhe
BallIe Parkcuralor. He is incharge of
mainlaining aII 03 acres of lhe park
and lhe adjacenl Ioresl Thealre.
Bul as lhe onIv fuII-lime empIovee
working in lhe park, he reIies on a
group of sludenl inlerns and dedi-
caledvoIunleers lo reslore lhe park`s
lraiIs, preserve ils pIanl Iife andedu-
cale lhe communilv.
¨We work ona verv smaII budgel,¯
Keilh said. ¨Bul lhe budgel goes a
Iong wav wilh voIunleers.¯
DougIas TiIden, a ChapeI HiII
reliree, has been voIunleering in
BallIeParksince2uu4÷lhevear lhe
Universilv gave lhe Norlh CaroIina
BolanicaI Garden lhe job of caring
for lhe park. TiIdenspends aboul 2u
hours per week voIunleering.
¨I had lhe lime and il cerlainIv is
a nice pIace lo be,¯ TiIden said. ¨Nol
loo slressfuI.¯
TiIden has become Keilh`s go-lo
man for slone work. He used slones
dugupfromlhe parkloIine porlions
of BallIe Park`s 2 miIes of lraiIs and
lo buiId a bench.
CurrenlIv, Keilh and his devoled
workforce are cIearingnewlraiIs and
removing non-nalive pIanls.
PIanls frompeopIe`s homes creep
inlo lhe park and begin lo grow,
he said. Removing lhem has been
Keilh`s projecl since he began work-
ing in BallIe Park in 2uu4.
¨We`re righl in lhe middIe of
ChapeI HiII, so we`re surrounded bv
neighborhoods,¯ Keilh said.
Keilh reIies on his reguIar group
of voIunleers andgroups of sludenls
who come lo his Salurdav voIunleer
sessions lo remove foreign pIanls,
Iike EngIishivv. The goaI is loremove
anv lhal weren`l naluraIIv growingin
lhe park when il was founded in lhe
Iale-18uus bv lhen-UNC Presidenl
Kemp PIummer BallIe.
Bul Keilh`s work in BallIe Park is
aboul more lhan working in lhe dirl
÷il is aIso aboul educaling peopIe
and gelling sludenls invoIved.
¨If vou wanl lo Iearn aboul gar-
dening and vou wanl lo Iearn aboul
pIanls, vou shouId voIunleer in a
garden,¯ said voIunleer Jeff Pralher,
a ChapeI HiII reliree.
Sludenls can voIunleer in BallIe
Park wilh Keilh`s reguIar Thursdav
morning group or al his monlhIv
Salurdav voIunleer sessions.
Some enjov voIunleering somuch
lhal lhev become park inlerns.
Senior SlevenIeingoIdbeganvoI-
unleering wilhlhe BolanicaI Garden
as a sophomore. Now he is one of
Keilh`s four paid inlerns.
¨I Iike lo be oul here jusl lo gel
oulside and gel dirlv and do some
work,¯ IeingoId said.
¨You wanl il discovered,¯ Pralher
said. ¨Bul vou don`l wanl il discov-
ered bv loo manv peopIe.¯
Coutoct thc Icotu:cs Eoito:
ot fcotu:cs(uuc.cou.
BLOG
DTH ONLINE: Watch a video of
students using ConnectCarolina
at blogs.dailytarheel.com.
¨A firsl-vear appIicalion is verv
differenl from a lransfer or gradu-
ale sludenl appIicalion,¯ he said.
¨Our goaI is lo make somelhing
lhal`s fIexibIe lo meel lhe ever-
changing needs of lhe admissions
office.¯
The firsl slep of lhis overhauI
was lhe $1.8 miIIion purchase of
a sophislicaled soflware suile spe-
cificaIIv for higher educalion caIIed
PeopIeSofl in November 2uu,.
The enlire projecl ÷ cosling
aboul $1uu miIIion ÷ is separaleIv
funded from lhe Universilv.
Il incIudes severaI olher com-
panion projecls ranging from
PorlaI, a galewav lhal wiII repIace
MvUNC and Sludenl CenlraI, lo
Documenl Managemenl, which
seeks lo make undergraduale
admissions a paperIess projecl.
Coutoct thc Uuiuc:situ Eoito:
ot uocsk(uuc.cou.
Ahi^mhlahpoblbmhklhimbhglbgmhpg
Eclipse Tanning Salon Eclipse Tanning Salon
$5.00 OFF
Airbrush
Tanning
$5.00 OFF
Hydration
Station
Not valid with any other offers.
Expires 4/30/09
NewClients Only
Cannot be combined with other offers.
3 TANS
for
$10.00
April Special Sunless Tan
Cannot be combined with other offers.
l05 A Pams Plaza · 968-3377
· Day Spa Atmosphere
· 8rand New Ultra High Pressure 8eds
· Medium Pressure 8ed and 8ooths
· Customized Sunless Airbrush Tanning
· Open 7 Days a week
· UNC Students show your
UNC |D for a discount
!"#$$!%&&$'()$#*++ "#$$!%&&$'()$#*++ "#$$!%&&$'()$#*++
!,-.&/+ ,-.&/+ ,-.&/+
!01/$*'(2*!1345!667
In front of Whole Foods Market
115 5. EIIioII ßd. º ChapeI HiII, NC º 919-942-7427
!89$:;*!
!891(2$
Mon-5aI (IimiIed Iime)
!813<#='>4='(13*! ?$$4*!13!=!<#$='!*$=*13+
Japanese Fast Food
261 S. E||iott Road · Chape| Hi|| (next to Peak Fitness)
928-9600
1
⁄ 2 Price Entree
Buy 1 entree and get 2nd of
equa| or |esser va|ue 1/2 price
SPECIAL
Hibachi Chicken
Entree
O NE PER CUSTOMER. M UST PRESENT COUPON. C ANNOT BE
COMBINED WITH OTHER SPECIALS OR OFFERS. E XPIRES 4/28/09
Dine In or Carry Out
O NE PER CUSTOMER. M UST PRESENT COUPON. C ANNOT BE
COMBINED WITH OTHER SPECIALS OR OFFERS. E XPIRES 4/28/09
$
4
99
tex mex
so good
it should
be illegal!
(the best soft taco...PERIOD.)
120 EA5I NAlN 5IREEI º CARRBORO, NC º 919.929.4669
~ armadillogrill.com ~
WARNING: WARNING:
HALF PRICE
TUESDAY
All food items will be
HALF PRICE on
Tuesday, April 7, 2009.
No coupon necessary!
With purchase of any beverage at regular price.
Chapel Hill location only
159
1
⁄ 2 E. Franklin St. ~ 967.5048
DINE IN ONLY !
68â08I 800I00l0 0I0I00
6l00k`â 60l00l
0000 I0l 0I000l ¡00â·800 8I ä.J0 0m * 800 6l0000 10.J0 8m·Z.00 0m
ë10 N0âI fl80kII0 8I, 60800I hIII, k6 * WWW.0l00kâ00l00l.00m
ß0â0lt8II00â ß0000I00 * N8Ik·I0â N0I00m0
'A| ||(º| c|a|:e. ||e C(cc|'º Cc(|e( re|u (era||º rcº||] .|||ace B||| \ea|... ou| a
:|cºe( |cc| (e.ea|º ||e pe(ºc|a| º|arp c| B||| Sr|||. T|e :cro||a||c| |º a W|||e(.'
-Mid-AtIantic 0cuntry

