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LOCAL CLIMATE CHANGE ACTION PLAN 2011-2021




Chapter II. OVERVIEW OF THE LGU PROFILE
A. Ecological Profile
Brief History of Barugo, Leyte








Figure I Map of the Philippines in Year 1662 showing Barugo, Leyte
http://images.search.yahoo.com/images - keyword - Cartes Des Isles Philippines
National Library of Australia, Bellin, Jacques Nicolas, 1703-1772.Carte des isles
Philippines [cartographic material]1746 - 1770. MAP RM 1662.

During the early days of the Spanish regime in the Philippines, a group of Malay
traders headed by Tamodo landed on the northern plains of Leyte.Tamodo and his
brothers, Kasadok and Sikatuna,were accompanied by some relatives, servants and
other families. The said part of the island was frequently drove by Moro plunderers
and so they finally found a settlement four(4) kilometers away from the seacoast.
The area was an ideal haven for them for it was safe from the easy approach of the
Moro plunderers. It offered them a peaceful settlement and an ideal hunting ground
for economic subsistence.
They found abundant gogo vines in the area which they loved to use for bathing
purposes, It is from this gogo word from which Balugo which later became the
name of the settlement was coined. After the death of Tamodo, Kasadok rose into
power. As the villages chieftain, he changed the site of the settlement to a better
place for strategic and economic reasons. He consequently chose a place situated
along the banks of Arabunog River whose surrounding forest was good for rice
cultivation. To realize this, he ordered his people to clear the northern and southern
portion of the new found settlement. Said place is now known as sitios Hawod,

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Laktosan, Tanaku and Asug. In 1636, a Spanish expeditionary force with a
missionary priest visited Balugo. Kasadok and the Spanish commander had a blood
compact as a sign of true and lasting friendship. The Spaniards bartered goods such
as combs, mirrors, bowls and plates and clothing materials with rice, chicken, pigs,
vegetables and other native products. Friendship between the natives and the
Spaniards soon developed. Through the Chieftain, the people were converted into
Christianity and were asked to pay tribute to the King of Spain. Kasadok,
Sikatuna and Panilawon together with their men were asked to pay tribute to
the King of Spain. Kasadok, Sikatuna and Panilawon together with their men were
baptized by the Spanish missionary priest. It was likewise agreed that Spanish
soldiers and a missionary priest be stationed at Balugo settlement to help the natives
spiritually and economically.
The following year, September 12, 1637, another expeditionary force from Spain
arrived and settled in Balugo. This become the fulfillment of the agreement between
Kasadok and the Spanish commander of the first expeditionary force which visited
the place. This marked the incorporation of the settlement of Balugo to the
mainstream of Spanish dominated area in the Visayas. Tamodo automatically
turned vassal to Spain. The construction of a Catholic Church further symbolized full
Hispanization of Balugo, a Spanish parish priest was said to have much difficulty in
pronouncing Balugo that he requested to change the letter l to r. Since then,
the name of the village become BARUGO instead of BALUGO.

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Location
Figure 2 Location Map of Barugo, Leyte

Source: MPDO GIS data, LGU Barugo
Barugo is located northwest of Leyte Island and is almost 50 kilometers from
Tacloban City the regional capital of Eastern Visayas. It is bounded on the east by
San Miguel Leyte, south by Jaro, Leyte, west by Carigara, Leyte and north by
Carigara Bay.
Topography
Barugo has mixed topographic relief. The northern, northwestern, southwestern and
some portions are board area of level to nearly level land. The northeastern portion
has a steeply undulating and rolling land sloping in many directions. The eastern
portion has a moderately undulating and rolling land sloping in many directions. The
southeastern portion has gently sloping areas with land sloping in one general
direction to gently land sloping in more than one general direction and board area of
land to nearly level land.
Slope
The municipality of Barugo has five (5) types of slope ranging from Slope Class A to
Class E. Slope Class A with a slope limit of 0 -3% has a land area of 4,391.0798
hectares or 49.05% which is the biggest land area as compared to the other slope

