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it
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Life's but a walking shadow ...
It is a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signify nothing.
W. Shakespeare

HIGH COMMAND
Grand tactical rules
for the second World War


Copyright 2005 - 2006 Richard Affinati


Game Designer:
Richard Affinati (ITALY)

Graphics Wizard and Chief Playtester:
Mike Patton (USA)


Acknowledgments:

Norman MacKenzie
“Kiss Rommel”
Luca Mazzamuto
“Alto Comando”
Lorenzo Sartori
“Dadi & Piombo”
Andrew Carless
“Translations”
Historical Background
www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk and www.topedge.com
QUESTIONS:

Please direct any questions or comments about the game to:

Riccardo Affinati: affinati@tin.it

CATALOGING IN PUBLICATION:

www.accademiawargame.it


Dedication:
HIGH COMMAND is dedicated as a token of remembrance to the soldiers
of the Second World War.
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HIGH COMMAND
Grand tactical rules
for the second World War

GAME PHILOPHY

For many years we played Napoleonic
battles in such a tactical way that warga-
mers would never allow us to field more
than a couple of Division per side. Then
we discovered methods that allowed us
to simulate entire battles without them
getting too complicated. However today
that old destructive mentality still ruins
our Second World War games, preven-
ting us from recreating entire battles.
At the most, expert wargamers put a few
more tanks and platoons on immense
tables and worry about tactical problems
and the thickness of armour, without e-
xmaning the strategic or gaming aspects
that are implicit in combats between in-
fantry division and armoured brigades.
With HIGH COMMAND we can play the
entire Normandy landigs, or even the
battles on the Russian Front or in Africa.


Richard Affinati

HISTORICAL BACKGROUND

When Benito Mussolini declared war on
the Allies on 10th June 1940, he already
had over a million men in the Italian Army
based in Libya. In neighbouring Egypt
the British Army had only 36,000 men
guarding the Suez Canal and the Arabian
oil fields. On 13th September, 1940, Mar-
shall Rodolfo Graziani and five Italian di-
visions began a rapid advance into Egypt
but halted in front of the main British de-
fences at Mersa Matruh. Although out-
numbered, General Archibald Wawell
ordered a British counter-offensive on 9th
December, 1940. The Italians suffered
heavy casualties and were pushed back
more than 800km (500 miles). British tro-
ops moved along the coast and on 22nd
January, 1941, they captured the port of
Tobruk in Libya from the Italians.
Ligth Tank M.3A1 STUART III
Adolf Hitler was shocked by the defeats
being suffered by the Italian Army and in
January 1941, sent General Erwin Rom-
mel and the recently formed Deutsches
Africa Korps to North Africa. Rommel
mounted his first attack on 24th March
1941, and after a week of fighting he pu-
shed Archibald Wawell and the British
Army out of most of Libya. However, un-
der Lieutenant General Lesile Morshead
the British managed to hold vital forward
supply base at Tobruk.
Aerchibald Wawell attempted a counter-
attack on 17th June, 1941, but his troops
were halted at Halfaya Pass. Three we-
eks later he was replaced by General
Claude Auchinleck.
On 18th November, 1941, Auchinleck
and the recently formed Eighth Army
went on the offensive. Erwin Rommel
was forced to abandon his siege of To-
bruk on 4th December, and the following
month had moved as far west as Archo-
bald Wawell had achieved a year pre-
viously. Aware that Wavell's supply lines
were now overextended, Rommel, after
obtaining reinforcements from Tripoli,
launched a counterattack. It was now the
turn of the British Army to retreat. After
losing Benghazi on 29th January, Claude
Auchinleck ordered his troops to retreat
to Gazala.
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Over the next few months the Eighth
Army, under Lieutenant General Neil Ri-
chie, established a line of fortifications
and minefields. Erwin Rommel launched
his offensive on 26th May. The Italian in-
fantry attacked at the front while Rommel
led his panzers round the edge of the
fortifications to cut off the supply routes.
Ritchie outnumbered Rommel by two to
one but he wasted his advantage by not
using his tanks together. After defeating
a series of small counter-attacks Rommel
was able to capture Sidi Muftah. On 12th
June, two of the three British armoured
brigades were caught in a pincer move-
ment and were badly defeated. Two days
later Neil Richie, with only 100 tanks left,
abandoned Gazala. Rommel returned to
Tobruk and took the port on 21st June,
1942. This included the capture of over
35,000 British troops. However, Rommel
now only had 57 tanks left and was for-
ced to wait for new supplies to arrive be-
fore heading into Egypt.
In July 1942, General Erwin Rommel and
the Italo-German Panzer Armee Afrika,
(part of the Deutsches Africa Korps) were
only 113km (70 miles) from Alexandria.
The situation was so serious that Win-
ston Churchill made the long journey to
Egypt to discover for himself what nee-
ded to be done. Churchill decided to ma-
ke changes to the command structure.
General Harold Alexander was placed in
charge of British land forces in the Middle
East and Bernard Montgomery became
commander of the Eighth Army.
On 30th August, 1942, Erwin Rommel
attacked at Alam el Halfa but was repul-
sed by the Eighth Army. Montgomery re-
sponded to this attack by ordering his tro-
ops to reinforce the defensive line from
the coast to the impassable Qattara De-
pression. Montgomery was now able to
make sure that Rommel and the German
Army was unable to make any further a-
dvances into Egypt.
Erwin Rommel

Over the next six weeks Montgomery be-
gan to stockpile vast quantities of wea-
pons and ammunition to make sure that
by the time he attacked he possessed
overwhelming firepower. By the middle of
October the Eighth Army totalled 195,000
men, 1,351 tanks and 1,900 pieces of
artillery. This included large numbers of
recently delivered Sherman M4 and
Grant M3 tanks. On 23rd October Mon-
tgomery launched Operation Lightfoot
with the largest artillery bombardment
since theFirst World War. The attack ca-
me at the worst time for the Deutsches
Africa Korps as Eewin Rommel was on
sick leave in Austria. His replacement,
General Geaorge Stumme, died of a he-
art-attack the day after the 900 gun bom-
bardment of the German lines. Stume
was replaced by General Ritter von Tho-
ma and Adolf Hitler phoned Rommel to
order him to return to Egypt immediately.