,

TuesdayFocus
ROAD TO THE
CHAMPIONSHIP
a DTH photo essay with photos from Kate Napier, Emma Patti and file
design by Jillian Nadell
In the second round, the LSU Tigers went up by five in the second period
until Ty Lawson’s 21 second-half points led the Tar Heels to an 84-70 rally.
North Carolina shot 60 percent in the first half — and better than 52 for
the game — and stopped Gonzaga cold in a 98-77 Sweet 16 matchup.
Roy Williams and the Tar Heels celebrate after cutting down the nets after
Monday’s final — the second title in five years for Williams and his team.
Four of UNC’s five starters scored at least 12 in the Final Four matchup with
third-seeded Villanova, eventually running the score up to an 83-69 victory.
Blake Griffin finished with 23 points and 16 rebounds, but UNC allowed only
two OU players to hit double digits in a 72-60 UNC victory in the Elite Eight.
It didn’t take long for UNC to clinch a first-round victory against Radford —
the score was 53-34 at halftime and had climbed to 101-58 at the close.
8 MN>L=:R%:IKBE0%+))2
I]Z9V^anIVg=ZZa
9 State & National MN>L=:R%:IKBE0%+))2 I]Z9V^anIVg=ZZa
BgIZkbl%M^qZl%k^mZk]^]fZgcZbe^]_hkl^qnZeZllZnem
HOUSTON (MCT) ÷ The crime
Aaron Harl confessed lo was unde-
niabIv repeIIenl.
Lasl Seplember, lhe 18-vear-
oId man was charged wilh sexu-
aIIv assauIling a ,-vear-oId neigh-
bor bov behind a looI shed in lhe
smaII easl Texas lown of Paris.
A reIalive of lhe viclim said she
waIked oulside and saw Harl wilh
his panls puIIed down, slanding
nexl lo lhe bov.
PoIice read Harl his Miranda
righls, and he quickIv admilled
his guiIl. On Ieb. 11, Harl`s courl-
appoinled allornev enlered guiIlv
pIeas lo each of five reIaled feIonv
counls, a jurv recommended muI-
lipIe senlences and a judge lhen
ruIed lhal lhe prison lerms be
served conseculiveIv, for a lolaI of
1uu vears.
Thal mighl have been lhe end
of Cause No. 22024 in lhe 6lh
JudiciaI Dislricl Courl of Lamar
Counlv, Texas ÷ jusl anolher dis-
maI criminaI case on lhe dockel of
an obscure lown.
Excepl lhal now, Iess lhan lwo
monlhs afler Harl was senlenced,
everv courl officiaI who had a hand
in lhe case seems lo agree lhal he
doesn`l reaIIv beIong in prison for
whal amounls lo lhe resl of his
naluraI Iife.
Thal`s because Harl is profound-
Iv menlaIIv relarded. He has an IO
of 4,, and his parenls sav he func-
lions al lhe IeveI of a 0-vear-oId.
The bov he confessed lo moIesling
is menlaIIv relarded as weII.
Whal`s more, lhe judge and lhe
jurv never heard anv experl les-
limonv aboul Harl`s diminished
menlaI funclioning, his capac-
ilv lo undersland his Miranda
righls or his abiIilv lo assisl in his
own defense, because his defense
allornev never subpoenaed anv
experls.
And since he has been in jaiI,
Harl himseIf has been repealedIv
raped, according lo his parenls.
The firsl assauIl, aIIegedIv bv an
inmale who is serving a far shorler
senlence of jusl eighl vears for sex-
uaI indecencv wilh a chiId, so dis-
lurbed lhe aIIeged rapisl`s molher
lhal she caIIed Harl`s parenls lo
apoIogize.
¨I have nighlmares lhinking
aboul Aaron in prison and how he
is going lo survive in lhere,¯ said
Roberl Harl, Aaron`s ,u-vear-oId
falher. ¨He`s lhe lvpe of kid who his
whoIe Iife peopIe beal him up, look
sluff from him, and he wouIdn` l
defend himseIf. He can`l read or
wrile. He can`l hardIv laIk.¯
Harl`s compIex case is lhrealen-
ing lo once again bring unweIcome
oulside scrulinv lo lhe funclioning
of lhe criminaI juslice svslem in
Paris.
The lown of 26, uuu drew
nalionaI civiI righls prolesls in
2uu, foIIowing a Chicago Tribune
reporl conlrasling lhe judiciaI
lrealmenl of a 14-vear-oId bIack
girI, who was senlenced lo up lo
seven vears in voulh prison for
shoving a haII monilor al her high
schooI, wilh lhe lrealmenl of a
14-vear-oId while girI, who was
given probalion for lhe more seri-
ous crime of arson.
;engmfZr
aZo^`hmm^g
bfikhi^k
mZq[k^Zd
<hg`k^llfZg
lZrlbmÍlZfblmZd^
KANSAS CITY, Mo. (MCT) ÷
U.S. Rep. Rov BIunl and his wife
are reviewing records lo see if lhev
mislakenIv received lax breaks on
a Washinglon properlv.
Records show lhe RepubIican
from SpringfieId, Mo., who is
running for U.S. Senale, mav have
erroneousIv received a homeslead
exemplion for a $1.6 miIIion resi-
dence in lhe Georgelown seclion
of lhe nalion`s capilaI.
Dislricl of CoIumbia Iaw aIIows
a residenliaI properlv owner ÷ in
lhis case, BIunl`s wife, AbigaiI ÷ lo
deducl $6,,õuu from lhe assessed
vaIue of a home if il serves as lhe
owner`s primarv residence.
Tax records reviewed Iasl week
showed lhe homeslead exemplion
had been appIied lo lhe home,
resuIling in an eslimaled lax
break of aboul $õ,õ lhis vear.
Bolh BIunls, however, cIaim
Missouri as lheir home, so lhe
exemplion shouIdn`l appIv.
Bul a BIunl spokesman said
D.C. officiaIs mislakenIv aIIowed
lhe exemplion and produced a
Ieller from a counciIman backing
up lhal cIaim.
¨The BIunls asked mv office
lo see lhal lhe exemplion ... was
removed,¯ wrole CounciIman Jack
Evans. ¨Bolh lhe BIunls and I
were assured lhis has been done.
I deepIv regrel lhal lhe assuranc-
es lo lhe BIunls were nol foIIowed
up on correclIv.¯
The Ieller is daled Thursdav,
lwo davs afler The Kansas Cilv
Slar asked BIunl`s campaign
aboul lhe exemplion. Il slales
lhal lhe BIunls asked lo remove
lhe exemplion in earIv 2uu4.
BIunl spokesman Rich Chrismer
said AbigaiI BIunl is working wilh
lhe Dislricl of CoIumbia lo resoIve
lhe issue, which couId incIude pav-
menl of back laxes.
Records show lhe dislricl aIso
appIied whal`s caIIed a lax assess-
menl credil lo lhe properlv, which
caps lhe growlh of laxes owed on
lhe home. If lhe dislricl deler-
mines lhal credil was improperIv
used, lhe BIunls` polenliaI back
lax IiabiIilv couId go up.
Dislricl Iaw aIIows lhe coIIeclion
of penaIlies and inleresl for owners
who incorreclIv cIaim homeslead
slalus, bul since lhe dislricl is lo
bIame for lhe probIem, lhe exlra
pavmenls mav nol be required.
In a slorv Iasl week, RoII CaII
said lhe D.C. governmenl issued
lax biIIs lolaIing aImosl $1uu,uuu
lo four House members, nol
incIuding BIunl, who had mis-
lakenIv received lhe exemplion
because of a dislricl error.
Fall 2008 and Spring 2009
Phi Beta Kappa Initiates
Zachary Seth Allard - Communication Studies
Danielle Marie Allen - Public Policy/Economics
Thomas Carlton Allen - Chemistry
Allison Campbell Altman - Dramatic Art
Krishna Paul Aluri - Biology
Rebecca Ellen Ambrose - Chemistry/Mathematics
Angharad Elizabeth Ames - Psychology
Kara Marie Anasti - Chemistry
Nicholas B. Anderson - Public Policy
Ellen Arlee Andrews - Psychology
Ian Geoffrey Anson - Political Science/Contemporary European Studies
Melissa M. Asmar - Nutrition
Rebecca W. Baker - English
Adrienne Michele Banny - Psychology
Colin Patrick Barbaro - Biology
Lindsey Johanna Barlow - Linguistics/English
Emily Elizabeth Batt - Spanish/Dramatic Art
Lauren Margaret Bauer - Biology/Spanish
Scott Joseph Bearden - Math Decision Science/Economics
Elizabeth Ann Beene - Music
Mikhail Mikhailovich Belikov - Economics/Political Science
Jennifer Catherine Bellis - Environmental Studies
Elinor Benami - International Studies/Economics
Jennifer Leigh Bender - Biology/Psychology
Curtis Stanley Bergquist - Music
David Joseph Bevevino - Political Science/Spanish
Bharath Panchalamarri Bhushan - Chemistry
Tessa Baxter Bialek - Political Science
Kelly Jo Blackburn - Communication Studies
Matthew Christopher Bloom - Economics/Political Science
William Cowan Boggess - English
Tabitha Aaron Bolden - Psychology/Sociology
Mark Christopher Bolin - Russian
Lisa Marie Bond - Biology
Katherine Shannon Booker - Biology
Megan Kathleen Bookhout - Psychology/History
Mary Elizabeth Borgo - Comparative Literature/English
Katharine Adrenne Bouser - Linguistics/French
Thomas Joel Brinkley - Biology
Alanna Ercelle Brock - Communication Studies/Political Science
Trevor Alan Brothers - Biology/Psychology
Lauren Elizabeth Burianek - Chemistry
Ramsey Lee Cardwell - Psychology/Linguistics
Jillian Sheridan Casey - Sociology
Carissa Lynn Chambers - Psychology/Spanish
William Cavanaugh Chapman, Jr. - Peace, War & Defense
Jeffrey Sanjay Chen - HIstory/Political Science
William Wiley Chesson - Interdisciplinary Studies/English
Sean David Childers - Political Science
Vivek Ram Chilukuri - International Studies
Andrew Timothy Chin - Environmental Health Science
Kaylan Alyssa Christofferson - Economics/International Studies
Emily Lauren Cippele - International Studies/History
Samuel Clinton Cowan, Jr. - Religious Studies/Economics
Katherine Bitting Cox - Spanish
Matthew James Craig - Political Science/Spanish
Tracey Michelle Crothers - Biology
Garrett Barton Cummings - Linguistics
Michael Keeter Cvelich - Exercise & Sports Science
Vikram Ajay Dashputre - Business Administration
Andrew S. Daub - English
Juliana Kathryn Daugherty - Geography
Olivia Coucy De Lancie - International Studies/Environmental Health
Science
Elizabeth Anne DeOrnellas - English
Hallum Kirkwood Dickens IV - Chemistry
Katharine Louise Diehl - Chemistry
Jennifer Elizabeth Dixon - Physics
Brittany Mel Dorman - American Studies/Sociology
Anna Murchison Dorn - American Studies
Katelyn Marie Dougherty - History/Spanish
Forrest Ryan Dowdy - English
Sean Patrick Doyle - Chemistry/Spanish
Robert Parks Dunn - Environmental Health Science /Spanish
Lindsey Carol Dvorak - Music
William Littleton Dworsky - Economics
Tyler Andrew Dzuba - Mathematics/Linguistics
Rachel Lindsay Eanes - American Studies
Rebecca Anne Earley - French/Spanish
Jessica Danielle Early - Political Science
Hannah Karen Easley - Studio Art
Brian Jacob Eddinger-Smith - English
Hollie Raye Edwards - Biology
Samantha Dawn Englander - Music
Katherine Anne Evans - English
Steven Glenn Feingold - Biomedical Engineering
Alexander Stuart Finch - Geography
Brittany Adair Fletcher - African Studies
Brandon Matthew Flowers - Mathematical Decision Sciences
Kelly Stuart French - Psychology
Scott Davis Gallisdorfer - Public Policy/English
Anneliese Ilona Gegenheimer - Bachelor of Science in Business
Administration/Chinese
Reuben Lyon Gelblum - Women’s Studies
Kelly Nicole Giedraitis - Journalism & Mass Communication/English
Megan Elizabeth Gill - Communication Studies
Thomas Clinton Ginn - Economics/Mathematics
Mark Joseph Godfrey - Economics/Political Science
Jason Adam Gonzalez - Exercise and Sports Science
Carolyn Ashley Gore - Political Science
Ariel Elizabeth Gould - Spanish/International Studies
Jeanne Elizabeth Graf - Exercise & Sports Science
Laurie Michelle Graham - Sociology/Psychology
Joshua Graybeal Gresham - Psychology/Spanish
James William Halicks - English
Michael Graham Halsey - Chemistry
Natalie Jeanne Hammel - Journalism & Mass Communication/
Psychology
Alex Jacob Hardee - Economics
Shaddi Husein Hasan - Computer Science
Margaret Katherine Hayslip - French
Melissa Lee Henderson - Geography/International Studies
Caroline Ross Herion - Journalism and Mass Communication/
International Studies
Elenda Tobi Hessel - Psychology/Political Science
Andrew Philip Hiatt - International Studies/Political Science
Rebecca Ann Hilton - Journalism and Mass Communication
Courtney Paige Hirsekorn - Society and Management/Exercise and
Sport Science
William Ryan Hobbs - Economics/Chinese
Lauren Nicole Hobson - Political Science/Psychology
David Edward Hodges - Journalism & Mass Communication/Political
Science
George Bennett Hodgin - Economics/Asian Studies
Kathryn Anne Hoffman - Journalism & Mass Communication/
International Studies
Luke Reynolds Hoffman - Music
Jordan Leigh Horton - Psychology
Gregory Liang Howard - Mathematics/Economics
Kelsey Christine Ice - Public Policy
Ashelyn Nicole James - International Studies/Spanish
Timothy Ryan Jarman - English
Analise Brooke Jenkins - Spanish/Chemistry
Addyson Elise Johnson - Dramatic Art/Psychology
Wesley Ray Johnson - Economics/Public Policy Analysis
Jennifer Kay Kanzelberger - Dramatic Art/Sociology
Jessica Lynn Kaplan - Psychology
Kristin Marie Kennedy - International Studies/Political Science
Anand Bipinrai Khandoobhai - Biology
Sung Taek Kim - Chemistry/Biology
Ivan Jivkov Kirov - Economics/Mathematics
Emily Elizabeth Kiser - Spanish
Matthew M. Knepper - Mathematics/Economics
Reid Thomas Koster - Political Science
Charles Alden Kreafle - History/Political Science
Laura Elizabeth Kurtz - Psychology
Jeffrey David LaFlam - Business Administration
Elizabeth Anne Lastra - Art History
Daniel Sellers Lawrence - English/Spanish
Emma R. Lawrence - Public Policy/Psychology
Tyler Nathaniel Layne - Political Science/Philosophy
Katherine Gravely Lea - English
Angela Singing Lee - Public Policy
Anna Hyun Lee - Business Administration/English
Fleming Hang Lei - International Studies/Psychology
Marianne More Lennon - Biology/Spanish
Kenly Paige Lewis - Communication Studies
David Huai-Jae Li - Business Administration
Erika L. Littman - Music
Ying Liu - Chemistry
Nicholas Aaron LoBuglio - Business Administration
Dennis Timothy Lockney - Biology
Laura Elizabeth Lumb - Peace, War & Defense/History
Katherine Quincy Mabe - English
