WASL - Washington Assessment of Student Learning

A Component of the Washington State Assessment System

Mathematics High School
Sample Items Teacher Materials

Dr. Terry Bergeson
State Superintendent of Public Instruction

NON-SECURE MATERIALS MAY BE COPIED BY WASHINGTON STATE EDUCATORS FOR INSTRUCTIONAL USE

Table of Contents

A Letter from the Superintendent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 How to Use this Sample Item Booklet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Introduction to High School Mathematics Sample Items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2007 Mathematics Sample Items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

The Office of the Superintendent for Public Instruction is committed to equal opportunity in all programs, activities and employment, and to full compliance with federal and state laws that prohibit discrimination on the basis of race, ethnicity, national origin, sex, sexual orientation, religion, military status, age or disability.

Copyright © 2007 by Washington Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction. All rights reserved. Educational institutions within the State of Washington have permission to reproduce this document. All other individuals wishing to reproduce this document must contact OSPI.

A Letter from the Superintendent
November, 2007

Dear Washington Educators: I am delighted to offer this publication of sample High School items. I hope you find these materials helpful in your efforts to improve instruction and increase student learning. These sample items are from our bank of high school WASL items. The items we are sharing with this release have not appeared on a previous test, but they have all been through every step of the two-year item development and review cycle. Every item has passed our quality checks and could have been used on a future High School test. We have decided to release these items and make them available to you to assist you and your students in gaining a deeper understanding of the kinds of things we are asking our students to know and be able to do. This document is also available on our Web site and offers the option to print sections individually. I encourage you to join with other staff to work with the item-specific scoring guides and the annotated student responses that illustrate each score point. Schools that have used this process in the past have given very positive feedback about this experience. Please continue to visit our Web site, www.k12.wa.us, for additional resources to guide your instructional practices. I wish you the best for the remainder of this school year as we continue our work together to ensure all students have the skills needed to be successful today and in the future. Sincerely,

Dr. Terry Bergeson State Superintendent of Public Instruction

3

How to Use this Sample Item Booklet
This document should be used to help administrators and teachers understand sample WASL items that reflect content-specific learning strands and targets that are derived from the Essential Academic Learning Requirements. This Sample Item Booklet includes the following information: • • WASL Mathematics items from the High School operational item bank A tools designation that shows whether the item could be placed on the assessment in a location on a day when tools are permitted (Y), on a day when tools are not permitted (N), or the day the item is placed does not matter (X). Information to indicate the strand and/or learning target information for each item Item-specific scoring guides, student work at representative score points, and annotations for scores.

• •

4

Introduction to High School Mathematics Sample Items
Welcome to the Sample Item Booklet for High School mathematics items. In this booklet you will find twenty items that were part of the High School item bank for mathematics. There are three types of assessment items for High School included in this document: • • Multiple-choice questions where students earn one point by selecting the right answer from four options Short-answer items where students earn up to two points by writing an answer, explaining their thinking, drawing a picture or diagram, or showing steps used to solve a problem Extended-response items where students can earn up to four points by constructing a response that asks for more details (graphs, tables, written summaries) or more thinking.

These sample items provide opportunities for teachers and administrators to become experienced with the item-specific scoring guides and annotated samples of student responses. As you study the items, you may want to become familiar with the WASL test and item specifications and grade level expectations (located on our website—www.k12.wa.us), and the annotated student responses contained in this Sample Item Booklet. Each item in this booklet represents a “learning target,” which is a mathematics skill derived from the Essential Academic Learning Requirements (EALRs) that can be captured in a paper and pencil assessment. These targets are subsets of the nine mathematics content and process strands. In order to assist you in your efforts in understanding and using the Sample Item Booklet, please do not hesitate to search our website www.k12.wa.us/assessment/WASL/mathematics for further resources. Sincerely, Yoonsun Lee (360) 725-6291 Director of Assessment and Psychometrics Mary Holmberg Lynda Eich Robert Hodgman Karen Hall (360) 725-6235 (360) 725-4974 (360) 725-6440 (360) 725-4962 3rd and 4th grade 5th and 6th grade 7th and 8th grade High School

5

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 1 The park biologist reported the deer tick population in the park was
estimated at 9.65 × 10 . What was the population estimate in standard notation?
5

1 A. 0.0000965 1 B. 0.000965 1 C. 96,500 1 D. 965,000
12277

Item Information Score Points: 1 Key: D Tools: N Strand and Target NS01 (Number and Numeration): Demonstrate understanding of the concepts and symbolic representations of rational numbers including whole number powers, square roots of perfect squares, and numbers written in scientific notation; demonstrate understanding of the relative values of rational numbers including whole number powers and square roots of perfect squares; demonstrate understanding of and use the distributive property and properties of addition and multiplication with rational numbers including integers (1.1.1, 1.1.2, 1.1.3)

6

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 2 Jeremy wanted to determine how many of the 972 students at East High
School have dogs. Jeremy surveyed 54 students.

East High School / Pet Ownership Society

Dogs

Cats

8

8

10

0 4 3

5 16 Birds

Based on the survey results, which is the best prediction of the total number of students in the school who have dogs?

1 A. 144 1 B. 216 1 C. 360 1 D. 432
12912

Item Information Score Points: 1 Key: C Tools: Y Strand and Target NS02 (Ratio and Proportion): Demonstrate understanding of and apply the concepts of ratio, percent, and both direct and inverse proportion (1.1.4)

7

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 3
In a given year the United States had 6.93 × 10 that amount, 3.30 × 10
10 11

dollars in circulation. Of

dollars were coins and the rest was paper money.

Which expression represents the amount of paper money in circulation?

1 A.

3.63 × 10

1

1 B. 3.63 × 1010 1 C. 6.60 × 1011 1 D. 6.90 × 1010
21401

Item Information Score Points: 1 Key: C Tools: N Strand and Target NS04 (Computation): Complete multi-step computations with combinations of rational numbers including integers, whole number powers, and square roots of perfect squares, using order of operations (1.1.6)

8

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 4 To qualify for the state cross-country championships, Nora needs to run
4 miles in 30 minutes or less. Which is the slowest average rate, in minutes per mile, Nora could run to qualify for the state cross-country championships?

1 A. 7.2 1 B. 7.4 1 C. 7.5 1 D. 7.8
27726

Item Information Score Points: 1 Key: C Tools: X Strand and Target ME02 (Units and Systems): Demonstrate understanding of rate and other derived units of measurement; demonstrate understanding of how to convert within the US or metric system to achieve an appropriate level of precision; explain why different situations require different levels of precision (1.2.2, 1.2.3)

9

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 5
Triangle JKE is an obtuse isosceles triangle with m∠ E = 10° and KE > JK. What is the measure of ∠J ?

1 A. 170° 1 B. 160° 1 C. 1 D.
85° 10°
21378

Item Information Score Points: 1 Key: B Tools: X Strand and Target GS01 (Properties and Relationships): Demonstrate understanding of the characteristics of cylinders, cones, and pyramids and the relationships among 1-dimensional, 2-dimensional, and 3-dimensional figures; draw, describe, and/or compare 1-dimensional, 2-dimensional, and 3-dimensional shapes and figures, including prisms, cylinders, cones, and pyramids; use the Pythagorean Theorem to determine if a triangle is a right triangle (1.3.1, 1.3.2)

10

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 6 Dorine drew a quadrilateral on a coordinate grid.
y

7 6 5 4 3 2 1 –7 –6 –5 –4 –3 –2 –1 1 –1 –2 –3 –4 –5 –6 –7 M 2 3 Q 4 5 6 7 N P

x

Dorine reflected the quadrilateral over the line y = −2 and then translated it left 4 units. What are the coordinates of the image of point M?