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classes. This board area of level land to nearly level land is found in the northern,
northwestern, western and some portions in the southern portions of the
municipality. This type of slope is suited for lowland rice production. Slope Class B
with a slope limit of 3 8% had the second biggest land area of 1, 991, 0000
hectares or 22.24%. These gently sloping areas in one general direction to gently
undulating and gently rolling land sloping in more than one general direction is
suited for upland rice production and mechanized rice production. These areas are
mostly found in the southeastern portion of the municipality with small patches in
the eastern and northwestern portions. Slope Class C with a slope limit of 8 18%
has the third largest land area of 1,550.7500 hectares or 17.32%. This moderately
undulating and rolling land sloping in many directions is suited for livestock
production and fruit bearing trees. These areas are mostly found in the eastern
portion of the municipality with small portions in the northeastern, southern and
southwestern portions. Slope Class D with a slope limit of 18 30% has a land area
of 895.2500 hectares or 10.00%. This steeply undulating and rolling land sloping in
many directions is suited for tree crop planting. These areas are mostly found in the
northeastern portion of the municipality, with small patches in the central and
southern portions. Slope Class E with a slope limit of 30 50% has the smallest land
area of 124.7500 hectares or 1.39%. This very steeply sloping land in many
directions to many direction to hilly areas is not suited to any type of agriculture. It
should be left to timber production.



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Geology
Based on the development map of the MHS Human Settlements Regulatory
Commission, Region VIII as reference, two kinds of bedrock foundations are found
in the Municipality of Barugo. Marly limestone and poorly consolidated sediments has
the biggest land area of 4,946.5758 hectares or 55.25% while metamorphosed
rocks, volcanic and highly crystallized rocks comprised 4,006.2500 hectares of
44.75%.
BEDROCK FORMATION LAND AREA (HAS) PERCENT TO TOTAL

1. Marly limestone and a poorly
Consolidated sediments
2. Metamorphosed rocks,
volcanic & highly crystallized
rocks.


4,946.5756

4,006.2580

55.25

44.75
TOTAL 8,952.8258 100%
Table 1: Bedrock formation of the Municipality
Source: Mines and Geosciences Bureau (MGB) region VIII

Soils
The Municipality of Barugo has six (6) soil types, Luisiana Clay with 2,496.000
hectares or 27.88% is found in northeastern and eastern portions of the
municipality. Guinbalaon Clay with 328.0000 hectares or 3.66% is found in the
southeastern of the municipality. Palo Clay loam with 2,888.8258 hectares or 32.7%
is found in the southeastern of the municipality. In the central portion of the
municipality, is San Manuel silt loams with 2,296.0000 hectares or 3.26 are found
around the estuarine areas and along the seashore.
The description of the soil types with the corresponding crops suitable to each type
is given below.

1. Luisiana Clay - is characterized with rolling to hilly photography, similar to the
guinbalaon soils.

The soil is well drained. The run-off in cultivated area is excessive and often times
produce gullies.

In between slopes of hills the drainage condition is poor. Since water collects in
these areas are usually converted into lowland rise paddies.


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Corn and rice, upland and lowland, as well as coconut are the principal crops
planted on this soil. In general, the soil is poor. Other crops grown are bananas
and sugar cane.

Accelerated soil erosion on this soil type is a success especially on slopes ranging
from 10 to 15 percent. To minimize its occurrence and to avoid the subsequent
destruction, some conservation measures such as contour farming, strip cropping
and terracing should be adopted. Lands under this type with steep slopes should
be planted to permanent crops like fruit trees, coffee and cacao, rather than grow
them to seasonal crops.

2. Guinbalaon Clay has rolling to roughly topography. Because of the few rivers
and gullies that traverse this soil it may be conveniently cultivated by farm
machinery as the wide trusts of land permit cultivation at a time. Only those
portions that lower the mountain sides are generally much rougher. These on the
lower parts are less rough.

This soil is well drained. Surface runoff, however, is excessive and often
causes gullies to cut through the cultivated areas. This internal drainage is fair.
This soil is seldom planted to lowland rice
3. Palo-Clay-Loam Although apparently level, has several depressed areas,
where runoff water easily collects and forms condition intermittent swamps. There
are several rivers and creeks that traverse this soil type but because of the very
low grade of slope, flow of water is very sluggish and takes considerable time to
drain. The sluggishness in drainage is attributed to the rather shallow water table,
usually on water from the surface.

Native vegetation consists mostly of grasses like talahib, tambo and agingay.
Entangled with those grasses are several species of vines that makes them appear
impenetrable. Such growths are common along river banks. Other species of plants
which are mostly weeds that grow on fallowed lowland rice fields are various
species of cyperaceous plants like biga-as, ager and tiong. These plants are
common not only on rice paddies but also in all wet or swampy portions of this soil
type. As in this case of the Paing series, badiang and lumbia are found best in
somewhat smaller quantities. Camias are also found growing wild along the
drainage canals. Of the trees, several species of the Picus family like balete, tibig
and is-is are found growing.

This layer is fairly rich in organic matter, it being constantly supplied by dead grass
leaves, and straws of the rice crop. When this soil contains the right amount of
moisture, plowing is very easy and pulverization is easily accomplished with the
use of the bamboo harrows. Since there are no boulders of any kind, cultivation

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with mechanized units can be done if desired. This soil seldom cakes or hardens
upon drying.