Jacob Aaron Mader - Psychology/Management & Society
Anna Koester Marshall - Latin American Studies/Comparative
Literature
Kathleen Edith Mason - Economics
Martin G. Mayer - Psychology
Eleni Marie Bambara McCabe - Psychology/Political Science
Cristin Deniece McClanahan - Biology
Joseph Harold McClellan - Biology
Thomas Brenton McElwee, Jr. - Spanish/Comparative Literature
Charles John McGeehan III - Afro-American Studies/Political Science
Sarah Denise McInnes - Women’s Studies
Zachary Luke McKee - Biology
Sean Shepard McKeithan - Journalism & Mass Communication/
Communication Studies
Emilea Jane McLean - Journalism and Mass Communication
Daniel Taylor McMillan - Health Policy and Management
Anthony Ryan McPeek - History/Political Science
Shannon Marie Mentock - Nutrition/French
Sarah Kay Meredith - Sociology
Rebecca Christine Merrick - English
John Wilcox Meyer - Comparative Literature/Spanish
Horace William Miller V - Psychology
Kevin James Miller - History/Slavic Languages
Nicholas Rourke Miller - Philosophy/Psychology
Claire Joanna Moellering - International Studies/Spanish
Jahan Joyce Mohiuddin - Environmental Health Science
Michael Niekrash Morrill - Political Science
Brianna Blu Mullis - Public Policy Analysis/Spanish
Kara Marie Murphy - Political Science
Samuel Jackson Need - Anthropology
Monique Lenee Newton - Bachelor of Science in Journalism and Mass
Communication
Jessica Leigh Nichols - Environmental Studies
Colette Erin Nickel - Peace, War and Defense
William Henry Niver - Journalism and Mass Communication/History
Amy Marie Olsen - Spanish/Womens Studies
Elizabeth Rose Ormond - International Studies and Spanish
Elizabeth Ann Overcash - English/Spanish
Alex James Owen - Economics/Dramatic Art
Eleanor Rousseau Oxholm - International Studies
James Thomas Page - Business Administration
Anthony Joseph Palermo - Political Science
Ivan Pallares - Chemistry
Daniel Keith Parker - Computer Science
Amit Hasmukh Patel - Economics
Courtney Elizabeth Patterson - English/Economics
Leslie Kathryn Peck - Environmental Science
David Chase Pell - Classic/German
Erin Michelle Pellarin - English
Todd Robert Penke - Economics
Edward Julian Clough Perkins - Political Science/Communication
Studies
David Joseph Peterson - Sociology/Classics
Elizabeth Ruth Pittman - Exercise & Sports Science
Emily Erin Portner - Political Science
John Setian Powell - English
Nathan Lawrence Powell - Psychology/History
Amanda Lee Pratt - Biology/Spanish
Ian McLean Ramsey - International Studies/French
Kaila Dean Ramsey - Religious Studies/Sociology
Rebecca Marie Reese - Biology
Daniel Phillip Reich - Biology
Samantha Claire Reichle - Geography
Rachel Elizabeth Ressner - International Studies/French
Cameron Brett Ritter - Biology
Aaron Michael Roberts - Exercise and Sports Science
Rachel L. Roberts - International Studies/History
Alice Kristin Robinson - Biology/Physics
Rachel Kathryn Rose - International Studies/Economics
Caitlin Amanda Ross - International Studies/Spanish
Emily Joy Rothchild - Music
Devin Cranford Routh - English
Ginette Lucien Rowe - Economics/History
Ariel Elyse Rudolph - Studio Art
Katherine Elise Rumbaugh - Journalism and Mass Communication
JoAna Lenn Rusche - Music
David Michael Ruskey - Journalism and Mass Communication/
Communcation Studies
Lauren Elizabeth Rust - Biology
Patricia Leigh Ryan - English
Aisha Ihab Saad - Environmental Health Science/Spanish
Anna Domenica Sandelli - Journalism and Mass Communication
Emir Singh Sandhu - Economics
Shoko Satoh - Political Science/International Studies
Angela Grace Schebell - Economics/Spanish
Gregory Vincent Schimizzi - Biology/Music
Caroline Catherine Schneider - Art History/English
Devin James Schoonmaker - History
Emily Susan Schrag - Management & Society
Schreier, Kara Anne - Psychology
Mark Daniel Schubel - Physics/Math
Kara June Scroggins - Mathematics/English
Kelly Marie Shackelford - Political Science/International Studies
Sarah Rajesh Shah - Political Science/History
Sheel Mukesh Shah - Physics
Kevin Arthur Shamburg - Biology
Alexander Joseph Shapiro - Religious Studies
Naima Gabriela Sharaf - Chemistry
Robert Allan Sharpe - Spanish
Caroline H. Shedlock - International Studies/Spanish
Stephanie Danielle Shorts - Psychology
Neil Harish Shrimanker - Business Administration/Political Science
Christina Lynda Shupe - Communication Studies/English
Morgan Campbell Siem - Journalism and Mass Communication
Mark Adam Simpson - Chemistry/Psychology
Melanie Joy Simpson - Dramatic Art
David Robert Singletary - Biology
John Heyward Smith - Political Science/Economics
Martha Marion Smith - Psychology/Political Science
Michael Wesley Snow - History/Political Science
Henry Lawlor Spelman - Classical Languages
Jennifer Marie Spillane - Psychology
Rachel Ann Steindel - English/Linguistics
Amy Christine Stelling - International Studies/Dramatic Art
Alexander Maxwell Stephens - Latin American Studies/Spanish
Robert Thompson Stephens - African and Afro-American Studies/
Interdisciplinary Studies
Nathan Hannoch Stern - Management and Society
John Austin Stevens - Physics/Chemistry
Hayleigh Tasha Stewart - Interdisciplinary Studies
James Macgregor Stewart - Philosophy
Michael Joseph Stipe - Music/Communication Studies
Joseph Edward Strader - Philosophy/Political Science
Yvette Harmony Sumner - English
Leah Ann Szarek - Journalism & Mass Communication/Political Science
John Wheeler Tabor - International Studies/History
Lauren Nicole Teegarden - Latin American Studies/Spanish
Mark Edward Therrien - Classics
Daniel Aaron Thomas - Chemistry
Joshua Allan Thompson - Biology
Katherine Walton Thompson - International Studies
Claire Jean Thomson - Biology
Eric Cameron Toler - Latin American Studies/Spanish
James Michael Tsahakis - Philosophy
Courtney Leigh Turco - Journalism and Mass Communication
Kathleen Sarah Turek - Biology/Spanish
Megan Elizabeth Turek - Journalism & Mass Communication/
Environmental Studies
Scott Andrew Turner - Communication Studies
Stephen Legrande Vance - Political Science
Christopher Michael Wall - Political Science/History
Christopher Leyton Wallace - Psychology
Joshua Adam Wallace - Biology
Kimberly Whitaker Warrington - English/Political Science
Zachary Bryce Waterman - Communication Studies
James Joseph Waters - Mathematical Decision Sciences/Economics
Cameron Lee Watkins - Public Health & Nutrition
Brooke Kathryn Weidenbenner - Biology
Rachel Elizabeth Weiner - Spanish
Sarah Siedler Welker - Public Policy/Economics
Margaret Marie West - Public Policy/Latin American Studies
Michael Derek Westafer - Biology
Jamie Lorain Whaley - Business Administration/Economics
Michael Lee Williford - Biomedical Engineering
Jonathan Gray Wilson - Environmental Studies/Spanish
Kristin Elizabeth Wilson - Journalism and Mass Communication
Sara Evelyn Wise - Public Policy/German
Cara Elizabeth Wittekind - Public Policy
Matthew Robert Wofford - Biology
Mark David Woodell - Business Administration
Forest Glen Woodward - Sociology/Spanish
John Monroe Wooten - Political Science
Sirima Yaemsiri - Biology
Rebecca Ann Yoder - Anthropology
Aaron Mark Yorke - International Studies
Elisabeth Irene Yorke - Biology
Chuan Zhang - Chemistry
Laura Elizabeth Ziemer - Psychology
NOTICE TO ALL DTH CUSTOMERS
Deadlines are NOON one business day prior
to publication for classified ads. We publish
Monday thru Friday when classes are in ses-
sion. A university holiday is a DTH holiday too
(i.e. this affects deadlines). We reserve the
right to reject, edit, or reclassify any ad. Ac-
ceptance of ad copy or prepayment does not
imply agreement to publish an ad. You may
stop your ad at any time, but NO REFUNDS or
credits for stopped ads will be provided. No
advertising for housing or employment, in ac-
cordance with federal law, can state a prefer-
ence based on sex, race, creed, color, religion,
national origin, handicap, marital status.
WIN A SCHOLARSHIP. Awarded by
the State Employees Association of
North Carolina (SEANC), District 19.
Deadline April 15. Contact Angela
Lyght at 962-0146 or angela_lyght@
unc.edu. 919-966-0381
Child Care Wanted
HILLSBOROUGH FAMILY DESIRES child care
for 2 year-old twin boys 2 mornings/wk
(8 hours total). Reliable transport, toddler
experience and playful attitude required.
Respond with availability and references to
mrobins@rochester.rr.com.
SUMMER SITTER NEEDED in Chapel Hill
for 7 year-old girl. Starting 6-15, M-F
2:45-5:45pm. Must have own car, refer-
ences, like dogs. $11/hr +$0.50/mile. Tom:
tmotyka@mindspring.com, 919-960-6076.
BABY SEEKING CARE. Needed: loving and
flexible babysitter in Chapel Hill. 15-20 hrs/
wk starting in May thru the Summer. Call
Joslyn, 770-344-8336.
BABYSITTER NEEDED! Sitter needed April 23
thru May 28. 2 great boys, ages 1 and 2.5.
Thursdays 2:15-6:15pm. Near Southpoint
Mall. Please send resume and rate to ingridk-
tung@yahoo.com. Non-smokers only.
CHILD CARE NEEDED for 10 and 8 year-olds.
Flexible hours for the Spring, Summer. Most
care is needed in the afternoon. Help with
picking the children up from school and tak-
ing them to afterschool activities. Great kids,
great pay! Please call 919-423-7662.
THE CHURCH OF RECONCILIATION is seeking
a child care provider for 1.5 hours on Sunday
mornings to supervise up to 12 preschool
aged children and 2 adult volunteers. Duties
include organizing games, activities, snack.
Must be able to interact well with children,
multi-task, make decisions, delegate to
other adult volunteers. Creative, energetic
personality and knowledge of First Aid a
plus. Occasional Sundays off can be negoti-
ated. $15/hr. Send cover letter and resume
to Katie Ricks, Associate in Ministry, at
assoc@churchrec.org. 929-2127.
PART-TIME SUMMER CHILD CARE needed
starting June 1st in Carrboro. Looking for fun,
experienced, responsible babysitter for 5 and
7 year-old girls. Non-smoker, safe driving re-
cord. Approximately. 20 hrs/wk. References
required. julie.decamppalmer@gmail.com,
919-942-5541.
For Rent
FAIR HOUSING
ALL REAL ESTATE AND RENTAL advertising in
this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair
Housing Act of 1968 which makes it illegal
to advertise “any preference, limitation, or
discrimination based on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial status, or national
origin, or an intention to make any such
preference, limitation, or discrimination.”
This newspaper will not knowingly accept
any advertising which is in violation of the
law. Our readers are hereby informed that
all dwellings advertised in this newspaper
are available on an equal opportunity basis
in accordance with the law. To complain of
discrimination, call the U. S. Department of
Housing and Urban Development housing
discrimination hotline: 1-800-669-9777.
TOWNHOME LEASE TO OWN. 2BR/2.5BA in
Carrboro. Only 2 years old, on busline, near
fitness center. W/D. Pets allowed, no cats. 1
car garage. Screened porch. Available July.
Sue 908-281-1598, sueb@dbarry.com.
EFFICIENCY APARTMENT. All amenities in-
cluding DSL and W/D. Non-smoker. Lovely
neighborhood off East Franklin. On busline.
Available May 15. $400/mo. 933-6488 or
260-1724.
AN AMAZING LOCATION! 2BR house.
Less than 200 yards from campus and
Franklin Street (North Street). AC, private
yard. $1,200/mo. pma@hotwhere.com or
824-7981.
AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY, 1BR/1BA with
W/D, dishwasher, central air and heat.
201 Carver Street, $650/mo. 933-8143,
www.merciarentals.com.
1 BLOCK BEYOND THE CAMPUS, a lovely,
expansive 1BR apartment. Exceptional
garden view with 12 windows. 1 off street
parking space. Quiet graduate students
sought. $1,075/mo, including wireless and
all utilities. Available June. Please email
ransomstreet@aol.com.
6BR STUDENT HOUSING. $2,000-$2,300/mo.
Nearly new 6BR/3BA apartments with securi-
ty system, solid counter tops, tile, hardwood
and Berber carpet. Best deal in Chapel Hill!
Hurry, we only have a few left at this price.
Check out our site at http://www.howell-
street.com. 919-967-3120.
2BR/2BA TOWNHOUSE: 701 North Columbia,
only $1,075/mo. Walk to campus or hop on
the bus almost at your door. Very nice with
security system, balcony, parking. Newer
building with W/D in each home and nice
yard. Great location. 919-967-3120.
105 STEPHENS STREET. 3BR Duplex. $1,800/
mo. Will be completely renovated with nice
upgrades by August 1. Walk to campus,
Franklin Street. Great location. Off street
parking. 919-967-3120.
LARGE 1-2 BEDROOM apartments.
Most have W/D and are easy walk-
ing distance to campus. $475-$720/mo.
www.chapelhillrentals.org. 933-5296.
SPACIOUS, MODERN 6BR/5BA town-
house on busline. Large bedrooms,
hardwood floors, W/D, dishwasher,
all appliances. Free parking, stor-
age and trash pick up. $400/mo.
Available August 2009. 933-0983 or
451-8140.
4BR/4BA UNIVERSITY COMMONS.
$1,500/month ($375/room). Includes
all utilities. On J and D buslines. Pri-
vate. 4BR/4BA. Shared common area
and amenities. Available August 1.
Phone: 919-767-1778, 919-923-0630
or nolaloha@nc.rr.com.
$475/MO. LARGE FURNISHED apartment
upstairs in private home. 15 minute walk
