Swinburne University of Technology Faculty of Information and Communication Technologies Systems Implementation and Acquisition Management HIT3410/8410

Teaching Period Semester 2, 2007
Credit Points 12.5

Duration & Contact Hours 3 hours per week for one semester Prerequisites Learning Objectives The student who successfully completes this unit of study will be able to:
• • Demonstrate knowledge of the issues and options available to providing organisational IT services. Evaluate the pros and cons of differing approaches to acquiring systems, and demonstrate an ability to match particular approaches to particular organisational contexts. Discuss the issues associated with software package selection, including requirements specification, selection criteria, vendor due diligence, and apply tools and techniques to business cases. Demonstrate an understanding of the principles and processes involved in software vendor selection and management, and contract negotiation and management. Explain the major issues and human concerns in IT-related organisational transformation, identify causes and consequences of human resistance to change, and to show an ability to identify and implement steps to effectively manage change in an organisation. Compare approaches and frameworks for implementing systems in organisations, and appreciate the purpose and approaches to post implementation reviews. Compare various approaches to user education, training and documentation. Demonstrate appropriate communications skills in group work and written and oral presentations

HIT1401 Introduction to Business Information Systems or equivalent,

• •

• •

Graduate Attributes
o  

Are capable in their chosen professional areas: To be able to apply skills in a practical context. Have an understanding of underlying concepts

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 o

Have an appropriate blend of breadth and depth of IS management knowledge Are able to analyse problems, design alternative solutions and make rationale choices. Operate effectively and ethically in work and community situations Are able to function as an effective team member with the capacity to lead and manage project teams Have the ability to effectively communicate using a range of media and in varied contexts. Have the ability to present well-reasoned arguments. Have the ability to plan and manage their time efficiently Have the ability to listen to and understand the views of others Have an understanding of the professional and ethical responsibilities of an IT professional. Have an understanding of cultural and accessibility issues in an IT context. Have an understanding of the global nature of the IT industry. Have a broad understanding of the role of IT in organisations and society. Have an understanding of business structures and objectives. Have the ability to identify and realise opportunities by innovatively applying IT knowledge and skills.

Are adaptable and manage change. 

o

Operate effectively in work and community situations     

o

Are aware of environments.     

o

Are entrepreneurial.  

Content
• • Understanding business needs and drivers for new systems, Build vs buy decisions, selecting software packages and vendors, criteria, vendor due diligence, open source opportunities and implications, obtaining detailed information and evaluation; Functionality gaps and modification issues: Legal issues, contracts, licences, professional service agreements and negotiating. Integration and implementation considerations. Risk management Building and selling a business case, benefits management and prioritising projects, Implementation options, leadership and processes Planning implementation projects Management of IT-based change, motivating organisational change and innovation Software installation, implementation project leadership, team members and communication Software configuration, interfaces, data management, simulation management, budget management Common software issues, versions and patches, instances, bugs, gaps. Reporting Documentation and training Recovering implementation projects in difficulties Preparing to go live with new systems, the cut over process Post implementation evaluation and reviews Systems maintenance and user support

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

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Learning and Teaching Method Lectures: 2 hours per week

The lectures will introduce the topics and readings. Students are expected to explore the topic further through the prescribed reading, and their own research. Students are expected to share and demonstrate their knowledge, learning and ideas through presentations and participating in discussions in the Lecture session and tutorial discussions. Tutorials: 1 hour per week. Students may only attend the tutorial to which they have been allocated. Assignment Mark Allocation 1. Assignment 1 (Group) 2. Assignment 2 (Group) 3. Assignment 3 (Individual) Final Examination Assessment Details
Assignment 1: Specifying and choosing a software application. (10%) Due 7 September 2007 As a member of a four-person team your task is to specify, determine the options, choose, and then prepare a short recommendation justifying your selection, of an online application. It should be suitable for collaborating online on a group assignment. This might be a project management application or similar. The system is to be available online, at no cost or within a budget you agree is acceptable. It should be suitable for a group of students such as yourselves, to use to manage group assignments now and in the balance of the semester. Expected deliverables: 1. The overall purpose of the application you are looking for, the functionality it needs to have with a brief explanatory rationale including assumptions you have made, and any other criteria you decide to use in your search and selection. 2. A short list of the software options available, together with a summary of the process you used to find and short list them. 3. Your software recommendation together with the reasons for your selection. 4. An outline of the process you used to make the selection. 5. An individual reflective journal kept during the assignment with regular entries about the experience of working on the assignment and things you learned as you went along. Up to 1000 words. To be individually submitted. (2.5%) (see example below). 6. A brief (10 minute) PowerPoint presentation covering (1) to (4) above. (2.5%) 7. Minutes of each team meeting including date, time, location, members attending, key points discussed such as progress (or lack of it) since last meeting, decisions made, actions agreed and who assigned to. This is a hurdle requirement for this assignment but no marks as such will be awarded for it.