4. San Manuel Silt Loam is the largest in area and the most important of them
all agriculturally. Although some depressions or sinkholes are present in this type,
water does not stay long on them but readily percolates. Drainage takes place
readily because the whole deposit of alluvium from which this soil developed is
loose and friable.

The surface soil of San Manuel Slit Loam is light and brown and is moderately
loose to slightly friable in consistency. Its very fine granular structure makes this
soil easy to work. The soils in cultivated areas fairly rich in organic matter, but
those under native vegetation have dark grayish soils indicating high content of
organic residues. In as such as the precipitation in the province is generally heavy,
and that this soil is fairly well drained, it may be safely assumed that its reaction
has a tendency towards acidity. Forest, which requires almost neutral soil, is found
growing well on this soil. The sub soil is fairly deep, reaching to 80 centimeters
below the surface. This horizon which is dark brown to light brown has a good fine
granular structure. Facing from its color, this layer does not contain as much
organic matter as the surface soil. Stones or boulders are about and being very
friable, roots of plants penetrate through this layer easily.

San Manuel Silt Loam is mostly utilized for the culture of lowland rice whenever the
supply of water can be controlled. Sweet potato is also grown on this soil. This
important root crop of the province is oftentimes used as a substitute for rice.

5. Obando Fine Sand the only soil type classified under this Obando series is
found on the eastern part of Leyte. It has an almost flat topography. In spite of its
relief, drainage is excessive. The loose and structure less condition of the soil
throughout the entire profile makes percolation very excessive. It is thereof, not
used to find soil poor in organic matter content, low in bases, and low in water
holding capacity.

This soil type being well drained is highly desired for residential purposes. The
native vegetation consists of some bamboo grooves, aroma and a variety of
cropping leguminous vine. The greater part of the area under this soil type has
been developed for coconuts.

This type is extensively planted to coconut as the crop ceases to be suitable
to the soil. Some fruit trees are very healthy and heavy yielder. This soil is fitted
not only to coconuts but also to a great variety of crops when adequately supplied
with organic water, carefully fertilized, and properly cultivated.

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6. Hydrosol The coastal areas around Leyte which are swamps are classified
under the term hydrosol. Such areas are depending upon the tides, either under
seawater or saturated with brackish water throughout the year. Hydrosol consists
of several layers. The uppermost part which is brackish and whose depth depends
on the rise and fall of the tide is called the aqueous horizon. Occupying a thin layer
between the aqueous and the soil material below is the sub-aqueous horizon. This
consists of slimy mud and partly decomposed plant material that are gray to
brownish gray. Beneath this layer is the soil material on the sub-based horizon
which consists of an alluvial deposit of sand and clay. When wet, the soil is dark
gray but becomes gray upon drying.

This gray coloration may be attributed to poor or total absence of aeration.
The sub-based layer os very soft, sticky and structure less mass whose depth often
reaches to one meter from the sub-aqueous horizon.

The native vegetation on this land type is very distinct in that only very
definite kinds of plants can grow on it. The common trees found growing are
bakanon, longaray, api-api, pagatpat and tabigi. Of palms, nipa is the most
important growing on the hydrosols.

SOIL TEXTURE LAND AREA PERCENT TOTAL

2, 496.000
328.0000
2,888.8258
2,296.0000
652.0000
292.0000

27.88
3.66
32.27
25.65
7.28
3.26

TOTAL 8, 952.8258 100%
Table No. 2 TEXTURE OF SOIL SURFACE
Source: Soil map, Bureau of Soils

Land Capability

The municipality of Barugo has four (4) types of land capability classes
distributed in its entirety. The widest land area of 4, 504.8258 hectares or 50.32% is
under land capability class A. This is a very good land, can be cultivated safely and
requires only simple but good farm management. This type is located in the cultural,
western and southeastern portions of the municipality. The second biggest land area

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of 3, 756.0000 hectares or 41.95% is under land capability Class M. This type which
is found in the northeastern, eastern, southern and southwestern portions of the
municipality is a steep land, very severely to excessively eroded or shallow for
cultivation. It is suited to pasture or forest with careful management. Land capability
Class X has a land area of 316.0000 hectares or 3.53%. This type is located in the
northern portion of the municipality along the sea shore. This is a good land, nearly
level, can be cultivated safely, but due to low fertility, shallowness, doughtiness,
slight alkalinity or salinity, it needs special soil management practices to maintain
productivity.



