Van Wert County Fair results, p4

and 7

Pirates down Lady Musketeers in
soccer, p6

HERALD

DELPHOS
The

Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869

75¢ daily

www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

Vol. 145 No. 57

Delphos, Ohio

2014 Relay for Life closes $97 from goal
BY NANCY SPENCER
DHI Media Editor
nspencer@delphosherald.com

2014 books, the community is invited to
a public forum at 6:30 p.m. Sept. 23 at
VFW Post 3035 to discuss some exciting
possible changes for the 2015 event.
“We have some possibilities that I
think Delphos will want to hear about,”
American Cancer Society Income
Specialist Jamie Orozco said. “The community really needs to come out that night
and give us their input. We have listened
to feedback from the committee, survivors
and team captains and ACS has answered
with more flexibility and options.”
Committee member Sue Apple hopes
to have a good crowd for the forum.
“The entire community supports Relay

DELPHOS — The deadline to turn in
money for the 2014 Relay For Life of
Delphos came and went Sunday and when
the dust settled, the local Relay was just
$97 shy of its $79,000 goal.
“My personal goal in my head was
$70,000 so what we did was wonderful,” Sandy Suever, longtime committee
member said. “I consider it a success just
because of the survivor participation we
have. That’s why we do this.”
While the ink has yet to dry on the

in one way or another,” Apple said. “It
takes everyone to make a successful event
and we want as many people giving their
input as possible.”
Delphos started Relaying in 2002 and
the events have raised more than $1
million toward research to find a cure.
In 2014, 23 teams raised money and 21
pounded the pavement during the Relay.
K&M Tire led with the highest team
total of $21,9312. K&M does a corporate
match.
The date for the 2015 Relay has not
been set and ACS has not released the
goal.

Judge Steele to step down
BY ED GEBERT
DHI Media Editor
news@delphosherald.com

VAN WERT —Van Wert
County Court of Common Pleas
will have a new judge effective at the beginning of 2015.
Judge Charles D. Steele, who
has served on the bench since
1999, announced his retirement
on Tuesday.
Steele was appointed to the
bench by Ohio Gov. Robert Taft
15 years ago and was elected by
county voters in 2006 and again
in 2012.
The new judge will be appointed by Gov. John Kasich from a
list of qualified attorneys submit-

Pathfinders cover spectrum at fair
Above: Pathfinder
Colleen
Schulte
won the County
Construction Award
and the Best Senior
Clothing Project at
the 2014 Van Wert
County Fair. Schulte
also won Senior
Showmanship. Left:
Grand
Champion
Roaster Pen went
to Pathfinder Marie
Mueller. See fair
results and more
photos on pages 4
and 7. (Submitted
photo)

Mostly sunny
today and
mostly clear
tonight.
Highs in the
lower 80s.
Lows in the
mid 60s. See page 2.

Obituaries
State/Local
The Next Generation
Community
Sports
Classifieds
Comics and Puzzles
World News

ted to the governor by the Van
Wert County Republican Central

See STEELE, page 10

St. Peter Lutheran Church will expand its free children’s breakfast to the community on
Sunday for its “Our Work. Our Hands!“ Sunday. (DHI Media file photo)

St. Peter’s offers community breakfast
BY NANCY SPENCER
DHI Media Editor
nspencer@delphosherald.com

DELPHOS — St. Peter Lutheran Church will
join approximately 10,000 Lutheran congregations
across the country Sunday in celebrating “Our Work,
Our Hands!” Sunday in performing a community
service. The church will open its doors and serve a
free breakfast from 8-9 a.m. for anyone who would
care to join them in food and fellowship.
“We were thinking of what we could do and we
decided to stick with something we’ve been doing
and doing well and expand it for the day,” In-reach-

Outreach Coordinator Susan McGue said. “We’ve
been serving breakfast with the Kids Breakfast outreach ministry for five years and now we’ll offer it
to the community.”
Scrambled eggs, pancakes and sausage links will
be served with orange juice, coffee, milk and water.
The Kids Breakfast just finished for the year on
Aug. 22 and is made possible with grants through the
Northwestern Ohio Senate and Community Unity, a
Delphos organization. There have also been monetary and food donations made by members of the
church and the general public.
See BREAKFAST, page 10

Chief warns residents of phone scams 4-H members cash in

Forecast

Index

Judge Steele

Committee.
Steele has the longest tenure
of any current Van Wert County
judge. Van Wert Municipal
Court Judge Jill Leatherman
was appointed by Gov. Ted
Strickland to replace Phil W.
Campbell in 2010 and Common
Pleas Probate and Juvenile
Court Judge Kevin Taylor was
appointed by Kasich to succeed
Rex Fortney in 2012.
Judge Steele’s replacement
will be appointed by Kasich from
a list of qualified attorneys submitted to the governor by the Van
Wert County Republican Central
Committee.

BY STEPHANIE GROVES
DHI Media Staff Writer
sgroves@delphosherald.com

2
3
4
5
6-7
8
9
10

SPENCERVILLE — Spencerville Police
Chief Darin Cook reported to council members Tuesday night that just in the last five
days, residents had been experiencing scam
artists calling and posing as IRS agents and
public utilities account managers requesting
payment on back income tax payments and
overdue accounts.
The first scam involved an individual
posing as an Ohio Power representative
requesting the business customer’s information, money on a refillable Money Pak Card
and to call a specific phone number with the
card information to access and withdraw the
money off the card.
“The caller does not have the company
name (utility service provider) and cannot provide the customer with an accurate
account number,” Cook said. “Two businesses in the area have been affected by this

scam.”
Cook said the second scam involved
an individual posing as an IRS agent who
wanted to verify an individual’s information. That individual knew he had not
received any correspondence from the IRS
and realized if it were the IRS, they would
already have all the information they needed.
“Some people (the targets of the scam)
are having a rough time financially, they
get scared thinking their utilities will be
shut off and they make the arrangements to
pay the scammer,” Cook said. “None of the
public utilities work in that manner.”
Cook advises anyone experiencing phone
calls of this nature to first call the utility
company using the number on their billing.
They should also call the Better Business
Bureau and their local police department.
Cook said the calls are untraceable and
the thieves use computers to run the scam.
See SCAMS, page 10

at Livestock Auction
BY ED GEBERT
DHI Media Editor
egebert@timesbulletin.com

VAN WERT — The 2014 Van Wert County Junior Fair
Livestock Auction began with the sale of a $2,500 gallon of milk. That sale occurred when around 30 bidders
joined in to buy the milk which benefits the six 4-Hers
who raised dairy cattle for judging this year. Each of the
six netted $436.67 for the sale.
Once the milk was gone, the bidders settled in to
buy the animals and give gifts to the 4-H participants.
The grand total of premiums and meat price totaled
almost $240,000. The premium total itself was the
second-highest since the turn of the century, $145,320.
That total bested the 2013 premiums of $140,138. The
record for premiums was set in the 2012 auction at
$146,210.
See AUCTION, page 10

2 — The Herald

www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

Apple: Some nude
shots taken from
stars’ accounts
LOS ANGELES (AP) —
Apple said Tuesday that hackers obtained nude photos of
Jennifer Lawrence and other
female celebrities by pilfering images from individual
accounts rather than through
a broader attack on the company’s services.
Meanwhile,
numerous
sharing sites removed images of the stars apparently in
response to copyright complaints.
However, experts say there
is no way to fully scrub the
photos from the Internet and
the images could keep popping up in the future, forcing celebrities to file repeated
complaints as they play a
cyber-version of the arcade
game “whack-a-mole.”
Apple said its engineers
have determined that hackers
breached individual accounts
and didn’t obtain general
access to a pair of the company’s services — iCloud
and Find my iPhone. The
tech giant said it released the
results after conducting 40
hours of investigation.
Law enforcement inquiries
likely will take days or weeks
to complete.
The FBI offered no details
on its efforts to identify people responsible for stealing
the images that were posted
on image-sharing site Imgur.
com, the social networking
sites Reddit and Twitter, and
other websites. But the agency
said Monday it was aware of
the breach and addressing the
matter.
Similar investigations have
involved the use of search
warrants and digital forensics
to determine how hackers
obtained everything from Paris
Hilton’s contact list to nude
photos of actresses Scarlett
Johansson and Mila Kunis.
Lawrence, an Oscar winner
for her role in “Silver Linings
Playbook,” contacted authorities after the images of her
began appearing Sunday.
By Tuesday, a Reddit
thread that had been compiling links to images of nude
photos of Lawrence and other
celebrities had been disabled
due to a copyright claim, the
website said.
Users reported difficulty
finding working links to the
images on other sites.
Representatives of Twitter,
Reddit and Imgur did not
respond to messages seeking
comment.
Apple Inc. said it was
cooperating with the FBI and
urged users to adopt stronger
passwords and enable a twostep authentication feature to
prevent data thefts.
Naked images purported to
be of other stars also were
posted, although the authenticity of many couldn’t be
confirmed.
Mark Rasch, a former federal prosecutor who specialized in computer crimes, said
investigators will focus on
who’s responsible for the theft
of the photos, the tools they
used, and the idiosyncrasies of
how they program.
“There is a digital trail,”
Rasch said. “What you hope
for (is) the people aren’t very
good at what they do, that they
screw up, that they (upset)
other hackers. Or that they
leave a trail.”

For The Record

30 teens escape from
Nashville detention center
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Thirty teens
“overwhelmed” their minders at a juvenile
detention center by simultaneously breaking
out of four dormitories and then crawling
under a weak spot in a chain-link fence. By
Tuesday evening, seven were still on the run.
Police caught up with some walking along
roads or coming out of the woods. Some
turned themselves in, including one at the
guard shack Tuesday evening. And some were
swiftly returned to the detention center by
their own families for their own good.
“He broke loose, he was gone, but he’s
back now,” said LaWanda Knowles, whose
nephew joined the escape. “I just want to
know that he’s here safely and he’s OK — I
don’t want the police jumping on him, nobody
beating on him or nothing.”
The teens — ages 14 to 19 — left
their rooms at the Woodland Hills Youth
Development Center at about 11 p.m. Monday
night and gathered in common areas. With
just 16 unarmed adults to keep watch over 78
youths in 12 dormitories, the staff was “overwhelmed,” said Tennessee Department of
Children’s Services spokesman Rob Johnson.
“Staffing was lighter during the overnight
hours, so presumably they had planned for
that,” Johnson said.
The groups of young men kicked out metal
panels under the windows of each dorm to
get into the yard, and then ran around for a
while before some started slipping through the
chain-link fence that encircles their campus.
The fence is buried 8 inches deep into the
ground, but the teens found a spot where they
could slip out underneath it.
None of the staff were hurt, and initially
they simply called other staffers for backup
to help bring the teens back into the dormitories. Once they spotted the teens escaping
the perimeter, they alerted police, and the

Tennessee Highway Patrol joined the search.
While juvenile records are sealed, police
released the names and mug shots of the remaining eight fugitives, all of whom are 17 or 18
years old. None are convicted killers, said
Melvin Whitlow, the facility’s superintendent.
Knowles said police had come searching
for her nephew around 5 a.m. at his home
about 8 miles from the facility. The teen
showed up about two hours later, and briefly
saw his parents and family, she said.
“He wanted to see his mom, and nieces and
nephews and his sisters, so he came home,” she said.
“But when we found out that he ran, I jumped in my
truck and put him in there and brought him back.”
Once back in custody, the teens who
escaped were being taken to juvenile court to
face potential escape charges, officials said.
Most of the 78 juvenile delinquents held
at the center Monday night had committed
at least three felonies, Johnson said, but the
facility is more like a high school with security than an adult prison. There are no guard
towers or barbed wire.
The teens stay in single rooms that for their
own security are locked on the outside, so that
only those with keys can enter. But they can
push their room doors open if they need to.
They wear blue pants with white or light gray
T-shirts, with no markings.
The center has a school, offers vocational training and career counseling, and works to move
teens to less restrictive settings, according to a state
website. It holds them until their 19th birthdays. All
have been charged as juveniles, not adults.
The fence was fixed and the center was
calm and back under control Tuesday morning, Johnson said. Police cars were on the
scene, but there was little activity at the center
or its neighbors — a women’s prison, several
trucking company offices, a frozen pizza plant
and a liquor distributor.

OBITUARY
Frances L. Kaufman
May 3, 1934-Sept. 1, 2014
OTTOVILLE — Frances
L. Kaufman, 80, of Ottoville
died 5:30 p.m. Monday at The
Meadows of Kalida.
She was born May 6, 1934,
in Hartford, Connecticut, to
Joseph and Rose (Cannarella)
Cantone, who preceded her in
death.
She is survived by
her three children, Cathy
(Randy) Gasser and Donna
(Dennis) Bendele, both of
Fort Jennings, and Tom (Lee)
Kaufman of Florida.
There will be no services
or visitation.
Arrangements are being
handled by Love-Heitmeyer
Funeral Home, Jackson Twp.
Condolences may be
expressed to: www.lovefuneralhome.com.

FUNERAL
BRABANT,
Richard,
82, of Celina, Funeral services will begin at 2 p.m.
today at Harter and Schier
Funeral Home, with visitation one hour before. Burial
will be at Resurrection
Cemetery with the Delphos
Veteran’s Council performing Military Burial Rites.
Memorial contributions may
be made to The Alzheimer’s
Foundation.

The Delphos
Herald
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary,
general manager
Delphos Herald, Inc.
Lori Goodwin Silette,
circulation manager
The
Delphos
Herald
(USPS 1525 8000) is published
daily except Sundays, Tuesdays
and Holidays.
The Delphos Herald is delivered by carrier in Delphos for
$1.82 per week. Same day
delivery outside of Delphos is
done through the post office
for Allen, Van Wert or Putnam
Counties. Delivery outside of
these counties is $117 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
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405 North Main St.
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POSTMASTER:
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CORRECTIONS

The Delphos Herald wants
to correct published errors in
its news, sports and feature
articles. To inform the newsroom of a mistake in published
information, call the editorial
department at 419-695-0015.
Corrections will be published
on this page.