1 A. (2, −5) 1 B. (−2, −5) 1 C. (−6, 1) 1 D. (−2, 1)
Item Information Score Points: 1 Key: B Tools: X Strand and Target GS02 (Locations and Transformations): Use geometric properties to describe or identify the location of points on coordinate grids; use multiple transformations including translations, reflections, and/or rotations to create congruent figures (1.3.3, 1.3.4)
21379

11

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 7 Melissa is playing a random spinner game. She gets 2 spins. For Melissa
to win, the spinner must stop on an even number for the first spin and the spinner must stop on a shaded number for the second spin. 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 1 2 3 4 5

Which fraction represents the probability that Melissa will win?

1 A. 1 B. 1 C.

1 4 1 2 3 4

1 D. 1
21403

Item Information Score Points: 1 Key: A Tools: X Strand and Target PS01 (Probability): Demonstrate understanding of the concepts of compound, dependent, and independent events; determine and use probabilities of compound, dependent, and independent events (1.4.1, 1.4.2)

12

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 8 Vance graphed the relation between fund-raising profits for the chess club
and the number of members. Chess Club Fund-raising

y
800 700 Profit (dollars) 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 Number of Members Which equation represents the data displayed on the graph?

n

1 A. 1 B. 1 C. 1 D.

y = 29n + 180 y = 60n + 180 y = 2 n + 180
3

y = 200 n + 180
3
27870

Item Information Score Points: 1 Key: A Tools: X Strand and Target PS03 (Data Representation and Interpretation): Draw a reasonable line to describe the data represented by a scatter plot and determine whether a straight line is an appropriate way to describe the trend in the data; read and interpret data presented in tables of ordered pairs and scatter plots and make predictions based on the given data; use statistics to support different points of view or evaluate a statistical argument based on data (1.4.5, 1.4.6)

13

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 9 Mrs. Morris gave her students this pattern of white tiles:
1 2 3 4

She asked her students to write an equation to represent the number of white tiles, t, for any figure number, n. Which equation represents the number of white tiles in the pattern?

1 A. 1 B. 1 C.

t = n+2 t = n+4 t = 4n + 4

1 D. t = 4n + 8
27448

Item Information Score Points: 1 Key: C Tools: X Strand and Target AS01 (Patterns and Functions): Recognize, extend, or create a pattern or sequence of pairs of numbers representing a linear function; identify or write a rule to describe a pattern, sequence, and/or a linear function (1.5.1, 1.5.2)

14

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 10 Mike kept track of the number of passengers on his bus, noticing
the following: – At the first stop, several passengers (p) got on the empty bus. – At the second stop, the number of passengers doubled when more people got on. – At the third stop, 3 passengers got off the bus and no passengers got on. – At the fourth stop, 2 passengers got on the bus and no passengers got off. Which expression represents the number of passengers on the bus after the fourth stop?

1 A. 2p 1 B. 2p 1 C. 2p 1 D. 2p

5 1 5 1
12937

Item Information Score Points: 1 Key: B Tools: X Strand and Target AS02 (Symbols and Notations): Represent relationships between quantities using squares, cubes, and square roots; use variables to write expressions, linear equations, and inequalities that represent situations involving rational numbers, whole number powers, and square and cube roots (1.5.3, 1.5.4)

15

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 11 A bicycle race across the United States starts in San Diego, California, and
finishes in Atlantic City, New Jersey. There are more than 50 checkpoints along the route where riders find out how far they have traveled and their overall time. What information is unnecessary for calculating the mean speed of an individual racer between two checkpoints?

1 A. The distance between each checkpoint 1 B. The exact number of checkpoints along the route 1 C. The time an individual racer left each checkpoint 1 D. The time an individual racer arrived at each checkpoint
12917

Item Information Score Points: 1 Key: B Tools: X Strand and Target SR01 (Define Problems): Identify questions to be answered in complex situations; recognize when information is missing or extraneous; identify what is known and unknown in complex situations (2.1.1, 2.1.2, 2.1.3)

16

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 12 Silvia worked in a store that sold cylinder-shaped children’s pools. She
made a sign relating the volumes of these two pools.

The Splasher Pool holds ? percent of the water the Paddler Pool holds.

Paddler Pool 3 ft 12 ft 1 ft

Splasher Pool

24 ft

The volume of the Paddler Pool is 108π cubic feet. The Splasher Pool holds which percent of the water the Paddler Pool holds?

1 A. 1 B.

33% 75%

1 C. 133% 1 D. 300%
27811

Item Information Score Points: 1 Key: C Tools: X Strand and Target MC01 (Connections within Mathematics): Use concepts and procedures from multiple mathematics content strands in a given problem or situation; relate and use different mathematical models and representations of the same situation (5.1.1, 5.1.2)

17

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 13 Amelia has four congruent square tiles. The total area of the four tiles is
144 square inches. What is the perimeter of each individual tile?

1 A.

6 inches

1 B. 24 inches 1 C. 36 inches 1 D. 48 inches
12930

Item Information Score Points: 1 Key: B Tools: N Strand and Target MC01 (Connections within Mathematics): Use concepts and procedures from multiple mathematics content strands in a given problem or situation; relate and use different mathematical models and representations of the same situation (5.1.1, 5.1.2)

18

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 14 In Pedro’s barn, the number of mice is inversely proportional to the
number of cats. When he owned 5 cats, there were 48 mice in the barn. He increased the number of cats to 8. Based on the increased number of cats, how many mice are in the barn? Show your work using words, numbers, and/or diagrams.

Based on the increased number of cats, how many mice are in the barn? _________________________

11834

Item Information Score Points: 2 Tools: X Strand and Target NS02 (Ratio and Proportion): Demonstrate understanding of and apply the concepts of ratio, percent, and both direct and inverse proportion (1.1.4)

19

2007 Mathematics Sample Items
Scoring Guide for item number 14 A 2-point response: The student shows understanding of using inverse proportion to determine a number by doing the following: • shows supporting work that uses inverse proportions • writes 30. A 1-point response: The student does one of the following: • shows supporting work that uses inverse proportions and could lead to finding the answer • writes 30. A 0-point response: The student shows very little or no understanding of using inverse proportion to determine a number.

NOTE: A ratio or table may be used to indicate the inverse.

20

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 14 In Pedro’s barn, the number of mice is inversely proportional to the
number of cats. When he owned 5 cats, there were 48 mice in the barn. He increased the number of cats to 8. Based on the increased number of cats, how many mice are in the barn? Show your work using words, numbers, and/or diagrams.

Annotation for example 2-point response: The student shows understanding of using inverse proportion to determine a number by showing supporting work that uses inverse proportions: “ xy = k → 5 i 48 = 240; m = mice, 8m = 240 → m = 30 .” Writes a correct answer of “30 mice.” This response earns two points.

21

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 14 In Pedro’s barn, the number of mice is inversely proportional to the
number of cats. When he owned 5 cats, there were 48 mice in the barn. He increased the number of cats to 8. Based on the increased number of cats, how many mice are in the barn? Show your work using words, numbers, and/or diagrams.

Annotation for example 2-point response: The student shows understanding of using inverse proportion to determine a number by showing supporting work that uses inverse proportions: “ y1( x1) = y2( x2) → 5( 48) = 8( x2) → 30 = x2 .” Writes a correct answer of “30.” This response earns two points.

22

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 14 In Pedro’s barn, the number of mice is inversely proportional to the
number of cats. When he owned 5 cats, there were 48 mice in the barn. He increased the number of cats to 8. Based on the increased number of cats, how many mice are in the barn? Show your work using words, numbers, and/or diagrams.

Annotation for example 2-point response: The student shows understanding of using inverse proportion to determine a number by k 240 showing supporting work that uses inverse proportions: “ y = → y = .” Writes a correct x 8 answer of “30.” This response earns two points.