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Land Resources

General Land Uses:

Barugo, one of the satellite municipalities of the Province of Leyte has a total
land area of 8, 952.8258 hectares. Based on the record of DENR, Regional Office,
agricultural area is still the dominant land use. There are also swamps, marshes and
fishponds area, the built up area, open water spaces and the road network.

Built up areas:

A land area of approximately 99.4747 hectares or 1.11% of the total land
area of the municipality is occupied by the thirty seven (37) different barangays
including the Poblacion barangays. These include the existing residential,
commercial, institutional, parks and open spaces, transportation facilities and utilities
in a particular Barangay.

Agricultural areas:

Widely dispersed within the municipality are agricultural lands occupying an
approximate area of 7,995.7384 hectares or 80.31% of the total land area of the
municipality. These areas are planted with coconuts, corn, vegetables and fruit
bearing trees.

Swamps, Marshes/Mangroves and Fishponds:

A total land area of 664.1171 hectares or 7.42% of the total land area of the
municipality is occupied by swamps, marshes, mangroves and fishponds areas which
are mostly located along the seacoast.

Rivers, Creeks or Open Water Spaces:

Bodies of water within the municipality which includes the rivers, creeks and
open water areas occupy a total land area of 105.5 hectares.

Road Network:

Existing roads which include the Provincial roads, the municipal streets,
Barangay roads and other transportation facilities and utilities occupy an aggregate
land area of 87.9956 hectares or only .98% of the total land area of the
municipality.


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Existing Urban Land Uses:

The Poblacion barangays which includes the six (6) districts has a total of
173.6301 hectares. This total land area is subdivided into the following land uses:


LAND USES AREA (in Hectares) PERCENT TO TOTAL

1. Built-up
2. Swamps, Marshes
/ Mangroves
Fishponds
3. Agricultural
4. Open Water Spaces
5. Road Network /
Transportation
Facilities/Utilities

99.4747

664.1171
7,995.7384
105.5000

87.9956

1.11

7.42
89.31
1.18

.98
TOTAL 8,952.8258 100
Table No. 3 Existing General land Uses
SOURCES: DENR, Region VIII

Residential Areas

A total land area of 15.4739 hectares or 8.91% of the Poblacion land area are
being utilized primarily for residential purposes. These land areas are widely
dispersed within the six (6) districts of the Poblacion.

Commercial Areas

Areas for commercial purposes total to only 1.0001 hectares or only .58% of
the total urban land area. These include the area currently used for the public
market, the merchandizing stores, the sari-sari stores and the like. These areas are
mostly concentrated north of the Poblacion.

Agri- Industrial Areas:

The area occupied by the existing Rice mills and the corn mill at the Poblacion
is only .2652 hectare or only .15% of the total urban area.




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Institutional Areas:

A total area of 4.1626 hectares or 2.40% of the total urban area is occupied
by the different institutional establishments located within the Poblacion. These
areas includes the municipal building and other government offices within the blocks
of Burgos street and St. Rosario street, the Ferrer Central School located in front of
the municipal building, the Elementary School located at Abanilla and Ponferrada
Streets, which is west of the Poblacion, by the Barugo Central Elementary School on
the southern portion of the Poblacion, and by the Roman Catholic Church in front of
Plaza.

Parks and Open Spaces:

The Municipal Plazas in front of the municipal hall and in front of the Ferrer
Central School, and the area occupied by the Roman Catholic Cemetery located on
the southern portion of the Poblacion and other recreational areas within the
Poblacion totals to approximately 3.2194 hectares or 1.85% of the total urban area.

Socialized Housing:

The municipalitys core shelter project spearheaded by the Social Welfare and
Development Office occupies an area of three (3) hectares. This is located north of
the Poblacion, in a municipal government acquired lots, primarily for the existing
squatters population of the municipality.

Vacant Areas

Areas within the Poblacion which are not yet utilized for any purpose totals to
3.4217 hectares. These are widely dispersed within the Poblacion.


Rivers, Creeks, Lakes and Seas:

A total area of three (4) hectares is being occupied by the Himanglos River
located within the Poblacion area. Pongso River has an approximate area of 76
hectares. Canomantag River has 3 hectares and Cabarasan River has 4 hectares.

Swamps, Marshes, Mangroves/Fishponds:

An existing land area of 35.6171 hectares is being utilized for fishponds and
occupied by swamps, marshes and mangroves at the Poblacion area.


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Agricultural Area:

Being an agricultural town, agriculture area is the dominant land use, even in
the Poblacion. This land use occupies an aggregate land area of 92.8883 hectares or
53.5% of the total Poblacion area. These are usually located outside of the urban
built-up area.