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The Germans defended their positions
well and after two days the Eighth Army
had made little progress and Bernard
Montgomery ordered an end to the at-
tack. When Erwin Rommel returned he
launched a counterattack at Kidney De-
pression (27th October). Montgomery
now returned to the offensive and the 9th
Australian Division created a salient in
the enemy positions.
Winston Churchill was disappointed by
the Eighth Army's lack of success and
accused Montgomery of fighting a "half-
hearted" battle. Montgomery ignored the-
se criticisms and instead made plans for
a new offensive, Operation Supercharge.
On 1st November 1942, Montgomery
launched an attack on the Deutsches A-
frica Korps at Kidney Ridge. After initially
resisting the attack, Rommel decided he
no longer had the resources to hold his
line and on the 3rd November he ordered
his troops to withdraw. However, Adolf
Hitler overruled his commander and the
Germans were forced to stand and fight.
The next day Montgomery ordered his
men forward. The Eighth Army broke
through the German lines and Erwin
Rommel, in danger of being surrounded,
was forced to retreat. Those soldiers on
foot, including large numbers of Italian
soldiers, were unable to move fast e-
nough and were taken prisoner.
For a while it looked like the the British
would cut off Rommel's army but a sud-
den rain storm on 6th November turned
the desert into a quagmire and the cha-
sing army was slowed down. Rommel,
now with only twenty tanks left, managed
to get to Sollum on the Egypt-Libya bor-
der. On 8th Novembre Erwin Rommel
learned of the Allied invasion of Morocco
and Algeria that was under the command
of General Dwigth D. Eisenhower. His
depleted army now faced a war on two
front.
Cruiser Tank Mk.VI(A.15) CRUSADER II

The British Army recaptured Tobruk on
12th November, 1942. During the El Ala-
mein campaign half of Rommel's 100,000
man army was killed, wounded or taken
prisoner. He also lost over 450 tanks and
1,000 guns. The British and Commonwe-
alth forces suffered 13,500 casualties
and 500 of their tanks were damaged.
However, of these, 350 were repaired
and were able to take part in future bat-
tles.
Winston Churchil was convinced that the
battle of El Alamein marked the turning
point in the war and ordered the ringing
of church bells all over Britain. As he said
later: "Before Alamein we never had a
victory, after Alamein we never had a de-
feat."
Allied troops continued to advance on
Tunis, the capital of Tunisia. General
Kenneth Anderson got to within 12 miles
of Tunis before being attacked at Djedei-
da by General Walther Nehring and the
Deutsches Africa Korps . A further at-
tempt by the Allies to reach Tunis was
halted by bad weather on 24th Decem-
ber, 1942.
General Jurgen von Arnim now arrived to
take control of the German forces in Tu-
nisia. In January 1943 he was joined by
General Erwin Rommel and his army in
southern Tunisia. Rommel was in retreat
from Egypt and was being chased by Ge-
neral Bernard Montgomery and the 8th
Army.
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Montgomery now spent several weeks in
Tripoli building up his supplies. Arnium
and Rommel decided to take this oppor-
tunity to attack Allied forces led by Gene-
ral Kenneth Anderson at Faid Pass (14th
February) and Kasserine Pass (19th Fe-
bruary). The Deutsches Africa Korps
then headed for Thala but were forced to
retreat after meeting a large Allied force
on 22nd February, 1943. General Harold
Alexander was now sent to oversee Al-
lied operations in Tunisia whereas Gene-
ral Erwin Rommel was placed in com-
mand of the German forces. On 6th
March 1943, Rommel attacked the Allies
at Medenine. General Bernard Montgo-
mery and the 8th Army fought off the at-
tack and the Germans were forced to wi-
thdraw. Rommel now favoured a full re-
treat but this was rejected by Adolf Hitler.
On 9th March, Rommel left Tunisia on
health grounds and was replaced by Ge-
neral Jurgen von Arnim as commander of
the Deutsches Africa Korps. Arnium now
concentrated in defending a 100 mile arc
across north-east Tunisia. By April 1943
the Allies had over 300,000 men in Tuni-
sia. This gave them a 6-to-1 advantage
in troops and a 15-to-1 superiority in
tanks. The Allied blockade of the Medi-
terranean also made it difficult for the
German Army to be supplied with ade-
quate amounts of fuel, ammunition and
food. The Allies now decided to make
another effort to take Tunis. General O-
mar Bradley, who had replaced General
Gorge Patton, as commander of the 2nd
Corps, joined General Bernard Montgo-
mery for the offensive. On 23rd April the
300,000 man force advanced along a 40
mile front. At the same time there was a
diversionary attack by the 8th Army at
Enfidaville. On 7th May 1943, British for-
ces took Tunis and the US Army captu-
red Bizerte. By 13th May all Axis forces
in Tunisia surrendered and over 150,000
were taken prisoner.
www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk
Bernard Montgomery

WEAPONS IN NORTH AFRICA

The fact that Rommels DAK (Deutsches
Afrika Korps) in North Africa contained
equipment which was far more advanced
and effective than the Eighth Armies e-
quivalent meant that the campaign lasted
much longer than it may have done o-
therwise, whilst at the same time there
were not sufficient numbers of them to
become a decisive factor in the cam-
paign. For instance, when the British
launched Operation Crusader in late No-
vember 1941 “the 8th Army outnumbered
the combined Axis force (118,000 men to
113,000), had 680 tanks (with 500 in re-
serve or in supply) to Rommels 390 and
1000 British planes confronted 320 Axis
aircraft. The 88mm flak gun was used as
an anti-tank gun more and more fre-
quently as the conflict progressed and
the Allies were slow to grasp its efect u-
pon the battlefield. At a startling 2000
yards it could still penetrate the British
tanks frontal armour, which made it an
extremely lethal weapon in the Germans
armoury and a severe threat to the Bri-
tish tanks throughout the Desert War. All
the technical edges which Rommel’s Afri-
ka Korps had over the Eighth army hel-
ped Rommel to inflict heavy losses on
the British, inevitably lengthening the de-
sert war. This had to weighed up against
the fact that the Italians weapons were
as much a liability as were the German
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ones superior. The Afrika Korps did not
receive sufficient numbers of these supe-
rior weapons, such as the Panther and
Tiger tanks or the 88mm flak guns to e-
nable it to be a decisive factor in the
campaign, but there were enough to len-
gthen the Desert war considerably.