to campus. Off South Columbia. Utilities,
wifi, W/D, parking included. No pets, smok-
ing. Graduate students preferred. Available
mid-May. Marcy, 518-281-4981.
4BR. WALK TO UNC. 4BR/4.5BA Columbia
Place. Updated, all private baths, parking.
Starts August 2009. $680/BR. Email agent
for photos, details: simong@hpw.com,
919-606-2803.
MILL CREEK 4BR/2BA. Price reduced
from $1,900/mo. to $1,650/mo. LAST
ONE. Available August. Walk to cam-
pus. Vanity in each bedroom. Ceiling
fans. Clean carpet. Fresh paint. Pool,
tennis, parking. 404-872-7121. jmar-
ber@yahoo.com.
REALLY NICE 4BR/3BA townhouse on
busline. Large bedrooms, hardwood
floors, W/D, dishwasher, all applianc-
es. Free parking, storage and trash
pick up. $425/mo. Available August
2009. 933-0983 or 451-8140.
4BR IN CARRBORO. On busline. W/D, yard
service, hardwood floors, parking. $1,860/
mo. Available June 1st and August 1st. Call
Ericka, 619-4703 or Susi, 619-4702.
LARGE HOUSE FOR RENT. House for rent
August 1st. 0.8 mile walk to campus. Large,
elegant, clean, 6BR, freshly painted, partially
furnished, hardwood floors, dishwasher, W/
D, etc. 1 Marilyn Lane, off Roosevelt. $2,700/
mo +utilities. house@telesage.com.
“A” FRAME HOUSE NEAR HOSPITAL on
Purefoy Road. Available April 1. One loft BR.
1BA. Kitchen, dining area with bar. Large liv-
ing room. Rear deck faces woods. Great for
grad, faculty, intern. Non-smoker. No pets.
$800/mo. 942-7283.
WALK TO UNC AND FRANKLIN ST. Sublet
2BR/1BA. Available now. $550/mo. Please
drive by 103-C Isley Street first. If you like the
location, call James, 919-605-3444.
2BR AVAILABLE in new 6BR/3BA
apartment for 2009-10 school year.
Includes all appliances, 2 W/D. 15
minute walk to campus, hospitals.
$425/mo. Contact kkwilson@email.
unc.edu for details.
For Sale
STUDENT TUXEDO SALE: Why rent? Own
a complete tuxedo for $85. We even have
a fabulous Carolina Blue tuxedo. All sizes.
Also over 4,000 prom, evening and pageant
gowns. Formalwear Outlet, 644-8243. www.
formalwearoutlet.com. Ten minutes from
campus.
NEW UNC LOGO MEN’S GOLF SHOES Foot-
Joy Contour Series, 11M, white, Carolina
blue, UNC logo on heel. $95, originally $140.
919-593-5226.
Help Wanted
SUMMER LEASING AGENT NEEDED!
Wanted: Full-time, temporary summer
leasing agent at FOXCROFT APARTMENTS
in Chapel Hill. Must be people and detail
oriented. The primary function will be to
lease apartments, but will also be respon-
sible for the day to day functions in a busy
office setting. Prior experience and com-
puter knowledge is a plus, but not neces-
sary. For more information or to schedule
an interview, please call Foxcroft Apart-
ments at 919-929-7005 and speak with
Tenille Fox or Brockton McKinney. Fax re-
sume to 919-929-8002 or email resume to
foxcroft@douthit.biz.
LIGHT HOUSE AND YARD WORK. 1 1/2 blocks
from campus. $10/hr. 919-929-7488.
RELIABLE BAKER and counter help wanted
at Bagels on the Hill in Chapel Hill. Contact
929-7700.
BUSY RETINOVASCULAR PRACTICE
seeks friendly, motivated, energetic
individual to work as an ophthalmic
assistant. Will be trained to use ultra-
sound electrodiagnostic equipment
and multiple instruments used in the
diagnosis of retinovascular disease.
Candidate would find experience
challenging and fulfilling. Fax resume
to 919-787-3591.
FIRST, SECOND SUMMER SESSION or
Fall part-time job position available
for people thinking about or major-
ing in one of the medical fields such
as nursing, physical therapy, occupa-
tional therapy, pre-med or one of the
other medical disciplines. No experi-
ence necessary, can train. Mornings,
evenings and weekend positions
available. Pays $12-$14/hr. Call
932-1314 for more information.
NANNY AND HOUSEHOLD MANAGER
NEEDED. Graduate, undergraduate student,
planning to take year off from UNC and
stay in area, needed to look after 4 children
(2 years-old to 11 years-old, older children
in school). Must be warm, happy, caring,
have nanny experience and good references.
Must be very organized, energetic, willing
to do grocery shopping, run errands, plan
activities, transport children and do light
housework. Full-time, minimum 1 year com-
mitment, $11-$14/hr BOE. Option for health
insurance and option to live in available. 1
block from campus, parking. Send resume to
Nanny@telesage.com.
SECURITY OFFICER. Duties include patrol-
ling campus, working communication desk,
completing reports, monitoring parking and
other related activities. Requires consider-
able walking, lifting and carrying of heavy
objects, standing for long periods of time and
assisting residents. Hours are part-time, 3rd
shift, Fridays and Saturdays every weekend,
11:30pm-8am. Interested applicants may
submit an application (available at www.car-
olwoods.org) to: Email: HR@carolwoods.org,
fax: 919-969-2507, mail: Human Resources
Department, Carol Woods Retirement Com-
munity, 750 Weaver Dairy Road, Chapel Hill,
NC 27514.
SURVEY TAKERS NEEDED: Make $5-$25 per
survey. www. GetPaidToThink.com.
CERVICAL CANCER starts with sex and Hu-
man Papillomavirus (HPV). Condoms can
protect, but don’t stop the spread of HPV.
You may never have symptoms or know
that you became infected. HPV infection can
cause genital warts and over time you can
raise your risk of developing cervical cancer.
Help research by volunteering for a vaccine
research study. You may qualify if you: are
between 16-26 years of age, are willing to
use birth control for a minimum of 7 months,
are not planning to become pregnant in
the first 7 months of the study, have never
been vaccinated for HPV, have not had an
abnormal PAP. Please call: 919-251-9223.
EGG DONORS NEEDED. UNC Health
Care seeking healthy, non-smok-
ing females 20-32 to become egg
donors. $2,500 compensation for
COMPLETED cycle. All visits and pro-
cedures to be done local to campus.
For written information, please call
919-966-1150 ext. 5 and leave your
current mailing address.
GYMNASTICS INSTRUCTORS WANTED. Sport
Art Gymnastics Center Chapel Hill looking
for enthusiastic, reliable individuals. Teach
recreational gymnastic classes. Interview
now, start September 2009. Children age 5+.
Mark, 919-929-7077, 919-732-2925.
Lost & Found
FOUND: KEYS AND FLASH DRIVE. 3 silver, 1
bronze key, (now broken) flash drive found
in crosswalk at Raleigh Street and South
Road intersection Monday, 8:10am. Email
kbodey@email.unc.edu if they’re yours.
LOST: SONY CAMERA (black touchscreen)
near Dean Dome after the Final Four game
against Nova. In a black case. REWARD!
Please call if found, 561-213-6827.
Roommates
ROOMMATE WANTED: Female undergrad
seeks roommate for Mill Creek 2BR/2BA
apartment, 2009-10 school year. $575/mo,
includes W/D, appliances, parking. 10 min-
utes to campus. Lease begins August 1.
ceholmes@email.unc.edu.
ROOMMATE WANTED TO SHARE really
nice 6BR/5BA townhouse on busline.
Large bedrooms, hardwood floors,
W/D, dishwasher, all appliances. Free
parking, storage and trash pick up.
$400/mo. 933-0983 or 451-8140.
Services
APPLYING FOR JOBS, GRAD SCHOOL? Make
a strong first impression with well written
cover letters, resumes, applications. Expe-
rienced writer, MA from UNC-CH. 919-801-
7294, laika@mebtel.net.
EXPERIENCED TEACHER AVAILABLE for tu-
toring 5th to 10th graders for EOG, SAT prep,
ESL, English, Math (including Algebra 1) and
beginning Spanish. $30/hour. 967-4931.
CHAPEL VIEW APARTMENTS. On 3 buslines.
Available 5-8 to 7-31. $555/mo. Furnished,
spacious BR, private BA, W/D. Utilities in-
cluded. Gym, tennis and pool. ys11@unc.
edu, 980-253-5207.
2 AWESOME SUBLEASES: 201 Howell Street,
$400/mo. AND 406 Pritchard Street, $600/
mo. Both VERY nice, easy walk to campus.
Can negotiate! tvanderb@email.unc.edu.
2BR SUBLET
for summer and fall 2009! $500/mo. Utilities.
216-A Greene Street. 1 mile from campus.
4BR/2.5BA, W/D, full kitchen, parking, living
area, deck. crphilli@email.unc.edu, 336-549-
2235.
FEMALE SEEKING SOMEONE to sublease Cha-
pel Ridge apartments this summer, through
July 31st. 4BR available, completely furnished,
private bathrooms. $540/month, willing to ne-
gotiate. Email chridgesublet@gmail.com
GREAT SUMMER SUBLET LOCATION! Sublet
room in townhome 2 north of Rosemary.
4BR/2BA, deck, parking. Less than 1/2 mile
from campus! Available beginning June 1.
$400/mo. Email bsines@unc.edu.
SUBLET. MILL CREEK. $400/mo. Need per-
son to share 2BR/2BA for summer. Fully
furnished. Porch facing the woods. Contact
mkcobb@email.unc.edu or leave message at
252-423-0957.
SUMMER SUBLET (1BR). Bedroom available
in a Carrboro apartment. Everything is in-
cluded, even internet, cable, a pool and park-
ing! Furnished or unfurnished. $515/mo. On
C busline! 269-275-3583.
CARRBORO: May 1 thru July 25. $435/mo for
one, $291/mo each if 2 people want to split
large room in 2BR, 2 minutes to Weaver, 8
minutes to UNC on bike. J busline. W/D, Big
porches, yard. Elizabeth, 336-391-5652.
SUMMER SUBLET furnished bedroom in 3BR/
1BA house with 2 female undergrad house-
mates on Kenan St. $450/mo +utilities. Really
close to campus. linzma@email.unc.edu.
SUMMER SUBLET IN CHAPEL RIDGE.
1BR with private bath available
May, June, July. $520/mo, utilities
included. Furnished, cable, internet.
Must find subleaser ASAP. Call Janie,
336-684-9025.
SUMMER SUBLET 2BR of a 4BR apartment
for sublet. Rooms are furnished, big closets,
share a bathroom. Kitchen and W/D. Loca-
tion: Rosemary Street, Warehouse Apart-
ments. Walk to campus. 1 room is $675/mo,
utilities included. Parking also available.
Email dlorant@email.unc.edu.
SUMMER SUBLET: Room, bath in great apart-
ment. 2.5 miles from campus. Female grad
student roommate, 5-1 thru 8-1. $400/mo
+utilities. Pool, exercise area access. katiero-
seisarose@yahoo.com.
SUMMER SUBLEASE: May 7 thru July 31.
Warehouse apartment with female room-
mates. 4BR/2BA. $525/mo, includes utilities.
On West Rosemary Street. 2 minutes from
Franklin Street. 919-259-8069.
SUMMER SUBLEASE: Nice room in Stratford
Hills apartment off MLK from May to July.
Close to campus and near A bus route. $318/
mo. pspolice@email.unc.edu, 919-259-5142,
1BR AVAILABLE IN 2BR/1BA unit off Ma-
son Farm Road to student or young prof.
Close to hospitals. Early May to June
30. $500/mo, everything included. Email
uncsublet@gmail.com or 704-860-6709.
SUMMER NANNY! Fun, swimming
pool. Loving person needed to assist
with activities for 3 kids, ages 7, 10,
12. Must like Legos, be willing to pick
up and drop off at summer camps in
Chapel Hill area. Reliable, non-smok-
er, clean driving record. 25-30 hr/wk,
June thru early August, flexible. Addi-
tional hours doing clerical work pos-
sible. Southern Village area. Great for
student. $11/hr based on experience.
metcalf@clinicaltools.com.
ON CAMPUS
DAY CAMP COUNSELORS
UNC-Chapel Hill Carolina Kids Camp is ac-
cepting applications for several full-time
summer day camp positions. Must be avail-
able June 2 through August 7, 2009. Prefer
prior experience with children ages 5-12 and
completion of some college course work. For
an application or more information, contact
Aimee Krans, Work Life Manager, aimee_
krans@unc.edu or 962-6008. Don’t delay!
Conducting interviews now. EOE.
OUTGOING CAMP REGISTRAR WANTED The
Chapel Hill-Carrboro YMCA is looking for a
summer camp registrar. Applicants must be
at least 18 years of age and have experi-
ence with computers, phone communica-
tion, problem solving skills and the ability
to work independently. This is a 20 hr/wk
job with flexible hours. The job will consist
of managing camp cancellations, balances
and wait lists. Hours available starting in
April and would continue until August 21st.
To apply go to our website at www.chcymca.
org or come to the YMCA at 980 MLK Jr.
Blvd., Chapel Hill, to fill out an application.
All questions please contact Whitney Kahn at
wkahn@chcymca.org or 919-442-9622.
Tickets For Sale
THE DEAD IN GREENSBORO. 4 floor lower
level tickets, sold out opening night of tour,
Sunday April 12. $250/pair OBO. Will deliver
on campus. Text, 919-265-3573.
Volunteering
COACH YOUTH SOCCER at the YMCA! Vol-
unteers are needed for the upcoming rec-
reational spring season (4-4 and 4-18 thru
5-30, Saturdays only). Ages range from 3
year-olds through 6th graders (boys and
girls). Be a part of a fun focused, beginner
based program. Volunteer with a friend or be
matched with other coaches! Contact Mike
Meyen with interest: mmeyen@chcymca.org,
919-442-9622 ext. 125.
6 HRS/MO MAKES A DIFFERENCE! Arc of
Orange County’s Community Connections
matches volunteers with adults with disabilities
exploring community activities. Susan, 919-
942-5119 ext. 111, spaul@arcoforange.org.
Wheels for Sale
1999 MIATA. 127K, 5 SPEED. Metallic green
with tan. New top, roll bar, battery. AC, cruise
control, leather interior, Bose sound. Asking
$4,600. 919-619-4442 or 919-304-2054. For
details: www.allenantiques.com/Miata.
Announcements For Rent For Rent Help Wanted Sublets Summer Jobs Child Care Wanted
BR = Bedroou º BA = Balh º uo = uoulh º hr = hour º wk = week º w/0 = washer/dryer º 0B0 = or besl oííer º ^C = air coudiliouiug º w/ = wilh º LR = liviug roou
Line Classified Ad Rates