Transportation and Utilities:

Areas occupied by the existing temporary bus, jeep terminal, by the municipal
streets are approximately 11.5818 hectares or 6.67% of the total urban land area.

LAND USES AREA IN HECTARES PERCENT TO TOTAL

1. Residential
2. Commercial
3. Agri-Industrial
4. Institutional
5. Parks & Open Spaces
6. transportation & Utilities
7. Socialized Housing
8. Vacant Areas
9. Rivers, Creeks, Lakes &
Seas
10. Agricultural
11. Swamps, Marshes
/Mangroves Fishponds

15.4739
1.0001
.2652
4.1626
3.2194
11.5818
3.0000
3.4217
87.0000
3.4217
35.6171

8.91
.58
.15
2.40
1.85
6.67
1.73
1.97
33.76
53.50
20.50

TOTAL 257.6301 100%
TABLE NO. 4 EXISTING URBAN LAND USES
Source: MPDO, Actual Survey

C. POPULATION AND DEMOGRAPHIC PROFILE

Population: 30,092 (NSO 2010 Population Survey)
27,569 (NSO 2007 Population Survey)
Projected population: 33, 801 (Year 2020)
Growth rate: 0.014
Household population: 6,148 (2010 CENSUS ON POPULATION & HOUSING)

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D. SOCIAL SERVICES

Only 11 Rural Barangays have no access to complete elementary school level
while all 37 Barangays have access to primary elementary school. Three Barangays
namely Calingcaguing, Sta. Rosa and Minuhang have National High Schools while the
Poblacion area has no existing High School.

The Municipality has been constructing the Birthing Facility and will be due for
completion by year 2011.

The most proximate public hospital to Barugo is the Carigara District Hospital
(CDH) which is located at about 6 kilometers away from the town proper. This is
under the auspices of the Provincial Government of Leyte and part of the Inter Local
Health Zone (ITHZ), the Municipality is allocating funds for operational subsidy of
said hospital.

All of the Barangays have existing Day Care Centers. Children of age 3-4
years old are legitimate to enroll at said Barangay facility.

E. ECONOMY

Economic activities of the Municipality according to its major ranking are
positioned as follows; Agriculture and Fishery, Commercial and Service Centers, and
related Industries. Farming and fishing accounts the major economic players with
almost 80% are engaged into that area. Twenty (20%) are shared by Commercial
and Service Centers and related industries such as public transport, retail and
wholesale, hardware, household and business services, sand and gravel, and other
small scale service facilities and industries.

There are also existing local tourism spots such as beach resorts which are for
continuous development by the private sector.

The Municipality of Barugo is very much dependent on the income derived
from the Internal Revenue Allotment (IRA) and national & international development
grants to sustain public service delivery. It accounts to a total of 94% of the total
income of Barugo which is about Php 50,000,000.00 based from the current financial
calendar. The remaining 6% are sourced from local income coming from taxes,
fees, permits and licenses.


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F. INFRASTRUCTURE AND PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION

The Municipality of Barugo has a total road network of 113 kilometers. Of
which, 9.30 kilometers are classified as national roads; 28.132 kilometers are
provincial roads and 75.568 kilometers municipal/barangay roads. The longest road
network is 7.36 kilometers traversing portions of Barangay Hiagsam & Pongso
junction-Pitogo-Roosevelt section. The shortest road sections are that of Hilaba-San
Isidro and San Isidro-Guindaohan with a road length of 0.20 kilometers each.
The daily public transport system is plying route to Tacloban City the Capital
City of Region VIII which is about 50 kilometers away. There are also public
transports going to nearby town Carigara, Leyte which has a better economic
activities and services that Barugo residents are getting from. The usual modes of
transportations going into the rural barangays are tricycles and motorcycles (habal-
habal).
Fifteen (15) barangays are currently served by the Metro Carigara Water
District (MCWD) while the rest have both Spring Water System and Jetmatic Pumps
as their source of potable water supply.
Almost all of the Barangays are now being served by its Electric Cooperative
based in Tunga Leyte that of LEYECO III.
The Municipality has a landline telephone facility operated by Bayan
Communications Inc. It has also the services of the three mobile phone providers
namely Smart Communications, Globelines and Sun Cellular.
The Municipality has for its internet connectivity a Satellite Broadband facility.
The national government offices located in Barugo are the following;
Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG) with two (2) of its attached
agencies the Philippine National Police (PNP) and the Bureau of Fire Protection
(BFP), COMELEC, National Telecommunications Office, Bureau of Internal Revenue
(BIR), Department of Agrarian Reform (DAR), Philippine Coconut Authority (PCA),
and the National Irrigation Authority (NIA).
F. ENVIRONMENT

The Municipality has a controlled dumpsite facility located at Barangay Bukid
which is 3 kilometers away from the town proper. Ninety percent (90%) of its solid
wastes are considered biodegradable. It has also a Vermi-Composting Facility
located at Poblacion District I. It is also implementing a segregated collection system

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at five (5) Poblacion Barangays and also at Rudlin Homes Subdivision located in
Barangay Abango Barugo, Leyte.