COMMANDERS AND THEIR TACTICS
IN THE WESTERN DESERT
In literature on the North African Cam-
paign in the Second World War, both
Rommel and Montgomeryas portrayed at
tactical genius`s that turned certain defe-
at into victory; this is due to the fact that
history prefers to glorify people and bat-
tles rather than an aspect of warfare
such as supplies. Rommel`s crowning
glory is said to have been at Gazala in
May 1942 and Montgomery`s at El Ala-
mein in October 1942. Likewise in Octo-
ber 1942 Montgomery enjoyed a numeri-
cal superiority that no other British com-
mander had possessed in North Africa as
the Eighth army had received 300 Sher-
man tanks more capable of matching the
lower grade Panzer tanks and 100 self
propelled guns in time for the El Alamein
offensive, so from these statistics it is
clear that logistical considerations were
much more decisive factors than Second
World War literature cares to mention.
One couldn`t help feeling a little sorry for
the man at this time. He had shown him-
self a brilliant fighter in the desert; three
times he had escaped Montgomery`s ef-
forts to surround his panzer army; he had
been consistently starved of supplies and
equipment.
1
Rommel was constantly held
back by the lack of fuel and ammunition,
which highlights the fact that supplies
were a much more significant factor than
commanders and their tactics. There is
also the fact that both strategies were
very similar aswell. At Gazala Rommels
attack was in accordance with the best
German textbookstrategy and looking
back on the battle of France, it all soun-
ded rather familiar. This was the case
Panzer IV
with Montgomery`s strategy too; where
deception was to play a key role and an
attack was to be made in the suprise
flank with the aim of outflanking and en-
circling the enemy. This clearly shows
that the tactics employed at Gazala and
El Alamein although effective, were not
original. Rommel successfully attacked at
Gazala, but then ignored Hitler and Ca-
vallero`s orders to pause, and pursued
the retreating Eighth Army 250 miles ac-
cross the desert to El Alamein. To put it
bluntly, Rommel had over-stretched him-
self
4
and this was as much a failure as
his Gazala battle had been a success,
but again literature selectively excludes
this in order to sustain the popular image
of Rommel as a tactical genious. Mon-
tgomery showed extreme caution when
pursuing the Axis forces after El Alamein,
which he could afford to do as his over-
whelming numerical superiority neccesi-
tated no hasty pursuit and the forces
from the Torch landings now formed the
1st Army which was also advancing in
the direction of Tunis. Rommel was for-
ced to go on the offensive at Alam Halfa-
because he knew the advantage of nu-
merical superiority would soon lay in the
hands of the Eighth Army. Fuel was in
short supply and the Afrika Corps had
insufficient Air support and all these fac-
tors led to Rommels defeat.
www.topedge.com
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BASING

We play with units (HQ, Artillery, Recon,
Infantry, Tank, Motorised Infantry) on ba-
se (measuring 3cm x 3cm for 6mm mi-
niatures; 6cm/12cm for 20mm or plastic
1/72), upon wich we then place the right
sort of soldier or vehicles. A base repre-
sent a battalion, more or less. If you have
troops that are already based for another
system you won’t have to change the ba-
sing as they are all the same. If you have
to start from scratch then try to create
some small dioramas, using your creati-
vity and modelling ability.
A truck and 3 or 4 soldiers will be enough
to represente a Motorised Infantry unit, a
Recon unit could be represented by an
armoured car and a couple of motorbike;
and for a tank unit, one tank will do.



IRREGULAR MINIATURE
3 Apollo Street, York YO10 5AP, UK
Tel/Fax: (in UK) 01904 671101
Tel/Fax: (overseas)+44 1904 671101 Email :
email@irregularmin.fsnet.co.uk
www.irregularminiatures.co.uk

6mm World War II - Armoured Divisions

40 Tanks and Vehicles and 20 Infantry strips (80
figures) Armoured Division Packs, for any Nation,
Year and Theatre. Made up to our own realistic
and balanced composition.

CONTENTS

FIGURES
German British Russian French Italian Ameri-
can Japanese Other Nations

TANKS, VEHICLES & GUNS
German Italian Japanese Polish French British
& Commonwealth American Russian

AIRCRAFT
German British Polish French Italian Rus-
sian American Japanese

PACKS
Armoured Divisions Battlepacks










BRITISH ARMOURED DIVISION




GERMAN PANZER DIVISION



HQ

TANK

TANK

TANK

RECON MOTORISED
INFANTRY
MOTORISED
INFANTRY
MOTORISED
INFANTRY
MOTORISED
INFANTRY
ARTILLERY ARTILLERY

HQ
TANK

TANK

MOTORISED
INFANTRY

MOTORISED
INFANTRY

TANK


MOTORISED
INFANTRY

MOTORISED
INFANTRY

RECON





ARTILLERY 88 MM

RECON

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BATTLE SET-UP


1. The table is divided into Zones a foot square, with bigger tables tending to impro-
ve the battle (preferably by extending it Southwards). The top (North) is considered
the Mediterranean and the south is the desert "sand sea".
2. Select forces using the Force Cards
3. Deploy British minefields followed by Axis ones
4. Deploy Italian forces, then British and lastly the Germans

Defences indicate minefields and dug-in positions with minefields being placed right
up to the centre line if wished.

Troops must be at least 6" - 15cm from the centre line. You need not put a Division's
troops near their HQ but this could be risky!

A Supply base (use a tent or supply truck model) is placed in the centre of each
"Supply" Zone. For a bigger table you might add other Supply bases further South.
Mediterranean Ocean
(optional) 120cm x 10cm
(optional) 48” x 4”
Axis Supply
30cm x 30cm
12” x 12”
Axis Defences
30cm x 30cm
12” x 12”
British Defences
30cm x 30cm
12” x 12”
British Supply
30cm x 30cm
12” x 12”
Axis Supply
30cm x 30cm
12” x 12”
Axis Defences
30cm x 30cm
12” x 12”
British Defences
30cm x 30cm
12” x 12”
British Supply
30cm x 30cm
12” x 12”
Axis Supply
30cm x 30cm
12” x 12”
Axis
30cm x 30cm
12” x 12”
British
30cm x 30cm
12” x 12”
British Supply
30cm x 30cm
12” x 12”
Axis
30cm x 30cm
12” x 12”
Axis
30cm x 30cm
12” x 12”
British
30x30cm
12” x 12”
British
30cm x 30cm
12” x 12”
Southern Desert
120cm x 30 or 60cm
48” x 12” or 24”
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TURN SEQUENCE

1. The German-Italian player may repla-
ce a “Dispersed” unit (one for the entire
army).
2. The German-Italian player may move
his units (including the replacements)
and place aircraft units.
3. The German-Italian units may fire.
4. The British player may replace a
“Dispersed” unit (one for the entire army).
5. The British player may move his units
(including the replacements) and place
aircraft units.
6. The British units may fire.

There are 9 to 12 turns in a day. Throw
before each turn from 10 to 12 with a 5+
indicating the game has ended.