Lawyer says family of girl with Uzi is devastated BLOOD DRIVE
JOSH CORNFIELD
Associated Press
PHOENIX — An attorney for the parents of a 9-year-old
girl who accidentally killed an Arizona shooting range instructor with an Uzi said Tuesday the family is devastated by the
tragedy that occurred on a brief excursion during a vacation.
The statement came as investigators released police reports
and 911 recordings involving the Aug. 25 shooting of instructor Charles Vacca at the Last Stop range in White Hills, about
60 miles south of Las Vegas.
The police reports name the child’s parents as Alex Gen
and Alison MacLachlan and don’t list the couple’s hometown.
New Jersey-based lawyer Kevin Walsh said the family
“prayed day and night that (Vacca) would survive his injury,
and they continue to pray for his family during this terribly
difficult time.”
The police reports say that immediately after the shooting,

the girl said she felt the gun was too much for her and had
hurt her shoulder.
Her family members were focused on the girl because
they thought she was injured by the gun’s recoil and didn’t
immediately realize that Vacca had been shot until one of his
colleagues ran over to him, the reports state.
The shooting set off a powerful debate over youngsters and
guns, with many people wondering what sort of parents would
let a child handle a submachine gun. However, neither the
reports nor the statement by Walsh explains why the parents
let the girl take the Uzi.
The family had taken a shuttle from Las Vegas to the range.
After arriving, the girl, her parents, sister and brother took a
monster truck ride before heading to the shooting range.
The girl’s father was the first one in the party to handle a
weapon. After he fired shots, Vacca instructed the girl on how
to shoot the gun, showed her a shooting stance, and helped her
fire a few rounds, according to the reports.

FROM THE ARCHIVES
One Year Ago
The Fort Jennings High School
Competition Team took first place in
the senior team division at the Van
Wert County Fair Cheer Competition
Saturday. Team members include Emily
Grone, Andrea Ricker, Cassie Horstman,
Jamie Saum, Stephanie Korte, Lindsey
Trentman, Sarah Hellman, Alyssa
Wiedeman, Jenna Calvelage, Sarah
Chandler, Lydia Mesker, Olivia Wieging,
Erin Eickholt, Devyn Wiechart, Jordan
Horstman and Hailey Young.
25 Years Ago – 1989
One of the highlights of the Van Wert
Fair was crowning of the junior fair king
and queen. Selected Thursday evening
to reign as the 1989 king and queen were
Jeremy Couts, 16, and Lisa Garwood,
18. Queen Lisa is a 1989 Lincolnview
High School graduate and the daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Garwood of Van
Wert. King Jeremy is a junior at Van
Wert High School and the son of Mr.
and Mrs. Jed Couts of Ohio City.

SEPTEMBER 18-21

ENTERTAINMENT
THURSDAY

5-9 THE TOAST “OFF THE WALL”
WITH JOE DENIM

Dave Christen of Delphos has taken
a position at Northwestern Auto Diesel
College of Lima. He began teaching in
the computerized engine control area for
the fall semester. Christen graduated in
1977 from St. John’s High School and
in 1978 from Northwestern Auto Diesel
College with an associate degree as an
automotive technician.
Kruse Furniture softball team outscored seven opponents 101-33 to
win the Class C American Softball
Association National Championship
last weekend in Mansfield. Players on
the all-tournament team were Lance
Kellemeyer, Dan J. Grothouse, Doug
Price, Derrick Shively and John Ardner.
50 Years Ago – 1964
Two shuffleboard courts, two horseshoe pitching courts, one blacktop basketball court and one blacktop tennis
court will be dedicated Wednesday evening at Middle Point as part of that community’s homecoming program. Three
games are scheduled for the basketball
courts. Ed Engel’s Senior Citizens will
take on Bob Buton’s Youngsters on the
shuffleboard court.
Don R. Miehls, son of Mrs. Arnold
Miehls, formerly of Delphos, has earned
a position of prestige in the city of
Carlsbad, N.M., where he was elected
to the post of city councilman last April.
Just recently the former Delphos resident
was granted a patent from the United
States Patent Office on a mechanical
device called a “Center Finder” for use
in machine shops.
Tom’s Peanuts softball team of

van werT, ohio

(419) 238-5888

6-7:30 BATTLE OF THE BUSINESSES
8-12 NASHVILLE’S JOE DENIM

2-4 BASKET BINGO

5-9 CAR SHOW/CRUISE-IN
8-12 BROTHER BELIEVE ME
SUNDAY
10-12 CHEERLEADING
2-3 THE GRAND PARADE
3-6 DUECES WILD

WWW.DELPHOSCHAMBER.COM/CANALDAYS

75 Years Ago – 1939
James Counselor was elected president of the Old Time ‘Coon Hunters
Club of Delphos at the annual meeting
held Friday night on the banks of the
Auglaize River. Other officers elected
were Frank Osting, vice president, and
Doyle Burkholder, secretary-treasurer.
Directors named were Doit Swihart,
chairman, N. S. Diltz and Elmer Will.
Herman Reasoner, who has conducted the Delphos Appliance Store
in the Lang Building for three years,
has retired from that business and will
be associated with Walter Crede in the
Crede Supply Store at 306 N. Main St.
Under the new arrangement, the store
will handle the lines which Reasoner
has sold in the past: the Philco radio, the
Frigidaire and the Maytag washer.
Sheeter’s defeated the Star Café at
Waterworks Park Friday night by a score
of 14 to 3. Grewe was on the mound
for Sheeter’s and allowed only five
hits. Wiechart and Kemper received.
Sheeter’s collected a total of 10 hits off
H. Ditto, Meekins and Thithoff. Plescher
of the Sheeter team connected with two
home runs and Lisk hit a home run.

349 Towne CenTer Blvd.

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

Delphos won the Middle Point slo-pitch
tournament by defeating Lima Agrico,
8-2, in the finals Saturday. Fetzer was
on the mound for the Delphos team and
allowed only eight hits. Druckemiller,
second sacker and leadoff man for
Delphos, had three singles in four trips
and Kill, catcher for the winners, had
three singles in three at bats. Fetzer
clouted a homer in the third inning.

Chinese Restaurant
Dine In & Take-Out

Sushi menu
available for take-out!

1.50 off
2 LUNCH Buffets
$

Must have coupon. Not valid with other offers or discounts.
Expires September 7, 2014

Big
buffet
selection
too!

2.00 off

$

2 Dinner Buffets

Must have coupon. Not valid with other offers or discounts.
Expires September 7, 2014

Order online at www.HongKongBuffetVanWert.com

INFORMATION
SUBMITTED

The
Fort
Jennings
Community Blood Drive will
be held from noon to 6 p.m.
today at the American Legion
hall.
Call Mary Lou Krietemeyer
at 419-286-2148 to make an
appointment.
Walk-ins are welcome.

EMERGENCY
RUN TOTALS
INFORMATION
SUBMITTED

The August emergency run
total was as follows:
105 - first responder calls
14 - fire calls
83 - EMS calls with two
MVAs
8 - service calls
Total: 105 calls

LOCAL GRAINS
Wheat
Corn
Soybeans

$5.39
$3.44
$13.45

LOTTERY
CLEVELAND (AP) —
These Ohio lotteries were
drawn Tuesday:
Mega Millions
01-08-54-69-72, Mega
Ball: 1
Megaplier
3
Pick 3 Evening
8-2-1
Pick 3 Midday
4-7-8
Pick 4 Evening
1-2-5-8
Pick 4 Midday
3-5-1-2
Pick 5 Evening
8-5-7-8-1
Pick 5 Midday
3-6-7-6-5
Powerball
Est. jackpot: $100 million
Rolling Cash 5
05-23-28-30-34
Est. jackpot: $120,000

WEATHER
WEATHER FORECAST
Tri-County
Associated Press
TODAY: Mostly sunny. Highs in the lower 80s. Southwest
winds around 10 mph.
TONIGHT: Mostly clear. Lows in the mid 60s. South
winds 5 to 10 mph.
THURSDAY: Partly cloudy. Highs in the upper 80s. South
winds 5 to 15 mph.
THURSDAY NIGHT: Mostly clear through midnight…
Then partly cloudy with a 20 percent chance of showers and
thunderstorms after midnight. Lows around 70. Southwest
winds 5 to 15 mph.
FRIDAY AND FRIDAY NIGHT: Mostly cloudy with a
50 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Highs in the
upper 80s. Lows in the lower 60s.

www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

STATE/LOCAL

GOP lawmakers
seek vote on
photo ID bill
COLUMBUS (AP) —
Several Republican lawmakers
hope to force the House to vote
on a bill requiring voters to
show photo identification at the
polls in the political swing state.
Backers of the measure
announced plans Tuesday to
use a legislative maneuver to
pull the bill from a committee,
which hasn’t held hearings on
it. The legislation was introduced almost a year ago.
“What is the problem that
we cannot have photo ID
required for voting in Ohio?”
state Rep. Matt Lynch said at a
news conference in Columbus.
“Frankly, there should be no
problem because we can’t get
on an airplane — we can barely get into a public building —
if we don’t have such an ID.”
Lynch, a Geauga County
Republican, joined three GOP
lawmakers in signing a discharge petition to get the bill
out of committee. The petition
requires 50 signatures from
representatives to force it to
the House floor for a vote.
It’s unclear whether the
effort will have much success. State lawmakers are
on summer break, and many
are campaigning ahead of
November’s election.

The Herald –3

Cedar Point announces
closing of Mantis
INFORMATION SUBMITTED

Iberdrola provides scholarship
to veterans and family members
Iberdrola Renewables Plant Manager Neil Voje (left) presents a $1,000
scholarship check to Staci Kaufman, Vantage superintendent, and Pete
Prichard, Vantage Adult Education director. The scholarship is designed
to assist veterans or immediate family members to obtain a credential
that will equip them with skills for employment in a needed technical
field. Participants enrolled in an energy-related field will be given priority consideration. The scholarship award can be applied towards tuition,
books and other instructional-related expenses including credential testing. Participants can take advantage of both short- and long-term training
programs. Scholarship applications may be found on the Vantage Career
Center website (vantagecareercenter.com) or in the Adult Education Office at Vantage Career Center. (Submitted photo)

American Red Cross seeks hospital volunteers
INFORMATION SUBMITTED
VAN WERT – For many years,
American Red Cross volunteers have
served at Van Wert County Hospital helping to support astounding care being provided to members of the Van Wert community and surrounding areas. Currently,
the American Red Cross of Van Wert
County supports 42 hospital volunteers
who are working in 16 different areas of
the hospital.
“We have a unique program” said
Carol Hennis, American Red Cross hospital coordinator. “Van Wert County is
the only county in Ohio to have American
Red Cross volunteers who serve within a
hospital. We are fortunate to be a part
of a large number of individuals who
donate their time and talents for the good
of our community. Our volunteers offer a
wide range of skills, interests, and backgrounds to our group which, in turn, is
shared to support both the hospital and
patients. Many opportunities for community members to become involved are
available and we try to match them with
the areas they feel they can make the
most difference.”
New this year, the American Red
Cross has launched an internship program which provides college students,
who are interested in pursuing a medical career, the opportunity to serve and
shadow in a variety of hospital areas.
“We are proud to be a part of this
new program. Students benefit from the
opportunity to explore their career field,
build experience, and network with professionals in their chosen study while
gaining valuable and marketable skills to
prepare them for their lives beyond college. All the while, we are continuing to
serve our community, serve our hospital,
and serve our mission,” Hennis said.
No specific skills are required. Red
Cross volunteers work in various mean-

The American Red Cross is seeking volunteers to help at the Van Wert
County Hospital. (Submitted photo)
ingful capacities throughout Van Wert
Hospital and are matched according to
their preferences. The duties of volunteers are varied according to the area of
their assignment. Volunteer duties may
include: providing assistance to staff
and patients; clerical duties – answering
phones, completing mail merges, filing;
stocking hospital materials and supplies;
greeting patients; coordinating the hospital prayer list; escorting patients and
providing directions to areas within the
hospital.
“Our group of American Red Cross
Volunteers provides highly valued and
dedicated services to our hospital and
community. They provide countless
hours of efforts, and without the help
of local volunteers, our hospital would

not be able to operate as effectively as
it does. We appreciate all of the hard
work of all of our volunteers,” said Mark
Minick, president and CEO, Van Wert
County Hospital.
Volunteer schedules are flexible and
can be adjusted to accommodate personal
and professional schedules. Volunteers
must be at least 18 years of age. All that
is needed is a dedicated, caring, and willing attitude.
Individuals interested in becoming a
Red Cross Volunteer, or those wanting more information about the available opportunities at Van Wert County
Hospital, should call the Red Cross
office at 419-238-9977. The office of the
American Red Cross is located at 208 E.
Main St., Van Wert.

SANDUSKY – It’s the “last stand” for one of Cedar Point’s
steel scream machines. Earlier today, the park announced that
the Mantis roller coaster will soon give its final rides.
Mantis was billed as the tallest, fastest and steepest standup roller coaster in the world when it opened on May 11,
1996. Featuring trains that secure guests in a standing position,
Mantis provides its passengers with a unique ride experience.
Mantis was built by the same legendary manufacturers that
brought guests the Raptor and GateKeeper roller coasters –
Bolliger and Mabillard (B&M), Monthey, Switzerland. In its
18-year history, Mantis has given more than 22 million thrilling rides.
“It’s time to say goodbye to one of the park’s coasters, and
it’s certainly been a different kind of ride for our guests,” said
Jason McClure, vice president and general manager of Cedar
Point. “But we’re extremely excited about what the future
holds here at the Roller Coaster Capital of the World™.”
Guests still have time to give Mantis a “standing ovation”
before it shuts down permanently at 8 p.m. Oct. 19. Additional
plans for the 2015 season will be announced at a later date.

Well water testing kits
available at SWCD
INFORMATION
SUBMITTED
VAN WERT — The
Van Wert SWCD has partnered with Heidelberg
University’s
National
Center for Water Quality
Research to offer residents
the opportunity to have
their well water tested.
Anyone whose drinking
water comes from a private well is responsible for
his/her water’s safety. For
anyone who has never had
his/her water supply tested,
it is always a good idea
to educate themselves on
what is present in the drinking water and also provide
themselves with some
baseline information in the
event there are changes in
the future that may impact
the quality of their water
supply.
A well has an increased
likelihood of contamination if:
• The well is more than
20 years old
• The well was dug or
driven rather than drilled
• The well is shallow
• The soil is sandy
• A chemical spill is
known to have happened
nearby
• The well is near possible sources of contamination, such as: cropland,
feedlots, landfills and
industrial sites, active or
abandoned
Even if a well fits none
of these categories, no one

can know the quality of
their water without testing.
Contaminants may have
entered the ground without
the homeowner’s knowledge or before they have
lived at the site.
The following are the
tests and pricing available:

Nitrate/Inorganic
Suite $25
Includes nitrate, nitrite,
ammonia, chloride, sulfate, fluoride, soluble
phosphorus, silica, and
conductivity

Pesticide
Immunoassay Screen $60
Detects major herbicides
such as atrazine (Aatrex),
simazine (Princep), alachlor (Lasso), metolachlor
(Dual), and acetochlor
(Harness)
— Metals by ICP /MS
$75
Includes antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium,
cadmium, chromium, lead,
selenium, aluminum, copper, iron, manganese. zinc,
nickel, sodium, calcium,
strontium, cobalt, magnesium, potassium, silica, and
vanadium
The test kits will be for
sale Oct. 6 through Oct. 17.
The samples need returned
to the Van Wert SWCD, 1185
Professional Drive, Van Wert,
on Oct. 20.
Participants
can
expect their confidential
results back in two-four
weeks from Heidelberg
University.