There is no pollutant industries located within the Municipality such that the
quality of air and water is generally good.

H. INSTITUTIONAL MACHINERY

Total Land Area:
The municipality of Barugo occupies a total land area of 8,952.8258 hectares. This
total land area is distributed to its 37 barangays including the town proper or the
Poblacion. Only 170.6301 hectares or 1.95% belongs to the poblacion, while the
biggest portion of 8,782.1957 hectares or 98.05% is the area of the 31 rural
barangays. The biggest Barangay in terms of land area is Barangay Ibag with
845.4843 hectares, followed by Barangay Balud with 721.7234 hectares and
Barangay Santa Rosa with 712.4054 hectares while the barangay with the smallest
land area is Barangay Minuswang with 86.0562 hectares, followed by Barangay
Domogdog with 91.7919 hectares and Barangay Cuta with 125.9273 hectares.
Total Number of Barangays:
37 Barangays with 10 Coastal and 27 landlocked barangays.
10 Coastal Barangays
1. Canomantag 6. Poblacion District V
2. Minuswang 7. Domogdog
3. Santarin 8. Minuhang
4. Poblacion District I 9. Balud
5. Poblacion District III 10. Duka
27 Landlocked Barangays
1. Abango 11. Hiagsam 21. Pongso
2. Amahit 12. Hilaba 22. Roosevelt
3. Balire 13. Hinugayan 23. San Isidro
4. Bukid 14. Ibag 24. Sta. Rosa
5. Bulod 15. Pikas 25. Tutug-an
6. Busay 16. Pitogo 26. Cabarasan
7. Caboloan 17. Poblacion District II 27. San Roque
8. Calingcaguing 18. Poblacion District III
9. Can-Isak 19. Poblacion District IV
10. Guindaohan 20. Poblacion District VI




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Organizational Structure

POLITICAL PROFILE:
Name of Mayor: Atty. Alden Montao Avestruz
Name of Vice Mayor: Hon. Dolores C. Boyd
Sangguniang Bayan Members:
1. Hon. Josephine C. Tiu Chairperson: Trade & Industry
Chairperson: Health, Sanitation, Clean &
Green
2. Hon. Venerando C. Villasin Chairperson: Public Market & Slaughter
House
3. Hon. Efren A. Avestruz Chairperson: Finance & Appropriation
Chairperson:
4. Hon. Federico Ayes Jr. Chairperson: Police & Fire Protection
Matters, Public Safety & Human Rights
5. Hon. Antonio Arpon Chairperson: Engineering, Infrastructure &
Public Works
5. Hon. Divina C. Buales Chairperson: Education, Culture & Science
Chairperson: Housing, &
Urban Development
6. Hon. Artemio L. Apostol Chairperson: Agriculture, Fisheries &
Cooperatives
Chairperson: Natural Resources, &
Environmental Protection
7. Hon. Marilyn A. Astorga Chairperson: Oversight Committee
Chairperson: Human Resource
Enhancement, Gender Advancement
Social & Cultural Affairs
Chairperson: Appointment, Promotion,
Labor & Employment


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LOCAL CLIMATE CHANGE ACTION PLAN 2011-2021