10% 20% 30%

due 7 Sept 2007 due 19 Oct 2007 due 2 Nov 2007

40%

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Items (1-4) above should not exceed 1500 words. A word count should be included in your submitted document. The list of options should be attached as an appendix and will not count towards the word count. Item (6), the presentation, is to be given during the Tutorial in Weeks 4 and 5 (see separate schedule). The written components (Items 1-5 and 7) are due by 5pm on Friday 7 September 2007 and should be submitted as hardcopy to the ICT Faculty Administration Office on the ground floor of the EN Building. Ensure each piece of your work has the standard Cover Sheet attached at the front with your name and student number. You can download a copy of the Cover Sheet from Blackboard, HIT3410/8410, Assessment Folder. There will normally be penalties for late submission.

Assignment 2: Researching Packaged Applications for an industry. Due 19 Oct 2007 This assignment will count as 20% towards your overall assessment. You are a member of a four person consulting team asked to research packaged software applications for a particular industry. You may pick any work area or industry from the list or nominate one of your choice. Your selection must be registered with and approved by your Tutor no later than 5pm Friday 14 September 2007. Choose from one of the below or a subset of those below: Agriculture/Horticulture Hospitality Manufacturing/Processing Healthcare Retailing Civic Administration Travel Education Engineering Publishing Freight/Distribution Education Engineering Publishing Farming Utilities Real Estate Freight/Distribution Entertainment Building Communications/Media

You are to clarify the high level functionality required in the work area or industry (or a specified sub-section of it), and then to research the packaged software applications available today in Australia, their key functionality and ways they are differentiated, licensing options, and likely cost. Also research the infrastructure they require to run on and the support available both for implementation and ongoing. Expected Deliverables: 1. An outline of the industry eg a subset of the hospitality industry such as hotel management, and the high level functionality required of software to support it, eg room reservations, guest billing, maintenance, staffing and so on. In each case give a brief explanation of the functionality required, the scale (such as the number of rooms). Detailed requirements are not expected, but do state the assumptions you make about the industry or organisation for which you are seeking software. Include a brief description of your research process. 2. An overview of the commonly available packaged software applications available in Australia today, the infrastructure they require, their high level functionality and how they are differentiated. This may be in the form of a table. Do not plagiarise from corporate brochures, though you may include such brochures in an appendix. 3. A review and commentary on the licensing of selected different applications and how they differ and likely costs. 4. A review and commentary on the support available for these selected applications (both pre and post-implementation).

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5. 6. 7.

An individual reflective journal kept during the assignment with regular entries about the experience of working on the assignment and things you learned as you went along. (5%, individually submitted and marked). Up to 1000 words. A brief (10 minute) PowerPoint presentation covering (1) to (4) above. Each member of the team is to speak during the presentation. Minutes of each team meeting including date, time, location, members attending, key points discussed such as progress (or lack of it) since last meeting, decisions made, actions agreed and who assigned to. This is a hurdle requirement for this assignment but no marks as such will be awarded for it.