HEADQUARTERS (HQ)

Once per turn for the whole army the He-
adquarters (HQ) can bring back to the
battlefield any unit from its own Division
that was previously “Dispersed” (i.e. pla-
ced in the “Remplacements” box). This
means that the player must decide wich
Headquarters (HQ) will use the available
replacement that turn. If a unit that co-
mes back into play is “Dispersed” again it
can be replaced afterwards. The HQ is
one of the most important units as it can
bring “Dispersed” units removed from the
game back into play. You can move units
to anywhere on the battlefield but the
may be “Destroyed” and not “Dispersed”
if they are too far from the HQ.
It is also assumed that the HQ is where
the batteries of light artillery and anti-craft
units are located. The HQ cannot be
“Destroyed”, unless there are no other
units in its Division left on the table. In
this case it is considered “Destroyed”.
The “Dispersed” HQ is not removed from
the battlefield, but in the next turn it re-
places itself, without being able to repla-
ce other units in its Division. The unit that
is replaced is placet next to its Headquar-
ters (HQ).
The “Dispersed” HQ immediately moves
15cm/6” directly to its rear (distant by
enemy), and it cannot move or fire and
no unit in its Division can be replaced un-
til the HQ is back in action. In any case a
“Dispersed” HQ has a command radium
of 30cm for its Division, impeding the De-
struction of units in the Division within
30cm if they are hit during combat, but
not their Dispersion. If the HQ is shot a-
gain must go back 15cm/6”.
Headquarters (HQ) Rommel

MOVEMENT

Units have a 360° frontale and their mo-
vement is always straight in any
direction. They may not move closet than
5cm from an enemy unit. Units can only
leave the battlefield from their set-up
side. They are considered “Dispersed”.
You can measure anything during the
game.


FIRING

You can only fire on a unit that is within
firing range and sighting range. If a unit
in the Division manages to see an enemy
unit, it is assumed that the whole Division
can see it. A Division may not spot on
behalf of other Divisions. You may fire at
one unit at a time and you need to roll a
5+. Units will fire at the closet enemy unit
except for artillery that can fire at any
target. Units do not block line of sigth.
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SAVING THROW

Every time a unit is hit it must make a sa-
ving throw or be removed as Dispersed
(removed from the battlefield and put in a
box labelled “Remplacements”), and then
may be return later during the battle (see
HQ). Those units that are not within 30
cm or 12” of their Division HQ are classi-
fied as Destroyed and removed from the
battle (without the possibility of being re-
placed).
Tanks and Recon automatically fail the
Saving Throw if hit by a 88mm (Tiger or
Artillery).







TERRAIN

Only Artillery can fire over hills, woods or
villages. If a unit is on top of a hill or wi-
thin woods or villages the spotting range
for enemies that want to sight them is re-
duced by 8cm, and units in woods, hills
or villages get a +1 modifier on their Sa-
ving Throw (except for tanks). Villages,
woods and hills have a standard size of
12cm x 12 cm.


GERMAN STUKAS & BRITISH AIR
FORCE

Each side is allowed up to two air-strikes
per turn that can be used against any e-
nemy unit. Roll a dice:
5 – 6 = the target must make a saving
Throw or become Dispersed (Destroyed
if not within 30cm from the HQ).
2 – 4 = no effect.
1 = if the attack is within 30cm of an e-
nemy HQ, the attacking aircraft is Destro-
yed. From that moment onwards you ha-
ve one less air attack per turn for the rest
of the battle.
Italian Tank


VICTORY CONDITIONS

Each player gets 3 Victory Point (VPs)
for every Tank unit destroyed; 2 Victory
Points for each Light Tank or Artillery
(88mm) destroyed; each Supply base
destroyed counts as five VP's; and one
Victory Point for every other type of e-
nemy unit destroyed. If there are less
than 5 VP difference between the totals
then the game is a DRAW; between 5
and 9 is a VICTORY and a difference
greater than 10 is a DECISIVE VIC-
TORY. All the Dispersed units that were
waiting to come back as Replacements
are considered automatically Destroyed,
i.e. all units that have not been replaced
at the end of the established number of
turns and are still Dispersed are conside-
red Destroyed.

If you destroy all three enemy Supply Ba-
ses you may opt to end the game and
claim an immediate Major Victory!
German teams
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MINEFIELDS

Each side can have up to 60cm or 24" of
minefields (a base depth deep). To cross
an enemy minefield dice per unit that
tries:

5-6 = Get through OK, stopping on other
side;
2-4 = unit stopped in front of minefield;
1 = the unit is Scattered (or Destroyed if
not near the HQ)!

To clear a one base wide Gap (allowing
up to six units to pass through each turn),
get an infantry unit adjacent to the mine-
field and throw with a 5 or 6 to create a
Gap. Note that only one infantry unit per
Division may try this per turn
(representing the Divisional engineers /
pioneers; count the Free French
"Brigade" as a Division for this rule).






DUG IN

Up to 16 units may begin as Dug-in (in
substantial trenches, protected by barbed
wire, suitable model bases being requi-
red).
Infantry, artillery, 88mm's, and HQ's im-
prove their saving throw to 4+ and allows
them to Spot 7,5cm or 3" further, as well
as allowing them shooting in the Dug-in
phase. Note: troops Dug-in on a Hilltop
only increase Spotting by 7,5cm or 3"
maximum. Tanks and Recon can be "in"
the trenches but get no benefit from
them. Troops in captured positions do
not get the Spotting bonus as the tren-
ches probably face the wrong way! Alter-
natively you may simply remove captured
positions.


ITALIAN PROBLEMS

Count the Italian HQ distance as 22,5cm
or 9" rather than 30cm or 12". Italian Foot
Infantry is short of AT weapons, so requi-
re a 6 to hit Tanks.
Italian soldiers to Bardia
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ORGANIZATION
*These have no HQ but can be attached out to another HQ for the battle.

British Tanks can be any mix of Infantry
(heavy) or Cruiser (light fast) tanks.




Italian "88mm" were either their own
90mm AA guns or attached Luftwaffe
forces. The numbers of 88mm are exag-
gerated because their tactical effect was
truly brutal! Light AT and support bat-
teries are assumed parcelled out a-
mongst the infantry.