LOCAL DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL

Chairman Atty. Alden M. Avestruz
Municipal Mayor

Members 37 Punong Barangays

1. District I, Poblacion Hon. Alden L. Apostol
2. District II, Poblacion Hon. Jeffrey C. Caezal
3. District III, Poblacion Hon. Marl A. De Guzman
4. District IV, Poblacion Hon. Jesus B. Cabanacan
5. District V, Poblacion Hon. Angel P. Tiu Jr.
6. District VI, Poblacion Hon. Violeta A. Magadan
7. Abango Hon. Alejandro A. Darnayla
8. Amahit Hon. Joemar Q. Acebo
9. Balire Hon. Eusebio B. Boreres
10. Balud Hon. Rogelio C. Claros
11. Bukid Hon. Magdalena C. Salvacion
12. Bulod Hon. Mario C. Panis
13. Busay Hon. Violeta A. Alberca
14. Cabarasan Hon. Leonilo G. Colibao
15. Caboloan Hon. Edita C. Alonzo
16. Calingcaguing Hon. Ma. Marita Q. Babor
17. Can-isak Hon. Josephine P. Verzosa
18. Canomantag Hon. Noel L. Briones
19. Cuta Hon. Serapio P. Castroverde
20. Domogdog Hon. Pantaleon F. Castroverde
21. Duka Hon. Genilyn M. Sanoria
22. Guindaohan Hon. Rhonel A. Agosto
23. Hiagsam Hon. Danilo D. Ariza
24. Hilaba Hon. Benilda A. MAdronero
25. Hinugayan Hon Rumolo A. Mobilla
26. Ibag Hon. Roger A. Bael
27. Minuhang Hon. Felimon I. Marabe
28. Minuswang Hon. Roque B. Pearanda
29. Pikas Hon. Edmond L. Balais
30. Pitogo Hon. Joel P. Panao
31. Pongso Hon. Gilda G. Elizondo
32. Roosevelt Hon. Domingo E. Adrales
33. San Isidro Hon. Rodolfo P. Busante
34. San Roque Hon. Ramel E. Panis
35. Santarin Hon. Marglenn E. Corbilla
36. Sta. Rosa Hon. Manuel S. Cayubit
37. Tutug-an Hon. Virginia A. Cebrano



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LOCAL CLIMATE CHANGE ACTION PLAN 2011-2021


List of duly Accredited Cooperatives and Non-Governmental Organizations of
the Sangguniang Bayan of Barugo, Leyte to wit:

Metro Ormoc Community Cooperative (OCCI) Jane Q. Jumao-as
(Executive Secretary)
The Circulo Barugeo of Metro Manila Officers of Circulo Barugeo
Incorporation ( President - Jorge Valentino V. Aruta)
Amahit Coconut Farmers Multi-Purpose Cooperative Donato Ayuste
Centenial Force Foundation INC. Ernesto Madriaga
Barugo Senior Citizens Association Alejandro Cadiente
Sta Cruz Youth Circle
Hinugayan Small Coconut Farmers Cooperative.
Amahit Small Coconut Farmers Cooperative, INC.
Minuswang Multi-Purpose Cooperative, INC.
Bulod Farmers Associations
New Road Farmers Multi-Purpose Cooperative
Abango Small Coconut Farmers Association


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LOCAL CLIMATE CHANGE ACTION PLAN 2011-2021


B. RISK PROFILE FOR RAPID ONSET HAZARD BROUGHT ABOUT BY THE
CHANGING CLIMATE

Climate Type

According to the Corona Climate Classification Chart, Barugo lies within the Type IV
climate which means there is no distinct dry and wet season. Generally, Barugo
experiences the wet months during the northwest monsoon season that is from
November to May while the dry season from April to May.

Natural Topography

Below is the watershed map showing the location of Barugo with respect to different
watershed divides;



As shown, Barugo is a catch basin of three watersheds that of Canomantag, Pongso and
Cabarasan. The major rivers are Canomantag River, Pongso River, Arabunog River,
Himanglos River and Cabarasan River. Carigara Bay is the run off point of all these
rivers.


Hydro-meteorological hazards


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LOCAL CLIMATE CHANGE ACTION PLAN 2011-2021


Historically, the town had been hit by strong typhoons and the most damaging were
Typhoon's Claring sometime in the 1960's, Typhoon atang in 1978, Typhoon Undang in
1984 and Typhoon Frank in 1998.
Being within a typhoon belt corridor and at the same time a catch basin area of three (3)
watershed divides, Barugo is very much vulnerable and exposed to hydro-meteorological
hazards such as typhoons, storm surges, rain induced landslide and flooding.

Vulnerability to Hydro-meteorological hazard

Flooding in a Category 5 Typhoon



Almost one third of the area in Barugo will be flooded in a worst case scenario situation.
That would be possible if there will be a Category 5 Typhoon (with wind speed of more
than 250 kph and rainfall amount of more than 300 mm), high tide, too much rainfall
and storm surge inundation.



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LOCAL CLIMATE CHANGE ACTION PLAN 2011-2021


Storm Surge in a Category 5 Typhoon



The shoreline of Barugo will experience a maximum height of as much as 4 meters
storm surge as reflected in the hazard map given by READY Project as of year 2007. The
barangays vulnerable to storm surge hazard are Canomantag, Minuswang, Santarin,
Poblacion I, III, & V, Domogdog, Minuhang, Balud and Duka.



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LOCAL CLIMATE CHANGE ACTION PLAN 2011-2021


Rain Induced Landslide Hazard



Because of the low elevation and gently rolling terrain of Barugo, it is only categorized
as having low susceptibility to rain induced landslide hazard.