Items (1-4) above should not exceed 2000 words. Include a word count in your document. Corporate brochures may be attached as an Appendix and not be included in the word count. Item (6), the presentation, is to be given during the Tutorial in Weeks 9 and 10 (a schedule will be prepared by your Tutor). The written components (Items 1-5 and 7) are to be submitted in hard copy by 5pm on Friday 19th October 2006 to the ICT Faculty Administration Office on the ground floor of the EN Building. Ensure each piece of your work has the standard Cover Sheet attached at the front with your name and student number. You can download a copy of the Cover Sheet from Blackboard, HIT3410/8410, Assessment Folder. Assignment 3: TBC This assignment is to be done individually and will count as 30% towards your final assessment. It should not exceed 2000 words. A hard copy of this assignment is to be submitted by 5pm Friday 2nd November 2007. to the ICT Faculty Administration Office on the ground floor of the EN Building. Ensure it has the standard Cover Sheet attached at the front with your name and student number. You can download a copy of the Cover Sheet from Blackboard, HIT3410/8410, Assessment Folder. Notes: 1. Example of a journal entry. Monday 20 August. At our last group meeting I agreed to [list tasks you took on]. Today I searched on the web for online project management applications for an hour. [Detail here how you searched] There were more than I expected. [List here some of the applications you found and looked at] Have been thinking about ways to categorise them. I need to think of criteria and build a table to compare them. [List possible criteria] Rang Josie and talked with her about it. She’s checking out the Project Management Institute site but hasn’t started yet. We need to arrange another meeting to see how everybody is going but nobody seems available. This is harder than I thought. Maybe if Josie and I worked together on it, it would be easier?

Pass requirements
This unit is intended to be an interactive forum for the exchange of views, ideas and experiences. Students are expected to arrive at each tutorial prepared to discuss the topic(s) and/or case(s) and/or discussion question(s) which have been scheduled. To pass this unit of study, a student must: • achieve at least 50% on assessment items 1-3 combined (i.e. must get a mark of 30/60 for assessment items 1-3 above), • and should attempt and submit all assessment items by the due dates unless an extension has been obtained form the unit Lecturer. Failure to attempt all Requests for extensions should be submitted to the Lecturer prior to the due date. • and must obtain at least 50% (a mark of 20/40) for the final examination.

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Unit Notes
Lecture presentations, details of readings (and links to readings where appropriate) and tutorial discussion materials will normally be posted on Blackboard well before the lecture but in some cases on a weekly basis. Please check Blackboard regularly. Recordings of Lectures Sound recordings will be made of all lectures and placed on Blackboard, where possible within 24hrs of the lecture. These can be listened to online or downloaded to an Ipod etc.

Text Book
The prescribed text is: Tayntor, C. B. (2006). Successful Packaged Software Implementation. Boca Raton, Auerbach Publications. This is available in the Swinburne Bookshop and purchase is recommended as many readings are drawn from this book and it will be a useful guide both during the Semester, in revision for exams and in future IS management work. Additional Readings will also be drawn from: Anderson, D & Anderson, L, (2001) Beyond Change Management: Advanced Strategies for Today’s Transformational Leaders. Pfeiffer. Baschlab, J & Piot, J, (2003) The Executives Guide to Information Technology, New York, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Cohen, A. R. & Bradford, D. L. (1989) Influence without Authority, New York, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Gelinas, UJ, Sutton, SG & Hutton, JE, (2005) Acquiring, Developing and Implementing Accounting Information Systems, Mason, Ohio, Thomson Gray, P. (2006) Managers Guide to Making Decisions about Information Systems, Hoboken, NJ, USA, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Marchewka, J. (2003) Information Technology Project Management, John Wiley & Sons McAfee. A, (2003) When too much knowledge is a dangerous thing. Sloan Management Review, 44(2): 83-89. Myerson J, (Ed) (2002) Enterprise System Integration, Boca Raton, Auerbach Starinsky, R. W. (2003) Maximising Business Performance through Software Packages, Boca Raton, Auerbach Publications. Ward, J. & Daniel, E. (2006) Benefits Management: Delivering Value from IS & IT Investments, Chichester England, John Wiley & Sons. Plus articles from a number of academic and professional journals. A detailed weekly reading list is published on the HIT3410/8410 Blackboard site.