Deadlines
Line Ads: Noon, one business day prior to publication
Display Classified Advertising:
3pm, two business days prior to publication
Private Party (Non-Profit)
25 Words ......... $15.00/week
Extra words ....25¢/word/day
Commercial (For-Profit)
25 Words ......... $35.50/week
Extra words ....25¢/word/day
Place a Classified: www.dailytarheel.com/classifieds or Call 919-962-0252
EXTRAS: Box Your Ad: $1/day º Bold Your Ad: $3/day
To Place a Line Classified Ad Log onto
www.dailytarheel.com/classifieds or Call 919-962-0252
DTH office is open Mon-Fri 8:30am-5:00pm
DTH Classifieds
10 April 7, 2009
HOROSCOPES
(c) 2009 TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES, INC.
To get the advantage, check the day's rating: 10 is the easiest day, 0 the most challenging.
If April 7th is Your Birthday...
As you gain confidence and skills, you’ll find it
easier to deal with the surprises and emergencies
that come your way. Keep practicing; you’ll get
good at this. You have natural talent.
Aries (March 21-April 19)
Today is a 7 - Don’t race off on your first
impulse. That could be disastrous. Pull
back just a little bit and keep watching.
Let somebody else be first. All is not as
it seems to be.
Taurus (April 20-May 20)
Today is a 7 - Continue to be the sen-
sible one. Others are getting scattered.
They’re trying to do too much at the
same time. Confusion will result. Advise
them to chill.
Gemini (May 21-June 21)
Today is a 7 - Calls for radical action
are balanced against a strong need to
make sure the course you take is going
to produce substantial results. Only take
carefully calculated risks.
Cancer (June 22-July 22)
Today is a 6 - There are plenty of people
telling you to hurry up and take action.
That would be foolish. Run out the num-
bers first, to find out what this is going to
cost. If you can’t afford it, wait.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)
Today is a 7 - Stick to your budget
precisely, or you could get into trouble.
Giving in to temptation once makes it
easier the next time. Don’t even get near
that slippery slope.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Today is a 7 - Continue to state your
position firmly. Once the adversary fully
understands, you’ll have solved the prob-
lem. If you don’t get that result now, stall
so you can try again at a better time.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Today is a 7 - The time isn’t quite right yet,
as you may already have noticed. Continue
to prepare, so you know just what to do.
This next promise, by the way, will stick.
Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Today is a 7 - Be a good listener. That’s
very important now. If appropriate, be a
consoling and devoted friend. In any case,
do what you need to do to get the whole
story.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Today is a 7 - There’s a test coming up; be
prepared. You’ve been deluged with infor-
mation. Take the time to read it. Discuss
it with your advisors. Your best course of
action becomes obvious.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Today is a 7 - Your investigations reveal
hidden problems. Make detailed lists of
whatever you find that could be difficult.
The more you know or can guess, the more
successful your mission will be.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Today is a 7 - Your studies may not have
prepared you for hard reality. No idealistic
picture of perfection is appearing. Look
away from that imaginary scene and get
practical. You need to make some money.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
Today is a 6 - You’ll soon have a much
better understanding of the entire situ-
ation. Keep your passions under control
and your partner at your side. The two of
you are wise to stay together, even if you
don’t agree.
BOLINWOOD
CONDOS
2 1
1
⁄2 miles to UNC
2 2BR/1
1
⁄2 BA with 923 sq/ft
$630/month & up
2 3BR/2BA with 1212 sq/ft
$750/month & up
2 Rent includes water
2 Very QUIET complex on
“N” busline
Real Estate Associates
919.942.7806
www.bolinwoodcondos.com
www.uni ver s i t ydi r ect or i es.com
PAID INTERNSHIP
To apply, send resume to Kennan at:
keiler@vilcom.com
º -/|-a.|.- |(:|a|a¡ a().|1-1
º :(-:||a¡ & a())||a¡ :1.
º w)(||a¡ 1|(-:||¡ w||| :1.-(||.-(.
º .ann-( .:|-1a|-. !):n 'an
º |:|| .:|-1a|-. ||-/|||-.!) |(./w|
º :)na-a.:||)a. ´!.))!.I'/|(
º ¡(-:| (-.an- |a||1-(
Announcements Announcements Announcements
UNC COMMUNITY SERVICE DIRECTORY
SPEEDING DWI UNDERAGE DRINKING
Robert H. Smith, Atty At Law
:¡: W. !n\×xii× S1nii1, \novi H\x's Pis1\cn\×1 - u6·-::oo
FREE
CONSULTATION
Carolina graduate with over 20 years
experience representing students.
RDU Taxi
919-840-7277
Serving the Triangle area
to and from RDU Airport
TRAFFIC CITATIONS · ÐWIS · CRIMINAL
E VERETT L AW F IRM , P.A.
1829 EAST FRANKLIN STREETUITE 1100-D
WWW . IVIRITTIAWIIRM . BIZ
919-942-8002
CLOSE TO CAMPUS at CARRBORO PLAZA ~ 918.7161
fñ88f0kI fß0I08-00IñkT f08ll0
COLOR/BW PRINTING, MOVING SUPPLIES,
LAMINATING, BINDING, MAILBOX SERVICES, FAX,
STAMPS, PACKAGING, INTERNATIONAL SHIPPING!
Jeffrey Allen Howard
~ ATTORNEY AT LAW, PLLC ~
919-929-2992 ~ jeffreyhowardlaw.com
jeffreyallenhoward@yahoo.com
Call me if you are injured at work or on the road.
Chapel Hill Taxi
5IudenI 5pring DiscounI º $25 Io & !rom ßDU AirporI
vvv.chapeIhiIIIaxi.com º 919-933-9595
Lab Poster Printing
Lab Poster Printing Lab Poster Printing
fast Iaro-ñroaod-fk££ 0elivery to 000
010-300-4032-www.labøoster.com
Professional TAX Services
Electronically Filed for Fast Processing
R. Allen Lyles, CPA
Over 20 Years of Experience
(919) 932-9623
alyles@nc.rr.com
CAROLINA PACKAGING
Up to 30% OFF Boxes • 15% OFF Shipping
UPS • FedEx • DHL • Postal Services
762 MLK Blvd., Next to Bada Wings • 968-1181
Over 280
Micro & Impo rted Beers
Cigarettes · Cigars · Rolling Tobacco
10B W. FRANKLIN 5TREET · 933-2007
306 E. MAIN 5T. (in front of Cat’s Cradle) · 96B-5000
CAMPUS
BEVERAGE
T
JS