23

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 14 In Pedro’s barn, the number of mice is inversely proportional to the
number of cats. When he owned 5 cats, there were 48 mice in the barn. He increased the number of cats to 8. Based on the increased number of cats, how many mice are in the barn? Show your work using words, numbers, and/or diagrams.

Annotation for example 1-point response: The student shows partial understanding of using inverse proportion to determine a number by writing a correct answer of “30.” The student does the arithmetic correctly “ 48 ÷ 8 = 6 → 6 × 5 = 30, ” but writes two contradictory proportions. This response earns one point.

24

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 14 In Pedro’s barn, the number of mice is inversely proportional to the
number of cats. When he owned 5 cats, there were 48 mice in the barn. He increased the number of cats to 8. Based on the increased number of cats, how many mice are in the barn? Show your work using words, numbers, and/or diagrams.

Annotation for example 1-point response: The student shows partial understanding of using inverse proportion to determine a number by writing a correct answer “30 Mice.” However, the supporting work is incorrect. This response earns one point.

25

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 14 In Pedro’s barn, the number of mice is inversely proportional to the
number of cats. When he owned 5 cats, there were 48 mice in the barn. He increased the number of cats to 8. Based on the increased number of cats, how many mice are in the barn? Show your work using words, numbers, and/or diagrams.

Annotation for example 1-point response: The student shows partial understanding of using inverse proportion to determine a number by showing supporting work that uses inverse proportions: “ 5 = x .” Writes an incorrect answer 8 48 “3.” This response earns one point.

26

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 14 In Pedro’s barn, the number of mice is inversely proportional to the
number of cats. When he owned 5 cats, there were 48 mice in the barn. He increased the number of cats to 8. Based on the increased number of cats, how many mice are in the barn? Show your work using words, numbers, and/or diagrams.

Annotation for example 0-point response: The student shows little or no understanding of using inverse proportion to determine a number. The equation shown is a direct proportion with a solution of 76.8, but the answer “76.8 mice” is incorrect. This response earns zero points.

27

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 15 Ms. Parker gave her students this picture of a rectangular prism:
108 cm2 36 cm2

4 cm

What is the surface area of the rectangular prism? Show your work using words, numbers, and/or diagrams.

What is the surface area of the rectangular prism? __________

11369

Item Information Score Points: 2 Tools: N Strand and Target ME03 (Procedures): Use formulas, including the Pythagorean Theorem, to determine measurements of triangles, prisms, or cylinders (1.2.5)

28

2007 Mathematics Sample Items
Scoring Guide for item number 15 A 2-point response: The student shows understanding of determining surface area of a rectangular prism by doing the following: • shows work to determine surface area of the prism • writes 384 square centimeters. NOTE: Allow one computation or one transcription error with an answer that follows from the error. A 1-point response: The student does one of the following: • shows 2(108) + 2(36) + 2(x), or equivalent, to show an addition of six faces • shows 48 as the area of the front face and sums three or more face areas labeled square centimeters • writes 384. A 0-point response: The student shows very little or no understanding of determining the surface area of a rectangular prism.

29

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 15 Ms. Parker gave her students this picture of a rectangular prism:
108 cm2 36 cm2

4 cm

What is the surface area of the rectangular prism? Show your work using words, numbers, and/or diagrams.

Annotation for example 2-point response: The student shows understanding of determining surface area of a rectangular prism by showing work that uses 12 as the length of the prism and 48 as the area of the front face. The student determines the area of the faces that show in the picture and then doubles that area. The student writes a correct answer of “384 cm2.” This response earns two points.

30

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 15 Ms. Parker gave her students this picture of a rectangular prism:
108 cm2 36 cm2

4 cm

What is the surface area of the rectangular prism? Show your work using words, numbers, and/or diagrams.

Annotation for example 2-point response: The student shows understanding of determining surface area of a rectangular prism by showing work that uses 12 as the length of the prism and 48 as the area of the front face. The student doubles the area of each face that shows in the picture. The student writes a correct answer of “384 cm2.” This response earns two points.

31

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 15 Ms. Parker gave her students this picture of a rectangular prism:
108 cm2 36 cm2

4 cm

What is the surface area of the rectangular prism? Show your work using words, numbers, and/or diagrams.

Annotation for example 2-point response: The student shows understanding of determining surface area of a rectangular prism by showing work to determine the total area of six surfaces. The student writes an answer of “374 cm2.” This incorrect answer follows from one computation error. This response earns two points.

32

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 15 Ms. Parker gave her students this picture of a rectangular prism:
108 cm2 36 cm2

4 cm

What is the surface area of the rectangular prism? Show your work using words, numbers, and/or diagrams.

Annotation for example 1-point response: The student shows partial understanding of determining surface area of a rectangular prism by showing work to sum six faces of the prism (bullet 1). This response earns one point.

33

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 15 Ms. Parker gave her students this picture of a rectangular prism:
108 cm2 36 cm2

4 cm

What is the surface area of the rectangular prism? Show your work using words, numbers, and/or diagrams.

Annotation for example 1-point response: The student shows partial understanding of determining surface area of a rectangular prism by showing work to sum three faces of the prism (bullet 2). This response earns one point.

34

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 15 Ms. Parker gave her students this picture of a rectangular prism:
108 cm2 36 cm2

4 cm

What is the surface area of the rectangular prism? Show your work using words, numbers, and/or diagrams.

Annotation for example 1-point response: The student shows partial understanding of determining surface area of a rectangular prism by showing work to sum six faces of the prism. The response shows two faces as “108” and four faces as “36” (bullet 1). This response earns one point.

35

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 15 Ms. Parker gave her students this picture of a rectangular prism:
108 cm2 36 cm2

4 cm

What is the surface area of the rectangular prism? Show your work using words, numbers, and/or diagrams.

Annotation for example 0-point response: The student shows little or no understanding of determining surface area of a rectangular. The student is attempting to find volume of the prism. This response earns zero points.

36

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 16 Livia saw this drawing at a museum:
y S 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Figure 1 R T

–7 –6 –5 –4 –3 –2 –1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 –1 S´ –2 –3 –4 –5 –6 Figure 2 –7 R´ T´

x

Name two transformations that could be used to move Figure 1 to Figure 2. Use the words rotation, reflection, and/or translation to describe the two-step transformation.

27096

37

2007 Mathematics Sample Items
Item Information Score Points: 2 Tools: X Strand and Target GS02 (Locations and Transformations): Use geometric properties to describe or identify the location of points on coordinate grids; use multiple transformations including translations, reflections, and/or rotations to create congruent figures (1.3.3, 1.3.4) Scoring Guide for item number 16 A 2-point response: The student shows understanding of describing the combination of two translations and reflections to transform one figure to another figure on a coordinate grid by doing the following: • writes to translate down 9, or equivalent • writes to reflect over the y-axis A 1-point response: The student does one of the following: • writes or shows to translate (slide) down 9, or equivalent • writes or shows to reflect (flip) over the y-axis • writes a combination of more than two transformations to transform Figure 1 to Figure 2. A 0-point response: The student shows very little or no understanding of describing the combination of two translations and reflections to transform one figure to another figure on a coordinate grid. NOTE: A description of a translation must include the direction and the distance. NOTE: A description of a reflection must include a line of a reflection. NOTE: A description of a rotation must include the point of rotation and the amount of rotation.

38

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 16 Livia saw this drawing at a museum:
y S 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Figure 1 R T

–7 –6 –5 –4 –3 –2 –1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 –1 S´ –2 –3 –4 –5 –6 Figure 2 –7 R´ T´

x

Name two transformations that could be used to move Figure 1 to Figure 2. Use the words rotation, reflection, and/or translation to describe the two-step transformation.

Annotation for example 2-point response: The student shows understanding of describing a combination of two translations, reflections, and/or rotations to transform Figure 1 to Figure 2. The student describes a translation “...down 9 units...” followed by a reflection “...over the y axis...” This response earns two points.