CINCINNATI (AP) — The parents
of four black students who allege their
children were expelled over rap music
videos and targeted because of race sued
a suburban school district in federal court
on Tuesday, charging violations of constitutional rights including free speech.
Attorney Robert Newman, representing the parents, said that the students were
expelled from Colerain High School in
Colerain Township, a 20-minute drive
northwest of Cincinnati, for making rap
music videos off campus and that black students were unfairly targeted. The parents’
lawsuit was filed in U.S. District Court in
Cincinnati against the Northwest Local
School District, the Colerain Township
Board of Trustees, members of both groups’
boards and some police officers.
A school district statement said the
lawsuit contains inaccurate information.
An attorney representing the township
didn’t immediately return a call seeking
comment on Tuesday.
School officials and police officers
interrogated black students about their
recent social media postings and affiliations with other black youths and showed
them photos collected by school staff
and police from social media websites,
the lawsuit says. The photos showed the
students making various hand signs or
participating in rap music videos, it says.
“Based on these images, school
administrators accused more than a
dozen African-American students of
making ‘street signs’ and belonging to a
‘gang,’” the lawsuit states.
Newman said white students involved
in similar conduct weren’t disciplined.

learning a Republican
consultant and appointee
of Gov. John Kasich was
responsible for hiring the
law firm whose challenge
pushed two of their candidates off the statewide
ballot.
Terry Casey worked
for Kasich’s 2010 campaign and the governor
has since appointed him
to the $70,000-a-year job
chairing the state personnel review board.
Casey’s role hiring
Zeiger, Tigges & Little
emerged in a case in
which Libertarians are
asking federal Judge
Michael Watson to restore
governor
candidate
Charlie Earl and attorney
general candidate Steven
Linnabary to November’s
ballot.
In a new court filing,
the party also says Bradley
Smith, hired to oversee the disqualification
hearing by Republican
Secretary of State Jon
Husted, didn’t disclose he
was working for Ohio’s
Republican
attorney
general, Mike DeWine,
doing pro bono work at
the time. DeWine’s office
confirmed Smith held an
appointment from Feb.

sage seeking comment
was left at Smith’s office
Tuesday.
Libertarians
have
asked Watson to expedite a trial in their case
on grounds the disqualifications were based
on partisan, not principled, reasons. The U.S.
Constitution prohibits
government officials from
removing candidates for
partisan reasons.
The Zeiger firm represented Libertarian voter
Gregory Felsoci in a protest of ballot petitions filed
by Earl and Linnabary,
but Casey hired the firm
and is paying the legal
bill — including through
contributions from Ohio
Republicans, he confirmed in an interview
Tuesday.
Casey defended his
role, saying Libertarians
would not have run into
trouble if they had submitted petitions that were
legal.
“The problem in their
theory is that, based on
the filings originally and
the hearing conducted by
Brad Smith, there was
clear evidence that came
out on the petitions: the
use of the paid circula-

said. “There never would
have been a complaint if
they’d have had sufficient
required signatures and
not have had the proven
legal problems.”
He said he’ll accept
money from Republicans,
Democrats or independents to help pay the
law firm — and thanked
Libertarians for the free
publicity.
Outside of the legal
challenge, Earl called on
Kasich to remove Casey
from his state post.
“Like many political
‘bag men’ and ‘fixers,’ he
lacks the ethical compass
to serve the people of
Ohio,” he said in a statement. “If Casey possesses
a scintilla of ethical probity, he would resign and
apologize to the people of
Ohio for colluding to limit
their voices and choices
in Ohio’s electoral process. Since he won’t, we
therefore call on Gov.
Kasich to dismiss Casey
… and restore some measure of confidence in state
government. “
A Kasich spokesman
declined comment, as did
Husted’s office. Husted is
scheduled to be deposed
Thursday in the case.

00101030

Expelled black
Libertarians tossed from ballot eye GOP ties
students’ parents sue
COLUMBUS (AP) 27, five days before the tor and other problems
Libertarians in Ohio Libertarians’ hearing, that made them deficient
Colerain school district —
cried foul Tuesday after through June 30. A mes- under state law,” Casey

4 – The Herald

www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

From the Vantage Point

The Next Generation

Vantage students complete summer internships
INFORMATION SUBMITTED
VAN WERT — When students
think of summer, they think of
sleeping late, lazy days and fun
nights. But getting a chance for
real-world experience in what
you’re studying in school AND
getting paid for it trumps the
former.
Internships provide incredible
opportunities for high school students to gain significant work
experience while exploring career
options. Although we mostly
hear about internships for college students, one local business
has started internships for high
school students who have the
right skills.
Two Vantage students Nick
Grote (Ottoville) and MiKenzie
Luginbill (Parkway) had the
right skills and earned a summer internship opportunity at
Kennedy Manufacturing in Van
Wert.
Both young men competed
with their classmates in Industrial
Mechanics
and
Precision
Machining for the two internships. That meant writing up a
resume, completing an application and interview and passing
a drug test. And then Kennedy
Manufacturing talked to their lab
instructors and others for recommendations!

Nick Grote of Ottoville works in the lab at Vantage. Grote was one
of two students who had a summer internship at Kennedy Manufacturing throughout the summer. (Submitted photo)
Grote worked in the maintenance department from 6 a.m.-

2:30 p.m. each weekday during the
summer. He worked on presses,

forklifts and sheers. Then he tore
apart motors, worked on hydraulic
pumps and did troubleshooting on
electrical issues, alongside fulltime Kennedy employees who were
his mentors.
Luginbill worked in the machine
shop, 5 a.m.-1:30 p.m. where he
ran mills, made stops for the brake
press and worked on the punch.
When asked about his unusual
summer work hours, he replied,
“Sometimes you have to wake up
pretty early to go to work. I stayed
because I wanted to work, learn
more and I needed the money.”
School started last week for
these high school seniors who
spent the summer working in
their field and getting more experience. They agreed that it was
a little hard to come back after
seeing what it would be like in
the real work world (and getting
a paycheck). But they both realize
that their summer internship was
an amazing opportunity.
“I was so excited when I got
this job,” Grote said. “It was such
an advantage to have had a year
of Industrial Mechanics class. A
lot of the things I did we learned
in lab. Hopefully, I can go back
to Kennedy for Early Placement
and, if I do a good job, get hired
permanently.”
See VANTAGE, page 7

Participation urged
in Library Card
Sign-up month
INFORMATION
SUBMITTED
DELPHOS — Do you
have the most important backto-school supply of all? The
library does.
September is National
Library Card Sign-up month
- a chance to get the card that
opens up a world of information and entertainment. Even
as our culture is shifting to
digital information, today’s
libraries are thriving technology hubs that many people
rely on for Internet access and
digital content.
Locally, the Delphos
Public Library is finding new
and innovative ways to extend
their collections and services,
providing access to a wide
variety of tools, both high-tech
and low-tech, to empower the
community. With an online
catalog, access to thousands
of eBooks, the BookMyne
app, a monthly tech night and
an expanding young adult
section, the library is about
more than books, it’s about
the future.
Stop in to get your card this
month. If you already have
a library card, find someone
who doesn’t and ask them to
sign up.

Van Wert County Fair Junior Fair Results

INFORMATION SUBMITTED

Weck
Boer Market Wether Class 2 1st Trophy Won by: Madelyn
Here is a partial list of winners from 4-H shows held through Pohlman
Monday at the Van Wert County Fair:
Boer Market Wether Class 3 1st Trophy Won by: Lillian
Goats
Hempfling
Senior Goat Showmanship Trophy Won by: Colleen Schulte
Boer Market Wether Class 4 1st Trophy Won by: Lillian
Intermediate Goat Showmanship Trophy Won by: Lillian Hempfling
Hempfling
Grand Champion Boer Market Goat Trophy Won by: Lillian
Junior Goat Showmanship Trophy Won by: Derick Dealey
Hempfling
Champion Goat Showman Chair Won by: Amanda Lobsiger
Grand Champion Boer Market Goat Banner Won by: Lillian
Grand Champion Meat Goat Female Trophy Won by: Hempfling
Amanda Lobsiger
Reserve Champion Boer Market Goat Trophy Won by:
Reserve Champion Meat Goat Female Trophy Won by: Joel Amanda Lobsiger
Germann
Reserve Champion Boer Market Goat Banner Won by:
Grand Champion Dairy Goat Female Trophy Won by: Joel Amanda Lobsiger
Germann
Market Goat Best Rate of Gain Feed Scoop Won by: Amanda
Reserve Champion Dairy Goat Female Trophy Won by: Joel Lobsiger
Germann
Market Goat 2nd Best Rate of Gain Feed Scoop Won by:
Grand Champion Dairy Market Goat Trophy Won by: Amanda Lobsiger
Amanda Lobsiger
Beef
Grand Champion Dairy Market Goat Banner Won by:
Senior Beef Showman Trophy Won by: Austin Sorgen
Amanda Lobsiger
Intermediate Beef Showman Trophy Won by: Caden
Reserve Champion Dairy Market Goat Trophy Won by: Joel Ringwald
Germann
Junior Beef Showman Trophy Won by: Adeline Sorgen
Reserve Champion Dairy Market Goat Banner Won by: Joel
Champion Beef Showman Chair Won by: Austin Sorgen
Germann
Champion Supreme Female Overall Banner Won by: Amanda
Lobsiger
Reserve Supreme Female Overall Banner Won by: Austin
Sorgen
Grand Champion Beef Feeder Calf Banner Won by: Adeline
Sorgen
Champion Beef Feeder Cash Won by: Adeline Sorgen
Reserve Champion Beef Feeder Calf Banner Won by: Liliana

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Dairy Steer Best Rate of Gain Feed Scoop Won by: Ronnie
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Grand Champion Performance Steer Banner Won by: Brett
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Champion Performance Steer Trophy Won by: Brett Schumm
Reserve Champion Performance Steer Trophy Won by:
Boer Market Wether Class 1 1st Trophy Won by: Zayne
www.edwardjones.com
Caden Ringwald
www.edwardjones.com
Reserve Champion Performance Steer Banner Won by:
Caden Ringwald
Show Steer 1st Weight Class Trophy Won by: Austin Sorgen
Show Steer 2nd Weight Class Trophy Won by: Jordan
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Dreaming Up

Pathfinder Lillian Hempfling won Grand Champion
Boar Goat, Intermediate Dairy Showmanship and Junior Poultry Showmanship. (Submitted photo)
Show Steer 3rd Weight Class Trophy Won by: Austin Sorgen
Show Steer 4th Weight Class Trophy Won by: Tristin Miller
Show Steer Best Rate of Gain Feed Scoop Won by: Tristin
Miller
Show Steer 2nd Best Rate of Gain Feed Scoop Won by:
Caden Ringwald
Grand Champion Show Steer Banner Won by: Austin Sorgen
Champion Show Steer Trophy Won by: Austin Sorgen
Reserve Champion Show Steer Banner Won by: Austin
Sorgen
Reserve Champion Show Steer Trophy Won by: Austin
Sorgen
Dairy Steer Drive 1 Winner Trophy Won by: Tara Vorst
Dairy Steer Drive 2 Winner Trophy Won by: Tanner Matthews
2nd Place Show Steer 1st Weight Class Trophy Won by:
Lauren Schmid
See FAIR, page 7

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In today’s world, fifty cents
doesn’t buy a heck of a lot —
except of course, when it comes
to your newspaper.
For less than the cost of a soda,
you can get word from across town
or across the nation. For less than
the price of a cup of coffee, you can
get your fill of local news, politics,
or whatever else is your cup of
tea. With something new to greet
you each day, from cover to cover,
your newspaper is still the most
“streetwise” buy in town!
The Delphos Herald
419-695-0015 ext. 122

www.delphosherald.com

LANDMARK

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

COMMUNITY

Family visits and a caramel
cake for summer’s end

Delphos Fire and
Police Station

CALENDAR OF
EVENTS

TODAY
9 a.m. - noon — Putnam
County Museum is open, 202
E. Main St., Kalida.
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. — The
Delphos Museum of Postal
History, 339 N. Main St., is
open.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff St.
Noon — Rotary Club
meets at The Grind.
6 p.m. — Shepherds of
Christ Associates meet in the
St. John’s Chapel.
6:30 p.m. — Delphos
Kiwanis Club meets at the
Eagles Lodge, 1600 E. Fifth
St.
7 p.m. — Bingo at St.
John’s Little Theatre.
Delphos Civil Service
Commission
meets
at
Municipal Building.
7:30 p.m. — Hope Lodge
214 Free and Accepted
Masons, Masonic Temple,
North Main Street.
9 p.m. — Fort Jennings
Lions Club meets at the
Outpost Restaurant.
THURSDAY
9-11 a.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. — The
Delphos Museum of Postal
History, 339 N. Main St., is
open.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff St.
3-7 p.m. — The Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for shopping.
6:30 p.m. — Delphos
Ladies Club, Trinity United
Methodist Church.
7 p.m. — Delphos
Emergency Medical Service
meeting, EMS building,
Second Street.
7:30 p.m. — Delphos
Chapter 23, Order of Eastern
Star, meets at the Masonic
Temple, North Main Street.
FRIDAY
7:30 a.m. — Delphos
Optimist Club, A&W DriveIn, 924 E. Fifth St.
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. — The
Delphos Museum of Postal
History, 339 N. Main St., is
open.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff St.
1-4 p.m. — Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for shopping.
SATURDAY
9 a.m.-noon — Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for shopping.
St. Vincent dePaul Society,
located at the east edge of the
St. John’s High School parking lot, is open.