Force Division HQ Recon Tank
Motorised
Infantry
Foot
Infantry
Artillery 88mm
German Panzer 1 2 3 4 - 1 1

90th Light
and 164° Infanterie
1 2 - 6 - 1 1
Italian Tank or Special 1 - 4 2 - 1 1
Motorised 1 - - 7 - 1 1
Infantry 1 - - - 6 2 -
British Armoured 1 1 3 4 - 2 -
Infantry 1 1 - 9 - 2 -

Free French, Australian or
Neozeland Brigade
1 - - 3 - 1 -
Armoured Brigade - - 3* - - - -
5° Leichtedivision 1 2 2 3 - 1 1
15° Schutzen Brigade 1 1 - 4 - 1 -
22° Fallschirmjager 1 - - - 2 1 -

Black Shirt
or Libyan
1 - - - 4 1 -

Tactical group, Montemurro,
Santamaria, Maletti, ecc.
1 1 1 2 - - 1

Selby Group
or Polish Brigade
1 1 - 1 - 1
Detachment 1 1 3 - 2
USA Armoured 1 1 6 3 - 3 -
Infantry 1 1 - 9 - 4 -
Folgore 1 - - - 6 2 Anti tank
Artillery 88 mm
14
www.accademiawargame.it
UNITS















German tank
Nationality Battalion type Spotting Range Saving throw Speed
All nations Head Quarters (HQ) 15cm or 6” 15cm or 6" 6 15cm or 6"

Reconnaissance
(Recon)
22,5cm or 9" 15cm or 6" 5+ 22,5cm or 9"
Foot Infantry 15cm or 6" 15cm or 6" 6 7,5cm or 3"
Motorised Infantry 15cm or 6" 15cm or 6" 6 15cm or 6"
Artillery 15cm or 6" 45cm or 18” 6 15cm or 6"
Supply Base - - 6 -
Anti-tank gun 15cm or 6" 15cm or 6" 6 15cm or 6"
German Tanks 15cm or 6" 15cm or 6" 4+ 15cm or 6"
88mm 15cm or 6" 30cm or 12" 6 15cm or 6"
Fallschirmjager 15cm or 6" 15cm or 6" 5+ 7,5cm or 3"

Schwere Panzer Abtei-
lung 501 (only Tunisia
campaign)
15cm or 6" 22,5cm or 9" 3+ 10cm or 4"
Italian Tanks 15cm or 6" 15cm or 6" 5+ 15cm or 6"
Folgore Infantry 15cm or 6" 15cm or 6" 5+ 7,5cm or 3"
Bersaglieri Infantry 15cm or 6" 15cm or 6" 6 15cm or 6"
British or
USA
Infantry Tank 15cm or 6" 15cm or 6" 4+ 15cm or 6"
British Cruiser Tank 15cm or 6" 15cm or 6" 5+ 22,5cm or 9"
Light Tank 15cm or 6" 15cm or 6" 6 15cm or 6"
15
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September 1940. The Italian Tenth Army
under Marshal Rodolph Graziani invaded
Egypt from Libya. At Sidi Barrani, 60 miles
into Egypt, the Italian armyset up a series of
fortifies camps in the desert. Eight miles to
the east. The British Western Desert Force
under Ge. Sir O’Connor was based at Mersa
Matruh, the terminus of the railway and road
leading out fron Alexandria. In a surprise
march O’Connor army of 36.000 circled
south of the Italian defenses and attack the
sidi Barrani encampments from the flank and
rear on December 9. The first Axis threat to
the Suez Canal was smashed.
1) NORTH AFRICAN CAMPAIGN: ITALIAN OFFENSIVE.

















FORCE CARDS. Each side may chooses one card and then randomly deal trhee more. This is their
strength for the oncoming battle. For a quicker battle have four rather than five cards. Allow inexpe-
rienced players to choose two of their deal. Once you have got used to the system, you can add o-
ther forces as you wish, and feel free to have your favourite Divisions rather than those noted. We
are not doing an exact recreation of the campaign, but will aim at its feel from the post of a high-
ranking leader.


THE CAMPAIGN

The aim is, in a series of battles, to push the enemy back until Africa is cleared. Note that we start at
Sollum. A Victory pushes the enemy back one area; a Major Victory pushes two spaces. Losing their
"last stand" area means total defeat! You should rename the British commander after any Major De-
feat as they were constantly replaced!


Divisions that suffered half their bases Destroyed (ignore Dispersed), are left out of the Force Card
pack for the next game. All formations return to strength for their next use.
ITALIAN CARDS
Bologna
Italian
Infantry
Division
Sabratha
Italian
Infantry
Division
Savona
Italian
Infantry
Division
Pavia
Italian
Infantry
Division
Brescia
Italian
Infantry
Division
Sirte
Italian
Infantry
Division
1°CC. NN
Italian
Infantry
Division
(Black Shirt)
Blank!:
Planes
from
Malta
sink
supply
convoy!
BRITISH CARDS
7th British
Armoured Division
4th (Indian):
British Infantry Division
New Zealand
Infantry
Brigade
6th British:
Infantry Division
Blank!
Troops
diverted
to Greece
or Mala-
ya!
Tobruk
Italian last stand
Marsa Lucch Bardia Sollum Sidi el-Barrani
Marsa Matruh
British last stand
16
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1941. In Great Britain’s first offensive of the
North African campaign, the British XIII
Corps, crossed the Egyptian frontier into
Libya, following its victory at Sidi Barrani. At
the small Mediterranean port of Bardia, Ge.
Sir O’Connor army surrounded 45,000 tro-
ops of the Italian Tenth Army under the ove-
rall command of Marshal Graziani, on Ja-
nuary 3, 1941. Leaving mop-up operations
to the infantry, the 7th Armoured raced west
along the coast road (Via Balbia) to the for-
tress of Tobruk.
2) NORTH AFRICAN CAMPAIGN: FIRST BRITISH OFFENSIVE.

















FORCE CARDS. Each side may chooses one card and then randomly deal three more. This is their
strength for the oncoming battle. For a quicker battle have four rather than five cards. Allow inexpe-
rienced players to choose two of their deal. Once you have got used to the system, you can add o-
ther forces as you wish, and feel free to have your favourite Divisions rather than those noted. We
are not doing an exact recreation of the campaign, but will aim at its feel from the post of a high-
ranking leader.

THE CAMPAIGN

The aim is, in a series of battles, to push the enemy back until Africa is cleared. Note that we start at
Sidi Barrani. A Victory pushes the enemy back one area; a Major Victory pushes two spaces. Losing
their "last stand" area means total defeat! You should rename the British commander after any Major
Defeat as they were constantly replaced!


Divisions that suffered half their bases Destroyed (ignore Dispersed), are left out of the Force Card
pack for the next game. All formations return to strength for their next use.