AAMCO RTP
The Complete Car Care Experts
919-493-2300
5116 S. Hwy 55, Durham, NC
Kevin M. Kennedy
ATTORNEY AT LAW
919-960-5023 • www.kevinkennedylaw.com
traffic • drugs • alcohol • dwi record expungements
STUDENT STAND UP
COMPETiTiON
CUAB’s CAROLiNA COMEDY FESTiVAL PRESENTS
Must sign up in advance: smorgan51@gmail.com
For more information, visit www.unc.edu/ cuab
N0000s0zr, â0t|| 15 ºI0M º00|00 0z0zt0l
CUAB’s CAROLiNA COMEDY FESTiVAL PRESENTS
SKETCH COMEDY
WRiTiNG WORKSHOP
with

ANNE BEATTS
Thursday, April 16 - Saturday, April 18
Must be able to attend all
three sessions. Space is limited;
First come, first serve.
Must sign up to participate: smorgan51@gmail.com
For more info, visit
www.unc.edu/ cuab
Announcements
The 0aìIy Tar HeeI
offìce wìII be cIosed
Frìday, Aprì I 10th
for Good Frìday
0eadIìnes for
Mon., ArpìI 13th ìssue.
Display Ads & Display Classifieds -
Wednesday, April 8th at 3pm
Line Classifieds -
Thurs., April 9th at noon
0eadIìnes for
Tues., AprìI 14th ìssue.
Display Ads & Display Classifieds -
Thursday, April 9th at 3pm
Line Classifieds -
Monday, April 13th at noon
We wìII re-open on
Mon., AprìI 13th
at 8.30am
RECYCLE ME PLEASE!
PLACE A CLASSIFIED
www.dailytarheel.com
OR CALL 962-1163
THANKS FOR A
GREAT SEASON
TAR HEELS!!!
11 News MN>L=:R%:IKBE0%+))2 I]Z9V^anIVg=ZZa
Hoops in Detroit
CompIele coverage of Mondav`s
nalionaI championship game. L^^
i`'*_hklmhkr'
Basketball glory
UNC aIum MichaeI Jordan was
inducled inlo lhe BaskelbaII HaII
of Iame. L^^i`'._hklmhkr'
Have you seen this man?
PoIice are searching for a man
lhev sav sloIe a waIIel from lhe
Iibrarv. L^^i`'-_hklmhkr'
Brown bagging
LocaI schooIs increased Iunch
prices, bul aid for lhose in need
won`l increase. L^^i`',_hklmhkr'
Downtown chase
A Durham man was arresled
afler a poIice chase and shooling
Iasl weekend. L^^i`',_hklmhkr'
gZf^l
Solution to
Monday!s puzzle
Complete the grid
so each row, column
and 3-by-3 box (in
bold borders) con-
tains every digit 1
to 9.
© 2009 The Mepham Group. All rights reserved.
Level: 1 2 3 4
(C)2009 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
All rights reserved.
Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
ACROSS
1 Working on, as homework
6 44th president
11 Actress Gardner
14 The blahs
15 Rice dish
16 “Big” London clock
17 Astound
19 Sob
20 Pickle holder
21 Oater actor Jack
22 “It’s a Wonderful Life”
director Frank
24 Cyclotron particle
26 Chain known for breakfasts
28 Breathing organ
30 Litter cries
32 “Married ... With Children”
dad
35 One hanging around
38 Suffix with web
39 Gossipy types
42 Letter after sigma
43 Refined grace
44 Kate of “The Reader”
46 Sarge’s order
50 “Plop, plop, fizz, fizz”
brand word
51 Hard to recall
54 “Don’t __ me, bro!”
55 “That rings a bell”
58 Darn with thread
60 Encountered
61 Saturn SUV
62 Classic baking powder
brand
65 __ loss: puzzled
66 Hang in midair
67 Kate’s sitcom pal
68 ’60s “trip” drug
69 33-Down’s field
70 Like really old bread
DOWN
1 Hip-hop record label
2 Airing after midnight, say
3 Way to organize all your
ducks?
4 Pencil remnant
5 Scoff at
6 Talk’s Winfrey
7 USS Missouri nickname
8 __ mode
9 Fem.’s opposite
10 Aptly named shaving lotion
11 Six-pack enhancer?
12 Open porches
13 “Pick a card, __ card”
18 Qualified
23 Like “algae” or “termini”:
Abbr.
25 Uris’s “__ 18”
27 Italian cheese city
29 Class with showers
31 Prize founder
33 Price known for Verdi roles
34 “How to Talk Dirty and
Influence People” author
Lenny
36 Canines and molars
37 Bit of work
39 Large-scale financial
rescues
40 Bozo
41 Revival structure
42 “Up, up and away” defunct
flier
45 Declare
47 Skating gold medalist
Dorothy
48 Log-in requirement
49 Lipton rival
52 “Waves of grain” color
53 Striped equine
56 Sound
rebound
57 Porker’s dinner
59 Apothecary’s weight
61 Batman portrayer
Kilmer
63 N.Y.’s Fifth, for one
64 Mop & __: floor cleaner
PHKDBGÍA:K=?HKMA>FHG>R
T
vIer GIasco, (Iefl) a firsl-vear, races wilh one hand behind his back againsl CaIIie
EIIis, a coxswain for lhe men`s rowing leam. The men`s rowing leam heId lhe firsl
12-hour seclions of ils erg-a-lhon Mondav in PoIk PIace. The leam sel up a lenl
wilh lhree rowing machines in lhe quad lo raise monev lo send lhe leam lo nalionaIs.
Members soId T-shirls and raced each olher and onIooking sludenls for donalions.
DTH/SARAH ACUFF
G^p@beebg`leZ[lmh
_h\nlhgin[eb\a^Zema
¨Uc thiul uc cou
cstoblish . ou:
j:cscucc globollu,
but uc houc o lot of
thiugs to uuoc:stouo
bcfo:c uc oo thot.¨
WILLIAM ZELMAN, PROFESSOR
BY TRIP SMITH
STAFF WRITER
IinanciaI shorlcomings al UNC
won`l keep lhe GiIIings SchooI of
GIobaI PubIic HeaIlh from address-
ing serious issues such as genelic
research, gIobaI educalion and hog
wasle managemenl.
In Iale March, lhe schooI
announced lhe crealion of four new
GiIIings Innovalion Laboralories
lhal wiII address whal researchers
delermined lo be some of lhe mosl
imporlanl pubIic heaIlh issues facing
Norlh CaroIina and lhe worId.
A leam of 1uu experls from
around lhe counlrv reviewed 31
proposaIs in lhe faII lo seIecl lhe
four new Iaboralorv focuses.
The Gi I I i ngs Innoval i on
Laboralories are nol phvsicaI
research faciIilies bul are officiaI-
Iv recognized and funded areas
of gIobaI pubIic heaIlh research
overseen bv facuIlv members wilh
experience in reIevanl fieIds.
The Gi I I i ngs Innoval i on
Laboralorv Program was among
lhe inilialives eslabIished in 2uu,
bv a $õu miIIion gifl from Dennis
and Joan GiIIings.
The addilionaI Iabs bring lhe
lolaI number of GiIIings Innovalion
Laboralories lo 14. Each focuses
on researching, innovaling and
improving an imporlanl issue in
gIobaI pubIic heaIlh.
Some of lhe Iaboralories lhal
aIreadv exisl focus on issues such as
respiralorv disease in chiIdren, cilv
air poIIulion and lropicaI disease.
The new laboratories
The four new Iaboralories wiII
focus on hog wasle lrealmenl,
genelics research soflware, drug
anaIvsis and gIobaI educalion.
Norlh CaroIina is lhe second-
Iargesl hog producing slale in lhe
counlrv, bul produclion exceeds lhe
slale`s capacilv lo manage or dispose
of wasle. One GiIIings Iab wiII seek
lo deveIop melhods of reducing lhe
air and waler poIIulion of hog wasle
whiIe harnessing melhane from lhe
wasle as an energv source.
Thal research wiII lake pIace al a
hog farm in Harnell Counlv.
Danvu Lin and Ired Wrighl,
who are bolh professors of bio-
slalislics, wiII work in lhe second
innovalion Iaboralorv. Their work
wiII focus on deveIoping new melh-
ods for genelics research and cre-
aling user-friendIv soflware lo aid
lhose melhods.
¨We have been doing research in
lhis area for a Iong lime,¯ Lin said.
¨Wilh lhe new GiIIings Iab, we are
confidenl lhal a Iol of good wiII
come oul of lhis.¯
In lhe lhird innovalion Iab, TiI
Slürmer, a professor of pharma-
coepidemioIogv and pubIic heaIlh,
wiII sludv nalionaI dala lo beller
undersland lhe drawbacks and ben-
efils of cerlain drugs lo oIder aduIls
lhal cIinicaI sludies oflen overIook.
The finaI Iaboralorv, overseen
bv WiIIiam ZeIman, a professor of
heaIlh poIicv and managemenl,
wiII use new lechnoIogies lo creale
a prololvpe of a gIobaI ¨seamIess¯
cIassroom lhal wouId aIIow sludenls
from around lhe gIobe lo inleracl
more cIoseIv and efficienlIv.
¨We lhink we can eslabIish,
lhrough UNC, our presence gIob-
aIIv, bul we have a Iol of lhings
lo undersland before we do lhal,¯
ZeIman said.
Coutoct thc Uuiuc:situ Eoito:
ot uocsk(uuc.cou.
Ah`pZlm^%`^g^mb\lmphh__hnkeZ[l
L\ahheh_F^]b\bg^hi^gl
bgm^kgZmbhgZeZ__Zbklh_ñ\^
¨This hos bccu o loug tiuc couiug. Uc
just :coli.co thot it uos uc:u iujo:tout
to ucct . thc school`s globol uisiou.¨
BRIAN MOYNIHAN, OFFICE OF INTERNATIONAL ACTIVITIES PROGRAM MANAGER
BY LAURA HOXWORTH
STAFF WRITER
Sludenls in lhe SchooI of Medicine
are increasingIv inleresled in gIobaI
heaIlh, and a new office wiII heIp
lhem lo pursue lhal inleresl.
The Office of InlernalionaI
Aclivilies aims lo supporl lhese
sludenls bv serving as a cenlraI
hub of informalion and aclivilies
reIaled lo gIobaI heaIlh.
¨There`s jusl a huge inleresl
in inlernalionaI experience,¯ said
Warren Newlon, execulive associ-
ale dean of educalion al lhe schooI.
¨Whal we lhoughl we needed lo do
was lo lrv lo supporl lhose aclivilies
and coordinale lhem.¯
Brian Movnihan, lhe office`s pro-
gram manager, said lhe office was
designed lo be a ¨one-slop shop¯
for bolh incoming sludenls from
overseas and UNC medicaI slu-
denls inleresled in going abroad.
Sludenls wiII be abIe lo go lhrough
lhe office for heIp wilh lhings Iike
financiaI aid, heaIlh and safelv infor-
malion, course credil and housing.
The office wiII be funded bv a
combinalion of monev from incom-
ing sludenls` luilion and monev
from lhe dean`s office.
The new office is anolher slep
in UNC`s push lo become a more
gIobaI-focused universilv.
ChanceI I or HoI den Thorp
announced in March lhe crealion
of a new GIobaI Research Inslilule,
which wiII focus on inlernalionaI
sludv lo allracl schoIars and increase
lhe schooI`s gIobaI presence.
Movnihan said lhe SchooI of
Medicine lvpicaIIv has aboul 4u lo
õu sludenls go abroad each vear lo
pIaces Iike Peru and Honduras.
Abroad, sludenls oflen sludv
in olher universilies, do research,
pursue service aclivilies or do a
combinalion of lhe lhree.
Movnihan aIso said lhe office
wiII serve lhe aboul 2õ lo 3u inler-
nalionaI sludenls who come lo lhe
SchooI of Medicine each vear, bul
he hopes il wiII heIp bring in even
more inlernalionaI sludenls.
¨This has been a Iong lime com-
ing,¯ Movnihan said. ¨We jusl reaI-
ized lhal il was verv imporlanl lo
meel UNC`s gIobaI vision and lhe
schooI`s gIobaI vision.¯
The office wiII aIso hoId evenls
and informalionaI sessions and
cooperale wilh olher gIobaI heaIlh
inilialives on campus.
¨We`re verv inleresled in Iinking
up wilh olher schooIs on campus,
especiaIIv lhe olher heaIlh reIaled
discipIines and lhe Campus Y,¯
Movnihan said.
Bul he said lhe office wiII be care-
fuI nol lo creale programs lhal over-
Iap wilh programs lhrough olher
organizalions, Iike lhe Campus Y.
¨We hope lo make sure we`re nol
reinvenling lhe wheeI wilh a Iol of
svslems lhev have,¯ he said.
The office opened Wednesdav
wilh a receplion lhal drew aboul 1uu
peopIe. Newlon and Mvron Cohen,
direclor and associale vice chanceI-
Ior for gIobaI heaIlh al lhe Inslilule
for GIobaI HeaIlh and Infeclious
Diseases, spoke al lhe receplion.
Coutoct thc Uuiuc:situ Eoito:
ot uocsk(uuc.cou.
Pbeel^ko^mahl^
`hbg`Z[khZ]
157 E. ROSEMARY ST. (UPSTAIRS) 942-6903
!"#$%&'()*'(+#$,! "#$%&'()*'(+#$,! "#$%&'()*'(+#$,!
!#$!'!%&-'(! #$!'!%&-'(! #$!'!%&-'(!
!,-',#$!.--*,/ ,-',#$!.--*,/ ,-',#$!.--*,/
30 Taps! 100 Different Bottled Beers!
TUESDAY
$2.50 Drafts
$3.00 Pitchers
I
n
t
e
n
d
e
d

P
u
b
lic
a
t
io
n

D
a
t
e
(
s
)
:

T
u
e
s
d
a
y
,

A
p
r
il
0
7
,

2
0
0
9
.