The Herald – 5

THRIFT SHOP WORKERS
Sept. 4-6
THURSDAY: Sue Vasquez, JoAnn Sandy Hahn, Eloise
Shumaker, June Link, Patti Thompson and Nora Schulte;
Annex — Dolly Mesker and Diane Kimmet.
FRIDAY: Eloise Shumaker, Dorothy Hedrick, Mary Jane
Watkins and Marge Kaverman; Annex — Lyn Rhoads and
Judy Pohlman.
SATURDAY: Kathy Ulrich, Sharon Wannemacher, Joyce
Day and Rosie Wittler; Annex — Nora Schulte and Dolly
Mesker.

Unbelievable! This is Loretta’s final year. She
will be in eighth grade. Joseph, 12, will be
in sixth grade; Lovina, 10, will be in fourth
grade; and Kevin will be in third grade.
The first day of school, September 2, is
Kevin’s ninth birthday. Kevin likes it better
THRIFT SHOP HOURS: 3-7 p.m. Thursday; 1-4 p.m.
when I tell people that he is my youngest
child than when I say he is my “baby.” He has Friday; and 9 a.m.-noon Saturday.
To volunteer, contact Volunteer Coordinator Barb
grown up so much, but for some reason we
Haggard at the Thrift Shop at 419-692-2942 between 8
don’t like to see time go so fast.
One evening this week the boys and a.m. and 4 p.m.
Lovina decided to build a top to cover our
little wagon. They were hammering away in
the pole barn. Finally they pulled it out so we
could see. I think the wagon will be a little
top-heavy, but I was amazed at their ambition
and success. They were creative and had fun
doing it. I’m not so sure if Joe appreciated
his tools being scattered around, and I told
Announce you or your family member’s
Joseph he wasn’t allowed to be pounding nails
birthday in our Happy Birthday column.
because of his surgery. Something tells me
Complete the coupon below and return it to
he didn’t listen after I was out of sight. Once
The Delphos Herald newsroom,
children start to feel better after being sick,
405 North Main St., Delphos, OH 45833.
it’s hard to keep them quiet! Joseph told me
Please use the coupon also to make changes,
he wants to be a carpenter when he gets older.
additions
or to delete a name from the column.
He said it is fun using a hammer.
THE DELPHOS HERALD
This week I will share my caramel cake
HAPPY BIRTHDAY COLUMN
recipe. I have had quite a few requests for it
since I wrote about my sister Susan bringing
Name
one along when we went camping. Until next
Address
week—God bless!
Caramel Cake
Cake:
Name
Birthday
1 box white cake mix
1/2 cup bread flour
Name
Birthday
1/4 cup vegetable oil
Name
Birthday
2/3 cup water
2 eggs
Name
Birthday
Set aside 1 cup cake mix for topping.
Telephone (for verification)
Combine remaining cake mix, flour, oil, water
and eggs. Beat well and then pour batter into
Check one:
a 9x13 cake pan.
add to birthday list
º Please
Topping:
Please delete from birthday list
º
1 cup reserved cake mix
º Please make change on birthday list
1 cup brown sugar
3/4 cup nuts
1/4 cup butter or margarine
Mix until crumbly. Sprinkle topping on
cake and cut through batter with a knife to
create a marble effect. Bake at 350 degrees for
30 minutes or until done.
Glaze:
1 cup powdered sugar
1 tablespoon corn syrup
1 tablespoon water
Mix together and drizzle over cake when
done.

COLUMN

Lovina and her daughters canned and
froze 41 quarts of corn this week.
(Submitted photo)
BY LOVINA EICHER
Sister Verena’s forty-eighth birthday was
Friday, August 22. She recently had our family and Jacob, Emma and their family there
in honor of her birthday. We enjoyed a pizza
dinner. Sister Susan made a cake for Verena
but then surprised her with an ice cream cake
from Dairy Queen.
It has been over a week now since son
Joseph’s surgeries. He seems weak yet, but he
is getting better every day. We thank God for
his many blessings!
This past week we were busy canning and
freezing sweet corn. We have a total of 41
quarts so far. My tomatoes are also producing
really well.
Sister Emma and Jacob will host baptismal
services for a boy and girl in our church district in a few weeks. I was finally able to help
her for a day last week. With Joseph not feeling well last week, it was hard for me to leave.
Joe’s sister Christine and her husband,
Jake, and their family let us know that they
would be at the church services at niece
Verena and Melvin’s house. We were unable
to go, as Joseph was still not able to stay up
that long. We were sorry we didn’t get to see
them. They live in a small community two and
a half hours north of here.
We had surprise visitors Sunday evening.
Joe’s sister Carol, Pete, and seven children
came after supper. It was a hot evening so we
all sat outside on our porch. The girls made
popcorn and lemonade. Their family is planning to move to Tennessee, so we will not get
to see them as often.
School doors will open next week for
our four youngest children. Half of our
children are done with their school years.

Happy
Birthday

Lovina Eicher is an Old Order Amish
writer, cook, wife and mother of eight.
Formerly writing as The Amish Cook,
Eicher inherited that column from her
mother, Elizabeth Coblentz, who wrote
from 1991 to 2002. Readers can contact
Eicher at PO Box 1689, South Holland,
IL 60473 (please include a self-addressed
stamped envelope for a reply) or at
LovinasAmishKitchen@MennoMedia.org.

SEPT. 4
Hayley Jettinghoff
Scott Siefker
Karen Sendelbach
Sarah Stemen
Rose Moore
Kurt Bonifas
Todd Rittenhouse
Katherine Watkins
Madison Jettinghoff
Michelle Lindeman
Destiny Coil

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6 – The Herald

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

SPORTS

www.delphosherald.com

Lady Pirates open PCL soccer
with win versus Musketeers
By JIM METCALFE
DHI Media Sports Editor
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com

St. John’s sophomore Nick Pohlman leads senior Anthony Hale through a path at the Spencerville Cross
Country Quad meet Tuesday. Nick finished with a
time of 19:47 and Anthony finished with a new PR
time of 19:57. St. John’s Curtis Pohlman won the
High School boys race with a time of 18:21. For
the team scoring, it was Shawnee 30, St. John’s
53, Spencerville 68 and Perry 77. In the girls race,
Breece Rohr led the way for St. John’s with a 2nd
place finish and Baylee Lindeman was 5th. There
was no team scoring due to Shawnee being the only
school with a team. In the Junior High boys race,
Canyon Scirocco won the race with a time of 13:16.
(Submitted photo)

Local Roundup

INFORMATION
SUBMITTED
Mustangs grab NWC golf
win
DEFIANCE — With Parker
Frey registering a 35, Allen
East’s boys golfers grabbed
a 171-189-201-234 Northwest
Conference quad win Tuesday
at Auglaize Golf Course.
Also scoring for the victorious Mustangs were Kayne
Richardson 42, Grant Whitley
44, Logan Ryan 50, Matt Meyer
53 and Harry Kill 55.
For the Panthers, the scores
were Ben Heilshorn 45, Corey
Adkins and Cade McGarvey
47, Ethan Dominique 50, Ellie
Miller 57 and Isaac Baldwin 60.
For the Bearcats, Chance
Campbell 43, Mitchell
Youngpeter 46, Brian Wood
51, Collin Davis 61 and Lydia
Dunlap 75.
For the Bulldogs, Zach Park
54, Brian Quillen 56 and Gage
Dunn and Logan Reedy 62 each.
—————Kalida bashes Archers,
Rams in golf
KALIDA — With Zach
Erhart and Jeff Knueve notching scores of 36, Kalida’s boys
golf unit bashed Tinora and
Antwerp 157-186-212 Tuesday

at Country Acres.
Also registering numbers for
the host Wildcats (3-1) were
Trent Siebeneck 39 and Noah
Lambert 46.
For the Rams (1-5), Cole
Woods 43, Brett Camp 44, Tom
Cameron 48 and Ryan Mohr 51.
On behalf of the Archers,
Jeff Coleman 42, Noah Cline
56 and Zeb Getrost and Jacob
Odenell 57.
—————
Kalida boys bump off
‘Riders
KALIDA — Kalida’s boys
varsity soccer unit defeated
St. Marys Memorial 3-1 on
Tuesday evening under the lights
at Kalida Soccer Stadium.
Wildcat goals were scored by
Austin Swift (assisted by Brent
Hovest), Devin Kortokrax (unassisted, PK) and Grant Unverferth
(assisted by Swift).
The Roughriders’ goal
was scored off a free kick by
Nathan Wilker.
Kalida had seven shots ongoal (Keegan Liette 4 saves),
while St. Marys had three
(Hovest 2 saves).
Halftime score was 1-0,
Kalida.
St. Marys won the junior
varsity match 2-0.

Associated Press
AP Top 25
The Top 25 teams in The Associated
Press college football poll, with first-place
votes in parentheses, records through
Sept. 1, total points based on 25 points
for a first-place vote through one point for
a 25th-place vote and previous ranking:
Record Pts Pv
1. Florida St. (46)
1-0
1,456 1
2. Alabama (1)
1-0
1,317 2
3. Oregon (5)
1-0
1,314 3
4. Oklahoma (2)
1-0
1,283 4
5. Auburn
1-0
1,186 6
6. Georgia (2)
1-0
1,114 12
7. Michigan St.
1-0
1,093 8
8. Ohio St.
1-0
982 5
9. Texas A&M (2)
1-0
978 21
10. Baylor
1-0
962 10
11. UCLA
1-0
944 7
12. LSU (1)
1-0
926 13
13. Stanford
1-0
886 11
14. Southern Cal
1-0
729 15
15. Mississippi
1-0
525 18
16. Notre Dame
1-0
519 17
17. Arizona St.
1-0
431 19
18. Wisconsin
0-1
364 14
19. Nebraska
1-0
352 22
20. Kansas St.
1-0
325 20
21. North Carolina
1-0
196 23
21. South Carolina
0-1
196 9
23. Clemson
0-1
164 16
24. Missouri
1-0
147 24
25. Louisville
1-0
141 NR
Others receiving votes: Texas 126,
Oklahoma St. 94, Duke 60, Florida 49,
Mississippi St. 49, Penn St. 49, Michigan
38, TCU 29, Washington 27, BYU 21,
Iowa 18, Marshall 18, Virginia Tech 17,
Tennessee 14, Cincinnati 8, Texas Tech
7, West Virginia 7, Rutgers 6, Arizona 4,
N. Dakota St. 2, Louisiana 1, Pittsburgh
1.
—————

Amway Top 25 Poll
The Amway Top 25 football coaches
poll, with first-place votes in parentheses,
records through Sept. 1, total points
based on 25 points for first place through
one point for 25th and previous ranking:
Record Pts Pvs
1. Florida State (57)
1-0
1541 1
2. Alabama
1-0
1432 2
3. Oklahoma (2)
1-0
1407 3
4. Oregon (2)
1-0
1358 4
5. Auburn
1-0
1289 5
6. Michigan State
1-0
1141 8
7. Ohio State
1-0
1114 6
8. Georgia (1)
1-0
1108 12
9. Baylor
1-0
1018 10
10. Stanford
1-0
999 11
11. UCLA
1-0
964 7
12. Louisiana State
1-0
912 13
13. Texas A&M
1-0
895 20
14. Southern California 1-0
713 15
15. Notre Dame
1-0
605 17
16. Arizona State
1-0
502 18
17. Mississippi
1-0
438 19
18. Nebraska
1-0
384 22
19. Wisconsin
0-1
373 14
20. Kansas State
1-0
370 21
21. South Carolina
0-1
272 9
22. Missouri
1-0
189 NR
23. North Carolina
1-0
168 23
24. Clemson
0-1
155 16
25. Texas 1-0 150 24
Others receiving votes: Oklahoma
State 106; Florida 84; Louisville 73;
Mississippi State 72; Michigan 59;
Washington 51; Duke 47; Brigham Young
26; Iowa 23; TCU 23; Minnesota 16;
Louisiana-Lafayette 13; Marshall 11;
Virginia Tech 11; Cincinnati (0-0) 7; West
Virginia 7; Arizona 6; Oregon State 5;
Colorado State 2; Northern Illinois 2;
Pittsburgh 2; Rutgers 2; Texas Tech 2;
Boise State 1; Memphis 1; Temple 1.

FORT JENNINGS — Fort Jennings
girls soccer mentor Rodney Wagner is
used to his Lady Musketeers getting off to
slow starts in the early going of the season.
That early-season trend continued in
Tuesday’s Putnam County League opener
versus perennial power Continental at the
Fort Jennings Athletic Complex.
The Lady Pirates — with 16 players
— had the better of the proceedings most
of the late afternoon/evening and
emerged with a 2-0 shutout.
“We’ve been struggling this
season making the connections
on our passes but I thought that
our practices the last two days
had helped solve some of that,”
Wagner exaplained. “I guess that
was wrong. We show glimpses at times
but we’re not consistent. We came out
flat today and we’re up and down on the
field; we don’t go to the ball enough and
we’re not getting many offensive chances
because we can’t make the connections.”
Continental (4-1-0, 1-0-0 PCL) outshot
the Musketeers (1-2-2, 0-1-0 PCL) 15-4
on-goal.
“Defense has been a big emphasis the
last week: our previous two matches, we
played two very good offensive teams,”
Continental head man Toby Bidlack said.
“We felt we needed to shore that area
up. I really like how McKenna Scott has
stepped up this season; we lose good players every year but players like her step
in and assume those roles. She’s been a
scorer for three years before this and still

is but she has taken on more responsibility
defensively.”
The Pirates owned the possession so
much the first half that they squeezed off
nine attempts to only two for the Orange
and Black, with senior Musketeer keeper
Erin Osting (11 total saves) stopping seven
and Pirate senior Emma Recker
nabbing two.
Osting had a nice denial at
28:20 when sophomore Blair
Tegenkamp’s 6-yarder from in
front was deflected by the keeper
and eventually cleared out.
The visitors got on board at 18:03.
Off a through pass from sophomore
Paige Lawhorn, she found the senior
Scott behind the defense and she carried it the rest of the way; her 1-on-1
14-yarder on the left wing slipped
through Osting’s hands and into the
twine for a 1-0 advantage.
Osting made one big save at 11:39,
when Scott got loose on the left side and
fired from 18 yards.
At 8:31, on a free ball in the box,
Lawhorn and Osting battled for possession;
Lawhorn managed a shot from 10 yards
but a defender kicked it out of harm’s way.
The Musketeers had their first foray
on-goal at 14:40 when junior Jordan
Horstman got behind the defense but her
10-yard try was denied by a diving Recker.
Their second shot came at 4:13 when
senior Alyssa Louth fired high from 28
yards but Recker got the save.
“We always open with some tough
matchups and that includes early PCL
matches; it’s what you deal with,” Wagner
added. “We lost a lot of good players from
last year but we also have a lot of talented

players back. The struggle right now is
to meld those veterans with a slew of talented young players; I’m confident it will
happen but I just don’t know when it will.
We also have to get about four girls back
from early-season injuries.”
The keepers were up to the task in the
second half, with sophomore Ashley
Mansfield stopping both the hosts’
tries on-goal and Osting denying
four of the Pirates’ five openings and
freshman Marissa Krietmeyer making one save against one shot.
The only shot that got through to the
back of the net was at 33:06 when Scott fed
a through ball to Lawhorn down the left side;
with Osting coming out slightly, the 14-yarder got past a diving keeper for a 2-0 lead.
The hosts tried to get one on the board at
23:17 when junior Brandi Kaskel got possession off a steal and made a good run down
the left side; with Mansfield out to try and
cut off the angle, she got enough of Kaskel’s
16-yarder to slow it down and sophomore
Jade Zachrich kicked it out of danger.
At 10:35, with Scott behind the
defense, she had a 1-on-1 14-yarder with
Osting, who had come out of her line; they
collided as ther keeper deflected the ball
away. However, she went down with an
injury and walked off the pitch.
“We have had some numbers issues
in the past but we’re used to it,” Bidlack
added. “There is a work ethic and a fitness
culture in this program; the girls know
from day one they had better be in shape.
They are committed to their skills and
their conditioning.”
The Musketeers host Kalida 5 p.m.
Friday; Continental visits Defiance
Saturday.