ITALIAN CARDS
Cirene
Italian
Infantry
Division
Catanzaro
Italian
Infantry
Division
Marmarica
Italian
Infantry
Division
Special
Italian
Division
Maletti
Tactical
Group
1° Libyan
Italian
Infantry
Division
2°CC. NN
Italian
Infantry
Division
(Black Shirt)
Blank!:
Planes
from
Malta
sink
supply
convoy!
BRITISH CARDS
7th British
Armoured Division
4th (Indian)
British
Infantry
Division
Detachment
6th (Australian)
British Infantry
Division
Blank!
Troops
diverted
to Greece
or Mala-
ya!
Selby Group
Beda Fomm
Italian last stand
Bengasi Derna Tobruk Bardia
Marsa Matruh
British last stand
Sidi Barrani
17
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1941. Gen. Erwin Rommel’s first Axis offen-
sive in North Africa began on March 24, at El
Agheila, Libya. Meeting thin British resistan-
ce, he drove eastward rapidly, recapturing
an evacuated Benghazi on April 4 and rea-
ching Tobruk four days later. Rommel’s tro-
ops stormed Tobruk durino April 10-14 and
again on April 30 but were beaten back each
time. Meanwhile the Axis counterattack car-
ried eastward to the Egyptian frontier on A-
pril 28.
3) NORTH AFRICAN CAMPAIGN: FIRST AXIS OFFENSIVE.

















FORCE CARDS. Each side may chooses one card and then randomly deal trhee more. This is their
strength for the oncoming battle. For a quicker battle have four rather than five cards. Allow inexpe-
rienced players to choose two of their deal. Once you have got used to the system, you can add o-
ther forces as you wish, and feel free to have your favourite Divisions rather than those noted. We
are not doing an exact recreation of the campaign, but will aim at its feel from the post of a high-
ranking leader.


THE CAMPAIGN

The aim is, in a series of battles, to push the enemy back until Africa is cleared. Note that we start at
Agedabia. A Victory pushes the enemy back one area; a Major Victory pushes two spaces. Losing
their "last stand" area means total defeat! You should rename the British commander after any Major
Defeat as they were constantly replaced!


Divisions that suffered half their bases Destroyed (ignore Dispersed), are left out of the Force Card
pack for the next game. All formations return to strength for their next use.

AXIS CARDS
Bologna
Italian
Infantry
Division
Pavia
Italian
Infantry
Division
Brescia
Italian
Infantry
Division
132nd Ariete
Italian Tank
Division
5° Leichtedivision
German
Division
15th Panzer
German
Division
Trento
Italian
Motorised
Division
Blank!:
Planes
from
Malta
sink
supply
convoy!
BRITISH CARDS
4th (Indian)
British
Infantry
Division
7th British
Armoured
Division
3° British
Armoured
Brigades
18° (Australian)
British Infantry
Brigade
Blank!
Troops
diverted
to Greece
or Mala-
ya!
9° (Australian)
British Infantry
Division
Marsa el-Brega
Axis last stand
El Agheila Ageidana Derna Tobruk
Sollum
British last stand
Bardia
18
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1941—1942. The second British offensive in
Libya was ordered by a new Middle East
commander, Gen. Sir Auchinleck and direct
by a new combat leader, Gen. Alan Cunnin-
gham. The attack, called Operation Cruse-
der, was launched on Novembre 18. The
initial attack of British armor reached Sidi-
Rezegh, the key to besieged Tobruk, on No-
vembre 19. Rommel counterattack fiercely
driving to the British rear at the Egyptian
frontier. Then, on the night of December 7-8,
Rommel, short of supplies, began to fall
back across Cyrenaica. The British occupied
Gazala and Benghazi. The pursuit finally
ended at El Agheila on January 6, 1942.
4) NORTH AFRICAN CAMPAIGN: SECOND BRITISH OFFENSIVE.

















FORCE CARDS. Each side may chooses one card and then randomly deal trhee more. This is their
strength for the oncoming battle. For a quicker battle have four rather than five cards. Allow inexpe-
rienced players to choose two of their deal. Once you have got used to the system, you can add o-
ther forces as you wish, and feel free to have your favourite Divisions rather than those noted. We
are not doing an exact recreation of the campaign, but will aim at its feel from the post of a high-
ranking leader.


THE CAMPAIGN

The aim is, in a series of battles, to push the enemy back until Africa is cleared. Note that we start at
Sollum. A Victory pushes the enemy back one area; a Major Victory pushes two spaces. Losing their
"last stand" area means total defeat! You should rename the British commander after any Major De-
feat as they were constantly replaced!


Divisions that suffered half their bases Destroyed (ignore Dispersed), are left out of the Force Card
pack for the next game. All formations return to strength for their next use.

AXIS CARDS
132nd
Ariete
Italian
Tank
Division
15th Panzer
German
Division
21st Panzer
German
Division
Trento
Italian
Motorised
Division
Brescia
Italian
Infantry
Division
Pavia
Italian
Infantry
Division
Savona
Italian
Infantry
Division
Blank!:
Planes
from
Malta
sink
supply
convoy!
BRITISH CARDS
7th British
Armoured
Division
4th (Indian)
British In-
fantry Divi-
sion
4th British
Armoured
Brigade
2nd New
Zealand
British
Infantry
Division
Blank!
Troops
diverted
to Greece
or Mala-
ya!
1st British
Armoured
Brigade
1st South
African
British
Infantry
Division
70°
British
Infantry
Division
El-Agheila
Axis last stand
Agedabia Bir el-Gobi
Sidi
Rezegh
Sollum
Sidi Barrani
British last stand
Bir Hacheim
19
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1942. On January 21, two weeks after the
British Eight Army had pursued his Panze-
rarmee Afrika back to El Agheila, Libya, the
German general Rommel turned and counte-
rattacked in western Cyrenaica. The Gazala
defeat and esnuing retreat cost the British
about 45,000 casualties, largerly prisoners,
plus the los of another 33,000 men in the
surrender of Tobruk. The long months of
fighting and pursuit finally ended on June 25
when the British made a stand at their Mersa
matruh base.
5) NORTH AFRICAN CAMPAIGN: SECOND AXIS OFFENSIVE.

















FORCE CARDS. Each side may chooses one card and then randomly deal trhee more. This is their
strength for the oncoming battle. For a quicker battle have four rather than five cards. Allow inexpe-
rienced players to choose two of their deal. Once you have got used to the system, you can add o-
ther forces as you wish, and feel free to have your favourite Divisions rather than those noted. We
are not doing an exact recreation of the campaign, but will aim at its feel from the post of a high-
ranking leader.


THE CAMPAIGN

The aim is, in a series of battles, to push the enemy back until Africa is cleared. Note that we start at
Ain el Gazala. A Victory pushes the enemy back one area; a Major Victory pushes two spaces. Lo-
sing their "last stand" area means total defeat! You should rename the British commander after any
Major Defeat as they were constantly replaced!