P
u
b
lis
h
e
d
N
C
,

T
h
e

D
a
ily

T
a
r

H
e
e
l
[
T
_
D
ir
e
c
t
o
r
y
_
U
p
d
a
t
e

t
o

P
u
b
lis
h

o
r

P
r
o
o
f
]


1
.
7
7
6
6
6
7
"

X

2
"

P
r
o
d
u
c
e
d
:

3
:
0
1

P
M

E
T
,

4
/
3
/
2
0
0
9

0
4
0
3
0
9
0
3
0
1
4
9

R
e
g
a
l
8
6
5
-
9
2
5
-
9
5
5
4
© 2009 Times For 04/07
Adv. Tix on Sale HANNAH MONTANA: THE
MOVIE
Adv. Tix on Sale OBSERVE & REPORT
(FAST AND THE FURIOUS (PG-13)
(125 PM 425 PM) 725 PM
MONSTERS VS. ALIENS (PG)
(110 PM 410 PM) 710 PM
DUPLICITY (PG-13)
(100 PM 400 PM) 700 PM
I LOVE YOU MAN (R) - ID REQ'D
(120 PM 420 PM) 720 PM
KNOWING (PG-13)
(105 PM 405 PM) 705 PM
12 ROUNDS (PG-13)
(115 PM 415 PM) 715 PM
Bargain
Matinees
$6.00
All shows $6.00 for college students with ID
Take 15/501 South towards Pittsboro
Exit Market St. / Southern Village
FAST AND FURIOUS J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:15-4:05-7:15-9:40
MONSTERS VS ALIENS I. . . . . . . . .12:30-2:40-4:50-7:05-9:15
DUPLICITY J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:10-4:00-7:05-9:45
KNOWING J. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:25-4:10-7:20-9:50
I LOVE YOU MAN K . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1:30-4:15-7:25-9:45
Make your impact today.
giving.unc.edu/gift
GO HEELS! CONGRATS ON A GREAT SEASON!
12 MN>L=:R%:IKBE0%+))2 Opinion
QUOTE OF THE DAY:
¨Thc:c`s uo uou uou guus uoulo
houc got o choucc to scc Michocl
]o:oou jlou uithout Dcou Suith.¨
MICHAEL JORDAN, FORMER UNC PLAYER AND HALL OF
FAMER, ON HIS FORMER COACH
RICKY SPERO
ENVIRONMENT COLUMNIST
Fourth-year physics graduate student
from Chapel Hill.
E-MAIL: RSPERO@PHYSICS.UNC.EDU
Mbil_hkZ
lfZee^k
\Zk[hg
_hhmikbgm
I
l`s so easv lo lhink of our
carbon, cIimale and energv
issues as big business` fauIl.
Or governmenl`s fauIl. Mavbe il`s
lhe worId`s fauIl.
Bul Iel`s be honesl. The lrulh is,
il`s mv fauIl. And il`s vour fauIl, loo.
I`d bel lhal no one reading lhis
is free of dav-in,
dav-oul aclivilies
lhal conlribule
lo carbon emis-
sions, energv wasle, IandfiIIs and
depIelion of naluraI resources. The
good news is lhal lhese praclices
are oflen easv lo improve.
This isn`l rockel science, bul if
vou`re in a rouline il can be easv
lo Iose sighl of lhe Iow-hanging
fruil. Here are some changes lo
consider.
If vou Iive on campus, congral-
uIalions. Your carbon foolprinl is
probabIv aIreadv much smaIIer
lhan lhe average American`s. You
Iive on dislricl cooIing and heal-
ing. You waIk, bike or lake pubIic
lransil lo mosl pIaces vou go.
Bul vou probabIv sliII use more
paper lhan vou need lo, Ieave vour
power cabIes pIugged in aII lhe
lime and eal a Iol of processed
foods. (Can vou sav Easv Mac?)
So Iook for wavs lo prinl Iess.
PIug power cabIes inlo a surge pro-
leclor lhal vou swilch off when vou
don`l need lhe juice. Trv carrols,
ceIerv or fruils as dorm snacks.
Changing vour food habils is
parlicuIarIv rewarding. Iresh pro-
duce is lvpicaIIv heaIlhier, more
fiIIing, uses Iess packaging and
induslriaI processing and lraveIed
a shorler dislance lo gel lo vour
labIe. (This Iasl isn`l lrue of aII pro-
duce. I`m Iooking al vou, kiwis.)
Ior lhose of vou wilh vour own
kilchens, I recommend buving a
share of a IocaI farm ÷ communilv
supporled agricuIlure. You prepav
for a season`s worlh of produce
from a IocaI farm, which vou coI-
Iecl everv week. The food is freshIv
picked, doesn`l lraveI far and is
usuaIIv grown wilhoul peslicides
and wilh suslainabiIilv in mind.
There are manv such farms here
in lhe TriangIe. Ior aIumni and
parenls reading from afar, vou can
find communilv supporled agricuI-
lure in mosl parls of lhe U.S. Visil
www.IocaIharvesl.org]csa.
Besl of aII, of course, is lo grow
vour own food. Tend herbs in a
window pIanler. Grow lomaloes
÷ lhev`re usuaIIv fIavorIess from
lhe grocerv slore anvwav. PIanl a
fruil-bearing lree or a berrv bush.
If vou Iive off campus, vour
carbon foolprinl is probabIv much
bigger. Turn off Iighls. Be mind-
fuI of lhe lhermoslal. Use shades
on soulh-facing windows lo keep
rooms cooI or warm, depending on
lhe season. Hang drv vour Iaun-
drv. Or al Ieasl lake vour loweIs
oul of lhe drver afler 1u minules
and hang lhem so vour cIolhes
drv fasler. WaIk lo work. Run lo
work. Bike lo work. Take lhe bus.
CarpooI, carpooI, carpooI.
If vou need a vehicIe, gel a
dieseI car, join lhe Piedmonl
BiofueIs Co-op and burn ils near-
Iv carbon-neulraI biodieseI.
IinaIIv, if vou`re considering
upgrades lo vour home, slarl wilh
beller insuIalion, seaIing air Ieaks,
swilching lo higher-efficiencv
appIiances, inslaIIing high insuIa-
lion doors and windows and add-
ing a soIar waler healer. Ior manv
of lhese, lhe federaI slimuIus pack-
age offers a 3u percenl lax credil.
Il`s so lempling lo bIame olhers
for our addiclion lo fossiI fueIs.
Bul companies wouIdn`l buiId
waslefuI producls if we didn`l buv
lhem. We wouIdn`l be consum-
ing so much oiI if we found olher
wavs lo gel around. Il`s our own
fauIl. So do somelhing aboul il.
ENVIRONMENT
COLUMNIST
P
arl of downlown ChapeI
HiII`s appeaI is lhal il has
lhe feeI of an aulhenlic
smaII lown.
Bul lhis couId change if
lhe ChapeI HiII Town CounciI
Iifls lhe ban on slreel vendors.
RepeaIing lhis ban has lhe
polenliaI lo overcrowd down-
lown and hurl IocaI business-
es.
The ban was firsl pul inlo
effecl in 10,,. According lo
former board member of
lhe ChapeI HiII Downlown
Parlnership Sleve AIIred, lhe
ban was pul in pIace afler ¨hip-
pies¯ were making more monev
al slreel slands lhan businesses
in slorefronls were.
And whi I e l i mes have
changed, lhe ban is sliII juslifi-
abIe.
AIIowing vendors couId
make compel i l i on more
inlense for downlown busi-
nesses whiIe doing nolhing lo
encourage business owners lo
renl oul vacanl reaI eslale.
PoIicies shouId be geared
loward supporl for permanenl
businesses in lhe slorefronls
Iining IrankIin Slreel.
And l he si dewaI ks on
IrankIin Slreel are aIreadv
crowded.
AIIowing slreel vendors
wouId simpIv delracl from lhe
allracliveness of downlown
ChapeI HiII.
Thev wouId bIock nol onIv
fool lraffic, bul aIso lhe view
of hisloric buiIdings lhal give
downlown ils characler and
much of ils appeaI.
And lhe lown can`l pick and
choose whal lvpes of vending
il wanls on IrankIin Slreel
because il cannol seIecliveIv
ban vendors.
Since 2uuõ, lhe lown counciI
has Iooked inlo repeaIing lhe
ordinance severaI limes, forlu-
naleIv wilh no reaI headwav.
Thev shouId save lhemseIves
lhe efforl of considering lhe
repeaI vel anolher lime.
=hgÍmZeehpo^g]^kl
:eehpbg`lmk^^mo^g]^klbg]hpgmhpg<aZi^e
Abeephne][^nglb`amer%\khp]lb]^pZedl
G
ang vi oI ence has a
de f i ni l e pr es enc e
i n Orange Counlv,
whelher we choose lo see il
or nol.
Il is preciseIv for lhis rea-
son lhal lhe new Projecl Safe
Orange inilialive shouId be
embraced bv evervone in our
communilv.
Projecl Safe Orange is parl
of a nalionaI crime prevenlion
inilialive caIIed Projecl Safe
Neighborhoods. This program
was inlroduced bv former
Presidenl George W. Bush in
2uu1 in an efforl lo reduce gun
vioIence in America.
And aI l hough Orange
Counlv is jusl now joining lhe
program, il has exisled for sev-
eraI vears in olher N.C. coun-
lies.
The idea behind lhe inilia-
live is quile simpIe. The pro-
gram aIIows U.S. allornevs for
each slale lo coIIaborale wilh
IocaI Iaw enforcemenl agen-
cies. This parlnership ensures
repeal offenders are idenlified,
slrongIv warned and hopefuIIv
rehabiIilaled.
The program aIso allempls lo
increase lrusl belween commu-
nilies and Iaw enforcemenl.
Inslead of mereIv enforcing
lhe Iaw, IocaI poIice and U.S.
allornevs wiII work logelher
lo prevenl crime in lhe firsl
pIace.
And il works.
In lhe parlicipaling coun-
li es of Durham, Iorsvlh,
Rowan and GuiIford, vioIenl
crime decreased significanlIv
afler lhe program was impIe-
menled.
Our nei ghbor, Durham
Counlv, saw vioIenl crime
decrease bv nearIv 3õ percenl
belween 2uuu and 2uu4.
Make no mislake ÷ Projecl
Safe Orange is needed. Jusl
because we don`l lhink aboul
vioIenl crime on a daiIv basis
doesn`l mean il doesn`l exisl.
On lhe conlrarv, gangs are an
increasing probIem for Orange
Counlv. Dislricl Allornev Jim
WoodaII said wilness inlimida-
lion in gang-reIaled prosecu-
lions in lhe counlv is on lhe
rise. And lhe U.S. allornev for
our dislricl named Inlerslale
4u a ¨holbed¯ of gang aclivilv
and vioIence.
Projecl Safe Neighborhoods
has been proven effeclive. Il
was a prudenl decision lo bring
il lo Orange Counlv and con-
fronl vioIenl crime before il
gels oul of hand.
G
ov. Bev Perdue`s admin-
islralion shouId be
appIauded for recenl
progress made overhauIing
Norlh CaroIina`s crumbIing
probalion svslem.
Recenl successes in Wake
Counlv indicale lhe adminis-
lralion`s poIicies have begun lo
lake effecl.
According lo The (RaIeigh)
News & Observer, aulhorilies