39

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 16 Livia saw this drawing at a museum:
y S 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Figure 1 R T

–7 –6 –5 –4 –3 –2 –1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 –1 S´ –2 –3 –4 –5 –6 Figure 2 –7 R´ T´

x

Name two transformations that could be used to move Figure 1 to Figure 2. Use the words rotation, reflection, and/or translation to describe the two-step transformation.

Annotation for example 2-point response: The student shows understanding of describing a combination of two translations, reflections, and/or rotations to transform Figure 1 to Figure 2. The student describes a “...vertical translation of -9,” followed by a reflection “...across the y axis...” This response earns two points.

40

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 16 Livia saw this drawing at a museum:
y S 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Figure 1 R T

–7 –6 –5 –4 –3 –2 –1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 –1 S´ –2 –3 –4 –5 –6 Figure 2 –7 R´ T´

x

Name two transformations that could be used to move Figure 1 to Figure 2. Use the words rotation, reflection, and/or translation to describe the two-step transformation.

Annotation for example 2-point response: The student shows understanding of describing a combination of two translations, reflections, and/or rotations to transform Figure 1 to Figure 2. The student describes two different ways to transform Figure 1 to Figure 2. Fortunately they are both correct. This response earns two points.

41

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 16 Livia saw this drawing at a museum:
y S 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Figure 1 R T

–7 –6 –5 –4 –3 –2 –1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 –1 S´ –2 –3 –4 –5 –6 Figure 2 –7 R´ T´

x

Name two transformations that could be used to move Figure 1 to Figure 2. Use the words rotation, reflection, and/or translation to describe the two-step transformation.

Annotation for example 1-point response: The student shows partial understanding of describing a combination of two translations, reflections, and/or rotations to transform Figure 1 to Figure 2. The student describes a reflection “...over the y-axis,” followed by an incorrect transformation. The transformation does not result in Figure 2. This response earns one point.

42

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 16 Livia saw this drawing at a museum:
y S 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Figure 1 R T

–7 –6 –5 –4 –3 –2 –1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 –1 S´ –2 –3 –4 –5 –6 Figure 2 –7 R´ T´

x

Name two transformations that could be used to move Figure 1 to Figure 2. Use the words rotation, reflection, and/or translation to describe the two-step transformation.

Annotation for example 1-point response: The student shows partial understanding of describing a combination of two translations, reflections, and/or rotations to transform Figure 1 to Figure 2. The student describes “...reflect it once...” but fails to name the line of reflection. “...translate it down 9,” is one of the possible correct transformations. The transformation does not result in Figure 2. This response earns one point.

43

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 16 Livia saw this drawing at a museum:
y S 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Figure 1 R T

–7 –6 –5 –4 –3 –2 –1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 –1 S´ –2 –3 –4 –5 –6 Figure 2 –7 R´ T´

x

Name two transformations that could be used to move Figure 1 to Figure 2. Use the words rotation, reflection, and/or translation to describe the two-step transformation.

Annotation for example 1-point response: The student shows partial understanding of describing a combination of two translations, reflections, and/or rotations to transform Figure 1 to Figure 2. When the student writes “Figure 1 could be reflected over the y axis and then translated (0,-9),” it is a description of a correct reflection, but (0,-9) is a point, not a description, of a translation down 9 units. This response earns one point.

44

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 16 Livia saw this drawing at a museum:
y S 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Figure 1 R T

–7 –6 –5 –4 –3 –2 –1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 –1 S´ –2 –3 –4 –5 –6 Figure 2 –7 R´ T´

x

Name two transformations that could be used to move Figure 1 to Figure 2. Use the words rotation, reflection, and/or translation to describe the two-step transformation.

Annotation for example 0-point response: The student shows little or no understanding of describing a combination of two translations, reflections, and/or rotations to transform Figure 1 to Figure 2. The student writes the vertices for Figure 1 and Figure 2, but does not describe a transformation. This response earns zero points.

45

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 17 Eva graphed data from winning times of the Boston Marathon. The data
were from 10-year intervals. Boston Marathon Winning Times Year 3:00:00 2:45:00 Time (hr:min:s) 2:30:00 2:15:00 2:00:00 1:45:00 1:30:00 1:15:00 1:00:00 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Years Since 1899 • Describe one trend or pattern in the data. • Use specific times and/or years from the data in your description. 1899 1909 1919 1929 1939 1949 1959 1969 1979 1989 1999 Time (hr:min:s) 2:54:38 2:53:36 2:29:13 2:33:08 2:28:51 2:31:50 2:22:42 2:13:49 2:09:27 2:09:06 2:09:52

12093

46

2007 Mathematics Sample Items
Item Information Score Points: 2 Tools: X Strand and Target PS03 (Data Representation and Interpretation): Draw a reasonable line to describe the data represented by a scatter plot and determine whether a straight line is an appropriate way to describe the trend in the data; read and interpret data presented in tables of ordered pairs and scatter plots and make predictions based on the given data; use statistics to support different points of view or evaluate a statistical argument based on data (1.4.5, 1.4.6) Scoring Guide for item number 17 A 2-point response: The student shows understanding of describing trends and patterns in data or graphs by doing the following: • describes one trend or pattern • includes in the description an interval of winning times and/or years. A 1-point response: The student does one of the following: • describes one trend or pattern • includes in the description an interval of winning times and/or years. A 0-point response: The student shows very little or no understanding of describing trends and patterns in data or graphs.

47

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 17 Eva graphed data from winning times of the Boston Marathon. The data
were from 10-year intervals. Boston Marathon Winning Times Year 3:00:00 2:45:00 Time (hr:min:s) 2:30:00 2:15:00 2:00:00 1:45:00 1:30:00 1:15:00 1:00:00 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Years Since 1899 • Describe one trend or pattern in the data. • Use specific times and/or years from the data in your description. 1899 1909 1919 1929 1939 1949 1959 1969 1979 1989 1999 Time (hr:min:s) 2:54:38 2:53:36 2:29:13 2:33:08 2:28:51 2:31:50 2:22:42 2:13:49 2:09:27 2:09:06 2:09:52

12093

Annotation for example 2-point response: The student shows understanding of describing trends and patterns in data or graphs by writing “...winning times of the Boston Marathon Kept decreasing as years went by.” The interval named is 1899 to 1999. This response earns two points.

48

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 17 Eva graphed data from winning times of the Boston Marathon. The data
were from 10-year intervals. Boston Marathon Winning Times Year 3:00:00 2:45:00 Time (hr:min:s) 2:30:00 2:15:00 2:00:00 1:45:00 1:30:00 1:15:00 1:00:00 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Years Since 1899 • Describe one trend or pattern in the data. • Use specific times and/or years from the data in your description. 1899 1909 1919 1929 1939 1949 1959 1969 1979 1989 1999 Time (hr:min:s) 2:54:38 2:53:36 2:29:13 2:33:08 2:28:51 2:31:50 2:22:42 2:13:49 2:09:27 2:09:06 2:09:52

12093

Annotation for example 2-point response: The student shows understanding of describing trends and patterns in data or graphs by writing “...time slowly decreased...” The interval named is 1899 to 1999. This response earns two points.

49

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 17 Eva graphed data from winning times of the Boston Marathon. The data
were from 10-year intervals. Boston Marathon Winning Times Year 3:00:00 2:45:00 Time (hr:min:s) 2:30:00 2:15:00 2:00:00 1:45:00 1:30:00 1:15:00 1:00:00 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Years Since 1899 • Describe one trend or pattern in the data. • Use specific times and/or years from the data in your description. 1899 1909 1919 1929 1939 1949 1959 1969 1979 1989 1999 Time (hr:min:s) 2:54:38 2:53:36 2:29:13 2:33:08 2:28:51 2:31:50 2:22:42 2:13:49 2:09:27 2:09:06 2:09:52

12093

Annotation for example 2-point response: The student shows understanding of describing trends and patterns in data or graphs. The student writes “...the times have gotten faster...” which is allowed since less time means the runner ran the race faster. The interval named is “1899 to 1979.” This response earns two points.