Van Wert too much for Lady Green
By JIM COX
DHI Media Correspondent
news@delphosherald.com

VAN WERT — Van Wert and Ottoville played two cliffhanger sets Tuesday night, both won by the Cougars, 25-23,
before the home team romped in the third, 25-14. The win
moved Van Wert to 5-1, while the Lady Green fell to 3-3.
The first set saw 11 ties and five lead changes, with
the lead getting as big as four points only once at 19-15,
Van Wert. With the score 22-22, a Landrie Koontz kill put
the Cougars on top 23-22 but Ottoville’s Annie Lindeman
trumped that to tie it at 23. With the set hanging in the
balance, a Lady Green kill attempt went into the net, and Van
Wert’s Alexis Dowdy then blasted the clincher.
The second set was a near duplicate of the first. There
were nine ties and five lead changes, the biggest lead
being three points, which happened three times, all by the
Cougars at 22-19, 23-20 and 24-21. At 24-21, Ottoville’s
C.J. Kemper put away two straight to get within one but
the Lady Green then committed a crucial communication
error, letting an easy one drop to the floor to end it.
Van Wert never trailed in the third set, although it was close
until Riley Jones took over the serving duties at 9-7 and reeled
off seven points in a row to make it 16-7, Cougars. The lead
got as big as 12 at 24-12, with Saige Royer administering the
match-ending kill.

“The girls came out tonight really playing as a team,” said
Cougar coach Vicki Smith. “All the hitters stepped up; it wasn’t
any one person. Defensively, Riley Jones did an awesome job
at libero, picking up a lot of hard hits. Alexis Dowdy was strong
in the middle. Serving has been pretty good this year; we have a
lot of aggressive servers. They did play well tonight.”
Dowdy, Alexa Dunlap and McKenzie Collins led Van Wert in
kills with 13, seven and six, respectively. Koontz was the top server, hitting on 17-of-19 with seven aces, and Collins went
14-for-14 with two aces. Amanda Coplin had 24 assists.
“We just played with a lot of inconsistency, a
lot of balls dropping unexpectedly, and we just
weren’t moving our feet,” said Ottoville coach Andi
Wertenberger. “We did not serve well. We just weren’t with it
tonight. We’re just very young, very green.”
Wertenberger hit the nail on the head with the
maturity issue. Van Wert’s varsity roster includes seven
seniors, three juniors, three sophomores and no freshmen. Ottoville’s has three seniors, one junior, five
sophomores and four freshmen.
Kemper, a freshman, led Ottoville servers, going
14-for-14 with four aces (13/15 attacks, 5 kills). Alexis
Thorbahn (66/75 setting) had 16 assists and Lindeman (23/26
attacks) had eight kills. Freshman Bridget Landin led in blocks
with six and Chelsey Boecker had four aces (14/14 serving).
Van Wert won the junior varsity game 23-25, 25-11, 26-24
to improve its record to 5-1. Ottoville’s JV squad is now 4-2.

College Football Polls Thatcher stout as Lancers shut out Lady Pirates
By BRIAN BASSETT
DHI Media Correspondent
news@delphosherald.com

MIDDLE POINT — It’s never an easy
match for the Lincolnview Lady Lancer
soccer team when the Bluffton Lady
Pirates come to town. Tuesday evening
was no exception at Lincolnview field.
The Lady Pirates led nearly every statistical category of a Northwest Conference
tilt, except the one that mattered - the
score.
The Lady Lancers got two goals
in the first half and held on for a
2-0 win.
“With our results against
Bluffton in the past, we’re really
happy with the win,” explained
Lincolnview coach Mark McCleery. “I
was glad the girls could hold them off that
second half (because) we were getting
tired out there.”
Bluffton got a steal and a shot on-goal
from sophomore forward Brooke Koontz
less than two minutes into the match,
which began an offensive onslaught by
the Lady Pirates on Lincolnview senior
goalie Julia Thatcher. The reigning AllNWC first-teamer, Thatcher, was up to the
challenge, however, and rejected all 27 of
Bluffton’s shots on-goal during the match.
“She’s a great goalie and had a lot

of saves for us,” continued McCleery,
who said he debated putting Thatcher in
the field early on in the match. “I don’t
know which is better (sometimes): to
have a fresh body on the field or to keep
(Thatcher) in-goal. In this case they were
getting a lot of shots-on-goal, so I decided
to keep her in there. She did a nice job.”
Meanwhile, both teams traded possessions for the first 30-plus minutes of the
match. Finally, senior forward Hannah
McCleery broke free for a Lady Lancer
goal at the 6:37 mark of the first half to
give Lincolnview a 1-0 lead.
Just over two minutes later,
McCleery stole a Bluffton
pass from 40 yards out and
turned it into the second Lady
Lancer goal of the evening,
running Lincolnview’s lead to 2-0.
Bluffton’s best scoring chance in the
first half came at the 17:50 mark,
when sophomore Katie Burkholder
found classmate Abbie Parkins in
front of a nearly-empty goal. The
Parkins kick from five yards out
hit the left goalpost — and almost
the right — before being cleared by
the Lincolnview defense. In fact,
the goal posts were almost as big of an
adversary to Bluffton as Thatcher on the
evening as the Lady Pirates hit three kicks
off the posts and one off the crossbar -

Column: Stewart’s Chase status doesn’t matter
By JENNA FRYER
Associated Press

pion has to win at Richmond or he
won’t be eligible to race this season
for a fourth title.
CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Tony
But does it really matter if Stewart
Stewart has one final shot
makes the 16-driver field?
to make the Chase and it’s
Not in the least.
not a very good one: He
Stewart’s team and his
must win Saturday night
employees and his sponat Richmond, where he
sors would be thrilled if
last visited Victory Lane
Stewart pulled it off and
in 2002.
it sure felt as if the crowd
He sat out three races
was pulling for him given
after his sprint car struck
his reception as he walked
and killed Kevin Ward Jr.
across the stage durat a New York dirt track
ing driver introductions.
on Aug. 9 and his return
Stewart received a rousing
to competition Sunday
ovation that was far louder
Stewart
night at Atlanta Motor
than for any other driver,
Speedway ended with a
even the wildly popular
blown tire and a 41st-place finish.
Dale Earnhardt Jr.
Now the 3-time NASCAR chamSo when his tire blew and he hit

the wall, ending his night just past
the halfway point, there was heavy
sadness in his voice as he radioed
his crew.
“Sorry, guys,” he said. “You
deserve better than this.”
Only the finish wasn’t that important in the grand scheme of life, which
Stewart is beginning to understand in
the aftermath of Ward’s death.
Returning to the track was imperative for Stewart, who had spent
nearly three weeks in seclusion.
Many of his peers tried and failed to
comfort him; Stewart simply wasn’t
ready to talk or text or let anyone into
his world of constant sorrow.
“I’ve wanted to talk to him for
weeks,” Atlanta winner Kasey Kahne
said. “I think a lot of people have and
haven’t been able to.”

none of which found the net.
“We got lucky,” admitted McCleery. “I
haven’t seen a team hit the crossbar that
many times. A lot of their shots were from
the side. I’m OK with those shots from the
side as long as we’re all over them in the
midfield.”
Bluffton didn’t go away after the intermission. The visitors added 12 more shots
on-goal in the second half, most of which
off the foot of Koontz, but the Lancer
defense held.
Senior defender Claire Clay led the
Lady Lancer defensive attack in front
of Thatcher, which held the Lady Pirate
offense at bay all evening en route to the
2-0 shutout win. In total, Bluffton recorded 27 shots on-goal to Lincolnview’s 12.
Coach McCleery was happy that the
win was a team effort.
“It’s important to have (Hannah) in
there and all the seniors with their
leadership. You’ve got (junior)
Savannah (Bigham) on defense,
Claire (Clay) on defense, (junior
forward) Autumn Proctor was in
there running all over they field. It’s
tough to play without any of them
on the field,” he added.
The win improves the Lady Lancer
record to 3-2-1 on the season, 2-0 in NWC
play. The Lady Pirates fall to 3-2 on the
season and 0-1 in conference play.

Martinez hits 3-run homer, Tigers win
Associated Press
CLEVELAND

J.D.
Martinez hit a 3-run homer off
closer Cody Allen in the ninth
inning, helping the Detroit Tigers
rally for a 4-2 win over
the Cleveland Indians on
Tuesday night.
Martinez’s 1-out shot over
the center-field wall bailed
out the Tigers, who had been
unable to get a clutch hit for
eight innings. But in the ninth,
Torii Hunter drew a leadoff
walk from Allen (5-4), Miguel
Cabrera singled, and after Victor
Martinez flied out, J.D. Martinez connected for his 19th homer, a crushing
blow to the Indians.

Phil Coke (3-2) pitched 1 1/3
innings and Joe Nathan worked
the ninth for his 29th save.
Detroit’s comeback kept the
Tigers on the heels of first-place
Kansas City in the AL Central.
The Indians wasted a
strong performance by Carlos
Carrasco, who side-stepped
danger for 5 1/3 innings and
struck out a career-high 10.
Carlos Santana hit a 2-run
homer for Cleveland, which
has dropped the first two in
this critical 4-game series.
Tigers rookie starter Kyle
Lobstein was superb in his first
career road start, allowing five
hits in 5 1/3 innings and striking
out 10.

www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

Fair

(Continued from page 4)

Pathfinder 4-H Club raked in the awards at the Van Wert County Fair this year.
From left: Sophia Wilson Black inc. third place in beef and also special achiever
award; Abby Buettner took second place table setting; Jeanelle Bonifas was
third place in horse Black inc. and first place in poultry; and Lillian Hempfling
was third place in poultry, second in goats and third in table setting. Not pictured: Michaela Hoffman, third place clothing development and second place in
food/nutrition; Marie Mueller first place in goats Black inc.; Anna Mueller, third
place in poultry Black inc.; Kurt Hoersten, second in dairy feeder Black inc.; and
Jordan Miller, second in beef Black inc. (Submitted photos)
Priest
Hunter Under Saddle:
14-19 English Pleasure:
Paige Motycka
Hunt Seat Equitation: 9-13:
Cassie Priest
Hunt Seat Equitation:
14-19: Paige Motycka
Western Pleasure: 9-11:
Cassie Priest
Western Pleasure: 12-14:
Paige Motycka
Western Pleasure: 15-19:
Lindsey Motycka
Western Horsemanship:
9-11: Cassie Priest
Western Horsemanship:
12-14: Paige Motycka
Western Horsemanship:
15-19: Emily Bauer
Novice Horsemanship:
9-19: Jeanie Bonifas
Trail: 9-13: Bryce Mihm
Trail:
14-19:
Paige
Motycka
Reining: 14-19: Lindsey
Motycka
Pleasure Driving, Light
Pony/Horse: 9-19: Jeanie
Bonifas
Driving
Reinsmanship
9-19: Jeanie Bonifas
Jr. Fair Horse Contesting
Cloverleaf Barrels: 9-13:
Regan Priest
Cloverleaf Barrels: 14-19:
Amanda Lobsiger
Barrels & Cones: 9-13:
Cassie Priest

Barrels & Cones: 14-19:
Emily Bauer
Flags 9-13: Bryce Mihm
Flags
14-19:
Paige
Motycka
Poles: 9-13: Regan Priest
Poles:
14-19:
Paige
Motycka
Stakes Race 9-13: Reagan
Priest
Stakes Race 14-19: Paige
Motycka
Key Hole: 9-13: Reagan
Priest
Key Hole: 14-19: Emily
Bauer
Speed & Control: 9-13:
Bryce Mihm
Swine
Champion Farrow to Finish
Trophy Won by: Addison
Mueller
Reserve Champion Farrow
to Finish Trophy Won by:
Garret Mueller
3rd Place Farrow to Finish
Trophy Won by: Adeline
Sorgen
4th place Farrow to
Finish Trophy Won by: Kurt
Hoersten
Class I Drive A - 1st Trophy
Won by: Brayden Evans
Class I Drive A - 2nd
Trophy Won by: Hayley
Walker
Class I Drive A - 3rd
Trophy Won by: Amanda
Lobsiger

Class I Drive B - 1st Trophy
Won by: Emma Leary
Class I Drive B - 2nd
Trophy Won by: Sidney
Davis
Class I Drive B - 3rd
Trophy Won by: Jenna Rode
Class II Drive A - 1st
Trophy Won by: Addison
Mueller
Class II Drive A - 2nd
Trophy Won by: Olivia Leary
Class II Drive A - 3rd
Trophy Won by: Shay Pond
Class II Drive B - 1st
Trophy Won by: Troy
Patterson
Class II Drive B - 2nd
Trophy Won by: Amanda
Lobsiger
Class II Drive B - 3rd
Trophy Won by: Jason
Whitler
Class III Drive A - 1st
Trophy Won by: Tara Vorst
Class III Drive A - 2nd
Trophy Won by: Madison
Williams
Class III Drive A - 3rd
Trophy Won by: Dane Ebel
Class III Drive B - 1st
Trophy Won by: Addison
Mueller
Class III Drive B - 2nd
Trophy Won by: Nick Keber
Class III Drive B - 3rd
Trophy Won by: McKenzie
Davis
Class IV Drive A - 1st
Trophy Won by: Devann
Springer
Class IV Drive A - 2nd
Trophy Won by: Cassie Priest
Class IV Drive A - 3rd
Trophy Won by: Layken E.
Klinger
Class IV Drive B - 1st
Trophy Won by: Laney Jones
Class IV Drive B - 2nd
Trophy Won by: Justin
Gibson
Class IV Drive B - 3rd
Trophy Won by: Ronnie
Schumm
Class V Drive A - 1st
Trophy Won by: Hannah
Leary
Class V Drive A - 2nd
Trophy Won by: Chase Clark
Class V Drive A - 3rd
Trophy Won by: Ronnie
Schumm
Class V Drive B - 1st
Trophy Won by: Zoey Pond
Class V Drive B - 2nd
Trophy Won by: Kurt
Hoersten
Class V Drive B - 3rd
Trophy Won by: Reagan
Priest
Class VI Drive A - 1st
Trophy Won by: Chloe
Kroeger
Class VI Drive A - 2nd

Pathfinder Maddie Pohlman won the Senior Modeling Division.