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Provisional Outline:
The content of each class and tutorial is a guide only and is subject to alteration in both order and emphasis. For more detail on the Readings see Blackboard. Students should regularly check the Unit Pages in Blackboard for announcements and details regarding classes, changes, readings, assessment and other relevant information.

Week 1

Date 9 August 2007 16 August 2007

Lecture Topic Introduction and overview of this Unit; Packaged software and its growing use. Acquisition & implementation as projects. Introduction to Benefits Management. Understanding organisation software needs. Software acquisition as a project. Leading change.

Tutorial No tutorial in Week 1.

Reading / Notes Unit outline Tayntor pp.3-11 Ward & Daniel pp35-47 Tayntor pp. 12-26 Gelinas pp. 2-12, 18-24 Anderson pp. 31-40 Gray pp227-8

2

Introductions, Set up Study Groups Discuss Assignment 1 Review & Set up Group Assig. 1 Discus the project management approach Assignmt. Prog.Review. Discuss Tayntor & Gelinas readings Assignment 1 Group presentations Assignment 1 Group presentations (cont)

3

23 August 2007

Formal selection processes. Evaluating software and vendors. Building management & employee support. Risk management skills Legal issues, contracts, licences, professional service agreements, service contracts and negotiating. Implementation considerations and leadership options. Risk management

Tayntor pp. 29-82 Gelinas pp. 24-29

4

30 August 2007 6 Sept 2007

Tayntor pp. 85-132

5

Tayntor pp. 137-161 Assignment 1 to be submitted by 5pm Friday 7 September 2007. Tayntor pp. 163-190 Ward & Daniels pp. 167-200 Topic for Assignment 2 to be confirmed with Tutor by 5pm Friday 14 September.

6

13 Sept 2007

Building a business case; Selling the solution; Managing change involving IS.

Discussion on negotiating, licensing and initial planning for implementation. Discussion on course so far.

Mid-semester break 7 27 Sept 2007 Overview of the implementation process, issues to be considered, high level planning Group Assignments returned. Discussion on Leadership in implmt.projects Discussion on driving & supporting org.change Assignment 2 Group presentations Assignment 2 Group presentations (cont) Tayntor pp. 195-204 Starinsky pp. 323-359

8

4 October 2007 11 Oct 2007 18 Oct

Software Installation, project leadership, team structure & members, implementation communication Software configuration, interfaces, data management, simulation management, budget management Managing software issues, versions and patches, instances, bugs, gaps, reporting,

9 10

Tayntor pp. 205-216 Marchewka Chpt 9 on Project Communication. Tayntor pp. 217-232, Tayntor pp. 233-250 Assignment 2 to be

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Week

Date 2007

Lecture Topic documentation and training. Salvaging implementation projects in trouble, preparing to go live, cutover processes. Post-implementation support, review, learning from the Project, Looking forward.

Tutorial Discussion on documentation and training. Group Assignment 2 returned in Tutorial.

11 12

25 Oct 2007 1 Nov 2007

Reading / Notes submitted by 5pm Friday 19th October. Myerson et al pp.721729 Tayntor pp. 263-283 Marchewka Chpt 12 Assignment 3 to be submitted no later than 5pm Friday 2nd November 2007

Exam preparation

Convenor: Name: Dr. Nick Grainger Room EN513A Telephone: 9214-8056 E-mail: ngrainger@ict.swin.edu.au Consultation Times: by appointment Tutors: Name: Telephone: E-mail: Mr Lasath Kahingala Name: Telephone: E-mail: Ms Loushinie Sathasivam Faculty of Information and Communication Technologies Level 5 EN Building Phone: 9214 5505 Fax: 9819 0823 Web Site: http://www.ict.swin.edu.au/

Special Information: Unit Blackboard Site This unit of study will utilise the Blackboard system for web access to learning material such as materials for tutorial activities, lecture materials, recommended web sites, examination information, assignment handouts and other important information. See http://mysubjects.swin.edu.au

Assessment Details and Regulations
Attendance Requirements: Students are expected to attend all scheduled classes for the unit of study. This unit of study is not available in external mode. Assessment Moderation: Students should be aware that the marks awarded during teaching period and for the final examination may be subject to moderation.

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