50

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 17 Eva graphed data from winning times of the Boston Marathon. The data
were from 10-year intervals. Boston Marathon Winning Times Year 3:00:00 2:45:00 Time (hr:min:s) 2:30:00 2:15:00 2:00:00 1:45:00 1:30:00 1:15:00 1:00:00 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Years Since 1899 • Describe one trend or pattern in the data. • Use specific times and/or years from the data in your description. 1899 1909 1919 1929 1939 1949 1959 1969 1979 1989 1999 Time (hr:min:s) 2:54:38 2:53:36 2:29:13 2:33:08 2:28:51 2:31:50 2:22:42 2:13:49 2:09:27 2:09:06 2:09:52

12093

Annotation for example 1-point response: The student shows partial understanding of describing trends and patterns in data or graphs by writing “...Time decreases.” No interval cited was named. This response earns one point.

51

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 17 Eva graphed data from winning times of the Boston Marathon. The data
were from 10-year intervals. Boston Marathon Winning Times Year 3:00:00 2:45:00 Time (hr:min:s) 2:30:00 2:15:00 2:00:00 1:45:00 1:30:00 1:15:00 1:00:00 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Years Since 1899 • Describe one trend or pattern in the data. • Use specific times and/or years from the data in your description. 1899 1909 1919 1929 1939 1949 1959 1969 1979 1989 1999 Time (hr:min:s) 2:54:38 2:53:36 2:29:13 2:33:08 2:28:51 2:31:50 2:22:42 2:13:49 2:09:27 2:09:06 2:09:52

12093

Annotation for example 1-point response: The student shows partial understanding of describing trends and patterns in data or graphs by writing “It took each of them at least 2-hours.” No interval cited was named. This response earns one point.

52

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 17 Eva graphed data from winning times of the Boston Marathon. The data
were from 10-year intervals. Boston Marathon Winning Times Year 3:00:00 2:45:00 Time (hr:min:s) 2:30:00 2:15:00 2:00:00 1:45:00 1:30:00 1:15:00 1:00:00 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Years Since 1899 • Describe one trend or pattern in the data. • Use specific times and/or years from the data in your description. 1899 1909 1919 1929 1939 1949 1959 1969 1979 1989 1999 Time (hr:min:s) 2:54:38 2:53:36 2:29:13 2:33:08 2:28:51 2:31:50 2:22:42 2:13:49 2:09:27 2:09:06 2:09:52

12093

Annotation for example 1-point response: The student shows partial understanding of describing trends and patterns in data or graphs by describing the interval 1949 to 1979 as “...marathon times go down at a steady rate...”. The statement “...the times stay at about 2:09 for the next 30 years” is an error—it should be 20 years. The student is trying to describe the entire interval from 1949 to 1999, but the error in describing 1979 to 1999 as the next 30 years prevents the response from earning credit for bullet 2. This response earns one point.

53

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 17 Eva graphed data from winning times of the Boston Marathon. The data
were from 10-year intervals. Boston Marathon Winning Times Year 3:00:00 2:45:00 Time (hr:min:s) 2:30:00 2:15:00 2:00:00 1:45:00 1:30:00 1:15:00 1:00:00 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Years Since 1899 • Describe one trend or pattern in the data. • Use specific times and/or years from the data in your description. 1899 1909 1919 1929 1939 1949 1959 1969 1979 1989 1999 Time (hr:min:s) 2:54:38 2:53:36 2:29:13 2:33:08 2:28:51 2:31:50 2:22:42 2:13:49 2:09:27 2:09:06 2:09:52

12093

Annotation for example 1-point response: The student shows little or no understanding of describing trends and patterns in data or graphs. The student describes transitions between data points rather than trends or patterns. This response earns zero points.

54

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 18 Only chocolate and vanilla ice cream cones are sold at an ice cream store.
In one day, the number of chocolate cones sold was 1 more than 4 times the number of vanilla cones sold. A total of 121 cones were sold that day. Let c = the number of chocolate cones sold. Let v = the number of vanilla cones sold. • Write equations to determine the number of chocolate cones sold that day. • Use the equations to determine the number of chocolate cones sold that day. Show your work using words, numbers, and/or diagrams.

How many chocolate cones were sold that day? ____________________

11833

Item Information Score Points: 2 Tools: Y Strand and Target AS03 (Evaluating and Solving): Simplify expressions; solve multi-step equations, systems of equations, and one-step inequalities (1.5.5, 1.5.6)

55

2007 Mathematics Sample Items
Scoring Guide for item number 18 A 2-point response: The student shows understanding of writing and solving a system of equations by doing the following: • writes equations to determine the number of chocolate cones sold; c = 1 + 4v and c + v = 121 or equivalent • shows work that supports how the number of chocolate cones was determined • writes 97. NOTE: Equations can be written using variables other than c and v if the variables are defined and used consistently in both equations. A 1-point response: The student does one of the following: • writes c = 1 + 4v or equivalent • writes equation in one variable 1 + 4v + v = 121, or equivalent • writes 97. NOTE: Allow for any variables that are used consistently in both equations. A 0-point response: The student shows very little or no understanding of writing and solving a system of equations.

56

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 18 Only chocolate and vanilla ice cream cones are sold at an ice cream store.
In one day, the number of chocolate cones sold was 1 more than 4 times the number of vanilla cones sold. A total of 121 cones were sold that day. Let c = the number of chocolate cones sold. Let v = the number of vanilla cones sold. • Write equations to determine the number of chocolate cones sold that day. • Use the equations to determine the number of chocolate cones sold that day. Show your work using words, numbers, and/or diagrams.

Annotation for example 2-point response: The student shows understanding of writing and solving a system of equations by writing “c = 4v + 1” and “c + v = 121.” The student shows work to solve equations and checks work. Student writes a correct answer of “97 chocolate cones.” This response earns two points.

57

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 18 Only chocolate and vanilla ice cream cones are sold at an ice cream store.
In one day, the number of chocolate cones sold was 1 more than 4 times the number of vanilla cones sold. A total of 121 cones were sold that day. Let c = the number of chocolate cones sold. Let v = the number of vanilla cones sold. • Write equations to determine the number of chocolate cones sold that day. • Use the equations to determine the number of chocolate cones sold that day. Show your work using words, numbers, and/or diagrams.

Annotation for example 2-point response: The student shows understanding of writing and solving a system of equations by writing “4v + 1 = c” and “c + v =121.” Shows work to solve equations algebraically. Student writes a correct answer of “97 chocolate cones.” This response earns two points.

58

2007 Mathematics Sample Items

18

Only chocolate and vanilla ice cream cones are sold at an ice cream store. In one day, the number of chocolate cones sold was 1 more than 4 times the number of vanilla cones sold. A total of 121 cones were sold that day. Let c = the number of chocolate cones sold. Let v = the number of vanilla cones sold. • Write equations to determine the number of chocolate cones sold that day. • Use the equations to determine the number of chocolate cones sold that day. Show your work using words, numbers, and/or diagrams.

Annotation for example 2-point response: The student shows understanding of writing and solving a system of equations by writing “ c = 121 − v” and “ v = ( c − 1) .” The student uses guess and check to determine “v = 24” and then
4

substitutes in the second equation. The student writes a correct answer of “97.” This response earns two points.