Vantage

(Continued from page 4)

“The best part of my summer internship was knowing that I
was working on a piece that was real that someone was going
to use to build a part. At work, I learned some things that we
haven’t covered in lab yet, so it was a little more challenging,
but I loved it,” Luginbill said.
Plant Manager Mike Pond told Vantage Career Tech supervisor Ted Verhoff, “It was a great experience for our entire
plant. Both MiKenzie and Nick helped us get some of the
bigger projects done ahead of time. It was also a good teaching and learning experience for our senior technicians. We’re
planning on doing it every summer going forward.”

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EOE M/F/D/V

2nd Place Show Steer 2nd
Weight Class Trophy Won
by: Isiac Bowersock
2nd Place Show Steer 3rd
Weight Class Trophy Won
by: Liliana Dietrich
Dairy Feeder
Sr. Dairy Feeder Calf
Showman Trophy Won by:
Ronnie Schumm
Senior Showman 2nd
Trophy Won by: Tanner
Matthews
Intermediate Dairy Feeder
Showman Trophy Won by:
Brett Schumm
Intermediate Showman
2nd Trophy Won by: Morgan
Miller
Jr. Dairy Feeder Calf
Showman Trophy Won by:
Alexis Bowen
Junior Showman 2nd
Trophy Won by: Brendan
Karl
Champion Feeder Calf
Showman Chair Won by:
Lauren Schmid
Dairy Feeder Calf Winner
Heat One Trophy Won by:
Baylee Miller
Dairy Feeder Calf 2nd
Place Heat 1 Trophy Won by:
Betty Vorst
Dairy Feeder Calf Winner
Heat Two Trophy Won by:
Lauren Schmid
Dairy Feeder Calf 2nd
Place Heat 2 Trophy Won by:
Ronnie Schumm
Dairy Feeder Calf Winner
Heat Three Trophy Won by:
Collin Overholt
Dairy Feeder Calf Winner
Heat Four Trophy Won by:
Kassidy Klinger
Dairy Feeder Calf 2nd
Place Heat 4 Trophy Won by:
Brendan Karl
Dairy Feeder Calf Winner
Heat Five Trophy Won by:
Betty Vorst
Dairy Feeder Calf 2nd
Place Heat 5 Trophy Won by:
Tyler L McNall
Dairy Feeder Calf Winner
Heat Six Trophy Won by:
Alexis Bowen
Dairy Feeder Calf 2nd
Place Heat 6 Trophy Won by:
Layken E. Klinger
Dairy Feeder Calf Winner
Heat 7 Trophy Won by:
Tanner Matthews
Dairy Feeder Calf 2nd
Place Heat 7 Trophy Won by:
Makenzie Bowen
Dairy Feeder Calf Winner
Heat 8 Trophy Won by: Abbi
Marbaugh
Dairy Feeder Calf 2nd
Place Heat 8 Trophy Won by:
Makenzie Bowen
Dairy Feeder Calf: Best
Rate of Gain Feed Scoop
Won by: Alexis Bowen
Champion Dairy Feeder
Calf Trophy Won by: Abbi
Marbaugh
GrandChampion Dairy
Feeder Calf Banner Won by:
Abbi Marbaugh
Reserve Champion Dairy
Feeder Calf Trophy Won by:
Makenzie Bowen
Reserve Champion Dairy
Feeder Calf Banner Won by:
Makenzie Bowen
Jr. Fair Horse Pleasure
Show
Western Showmanship:
9-11: Breck Evans
Western Showmanship:
12-14: Reagan Priest
Western Showmanship:
15-19: Cassie Priest
Horseless
Horse
Showmanship:
9-19:
Makenna Tice
English Showmanship:
9-11: Adalynn Longstreth
English Showmanship:
12-14: Jeanie Bonifas
Champion of Showmen:
Cassie Priest
Hunter Under Saddle: 9-13
English Pleasure: Reagan

Trophy Won by: Hayley
Walker
Class VI Drive A - 3rd
Trophy Won by: Bobby Spath
Class VI Drive B- 1st
Trophy Won by: Brayden
Evans
Class VI Drive B - 3rd
Trophy Won by: Destiny Coil
Class VII Drive A- 1st
Trophy Won by: Troy
Patterson
Class VII Drive A - 2nd
Trophy Won by: Hannah
Leary
Class VII Drive A - 3rd
Trophy Won by: Jason
Whitler
Class VII Drive B- 1st
Trophy Won by: Breena
Grace
Class VII Drive B - 2nd
Trophy Won by: Garret
Mueller
Class VII Drive B - 3rd
Trophy Won by: Elijah
Wortman
Class VIII Drive A- 1st
Trophy Won by: Tyler Priest
Class VIII Drive A - 2nd
Trophy Won by: Gabe Evans
Class VIII Drive A - 3rd
Trophy Won by: Destiny Coil
Class VIII Drive B - 1st
Trophy Won by: Madelyn
Lamb
Class VIII Drive B - 2nd
Trophy Won by: Tanner
Matthews
Class VIII Drive B - 3rd
Trophy Won by: Chase Clark
Champion Barrow Trophy
Won by: Hannah Leary
Reserve Grand Champion
Market Hog Banner Won by:
Hannah Leary
Reserve Grand Champion
Market Hog Trophy Won by:
Hannah Leary
Junior Showman Winner
Trophy Won by: Madelyn
Lamb
Junior Showman 2nd
Trophy Won by: Laney Jones
Junior Showman 3rd
Trophy Won by: Addison
Mueller
Junior Showman 4th
Trophy Won by: Betty Vorst
Intermediate Showman
Winner Trophy Won by:
Addison Mueller
Intermediate Showman
2nd Trophy Won by: Betty
Vorst
Intermediate Showman 3rd
Trophy Won by: Chase Clark
Intermediate Showman
4th Trophy Won by: Brett
Schumm
Senior Showman Winner
Trophy Won by: Brayden
Evans
Senior Showman 2nd
Trophy Won by: Gabe Evans
Senior Showman 3rd
Trophy Won by: Troy
Patterson
Senior Showman 4th
Trophy Won by: Katie
Mcclure
Champion
Swine
Showman Chair Won by:
Jason Whitler
Rabbits
Champion
Junior
Showman Trophy Won by:
Sophia Miller
Champion Intermediate
Showman Trophy Won by:
Katelyn Welch
Champion
Senior
Showman Trophy Won by:
Madelyn Lamb
Champion
Rabbit
Showman Chair Won by:
Frankie Carey
Champion Single Fryer
Trophy Won by: Elijah
Wortman
Grand Champion Single

­
Description­

The Herald - 7

Fryer Banner Won by: Elijah
Wortman
Champion Meat Pen
Trophy Won by: Samantha
Klinger
Grand Champion Meat Pen
Banner Won by: Samantha
Klinger
Reserve Champion Meat
Pen Trophy Won by: Lauren
Henderson
Reserve Champion Meat
Pen Banner Won by: Lauren
Henderson
Champion Doe and Litter
Trophy Won by: Hunter
Gillespie
Reserve Doe & Litter
Trophy Won by: Alicia Rist
Best of Breed-Hotot
Trophy Won by: Melissa
Hauter
Best of Breed-Californian
Trophy Won by: Gene
Gillespie
Best of Breed-Dutch
Trophy Won by: Alicia Rist
Best of Breed-Dwarf Hotot
Trophy Won by: Melissa
Hauter
Best of Breed-English
Lop Trophy Won by: Justin
Overmyer
Best of Breed-English
Spot Trophy Won by: Brynn
Mollenkopf
Best Of Breed-Flemish
Giant Trophy Won by: Leslie
Marbaugh
Best of Breed-Florida
White Trophy Won by:
Braxton Strunkenburg
Best of Breed-Crème
D’Argent Trophy Won by:
Cody Gamble
Best of Breed-Havana
Trophy Won by: Katelyn
Welch
Best of Breed-Himalayan
Trophy Won by: Sarah
Klinger
Best of Breed-Holland
Lop Trophy Won by: Allison
Hauter
Best of Breed-Mini Lop
Trophy Won by: Frankie
Carey
Best of Breed-Jersey
Wooley Trophy Won by:
Frankie Carey
Best of Breed-Mini Rex
Trophy Won by: Katie Hauter
Best of Breed-Mini Satin
Trophy Won by: Libby Price
Best of Breed-Mixed
Breed Trophy Won by: Elijah
Wortman
Best of Breed-Netherland
Dwarf Trophy Won by:
Madelyn Lamb
Best
of
Breed-New
Zealand Trophy Won by:
Sarah Klinger
Best of Breed-Polish
Trophy Won by: Madelyn
Lamb
Best of Breed-Rhinelander
Trophy Won by: Katelyn
Welch
Best of Breed-Satin Trophy
Won by: Allison Hauter
Best of Breed-Sliver Fox
Trophy Won by: Braxton
Strunkenburg
Best of Breed-Standard
Chinchilla Trophy Won by:
Sophia Miller
Best of Breed-Lion Head
Trophy Won by: Derek Biro
Best In Show Trophy Won
by: Madelyn Lamb
Second Best In Show
Trophy Won by: Allison
Hauter
Runner-up Best 4 Class
Trophy Won by: Brynn
Mollenkopf
Runner-up Best 6 Class
Trophy Won by: Allison
Hauter

STOCKS

Quotes of local interest supplied by
EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS
Close of business September 2, 2014
Last­Price­

American­Electric­Power­Co.,­Inc.­
52.88­
AutoZone,­Inc.­
536.56­
Bunge­Limited­
85.27­
BP­plc­
47.20­
Citigroup­Inc.­
51.96­
CenturyLink,­Inc.­
40.86­
CVS­Caremark­Corporation­
79.73­
Dominion­Resources,­Inc.­
69.47­
Eaton­Corporation­plc­
70.27­
Ford­Motor­Co.­
17.60­
First­Defiance­Financial­Corp.­
27.89­
First­Financial­Bancorp.­
16.79­
General­Dynamics­Corp.­
122.66­
General­Motors­Company­
34.80­
The­Goodyear­Tire­&­Rubber­Company­ 25.73­
Huntington­Bancshares­Incorporated­
9.91­
Health­Care­REIT,­Inc.­
67.26­
The­Home­Depot,­Inc.­
91.15­
Honda­Motor­Co.,­Ltd.­
33.77­
Johnson­&­Johnson­
103.36­
JPMorgan­Chase­&­Co.­
59.67­
Kohl’s­Corp.­
59.11­
Lowe’s­Companies­Inc.­
52.61­
McDonald’s­Corp.­
92.80­
Microsoft­Corporation­
45.09­
Pepsico,­Inc.­
92.48­
The­Procter­&­Gamble­Company­
82.98­
Rite­Aid­Corporation­
6.37­
Sprint­Corporation­
5.54­
Time­Warner­Inc.­
77.32­
United­Bancshares­Inc.­
14.90­
U.S.­Bancorp­
42.27­
Verizon­Communications­Inc.­
49.77­
Wal-Mart­Stores­Inc.­
75.75­
Dow­Jones­Industrial­Average­
17,067.56­
S&P­500­
2,002.28­
NASDAQ­Composite­
4,598.19­

Change

-0.82
-2.28
+0.62
-0.64
+0.31
-0.13
+0.28
-0.75
+0.46
+0.19
-0.01
+0.18
-0.59
0.00
-0.24
+0.07
-0.32
-1.88
-0.28
-0.37
+0.22
+0.32
+0.10
-0.92
-0.34
-0.01
-0.13
+0.15
-0.07
+0.29
-0.01
-0.01
-0.05
+0.25
-30.89
-1.09
+17.92

8 – The Herald

Classifieds
100 ANNOUNCEMENTS
105 Announcements
105Card
Announcements
110
Of Thanks
115 Entertainment
120
In
Memoriam
NEW ADULT Zumba
125 LostSeptember
And Found 10th at
starting
130 Prayers
The
Dancer By Gina
135 School/Instructions
Wednesdays
140 Happy Ads 6:30pm!
Grab
a friend
145 Ride
Shareand save $

together! 10 week ses sions
and walk-ins. Call
200 EMPLOYMENT
205 Business Opportunities
419-692-6809
or Face 210 Childcare
book.
215 Domestic
220 Elderly Home Care
Business
225
205Employment Services
Opportunities
230 Farm
And Agriculture
235 General

TUITION FREE Tax
School. IRS Approved.
Qualifies for CE credits.
Earn extra income after
taking course. Flexible
schedules. Convenient
locations. Small book
fee. Register Now!
Courses start September
15th. Call 419-229-1040
Liberty Tax Service

235 Help Wanted
CLASS A CDL Truck
Drivers wanted for local
work. One full-time, one
part-time position available. Home daily, round
trip runs. Ottoville and
Columbus Grove locations preferred. Excellent
pay. Call 419-707-0537.
LOOKING FOR a dependable Class A CDL driver.
Driving experience preferred and home daily.
Send resume to: L & S
Express
P O Box 726
Saint Marys, OH 45885 or
E - m a i l
t o :
lsexpress@bright.net or
call 419-394-7077

SEEKING
HOUSEKEEPERS.
Team-oriented, part-time, must be
available weekends. Apply in person. Microtel,
480 Moxie Lane.