in Wake Counlv arresled 6u
probalion vioIalors lhis pasl
week during an operalion lo
crack down on lhe high num-
ber of individuaIs who have
been evading officers.
The new adminislralion`s
aggressive endeavor lo crack
down on evaders and equip
Iaw enforcemenl wilh lhe nec-
essarv looIs lo lrack abscond-
ers demonslrales ils dedicalion
lo keeping Norlh CaroIinians
safe.
This reform has been Iong
overdue.
In December, furlher inves-
ligalions bv The (RaIeigh)
News & Observer reveaIed
deep fIaws in lhe probalion
svslem. Aboul 13,uuu proba-
lioners were unaccounled for.
Since 2uuu, õ8u probalioners
had commilled mansIaughler
or murder.
Efforls bv aulhorilies lo
lrack down probalion vioIalors
are parlicuIarIv meaningfuI lo
lhe UNC communilv.
Over a vear has passed since
former sludenl bodv presidenl
Eve Carson`s dealh.
The lwo men charged wilh
her murder, Lawrence Lovelle
and Demario Alwaler, received
inadequale allenlion from lheir
probalion officers.
Lovelle had never seen his
probalion officer in person.
And Alwaler was under lhe
purview of 1u probalion offi-
cers in lhree vears and wenl
four monlhs wilhoul being
seen bv anvone.
A slalewide roundup of pro-
balion offenders Iike Alwaler
and Lovelle shouI d have
occurred Iong ago.
Bul finaIIv, somelhing is
being done.
A slrong, renewed efforl
bv Perdue`s adminislralion lo
crack down on evaders shows
lhal lhe governor underslands
lhe severe impIicalions of hav-
ing lhousands of unchecked
criminaIs roaming around lhe
slale.
Now lhal aulhorilies have
beller access lo informalion
and lracking abiIilies, Wake
Counlv is producing posilive
resuIls.
We hope lhal olher counlv-
wide efforls lo Iasso offenders
wiII soon be underwav.
Lm^iibg`ni^g_hk\^f^gm
K^\^gmkhng]nih_/)ikh[ZmbhgobheZmhklbgPZd^
<hngmrlahpl@ho'I^k]n^f^Zgl[nlbg^ll
Ik^o^gmbg``Zg`obhe^g\^
EDITORIAL CARTOON By Alex Lee, lobin@email.unc.edu
Out-of-state students add
to UNC’s rich diversity
TO THE EDITOR.
Wilh aII due respecl lo J.K.
Pellil, I have lo slrongIv disagree
wilh his argumenl (¨In-slale slu-
denls shouId be given more pri-
orilv,¯ ApriI 1) lhal UNC-ChapeI
HiII shouId be reserved for Norlh
CaroIinians onIv.
Iirsl of aII, il is a facl lhal il
is harder for oul-of-slale slu-
denls lo gel inlo UNC-ChapeI
HiII lhan in-slale sludenls.
According lo lhe Office of
Undergraduale Admissions, lhe
cIass of 2u13 had 0,28, in-slale
sludenls appIv for earIv admis-
sion. 4,õ86 sludenls, or 40 per-
cenl, were admilled.
On lhe olher hand, lhe cIass
of 2u13 had 12,22u oul-of-
slale sludenls appIv for earIv
admission whiIe 2,,23, or 22
percenl, were admilled lo lhe
Universilv.
I am in no wav impIving
lhal oul-of-slale sludenls are
smarler lhan in-slale sludenls;
indeed, some of lhe brighlesl
individuaIs I have had lhe priv-
iIege lo meel al UNC-ChapeI
HiII are in-slale sludenls.
Bevond lhe simpIe numbers
game, a kev lo a successfuI coI-
Iege is a diverse environmenl.
Norlh CaroIina is a slale lhal
I have come lo Iove wilh manv
diverse peopIe of wide-ranging
inleresls.
However, having sludenls
from differenl areas of lhe coun-
lrv and olher nalions adds lo
lhal rich diversilv.
Lowering lhe number of
admilled oul-of-slale sludenls
aIso hurls Norlh CaroIina as a
whoIe. Losing lhese laIenled
individuaIs who wanl lo come
lo a universilv as presligious as
UNC-ChapeI HiII wouId have
an adverse effecl on lhe unbe-
IievabIe growlh going on in lhe
TriangIe.
J.K. Pellil is proud of lhe
Universilv and he righlIv shouId
be. I undersland lhal Norlh
CaroIinians have heIped pav for
mv educalion bv providing me
wilh lhe besl Iearning environ-
menl lhal I couId ask for and I
am gralefuI lo be here.
I wanl olher oul-of-slale slu-
denls lo be given lhal opporlu-
nilv as weII.
Ouik ßouc:jcc
Ii:st-uco:
When smoking, think of
your future quality of life
TO THE EDITOR.
March 2õ marked lhe 14lh
annuaI Kick Bulls Dav, where
kids across Norlh CaroIina raI-
Iied againsl lobacco. Members
of Tobacco Cessalion Advocales
decided lo promole lhe dav bv
having a dispIav al PoIk PIace,
specificaIIv al lhe fIag poIe.
The message was simpIe and
bIunl.
¨How much wouId vou pav
lo die? Smokers pav lwo limes
more heaIlh insurance and on
average wiII die 12 vears earIier
lhan lhe nonsmoker.¯
Bodv bags were IabeIed wilh
fake $1uu biIIs laped lo lhe oul-
side.
One smoker who was upsel
al our dispIav commenled on
how he feIl we were lrealing
smokers Iike chiIdren.
His argumenl is lhal ¨mosl
smokers know aboul heaIlh
effecls and choose lo lake risks
FEATURED ONLINE READER COMMENT:
I]Z9V^anIVg=ZZa
SPEAK OUT
WRITING GUIDELINES:
¢Please type: Handwritten
letters will not be accepted.
¢Sign and date: No more than
two people should sign letters.
¢Students: Include your year,
major and phone number.
¢Faculty/staff: Include your
department and phone number.
¢Edit: The DTH edits for space,
clarity, accuracy and vulgarity.
Limit letters to 250 words.
SUBMISSION:
¢Drop-off: at our office at Suite
2409 in the Student Union.
¢E-mail: to dthedit@gmail.com
¢Send: to P.O. Box 3257, Chapel
Hill, N.C., 27515.
on lheir heaIlh, and sludies
show lhal secondhand smoke
doesn`l harm anvone as Iong as
il was a cerlain dislance awav.¯
When I came back, aII lhe
bodv bags were removed and lhe
sign was defaced wilh cigarelle
burn hoIes. As a nonconfron-
lalionaI person, I reaIized lhal
lhis dispIav is oul of characler
for me.
Bul, being a pharmacv slu-
denl, I can` l escape lhe reaIilv
of lhe heaIlh effecls of smok-
ing and was shocked lhal such
an honesl and lrulhfuI message
wouId be mel bv anger and
deslruclion.
When laIking wilh eIderIv
peopIe, oflen limes I am sad-
dened bv lhose who have
emphvsema from vears of lobac-
co. I wonder if lhev have anv
regrels aboul smoking, because
il affecls lheir brealhing manv
vears Ialer.
Yes, lhe reason someone
smokes is muIlifacloriaI, bul
jusl lhink ÷ how do I wanl mv
quaIilv of Iife lo be 1u, 2u, õu
vears from now?
Souou Zucco:cllo
G:oouotc Coo:oiuoto:
Tobocco Ccssotiou Aouocotcs
Allowing travel to Cuba
creates more opportunities
TO THE EDITOR.
In lhe summer of 2uu6, I
¨broke lhe Iaw¯ bv lraveIing lo
Cuba.
If lhe recenlIv inlroduced,
biparlisan biII lo aIIow lraveI
belween lhe Uniled Slales and
Cuba passes bolh houses, I mighl
nol need IegaI represenlalion
when I relurn lhis summer.
Mosl pro-lraveI ban poIili-
cians cIaim lhev wanl lo ensure
lhal Cubans can enjov human
righls and unliI lhen, lhe lraveI
ban shouId remain.
The probIem is lwo-foId;
firsl, lhere is no correIalion
belween allempling lo slarve
a nalion and increased poIili-
caI freedom; second, lhere is
no idenlifiabIe principIe behind
lhe posilion.
Cuba i s lhe onI v nali on
againsl which we have a lraveI
ban amongsl scores of coun-
lries wilh poor human righls
records.
In our counlrv, which prides
ilseIf on personaI freedoms, lhe
governmenl shouId nol leII lheir
cilizens where lhev are aIIowed
lo lraveI.
An end lo lhe lraveI ban
wouId aIso faciIilale lrade wilh
Cuba, crealing jobs and provid-
ing an infIux of capilaI inlo our
economv.
The isIand nalion`s ideaI
Iocalion and Iarge popuIalion
couId serve as a markel for
U.S. goods, incIuding goods
produced in Norlh CaroIina.
Il is aIso ridicuIous lo lake
awav resources from reaI secu-
rilv lhreals and use lhem lo
harass lourisls seeking lo Iearn
aboul anolher cuIlure.
I urge evervone lo caII lheir
U.S. senalors and ask lhem lo
supporl biII S. 428.
Al a lime when our new pres-
idenl seeks lo fix lhe nalion`s
broken image around lhe worId,
ending lhis Iong slanding hvpo-
crilicaI poIicv wouId provide a
good slep in lhal direclion.
Justiu Ilo:cs
Thi:o-uco:
UNC School of Lou
G^pikh`kZfZbf^]Zm_b`ambg``Zg`obhe^g\^
\hfbg`mh<aZi^eAbee%Zg]p^g^^]bm
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
¨Slijjiug slccj souuos lilc o
su:c-fi:c jlou to gct o jojc: ou
Tucsoou.¨
— ON “HOW TO SNAG YOUR COPY OF TUESDAY’S ISSUE (IF
UNC WINS)”
EDITOR’S NOTE: Columns, cartoons and letters do not necessarily represent the opinions
of The Daily Tar Heel or its staff. Editorials reflect the opinions of The Daily Tar Heel edito-
rial board. The board consists of eight board members, the associate opinion editor, the
opinion editor and the editor.
WEDNESDAY:
Public Editor Eric Johnson writes
about accuracy at the DTH and its
mission as a teaching paper.
Estoblishco 1808,
11ó uco:s
of coito:iol f:ccoou
I]Z9V^anIVg=ZZa
ALLISON NICHOLS
EDITOR, 962-4086
NALLISON@EMAIL.UNC.EDU
OFFICE HOURS:
MON., WED. 2-3 P.M.
ERIC JOHNSON
PUBLIC EDITOR
ERICJOHNSON@UNC.EDU
ABBEY CALDWELL
JAMES DING
PATRICK FLEMING
NATE HAINES
PETE MILLER
CAMERON PARKER
ANDREW STILES
CHRISTIAN YODER
HARRISON JOBE
OPINION EDITOR
HJOBE@EMAIL.UNC.EDU
MEREDITH ENGELEN
ASSOCIATE OPINION EDITOR
EMEREDIT@EMAIL.UNC.EDU
EDITORIAL BOARD MEMBERS