59

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 18 Only chocolate and vanilla ice cream cones are sold at an ice cream store.
In one day, the number of chocolate cones sold was 1 more than 4 times the number of vanilla cones sold. A total of 121 cones were sold that day. Let c = the number of chocolate cones sold. Let v = the number of vanilla cones sold. • Write equations to determine the number of chocolate cones sold that day. • Use the equations to determine the number of chocolate cones sold that day. Show your work using words, numbers, and/or diagrams.

Annotation for example 1-point response: The student shows partial understanding of writing and solving a system of equations by writing “ c = v × 4 + 1 .” The student uses 24 for v but shows no supporting work to determine 24. The student writes a correct answer of “97.” This response earns one point.

60

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 18 Only chocolate and vanilla ice cream cones are sold at an ice cream store.
In one day, the number of chocolate cones sold was 1 more than 4 times the number of vanilla cones sold. A total of 121 cones were sold that day. Let c = the number of chocolate cones sold. Let v = the number of vanilla cones sold. • Write equations to determine the number of chocolate cones sold that day. • Use the equations to determine the number of chocolate cones sold that day. Show your work using words, numbers, and/or diagrams.

Annotation for example 1-point response: The student shows partial understanding of writing and solving a system of equations by writing “4v + 1 = c” and “121 = v+ 4v + 1.” The student writes an incorrect answer of “98.” This response earns one point.

61

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 18 Only chocolate and vanilla ice cream cones are sold at an ice cream store.
In one day, the number of chocolate cones sold was 1 more than 4 times the number of vanilla cones sold. A total of 121 cones were sold that day. Let c = the number of chocolate cones sold. Let v = the number of vanilla cones sold. • Write equations to determine the number of chocolate cones sold that day. • Use the equations to determine the number of chocolate cones sold that day. Show your work using words, numbers, and/or diagrams.

Annotation for example 1-point response: The student shows partial understanding of writing and solving a system of equations by writing “ 121 = 4( v ) + 1 + v ,” which is a combination of both equations. The student writes an incorrect answer of “91.” This response earns one point.

62

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 18 Only chocolate and vanilla ice cream cones are sold at an ice cream store.
In one day, the number of chocolate cones sold was 1 more than 4 times the number of vanilla cones sold. A total of 121 cones were sold that day. Let c = the number of chocolate cones sold. Let v = the number of vanilla cones sold. • Write equations to determine the number of chocolate cones sold that day. • Use the equations to determine the number of chocolate cones sold that day. Show your work using words, numbers, and/or diagrams.

Annotation for example 0-point response: The student shows little or no understanding of writing and solving a system of equations. The student uses tallies to find a solution to one of the equations, c + v = 121 . The student writes an incorrect answer of “65.” This response earns zero points.

63

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 19 Jay earns $16.42 per hour. He earns 1.5 times his hourly wage for every
hour he works over 40 hours each week. He earns 2 times his hourly wage on Sunday. Jay worked 3 hours on Sunday and earned a total of $903.10 for the week. How many total hours did Jay work last week? Show your work using words, numbers, and/or diagrams.

How many total hours did Jay work last week? ______________

11107

Item Information Score Points: 2 Tools: Y Strand and Target SR02 (Construct Solutions): Select and organize relevant information; use appropriate concepts and procedures from number sense, measurement, geometric sense, probability and statistics, and algebraic sense; use a variety of strategies and approaches; determine whether a solution is viable, mathematically correct; and answers the question(s) asked (2.2.1, 2.2.2, 2.2.3, 2.2.4)

64

2007 Mathematics Sample Items
Scoring Guide for item number 19 A 2-point response: The student shows understanding of solving a problem by doing the following: Understanding • uses total pay of $903.10, hourly wage of $16.42, 2 times the hourly wage for Sunday, and 1.5 times hourly wage for hours over 40 Strategy/Procedure • shows appropriate strategies to partition $903.10 into 3 pieces and to determine total hours worked Regular Wages 40 hr week + 3 hr Sunday + overtime 37 hr week + 3 hr Sunday + overtime Answer • writes 48 or 49. NOTE: Allow for one incorrect intermediate answer based on a correct operation with an answer consistent with the error A 1-point response: The student does one of the following: • shows appropriate strategies to partition $903.10 into at least 2 pieces • writes 48 or 49. 0-point response: The student shows very little or no understanding of solving a problem. $16.42 x 40 $656.80 $16.42 x 37 $607.54 Sunday Wages 2 x $16.42 x 3 $98.52 2 x $16.42 x 3 $98.52 Overtime Wages or Hours $147.78 $147.78 or 6 hrs $197.04 $197.04 or 8 hrs

65

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 19 Jay earns $16.42 per hour. He earns 1.5 times his hourly wage for every
hour he works over 40 hours each week. He earns 2 times his hourly wage on Sunday. Jay worked 3 hours on Sunday and earned a total of $903.10 for the week. How many total hours did Jay work last week? Show your work using words, numbers, and/or diagrams.

Annotation for example 2-point response: The student shows understanding of solving a problem by using the given information to determine Sunday wages, regular wages, and overtime wages. The student used the overtime wages to determine the number of overtime hours worked as 6. The student writes a correct answer of “49 hrs.” This response earns two points.

66

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 19 Jay earns $16.42 per hour. He earns 1.5 times his hourly wage for every
hour he works over 40 hours each week. He earns 2 times his hourly wage on Sunday. Jay worked 3 hours on Sunday and earned a total of $903.10 for the week. How many total hours did Jay work last week? Show your work using words, numbers, and/or diagrams.

Annotation for example 2-point response: The student shows understanding of solving a problem by using the given information to determine Sunday wages, regular wages, and overtime wages. The student used the overtime wages to determine the number of overtime hours worked as 6. The student writes a correct answer of “49 hrs.” This response earns two points.

67

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 19 Jay earns $16.42 per hour. He earns 1.5 times his hourly wage for every
hour he works over 40 hours each week. He earns 2 times his hourly wage on Sunday. Jay worked 3 hours on Sunday and earned a total of $903.10 for the week. How many total hours did Jay work last week? Show your work using words, numbers, and/or diagrams.

Annotation for example 2-point response: The student shows understanding of solving a problem by using the given information to determine Sunday wages, regular wages, and overtime wages. The student used 37 hours to determine regular wages and counted Sunday as part of the forty-hour work week. The student used the overtime wages to determine the number of overtime hours worked as 8. The student writes a correct answer of “48 hrs.” This response earns two points.

68

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 19 Jay earns $16.42 per hour. He earns 1.5 times his hourly wage for every
hour he works over 40 hours each week. He earns 2 times his hourly wage on Sunday. Jay worked 3 hours on Sunday and earned a total of $903.10 for the week. How many total hours did Jay work last week? Show your work using words, numbers, and/or diagrams.

Annotation for example 1-point response: The student shows partial understanding of solving a problem by using the given information to determine Sunday wages, regular wages, and overtime wages. The student used the overtime wages to determine the number of overtime hours worked as 6. The student writes an incorrect answer of “6” hrs. This response earns one point.

69

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 19 Jay earns $16.42 per hour. He earns 1.5 times his hourly wage for every
hour he works over 40 hours each week. He earns 2 times his hourly wage on Sunday. Jay worked 3 hours on Sunday and earned a total of $903.10 for the week. How many total hours did Jay work last week? Show your work using words, numbers, and/or diagrams.

Annotation for example 1-point response: The student shows partial understanding of solving a problem by using the given information to determine Sunday wages and regular wages, but not overtime wages. The student writes an incorrect answer of “44.5.” This response earns one point.

70

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 19 Jay earns $16.42 per hour. He earns 1.5 times his hourly wage for every
hour he works over 40 hours each week. He earns 2 times his hourly wage on Sunday. Jay worked 3 hours on Sunday and earned a total of $903.10 for the week. How many total hours did Jay work last week? Show your work using words, numbers, and/or diagrams.