VANCREST
Health Care Centers

We need you...

NOW HIRING!!

www.delphosherald.com

240 Healthcare
245 Manufacturing/Trade
235
Help Wanted
250
Office/Clerical
255 Professional
260
P / TRestaurant
-F/T
C O O K and
265 Retail
counter/line
270 Sales and positions.
Marketing Day
shift.
Mature,
dependable,
275
Situation
Wanted
willTransportation
train. Customer serv280

ice skills preferred. Send

300
REAL to
ESTATE/RENTAL
resume
Box 141, Del305
Apartment/Duplex
phos,
OH 45833.
310 Commercial/Industrial
315 Condos
SECRETARY:
Full time.
320
House
325
Mobile
Homes
Lima,
Ohio
office. Apply
330
Space
to Office
Delphos
Herald Box
335 Room
130,
Delphos,
340 Warehouse/StorageOhio

45833, on before September 8, 2014.

F/T and P/T
All shifts available

STNA’s
F/T & P/T.

All shifts available

ented and able to work
part time through the week
plus alternate Saturday
mornings. Competitive
compensation package
with 401K. Please send
resume to Box 129, c/o
Delphos Herald, 405 N.
Main St., Delphos, OH
45833.

275 Work Wanted
HOMETOWN HANDYMAN A-Z SERVICES
•doors & windows
•decks •plumbing •drywall •roofing •concrete
Complete
remodel.
567-356-7471

305

Apartment/
Duplex For Rent

RICKER ADDITION: All
brick, 2BR ranch. All
appliances, garage
w/opener. No pets.
$595mo. Lease deposit.
Immediate possession.
419-453-3290.

555

Garage Sales/
Yard Sales

P/T - 2nd shift

DIETARY
P/T - Days

CABINET SHOP, 188 N.
West Canal St., Ottoville.
Doors (finished & unfinished), Trim Work, For mica, Wood, Misc. Tools,
Handles, Hardware &
More.
Friday
9/5
Noon-6pm, Saturday 9/6
8am-3pm.

STNA classes
available soon.

VANCREST OF DELPHOS
1425 E 5th St.,
Delphos, OHIO
EOE

• automatic transmission
• standard transmission
• differentials
• transfer case
• brakes & tune up

2 miles north of Ottoville

419-453-3620
625 Construction

Tool and
Machinery

592 Wanted to Buy

Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold

Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.

2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899

not to, to no avail. What
should I do? -- MORE
MODEST IN NORTH
CAROLINA
DEAR
M.M.:
It
appears you married an
exhibitionist. You might
point out to her that parading
around that way could be
considered disrespectful to
the workers she’s exposed
herself to. But don’t be
surprised if she’s unwilling
to change because it may
give her some kind of thrill.
(I’m sure it also gives the
viewers something to talk
about around the dinner
table.)
DEAR ABBY: Please
remind beachgoers that they
need to leave their fire pits
OPEN and not cover them
with sand. My 16-monthold grandnephew was

those burns.
People don’t realize that
covering the coals with
sand hides them and keeps
them hot for up to 24 hours!
Beach fires must be treated
differently from those in a
forest, where they should be
covered with dirt because
of the surrounding trees. -BEACH ETIQUETTE
DEAR
B.E.:
I’m
printing your letter not only
as a warning to beachgoers
who might be using fire
pits, but also to the parents
of small children because
hot buried coals can be a
hidden danger to their little
ones. Because the coals
cannot be seen, children
sometimes confuse fire
pits ringed by rocks with
“sandboxes,”
and
the
results can be tragic.

available, the coals should
simply be allowed to burn
out.
DEAR ABBY: My
husband, “Patrick,” and
I were married last year.
On the morning of our
wedding, his grandmother,
“Sally,” died. It was very
sudden. Everyone assumed
we’d postpone it, but we
didn’t.
Abby, my husband is still
emotionally distraught over
her death. Patrick’s parents
were absent from his life
and Grandma Sally had
raised him. Did we make a
mistake by not postponing
our wedding? How can
I help him? -- SAD
NEW WIFE IN SOUTH
CAROLINA
DEAR SAD NEW
WIFE: Life is for the

Q: I’ve read the
story behind the song
“Happy
Birthday”
many times, but I
always forget the
details. I promise if
you print an answer
to my question, I’ll
cut it out and save it
for future use. -- S.J.,
Marshalltown, Iowa
A: Two sisters,
Mildred Hill, a teacher,
and Patty Hill, a
principal, wrote a
song called “Good
Morning to All.” The
song was published
in
the
collection
“Song Stories for
Kindergarten” in 1893.
In 1924, a man
named Robert H.
Coleman published
the song without the
sisters’ permission.
Coleman
added
a
verse,
“Happy
Birthday to You.” This
verse quickly became
the song’s new title.

Mildred died in 1916, the family’s original 1, 1931. President
but Patty and a third spelling of the name, Herbert
Hoover
sister, Jessica Hill, wrote the book you pressed a button in
took Coleman to court found.
William Washington, D.C., to
and proved they wrote Falkner was born turn on the building’s
and owned
around 1825 lights.
the original
and died in
Q: Which president
song. The
1889. William was in office when
court agreed
F a u l k n e r , running water was
that
all
winner of the first installed in the
royalties
Nobel Prize White House? -- P.H.,
for the song
in literature, Cocoa, Fla.
belonged to
was born in
A: Running water
the Hills.
1897 and died was introduced to
Q: Going
in 1962. He the White House in
through
is reported to 1833, during Andrew
b o o k s
have said, “I Jackson’s presidency.
Faulkner
in a used
want to be a
Q: I recently heard
bookstore, I came writer like my great- of “Moodus noises.”
across one titled “The granddaddy” when he What are they? Do
Little Brick Church” was a child.
they have anything
by William Falkner. I
Q: I heard a quote to do with the town
thought his name was on TV, but I can of Moodus, Conn.? -spelled Faulkner. Is recall only some B.L., Everett, Wash.
this a different writer? of the words: “You
A: The town of
-- I.D., Waco, Texas
should not see or Moodus,
Conn.,
A: It’s a different touch beautiful things gets its name from
writer,
but
from but feel them.” I’m Native
Americans,
the same family. sure this is not it who called the area
Faulkner’s
great- exactly. Do you know “Machimoodus,” or
grandfather,
using the whole thing? “place of noises.”
-- E.W.M., Lawton, The noises are from
Okla.
a peculiar type of
A: Helen Keller earthquake rumbling
said, “The best and in the area. The noises
most beautiful things are often compared
in the world cannot be to distant thunder or
670 Miscellaneous
seen or even touched, cannon fire and have
they must be felt with occurred for centuries.
is not the
SAFE & theQ:heart.”What was Moodus
only place that has this
SOUND originally at the site unusual sound from
of the Empire State earthquakes; there are
DELPHOS
Building? I was once several other locations
SELF-STORAGE
told it was the last in the world that report
Security Fence
farm in Manhattan. such sounds.
•Pass Code •Lighted Lot
How long did it take
Q: More than a
•Affordable •2 Locations
Why settle for less?
to build the structure? few years ago, I saw a
movie starring Richard
419-692-6336 -- Panama City, Fla.
A: I am sure that Dreyfuss and Teri Garr.
at one time the site Dreyfuss was addicted
r’s Custom C
e
of the Empire State to horse racing while
d
a
r
Building was a farm, Garr was addicted to
but it was not when alcohol. Despite my
construction of the description, it was a
soon-to-be
world’s funny movie -- but I
tallest building began. can’t recall the title. Do
In its place was the you know it? -- E.W.,
Waldorf Astoria hotel. Ridgecrest, Calif.
Specializing in Stock and
Excavation for the
A: The movie
Custom Golf Carts
new building began you’re thinking of is
Jan. 22, 1930, and “Let It Ride,” which
Tim Carder
construction started was released in 1989.
567-204-3055
on March 17. The It is available on
Delphos, Ohio
framework rose at a DVD. Critics call the
rate of 4 1/2 stories movie mildly funny,
715 Blacktop/Cement per week. As many as blaming the script
3,400 people worked more than the actors
on the construction on its failure.
of
the
building,
racking up a total of 7
(Send
your
million hours of work. questions
to
Mr.
40 custom colors of
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830 Boats/Motors/Equipment
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know how
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if SUV’s
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plans. I am sure that’s what
Grandma Sally would have
wanted.
Please convey to your
husband how sorry I am
for his loss. Because he is
moving so slowly through
the grieving process, it
would be helpful for him
to contact a grief support
group. To find one, he can
ask a doctor, clergyman or
hospice for a referral.

Dear Abby is written by
Abigail Van Buren, also
known as Jeanne Phillips,
and was founded by her
mother, Pauline Phillips.
Contact Dear Abby at www.
DearAbby.com or P.O. Box
69440, Los Angeles, CA
90069.
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Eating fish in place of
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D E A R
Dr. Anthony
DOCTOR K:
Does eating fish
Komoroff
help
prevent
prostate cancer?
D E A R
READER:
Y o u ’ v e
certainly heard
me encourage
readers to eat
plenty of fish,
particularly fatty fish such as salmon and
mackerel. That’s because many good studies
have found that people who eat fish frequently
have lower rates of many serious diseases,
including heart disease and several types of
cancer.
A recently published study from the Prostate
Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT) was described
in the media as coming to the opposite
conclusion. I don’t agree, but to explain why,
I first need to talk about the substances in fish
that are thought to be beneficial for humans.
Fish contain high levels of two omega-3 fatty
acids, EPA and DHA, which have been shown
to reduce the risk of heart attacks and strokes.
EPA and DHA also calm inflammation -- and
inflammation contributes to the development
and progression of prostate cancer. That’s why
researchers were interested in learning whether
these fatty acids might help prevent prostate
cancer.
The PCPT measured levels of various fatty
acids in the blood of 3,461 men, 1,658 of whom
developed prostate cancer during the PCPT
study. They found that men with the highest
levels of DHA were 2.5 times more likely to
develop aggressive, high-grade prostate cancer
over a seven-year period compared with men
who had the lowest levels of DHA. What could
explain these results?
It’s not clear. But the PCPT did not require
men to undergo prostate biopsies before
enrolling in the study. So it’s possible that
some of the participants already had highgrade cancer before they entered the trial.
Most important, this was not a study of fish
consumption at all. It was a study of the levels
of certain nutrients in the blood, including
omega-3 fatty acids such as DHA. These
omega-3s could have come from supplements,
from food other than fish, or from fish itself.
It’s also important to put the results in
perspective. The researchers analyzed blood
samples from the 1,658 men who developed
prostate cancer during the PCPT study. But
only 125 of these men -- about 8 percent of
the total -- developed high-grade tumors. The
vast majority of men developed low-grade
cancer, and DHA levels had no relationship to
low-grade cancer. So while high levels of DHA
may increase risk of developing high-grade
cancer, the actual risk is still low.
Many more men die of heart disease than
from prostate cancer. Eating fatty fish prepared
healthfully (poached, broiled or grilled) in
place of red meat is a good way to protect your
heart. So if you eat fish, do it for your heart and
your overall health.
At this time, there is no evidence that fish
prevents prostate cancer. But this new study
does not say, as was reported by some in the
media, that eating fish increases the risk of
prostate cancer.

On
Health

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(Dr. Komaroff is a physician and professor
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02115.)

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THE

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Comics & Puzzles
Zits

Today’s
Horoscope
By Eugenia Last

Wednesday, Sept. 3, 2014

Blondie

Protect what you have
worked so hard to hold on to.
Careful time management and
the ability to delegate tasks will
prevent you from becoming
run-down. Keeping on top of
your own ventures will be of
paramount importance, so don’t
let others do the work for you.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
-- Emotional issues will become
more pronounced if you aren’t
honest. Be diplomatic, but don’t
lie to protect others’ feelings or
avoid an argument. Truth will
be your saving grace in the end.

For Better or Worse

Beetle Bailey

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23)
-- Plan an event with friends.
An enjoyable evening of
entertainment will provide a
welcome diversion from workrelated stress and personal
problems. Some interesting
news is coming your way.

SCORPIO
(Oct.
24Nov. 22) -- Make your
finances a priority. Look into
moneymaking schemes that
will increase your revenue
stream without a major cash
outlay. Don’t share personal
matters prematurely. Protect
your reputation.
SAGITTARIUS
(Nov.
23-Dec. 21) -- If others seem
especially trying, look at your
actions and consider if you are
the cause. Perhaps you have
been too demanding or shorttempered. Be honest and strive
to be more considerate.

Pickles

The Herald — 9

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

Crossword Puzzle

ACROSS
1 Feeling
5 Meadow
10 News summaries
12 No-goodnik
13 Hooded
pullover
14 Crater Lake
locale
15 Piece of
chicken
16 Yes, at the
altar (2 wds.)
18 Rand of
fiction
19 Intending
22 Shower
feature
25 Got closer
to
29 Juvenile
30 Further
down
32 Organic
compound
33 Hobby shop
wood
34 Element in
salt
37 German
steel city
38 Is afraid of
40 Drone
43 Elec. unit
44 Impulse
48 Pack scavenger
50 More
creepy
52 Different
ones
53 Lithe
54 Seance
invitee
55 Out on the
briny

7 Tense
8 Zoo favorite
9 Cave, perhaps
10 Untrained,
as recruits
11 Read hastily
12 Noted frontiersman
17 Huge racket
20 Bergman of
old films
21 Talked on
and on
22 Beautician’s
coloring
23 Sea in Antarctica
24 Parking lot
sight
26 Gives encouragement to
27 Plumbing
bends
28 Two tablets,
maybe
31 Unnaturally
pale
35 Where Asia
begins

Yesterday’s answers
36 Dues
payer: Abbr.
39 Simians
40 House
feature
41 Canyon
reply
42 Is very
thrifty
45 Annoy
46 -- --

DOWN
1 --, vidi, vici
2 Computer
graphic
3 Haggled
4 It banned
DDT
5 Wide’s
partner
6 Notion

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) -- This is not a good
time to reveal your private plans
or secrets. Aim to be a leader,
not a follower. Someone you
trust will let you down. Cover
your back and take care of your
own responsibilities.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 19) -- One way to attract
influential followers is to get
involved
in
humanitarian
causes. You can make a
difference if you adopt a
leadership position and express
your point of view.