Divisions that suffered half their bases Destroyed (ignore Dispersed), are left out of the Force Card
pack for the next game. All formations return to strength for their next use.


AXIS CARDS
15th Panzer
German
Division
21st Panzer
German
Division
90th Light
German
Division
Trieste
Italian
Motorised
Division
132nd
Ariete
Italian
Tank
Division
Brescia
Italian
Infantry
Division
Pavia
Italian
Infantry
Division
Blank!:
Planes
from
Malta
sink
supply
convoy!
BRITISH CARDS
7th British
Armoured
Division
1st South
African
British
Infantry
Division
Free French
British Infantry
Brigade
1st British
Armoured
Brigade
Blank!
Troops
diverted
to Greece
or Mala-
ya!
1st British
Armoured
Division
5th (Indian)
British
Infantry
Division
50°
British
Infantry
Division
El Agheila
Axis last stand
Bir Hacheim Ain el Gazala Tobruk
Marsa Matruh
British last stand
20
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1942. The last Axis eastward thrust had be-
en blocked at Alam halfa two months before.
On the night of October 23-24, under cover
of an 800-gun artillery barrage, Gen. Leese’s
XXX Corps struck west from the village of El
Alamein. For seven long days the Eighth
Army slugged at the Axis defenses, manned
chiefly by the veteran Africa Korps-15th and
21st Panzers and 90th Light. On two of the-
se days, October 27 and 28, Rommel’s ar-
mor counterattacked fiercely but was beaten
back by the Eighth Army. The Axis withdra-
wal, begun the night of Novembre 4-5, conti-
nued without letup for 15,000 miles ...
6) NORTH AFRICAN CAMPAIGN: THIRD BRITISH OFFENSIVE.

















FORCE CARDS. Each side may chooses one card and then randomly deal four (British) and three
(Axis) more. This is their strength for the oncoming battle. For a quicker battle have four rather than
five cards. Allow inexperienced players to choose two of their deal. Once you have got used to the
system, you can add other forces as you wish, and feel free to have your favourite Divisions rather
than those noted. We are not doing an exact recreation of the campaign, but will aim at its feel from
the post of a high-ranking leader.


THE CAMPAIGN

The aim is, in a series of battles, to push the enemy back until Africa is cleared. Note that we start at
Kidney Ridge. A Victory pushes the enemy back one area; a Major Victory pushes two spaces. Lo-
sing their "last stand" area means total defeat! You should rename the British commander after any
Major Defeat as they were constantly replaced!


Divisions that suffered half their bases Destroyed (ignore Dispersed), are left out of the Force Card
pack for the next game. All formations return to strength for their next use.

El Daba
Axis last stand
Kidney Ridge Ruweisat
El Alamein
British last stand
Sidi Abdel Rahman
AXIS CARDS
15th Panzer
German
Division
21st Panzer
German
Division
90th Light
German
Division
Trieste
Italian
Motorised
Division
132nd
Ariete
Italian
Tank
Division
Brescia
Italian
Infantry
Division
Pavia
Italian
Infantry
Division
Blank!:
Planes
from
Malta
sink
supply
convoy!
BRITISH CARDS
7th British
Armoured
Division
1st South
African
British
Infantry
Division
10° British
Armoured
Division
51st British
(Higjhland)
Infantry
Division
Blank!
Troops
diverted
to Greece
or Mala-
ya!
1st British
Armoured
Division
4th (Indian)
British
Infantry
Division
50°
British
Infantry
Division
21
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1942—1943. The Anglo-American invasion
of French Northwest Africa on Novembre 11
provoked a quick Axis reaction in Tunisia.
The German general Jurgen von Arnim con-
cetrated most of the Axis strength in the nor-
thern cities of Tunis and Bizerte. On Fe-
bruary 14 Rommel’s 10th and 21st Panzer
divisions of the veteran Africa Korps lunged
out of faid toward Kasserine Pass, the gate-
way to the communications hub of Tebessa.
The German attack at Kasserine proved to
be the last successful Axis offensive in Afri-
ca. Three Axis divisions, trapped between
Allied forces in Bizerte and Tunis, surrende-
red on May 9. The six-month battle of Tuni-
sia ended the North Africa campaign.
7) NORTHWEST AFRICAN CAMPAIGN: TUNISIA.


















FORCE CARDS. Each side may chooses one card and then randomly deal four (British) and trhee
(Axis) more. This is their strength for the oncoming battle. For a quicker battle have four rather than
five cards. Allow inexperienced players to choose two of their deal. Once you have got used to the
system, you can add other forces as you wish, and feel free to have your favourite Divisions rather
than those noted. We are not doing an exact recreation of the campaign, but will aim at its feel from
the post of a high-ranking leader.

THE CAMPAIGN

The aim is, in a series of battles, to push the enemy back until Africa is cleared. Note that we start at
Kasserine. A Victory pushes the enemy back one area; a Major Victory pushes two spaces. Losing
their "last stand" area means total defeat! You should rename the British commander after any Major
Defeat as they were constantly replaced!


Divisions that suffered half their bases Destroyed (ignore Dispersed), are left out of the Force Card
pack for the next game. All formations return to strength for their next use.

Médenine
Allies last stand
el Kef Kasserine Mareth Uadi Akarit
Enfidaville
Axis last stand
AXIS CARDS
15th Panzer
German
Division
21st Panzer
German
Division
Schwere
Panzer
Abteilung 501
Trieste
Italian
Motorised
Division
Centauro
Italian
Tank
Division
Superga
Italian
Infantry
Division
10° Panzer
German
Division
Blank!:
Planes
from Malta
sink supply
convoy!
ALLIES CARDS
7th British
Armoured
Division
1st British
Infantry
Division
10° British
Armoured
Division
1st USA
Infantry
Division
1st USA
Armoured
Division
1st British
Armoured
Division
4th (Indian)
British
Infantry
Division
50°
British
Infantry
Division
22
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8) NORTHWEST AFRICAN CAMPAIGN: BEDA FOMM.

1941. On February 5 the 7th Armoured reached the coast at Beda Fomm, well beyond Benghazi,
blocking the retrat into Tripoli of Marshal Graziani’s Italian Tenth Army. After two days of futile effort
to break through the British defenses, the entire Italian army of 20,000 men surrendered.
The game table is approx 60” (150cm) x 36” (90cm).