Annotation for example 1-point response: The student shows partial understanding of solving a problem by using the given information to determine Sunday wages and regular wages, but not overtime wages. The student subtracted Sunday wages from 903.10 and used that number to determine the number of regular hours worked, “ 804.58 ÷ 16.42 = 49 hours.” The student completely neglects overtime and writes an incorrect answer of “52 hours.” This response earns one point.

71

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 19 Jay earns $16.42 per hour. He earns 1.5 times his hourly wage for every
hour he works over 40 hours each week. He earns 2 times his hourly wage on Sunday. Jay worked 3 hours on Sunday and earned a total of $903.10 for the week. How many total hours did Jay work last week? Show your work using words, numbers, and/or diagrams.

Annotation for example 0-point response: The student shows little or no understanding of solving a problem. The student divides the total wages by the hourly wage for regular hours, “ 903.10 = 55 hours worked.” The student
16.42

writes an incorrect answer of “55.” This response earns zero points.

72

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 20 Nika must determine the cost of materials for a brick patio for one of her
customers. She must organize the information so the customer can clearly understand what materials are needed for the project and how much they will cost. Patio Design 40 ft

20 ft 30 ft

30 ft – – – – – – – Bricks will be set on a 2-inch layer of sand. Plastic edging will surround the patio. Each brick is 4 inches wide and 8 inches long. The bricks will be placed side by side, leaving no space. Sand costs $18.00 per cubic yard. Edging costs $15.00 for a 25-foot roll. Bricks cost $0.48 each.

73

2007 Mathematics Sample Items
• Determine the cost of materials for the brick patio for Nika’s customer. • Organize the information so the customer can clearly understand the quantity of materials needed for the project and how much they will cost.

07577

74

2007 Mathematics Sample Items
Item Information Score Points: 4 Tools: Y Strand and Target CU02 (Organize, Represent, and Share Information): Organize, clarify, and refine mathematical information for a given purpose; use everyday and mathematical language and notation in appropriate and efficient forms to clearly express or represent complex ideas and information; explain and/or represent complex mathematical ideas and information in ways appropriate for audience and purpose in a context that is relevant to tenth grade students (4.2.1, 4.2.2, 4.2.3)

75

2007 Mathematics Sample Items
Scoring Guide for item number 20 A 4-point response: The student communicates mathematical information by doing the following: • includes component materials and a total cost for sand, a total cost for edging, and a total cost for bricks • writes quantities and costs for component materials: • sand 6.5 – 7.5 cubic yards, inclusive, or equivalent and $117 to $135, inclusive • edging 5.6 – 6 rolls, inclusive, or equivalent and $84 to $90, inclusive • bricks 4900 – 5000, inclusive, or equivalent and $2352 to $2400, inclusive NOTE: When total cost is included it must follow from student work. • • labels three of the four: sand using in3, ft3, or yd3; edging using ft or rolls; bricks using in2, ft2, or bricks; and all costs using $ organizes their information for the customer and includes quantity and cost of materials.

A 3-point response: The student does 3 of the 4 requirements for a 4-point response. A 2-point response: The student does two of the following: • includes component materials and a total cost for sand, a total cost for edging, and a total cost for bricks • writes two or three of the quantities and costs for component materials: • sand 6.5 – 7.5 cubic yards, inclusive, or equivalent and $117 to $135, inclusive • edging 5.6 – 6 rolls, inclusive, or equivalent and $84 to $90, inclusive • bricks 4900 – 5000, inclusive, or equivalent and $2352 to $2400, inclusive NOTE: When total cost is included it must follow from student work. • • labels three of the four: sand using in3, ft3, or yd3; edging using ft or rolls; bricks using in2, ft2, or bricks; and all costs using $ organizes their information for the customer and includes quantity and cost of materials.

A 1-point response: The student does 1 of the 4 requirements for a 2-point response. A 0-point response: The student shows very little or no understanding of communicating mathematical information. NOTE: Allow for one computation error or one rounding error with answers that follow from that error. Quantities 6.5 – 7.5 cubic yards of sand 140 feet of edging 5.6 – 6.0 rolls of edging 158,400 square inches of bricks 1,100 square feet of bricks 4,900 – 5,000 bricks Associated Unit Cost $18 per yard $0.60 per foot $15 per roll $0.015 per square inch $0.216 per square foot $0.48 per brick

76

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 20 Nika must determine the cost of materials for a brick patio for one of her
customers. She must organize the information so the customer can clearly understand what materials are needed for the project and how much they will cost.

77

2007 Mathematics Sample Items
• Determine the cost of materials for the brick patio for Nika’s customer. • Organize the information so the customer can clearly understand the quantity of materials needed for the project and how much they will cost.

Annotation for example 4-point response: The student shows understanding of communicating mathematical information for a given purpose by including component materials and their total costs for sand, edging, and bricks. The student writes correct quantities for the materials and writes a total cost for sand of “$126,” for edging of “$90,” and for bricks of “$2376.” The total cost of “$2592” follows from student work. Unit labels are included for quantities of materials and the information is organized so a customer would know the individual and total quantity and cost of the materials to build the patio. This response earns four points.

78

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 20 Nika must determine the cost of materials for a brick patio for one of her
customers. She must organize the information so the customer can clearly understand what materials are needed for the project and how much they will cost.

79

2007 Mathematics Sample Items
• Determine the cost of materials for the brick patio for Nika’s customer. • Organize the information so the customer can clearly understand the quantity of materials needed for the project and how much they will cost.

Annotation for example 4-point response: The student shows understanding of communicating mathematical information for a given purpose by including component materials and their total costs for sand, edging, and bricks. The student writes correct quantities for the materials and writes a total cost for sand of “$122.22,” for edging of “$90,” and for bricks of “$2376.” The total cost of “$2588.22” follows from student work. Unit labels are included for quantities of materials and the information is organized so a customer would know the individual and total quantity and cost of the materials to build the patio. This response earns four points.

80

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 20 Nika must determine the cost of materials for a brick patio for one of her
customers. She must organize the information so the customer can clearly understand what materials are needed for the project and how much they will cost.

81

2007 Mathematics Sample Items
• Determine the cost of materials for the brick patio for Nika’s customer. • Organize the information so the customer can clearly understand the quantity of materials needed for the project and how much they will cost.

Annotation for example 4-point response: The student shows understanding of communicating mathematical information for a given purpose by including component materials and their total costs for sand, edging, and bricks. The student writes correct quantities for the materials and writes a total cost for sand of “$134,” for edging of “$84,” and for bricks of “$2,376.” The total cost of “$2,594” follows from student work. Unit labels are included for quantities of materials and the information is organized so a customer would know the individual and total quantity and cost of the materials to build the patio. This response earns four points.

82

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 20 Nika must determine the cost of materials for a brick patio for one of her
customers. She must organize the information so the customer can clearly understand what materials are needed for the project and how much they will cost.

83

2007 Mathematics Sample Items
• Determine the cost of materials for the brick patio for Nika’s customer. • Organize the information so the customer can clearly understand the quantity of materials needed for the project and how much they will cost.

Annotation for example 3-point response: The student shows partial understanding of communicating mathematical information for a given purpose by including component materials and their total costs for sand, edging, and bricks. The student writes correct quantities for only two of the three component materials and writes a total cost for edging of “$90,” and for bricks of “$2376.” The quantity and associated cost of sand is incorrect due to the conceptual error in converting cubic inches to cubic feet (divided by 144 not 1728). The total cost of “$6875” follows from student work. Unit labels are included for quantities of materials and the information is organized so a customer would know the individual and total quantity and cost of the materials to build the patio. This response earns three points.

84

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 20 Nika must determine the cost of materials for a brick patio for one of her
customers. She must organize the information so the customer can clearly understand what materials are needed for the project and how much they will cost.