Garfield

PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) -- You may be feeling
anxious or hurt. Rather than
dwell on negative events,
take this opportunity to do
something enjoyable that will
ease your mind and lift your
spirits.

Born Loser

ARIES (March 21-April
19) -- Don’t let others make
decisions for you. Plan to spend
some time outdoors or get
involved in a cause that you
feel passionate about. You will
be inspired if you visit an old
friend.

Hagar the Horrible

GEMINI (May 21-June
20) -- Stay on an even keel and
don’t let your emotions exhaust
you. Stewing over an unhappy
event will lead nowhere.
Channel your energy toward
love and affection instead.

Barney Google & Snuffy Smith

TAURUS (April 20-May
20) -- You may feel burdened
by the needs of an older relative.
Take a moment to address your
own needs, but don’t overspend
in the process.

CANCER (June 21-July
22) -- An industry or workrelated function will provide
you with the perfect chance to
meet someone new and exciting.
Uphold your reputation at work
by performing well and putting
in some overtime.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
-- You will have no problem
making a lasting impression.
Be prepared to step into the
limelight. A physical challenge
will be invigorating and
rewarding.
COPYRIGHT 2014 United
Feature Syndicate, Inc.

DISTRIBUTED
BY
UNIVERSAL UCLICK FOR
UFS

Answer to Sudoku
Hi and Lois

Marmaduke

The Family Circus® By Bil Keane

move on!
47 Sooner
than
48 Slow run
49 Easel
display
51 Zsa
Zsa’s sister

2
10 – The Herald

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

Home Depot probes
possible credit card
data breach
NEW YORK (AP) — Home
Depot may be the latest retailer
to suffer a major credit card data
breach.
The Atlanta-based home
improvement retailer told The
Associated Press Tuesday that it
is working with both banks and
law enforcement to investigate
“unusual activity” that would
point to a hack.
“Protecting our customers’
information is something we
take extremely seriously, and
we are aggressively gathering
facts at this point while working to protect customers,” said
Paula Drake, a spokeswoman at
Home Depot, declining to elaborate. She said the retailer would
notify customers immediately if
it confirms a breach.
Shares of Home Depot Inc.
fell $1.88, or 2 percent, to close
at $91.15.
Hackers have broken security walls for many retailers in
recent months, including Target,
grocery store chain Supervalu,
P.F. Chang’s and the thrift store
operations of Goodwill.

www.delphosherald.com

Study: Playing music helps sharpen kids’ brains
LOS ANGELES (AP) — The
founder of a Los Angeles-based nonprofit that provides free music lessons
to low-income students from gangridden neighborhoods began to notice
several years ago a hopeful sign:
Kids were graduating high school
and heading off to UCLA, Tulane and
other big universities.
That’s when Margaret Martin asked
how the children in the Harmony
Project were beating the odds.
Researchers at Northwestern
University in Illinois believe that
the students’ music training played a
role in their educational achievement,
helping as Martin noticed 90 percent
of them graduate from high school
while 50 percent or more didn’t from
those same neighborhoods.
A two-year study of 44 children in
the program shows that the training
changes the brain in ways that make
it easier for youngsters to process
sounds, according to results reported
in Tuesday’s edition of The Journal of
Neuroscience. That increased ability,
the researchers say, is linked directly
to improved skills in such subjects as
reading and speech.
But, there is one catch: People

have to actually play an instrument to
get smarter. They can’t just crank up
the tunes on their iPod.
Nina
Kraus,
the
study’s
lead researcher and director of
Northwestern’s auditory neuroscience
laboratory, compared the difference to
that of building up one’s body through
exercise. “I like to say to people:
You’re not going to get physically fit
just watching sports,” she said.
Kraus said studies like hers are
challenging because researchers need
to follow subjects for years in order
to track changes in the brain. She said
more and larger studies need to be
done in a variety of districts around
the country to “help us understand
what are the most effective forms of
learning and how might learning be
tailored for an individual child.”
The latest findings are striking a
chord with supporters of such programs
who say music is frequently the first cut
for school boards looking to save money.
“Over and over, we’ve learned
that children need rich, multisensory
environments, and learning music sort
of brings all of that into a package
for them,” said Mary Luehrsen of
the National Association of Music

Merchants Foundation, which awards
scholarships and research grants for
the study of music, adding that the
results make the point that music
training should be an important part
of all school curriculums.
April Benasich, a professor of
neuroscience at Rutgers University
who was not involved in the study,
said previous research by Kraus has
demonstrated the value of music is
improving concentration, memory
and focus in children.
Benasich, who researches early brain
development, said the study’s findings
are “a game-changer for both the scientific and public policy domains, particularly in an era when these sorts of
enrichment activities are being aggressively eliminated from our schools.
Martin approached the National
Institutes of Health, seeking to learn if
there was a connection between music
and the educational achievements of
the program’s 2,000 students. The
NIH put her in touch with Kraus,
who studies the changes in the brain
that occur through auditory exposure.
Many of Harmony Project’s students
have no interest in pursuing professional music careers, Martin said.

Scams

(Continued from page 1)
Village council members suspended the rules and passed on
their first reading two new resolutions, including authorizing Village
Administrator Sean Chapman
to enter into agreement with
Spencerville Schools for the Safe
Routes to Schools (SRTS) Project and
authorizing Chapman to enter into an
agreement with Ohio Department of
Natural Resources (ODNR) for the
Clean Ohio Trails Fund Canal Trail
Project.
Council members also suspended
the rules and passed on emergency measure an ordinance authorizing Mayor J.P. Johnson to enter into
contract with the Ohio Department
of Transportation (ODOT) for preliminary engineering for the SRTS
Project and contracts with the director of ODOT for the completion of
the project.
“Each are being passed on emergency measures due to the time constraints,” Johnson said.
Two resolutions: transferring
appropriations within the Capital

Projects and Income Tax Refunds and
supporting the Fourth Street Culvert
Project; were read.
Village Clerk Dawn Bailey said
transferring appropriations will pay
for the paving at the Water Treatment
Plant and a new computer for the
municipal office.
“During the second week of
September, we plan on changing the
valve configurations for the well feed
and the clearwell feeds to enable us
to send filtered water to the distribution system by the end of that week,”
Chapman said. “This will be a tremendous improvement to the water
quality.”
During this time, finalization of
the nanomembranes will occur and all
membranes will be loaded and tested,
with the softening membranes going
online that second week of September
or shortly thereafter. Chapman said
once the plant goes online, the village
will still have the ability to revert
back to the old plant if there are any
serious operational issues with the
new plant.
“Water Treatment Plant Manager
Jim Cave met with Jen Alexander of

the Ohio Environmental Protection
Agencies (OEPA) lab certification
unit and the inspection went very
well,” Chapman said. “All Village
Utilities employees passed the individual certification and are now qualified to run the necessary daily testing
as established by the OEPA.
Chapman said all employees will
receive certificates and will be eligible for renewal in one year. Each
employee must perform at least three
tests each month in order to maintain
certification.
Chapman said he recently spoke to
Julie Ward of Ohio Rural Community
Assistance Partnership (RCAP)
regarding income surveys and funding
scenarios for the proposed
North Main Street water line replacement and the Fourth Street culvert
replacement.
“Julie feels that each of these projects, if proven eligible by a townwide income survey, could be funded
through the Community Development
Block Grant (CDBG)
program,”
he said. “We will begin the community-wide survey process at the first
of the year.”

Chapman reported that Bluffton
Paving completed the 2014 OPWC
Street Program, 2014 County Road
Program and the WTP/Pool
driveway. The total estimated cost
was around $147,000, with about half
of this cost coming from OPWC and
Permissive Taxes.
Chapman also received confirmation for the water tower inspection by
Mid-Atlantic Storage Systems who
will perform the inspection on Sept.
12.
“Our crews will drain the tank on
Thursday prior and run the system
off of one of the high-service pumps
with pressure relief valves located at
the plant,” he said. “Once the inspection has been completed, we will
place the tower back online by Friday
evening.”
Chapman reported the village
has suffered four more main water
line breaks over the holiday weekends in the alley behind 129 S.
Broadway St.; in the alley behind
319 N. Canal St.; in front of 431 E.
Fourth St.; and at the intersection
of South Broadway and George
streets.

Breakfast

(Continued from page 1)
The programs averages nearly 40 children a day during the
summer with the highest daily attendance at 53.
The breakfasts are made-to-order. The ministry serves pancakes and cereal each day, French Toast twice a week, eggs
once a week, orange juice, milk and water. A new addition
this year was a sack lunch for those who would like to take
one to go.
“We had peanut butter, peanut butter and jelly and jelly
sandwiches, a bag of chips and some type of snack like pudding or fruit chews. They had to be travel-friendly because
most of our kids were on bicycles and would shove them in a
backpack,” McGue said. “We had no clue if there was a need
and we ended up packing 25 of them a day.”
Extras like sunscreen and toothpaste occasionally appear
as well.
During the last week, children were encouraged to write
down their name, their school and what they liked about the
breakfast program.
“The most common answer was hanging with their friends.
Some stayed the whole time and some ate and left. One girl
said she made a new friend,” McGue said. “We had people
from all over. If the kids had a cousin staying with them, they
brought them along. We had a signature from Cleveland, so we
really reached out.”
McGue said everyone is pleased with the breakfast ministry; she likes the fact that the kids have a safe place to be in
the morning and they get a good breakfast.
“What a good place to hang out — a church,” she added.
“We hope everyone will join us Sunday.”

SEPTEMBER 4-7, 2014
Kalida, OH

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A FULL MIDWAY OF RIDES, CONCESSIONS AND
FOOD STANDS OPERATING DAILY
SOMETHING FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY !!!

00099142

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Answers to Monday’s questions:
Boxing great Muhammad Ali fought in only
one professional championship title bout under
his birth name, Cassius Clay; his first, on Feb. 25,
1964, when he defeated Sonny Liston to become
the world heavyweight champion.
In the world of finance, the meaning of the term
burgernomics is to use the cost of a Big Mac in different countries to determine the purchasing power parity
between nations. The term was introduced in 1986 by
The Economist magazine in it Big Mac Index.
Today’s questions:
What Major League Baseball team’s cap did actor
Jack Nicholson refuse to wear in the 2006 Oscarwinning film The Departed?
What are you afraid of if you have astraphobia?
Answers in Thursday’s Herald.
Over breakfast one morning, a woman said to her
husband, “I bet you don’t know what day this is.”
“Of course I do,” he indignantly answered, going
out the door on his way the office.
At 10 a.m., the doorbell rang and when the woman
opens the door, she was handed a box containing
a dozen long-stemmed red roses. At 1 p.m., a foilwrapped, two-pound box of her favorite chocolates
arrive. Later, a boutique delivered a designer dress.
The woman couldn’t wait for her husband to come
home.
“First the flowers, then the candy, and then the
dress!” she exclaimed. “I’ve never spent a more wonderful Groundhog Day in my whole life!’

It’s no longer
safe to recline
your airplane seat
NEW YORK (AP) —
Squeezed into tighter and
tighter spaces, airline passengers appear to be rebelling,
taking their frustrations out on
other fliers.
Three U.S. flights made
unscheduled landings in the
past eight days after passengers got into fights over the
ability to recline their seats.
Disputes over a tiny bit of personal space might seem petty,
but for passengers whose
knees are already banging into
tray tables, every inch counts.
“Seats are getting closer
together,” says Sara Nelson,
president of the Association of
Flight Attendants, which represents 60,000 flight attendants
at 19 airlines. “We have to deescalate conflict all the time.”
There are fights over overhead bin space, legroom and
where to put winter coats.
“We haven’t hit the end of
it,” Nelson says. “The conditions continue to march in
a direction that will lead to
more and more conflict.”
Airlines today are juggling
terror warnings in Britain, the
Ebola outbreak in Africa and
an Icelandic volcano erupting
and threatening to close down
European airspace. Yet, the issue
of disruptive passengers has
captured the world’s attention.
It’s getting to the point
where the pre-flight safety videos need an additional warning: Be nice to your neighbor.
The International Air
Transport Association calls
unruly passengers “an escalating problem,” saying there
was one incident for every
1,300 flights in the past three
years. The trade group would
not share detailed historical
data to back up the assertion
that this is a growing problem.
Today’s flying experience is far from glamorous.
Passengers wait in long lines
for security screening, push
and shove at the gate to be
first on board, and then fight
for the limited overhead bin
space. They are already agitated by the time they arrive
at their row and see how
cramped it is.

Auction

(Continued from page 1)

The average take for those
going through the auction this
year was $471.82, a record
amount, besting the 2013
average of $433.86.
Weather at Farm Focus
Arena on the Van Wert County
Fairgrounds remained comfortable throughout the day
with only a short shower during the early afternoon to mar
the proceedings.
Although the total of dollars collected increased,
the number of animals sold
dropped off for the second
straight year. This year’s total
number of units sold fell to
308, the lowest this century.
There were 323 units in 2013
and 359 in 2012. Those numbers were well over 400 during
the years 2001-06. Despite the
shrinking numbers of entries,
premiums paid to exhibitors
remains strong.
There were 77 swine sold
at auction on Tuesday, followed closely by the number
of rabbits (74). Next in quantity were the sale’s 36 turkeys
sold and 32 poultry, 27 sheep,
26 steers, 24 dairy feeders and
11 goats. The swine brought
in an average of $479.87,
steers averaged $879.81 and
sheep averaged $544.63.
Rabbits averaged a premium of $306.76, turkeys
brought in an average of
$366.67, poultry averaged
$330.47, dairy feeder calves
averaged $661.04 each and
goats paid an average premium of $540.91.

Steele

(Continued from page 1)

Steele has a Bachelor of
Science degree from Bowling
Green State University, a
Master’s of Science from St.
Francis College and a Juris
Doctor from Ohio Northern.
He has served as assistant
prosecuting attorney from
1988-99, as Veterans Service
Commissioner from 198999 and as a trustee for the
Brumback Library from
1989-1999. Steele also was
a member and president of
Van Wert City Council from
1984-87.

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