THE FORCE
British (Special Force)
1 HQ (Major Combe), 1 Recon, 3 Tank, 2 6pdr Anti-tank, 4 Motorised Infantry.

Italian (Gen. Bergonzoli)
1 HQ, 3 Tank (M13-40), 9 Foot Infantry, 1 Tank Light (L3).

* Count the Italian HQ distance as 22,5cm or 9" rather than
30cm or 12".
** Italian Foot Infantry is short of AT weapons, so require a 6
to hit Tanks.
*** Italian Tanks automatically fail the Saving Throw if hit by
a Anti-tank.

Victory Conditions
The Italian win if they can exit the equivalent of six units
(stands), off the eastern edge of the board. The game
ends when all Italian stands are off table or destroyed.



British
Deployement
Italian
Deployement
Road
Hill
Head Quarters (HQ)* 15cm or 6” 15cm or 6" 6 15cm or 6"

Reconnaissance
(Recon)
22,5cm or 9" 15cm or 6" 5+ 22,5cm or 9"
Foot Infantry** 15cm or 6" 15cm or 6" 6 7,5cm or 3"
Motorised Infantry 15cm or 6" 15cm or 6" 6 15cm or 6"
6pdr Anti-tank*** 15cm or 6" 15cm or 6” 6 15cm or 6"
Tank (British) 15cm or 6" 15cm or 6" 4+ 15cm or 6"
All nations Battalion type Spotting Range Saving throw Speed
Tank (Italians) 15cm or 6" 15cm or 6" 5+ 15cm or 6"
eastern
edge
23
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TANK - BRITISH TANK - BRITISH TANK - BRITISH
MOTORISED INFANTRY - BRITISH MOTORISED INFANTRY - BRITISH MOTORISED INFANTRY - BRITISH
MOTORISED INFANTRY - BRITISH
6pdr ANTI-TANK - BRITISH 6pdr ANTI-TANK - BRITISH
HQ - BRITISH RECON - BRITISH
TANK - ITALIAN TANK - ITALIAN TANK - ITALIAN
BEDA FOMM
The Units and Markers: Print-off and/or photocopy the units onto tan
(for Allied) and gray (for Italian) paper. Then glue strips of the units
onto cardboard. (Here, I would mark the backs of the units with a colo
to distinguish them when they are "dispersed"/flipped.)
Finally, sciss them out.
HQ - ITALIAN
LIGHT TANK - ITALIAN FOOT INFANTRY - ITALIAN
FOOT INFANTRY - ITALIAN FOOT INFANTRY - ITALIAN FOOT INFANTRY - ITALIAN
FOOT INFANTRY - ITALIAN FOOT INFANTRY - ITALIAN FOOT INFANTRY - ITALIAN
FOOT INFANTRY - ITALIAN
FOOT INFANTRY - ITALIAN
24
www.accademiawargame.it
9) NORTHWEST AFRICAN CAMPAIGN:
HALFAYA PASS, 15
TH
JUNE, 1941.

Background

The 11th Indian Brigade was ordered to destroy
the enemy forces in the area of Halfaya pass as
part of Wavells 'Operation Battleaxe' during the
summer of 1941. Aided by Matildas of the 4th
RTR, the 11th was to advance on the Sollum -
Sidi Barrani coastal road and take positions held
by 'Reverend' Bachs Afrika Korp forces. The at-
tack begins at dawn on June 15th.

British order of battle

11th Indian Brigade
1 X HQ (Brigadier R.A. Savory), 4 X Motorised
Infantry (2nd Battalion, 5th Mahratta Light Infan-
try), 4 X Motorised Infantry (1st Battalion, 6th Ra-
jputana Rifles), 4 X Motorised Infantry (2nd Bat-
talion, Queens own Cameron Highlanders), 2 x
Artillery (25 pdrs)..

Tank Unit
3 x Tank (Matilda IIs of the 4th RTR).

German order of battle

1 X HQ (Reverend Wilhelm Bach), 4 X Motorised
Infantry (1st Battalion, 104th Infantry Regiment).

1 x HQ (Supports weapons), 1 X Artillery (88mm
Flak), 1 X Artillery (105mm Howitzer), 1 x Tank
(Pz II), 1 X Light Anti-tank gun, (Tanks automati-
cally fail the Saving Throw if hit by a Anti-tank gun
or 88mm Flak).

2 x Minefields (4” X 4” - 10cm X 10cm).

Scenario basis and terrain

The game length is 15 turns starting with British
turn 1 and ending with German turn 15. Terrain
features are as per scenario map (60” X 36” –
150cm X 90cm). Wadis provide soft cover to in-
fantry or support weapons.

Victory Conditions

British : Capture the Pass above and below the
escapment.

German: Prevent the British from capturing the
ground above and below the escarpment.
Any other result is a draw

Deployment and arrivals

The on board German forces may deploy any-
where on the board as shown. All on-board forces
start dug-in (hard cover). The British forces de-
ploy as shown:


Scenario Map
Halfaya
Pass
German Deployment Zone
Halfaya Pass Scenario, June 15th 1941
8th Army
Deployment
Wadis
Sea
25
www.accademiawargame.it
INDEX
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 2
GAME PHILOPHY 3
HISTORICAL BACKGROUND 3
WEAPONS IN NORTH AFRICA 6
COMMANDERS AND THEIR TACTICS IN THE WESTERN DESERT 7
BASING 8
MINIATURE 8
BATTLE SET-UP 9
TURN SEQUENCE 10
HEADQUARTERS (HQ) 10
MOVEMENT 10
FIRING 10
SAVING THROW 11
GERMAN STUKAS & BRITISH AIR FORCE 11
VICTORY CONDITIONS 11
MINEFIELDS 12
DUG IN 12
ITALIAN PROBLEMS 12
ORGANIZATION 13
UNITS 14
SCENARIO: ITALIAN OFFENSIVE 15
SCENARIO: FIRST BRITISH OFFENSIVE 16
SCENARIO: FIRST AXIS OFFENSIVE. 17
SCENARIO: SECOND BRITISH OFFENSIVE. 18
SCENARIO: SECOND AXIS OFFENSIVE. 19
SCENARIO: THIRD BRITISH OFFENSIVE. 20
SCENARIO: TUNISIA. 21
SCENARIO: BEDA FOMM. 22
SCENARIO: HALFAYA PASS, 15
TH
JUNE, 1941 24
26
www.accademiawargame.it






















DESERT WAR, 1940 - 1943.

EASTERN FRONT, 1941 - 1945.

ITALIAN FRONT, 1943 - 1945.

WESTERN FRONT, 1944 - 1945.

PACIFIC, 1941 - 1945.

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