85

2007 Mathematics Sample Items
• Determine the cost of materials for the brick patio for Nika’s customer. • Organize the information so the customer can clearly understand the quantity of materials needed for the project and how much they will cost.

Annotation for example 3-point response: The student shows partial understanding of communicating mathematical information for a given purpose by including component materials and their total costs for sand, edging, and bricks. The quantity and associated cost of each component is incorrect. The total cost of “$8013.60” follows from student work. Three of four labels are included for quantities and costs of materials. The information is organized so a customer would know the individual and total quantity and cost of the materials to build the patio. Bullets 1, 3, and 4 receive credit. This response earns three points.

86

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 20 Nika must determine the cost of materials for a brick patio for one of her
customers. She must organize the information so the customer can clearly understand what materials are needed for the project and how much they will cost.

87

2007 Mathematics Sample Items
• Determine the cost of materials for the brick patio for Nika’s customer. • Organize the information so the customer can clearly understand the quantity of materials needed for the project and how much they will cost.

Annotation for example 3-point response: The student shows partial understanding of communicating mathematical information for a given purpose by including component materials and their total costs for sand, edging, and bricks. The student writes correct quantities for only two of the three component materials and writes a total cost for edging of “90$” and for bricks of “2376$.” Note that the “$” sign is in an incorrect position. The quantity and associated cost of sand is incorrect due to the conceptual error in converting cubic inches to cubic feet (divided by 12 then 3 not 1728). The total cost of “$158,400” follows from student work. Unit labels are included for quantities of materials and the information is organized so a customer would know the individual and total quantity and cost of the materials to build the patio. This response earns three points.

88

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 20 Nika must determine the cost of materials for a brick patio for one of her
customers. She must organize the information so the customer can clearly understand what materials are needed for the project and how much they will cost. Patio Design 40 ft

20 ft 30 ft

30 ft – – – – – – – Bricks will be set on a 2-inch layer of sand. Plastic edging will surround the patio. Each brick is 4 inches wide and 8 inches long. The bricks will be placed side by side, leaving no space. Sand costs $18.00 per cubic yard. Edging costs $15.00 for a 25-foot roll. Bricks cost $0.48 each.

89

2007 Mathematics Sample Items
• Determine the cost of materials for the brick patio for Nika’s customer. • Organize the information so the customer can clearly understand the quantity of materials needed for the project and how much they will cost.

Annotation for example 2-point response: The student shows partial understanding of communicating mathematical information for a given purpose by including component materials and their total costs for sand, edging, and bricks. The total cost of “$369.60” follows from student work. The response has incorrect quantities and costs for the component materials. Only 2 of 4 units (ft., $) are correctly labeled. The information for the customer is organized. Bullets 1 and 4 receive credit. This response earns two points.

90

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 20 Nika must determine the cost of materials for a brick patio for one of her
customers. She must organize the information so the customer can clearly understand what materials are needed for the project and how much they will cost.

91

2007 Mathematics Sample Items
• Determine the cost of materials for the brick patio for Nika’s customer. • Organize the information so the customer can clearly understand the quantity of materials needed for the project and how much they will cost.

Annotation for example 2-point response: The student shows partial understanding of communicating mathematical information for a given purpose by including component materials and their total costs for sand, edging, and bricks. The response includes two of three correct quantities (5.6 rolls, 5000 bricks) and costs ($84, $2400) for the component materials. The total cost of “$3084” follows from student work. The information for the customer does not include quantities for sand and edging. Receives credit for bullets 1 and 2. This response earns two points.

92

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 20 Nika must determine the cost of materials for a brick patio for one of her
customers. She must organize the information so the customer can clearly understand what materials are needed for the project and how much they will cost.

93

2007 Mathematics Sample Items
• Determine the cost of materials for the brick patio for Nika’s customer. • Organize the information so the customer can clearly understand the quantity of materials needed for the project and how much they will cost.

Annotation for example 2-point response: The student shows partial understanding of communicating mathematical information for a given purpose by including component materials and their total costs for sand, edging, and bricks. The response includes only one correct quantity (6 rolls) and the correct cost ($90) for the component material. The information for the customer does not include a correct reference to the quantity of sand since we don’t know that a “sand bag” is equal to a “cubic yard.” Receives credit for bullets 1 and 3. This response earns two points.

94

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 20 Nika must determine the cost of materials for a brick patio for one of her
customers. She must organize the information so the customer can clearly understand what materials are needed for the project and how much they will cost. Patio Design 40 ft

20 ft 30 ft

30 ft – – – – – – – Bricks will be set on a 2-inch layer of sand. Plastic edging will surround the patio. Each brick is 4 inches wide and 8 inches long. The bricks will be placed side by side, leaving no space. Sand costs $18.00 per cubic yard. Edging costs $15.00 for a 25-foot roll. Bricks cost $0.48 each.

95

2007 Mathematics Sample Items
• Determine the cost of materials for the brick patio for Nika’s customer. • Organize the information so the customer can clearly understand the quantity of materials needed for the project and how much they will cost.

Annotation for example 1-point response: The student shows partial understanding of communicating mathematical information for a given purpose by including component materials and their total costs for sand, edging, and bricks. The response does not identify any quantities, and the costs for the component materials are incorrect. Unit labels on quantities do not exist and the “$” symbol is incorrectly placed behind the dollar amounts. The information for the customer does not include quantities. Receives credit for bullet 1. This response earns one point.

96

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 20 Nika must determine the cost of materials for a brick patio for one of her
customers. She must organize the information so the customer can clearly understand what materials are needed for the project and how much they will cost.

97

2007 Mathematics Sample Items
• Determine the cost of materials for the brick patio for Nika’s customer. • Organize the information so the customer can clearly understand the quantity of materials needed for the project and how much they will cost.

Annotation for example 1-point response: The student shows partial understanding of communicating mathematical information for a given purpose by including component materials and their total costs for sand, edging, and bricks. The response does not include any quantities and the costs for the component materials are incorrect. Only 1 of 4 unit labels on quantities is included. The information for the customer does not include quantities. Receives credit for bullet 1. This response earns one point.

98

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 20 Nika must determine the cost of materials for a brick patio for one of her
customers. She must organize the information so the customer can clearly understand what materials are needed for the project and how much they will cost.

99

2007 Mathematics Sample Items
• Determine the cost of materials for the brick patio for Nika’s customer. • Organize the information so the customer can clearly understand the quantity of materials needed for the project and how much they will cost.

Annotation for example 1-point response: The student shows partial understanding of communicating mathematical information for a given purpose by including the component materials and their total costs for sand, edging, and bricks. The response includes only one correct quantity (6 rolls) and the correct cost ($90) for the component material. Only 2 of 4 units (rolls, $ on all costs) are correctly labeled. The information for the customer does not include quantities for bricks or sand. Receives credit for bullet 1. This response earns one point.

100

2007 Mathematics Sample Items 20 Nika must determine the cost of materials for a brick patio for one of her
customers. She must organize the information so the customer can clearly understand what materials are needed for the project and how much they will cost. Patio Design 40 ft

20 ft 30 ft

30 ft – – – – – – – Bricks will be set on a 2-inch layer of sand. Plastic edging will surround the patio. Each brick is 4 inches wide and 8 inches long. The bricks will be placed side by side, leaving no space. Sand costs $18.00 per cubic yard. Edging costs $15.00 for a 25-foot roll. Bricks cost $0.48 each.

101

2007 Mathematics Sample Items
• Determine the cost of materials for the brick patio for Nika’s customer. • Organize the information so the customer can clearly understand the quantity of materials needed for the project and how much they will cost.

Annotation for example 0-point response: The student shows very little or no understanding of communicating mathematical information for a given purpose. The information for the customer does not include quantities or costs of the component materials. This response earns zero points.

102