Barugo has initiated Barangay Based Participatory Land Use Planning through the
assistance of German International Cooperation (GIZ) and one of the output of all
barangays is to come up with a risk assessment and mapping of their respective
barangays. Their output were consolidated, validated and processed by the sectoral
planning body as well as the technical staff of the Municipality.

As shown below is the photo of the barangay based land use and risk assessment in one
of the baragay;


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LOCAL CLIMATE CHANGE ACTION PLAN 2011-2021


Below is the risk assessment matrix summary of the municipality in relation to hydro-meteorological hazards;

HAZARD
VULNERABILITY VULNERABILITY/
RISK
RATING
SENSITIVITY EXPOSURE CAPACITY
Flooding
Storm Surge
Rain
induced
landslide


High (Flooding and
Storm Surge)
Low (Rain Induced
Landslide)

1. Communities
still need more trainings
, early warning system
and rescue equipments.

2. The Municipality is very
much exposed to flooding
& storm surge.

3. High poverty index.
36.6% of the
population
(11, 380), is
considered poor
2,183 Households
within the flood
prone area
(35% of the total
HH)
Lack of awareness on family disaster prevention,
mitigation and preparedness.
2,859 aged
4 years old &
below
1,000 aged 4 years
Old & below w/in
Flood prone area
Functional MDRRMC and BDRRMC
Access to national early and local warning system
e.g. Project NOAH, radio, TV, cell phone and social
media. Local - Bandillo and flood warning signs
Barangays underwent participatory planning to
include hazard and vulnerability mapping
All barangays have designated evacuation centers
Lack of disaster rescue equipments.
2,347 aged 60
years old & over
820 aged 60 yrs.
Old and up w/in
Flood prone area.
Barangays have community volunteers in emergency
and disaster operations.
Himanglos river flood control need structural repair.
Poor drainage facility.
Poblacion barangays are protected by mangroves
LGU lacks budget on DRRM and CCA.
600 hectares of
Riceland prone to
flooding
Catch basin area (Slope 0-5 meters is almost 1/3
of the total area.



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LOCAL CLIMATE CHANGE ACTION PLAN 2011-2021


Chapter III. Climate Profile

Past Climate Data and Related Disaster Risk Events

Based on records of PAG-ASA, the following data showed typhoon tracks and its
perceived strength in terms of wind intensity as well as cost of damages to lives and
properties;
1) January










2) March











1. TY "Asiang"
(5 to 9 Jan. 1972)
Casualties: 209
Damages : PHP 145 M

2. TY "Auring"
(22 to 25 Jan. 1975)
Casualties: 48
Damages : PHP 16 M

LEGEND:
=>TD (up to 63 kph)
=>TS (64 - 117 kph)
=>TY (over 117 kph)

BARUGO
1. TY "Bising"
(22 to 29 Mar. 1962)
Casualties: 203
Damages :PHP587.5 M

LEGEND:
=>TD (up to 63 kph)
=>TS (64 - 117 kph)
=>TY (over 117 kph)

BARUGO

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LOCAL CLIMATE CHANGE ACTION PLAN 2011-2021


BARUGO
3) April










1. TY "Atang"
(18 to 27 Apr. 1978)
Casualties: 111
Damages :PHP 245 M

2. TY "Bebeng"
(12 to 20 Apr. 1979)
Casualties: 93
Damages :PHP 267.2 M

LEGEND:
=>TD (up to 63 kph)
=>TS (64 - 117 kph)
=>TY (over 117 kph)

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LOCAL CLIMATE CHANGE ACTION PLAN 2011-2021


BARUGO

4) May










5) June





1. TY "Klaring"
(11 to 22 May 1966)
Casualties: 82 dead
Damages :PHP 120 M

2. TY "Didang"
(12 to 26 May 1976)
Casualties: 347
Damages :PHP 624.7 M

LEGEND:
=>TD (up to 63 kph)
=>TS (64 - 117 kph)
=>TY (over 117 kph)
1. TY "Konsing"
(22 to 25 June 1972)
Casualties: 131 dead
Damages :PHP 100 M

2. TY "Goring"
(23 to 27 June 1983)
Casualties: 56
Damages:PHP 2,774.4 M

LEGEND:
=>TD (up to 63 kph)
=>TS (64 - 117 kph)
=>TY (over 117 kph)

BARUGO

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LOCAL CLIMATE CHANGE ACTION PLAN 2011-2021


BARUGO
6) November










Based on the above records of destructive typhoons,
the closest typhoon path with Barugo are that
of Typhoon's Asiang (January, 1972), Atang (April, 1978),
Bebeng (April, 1979), Klaring (May, 1966), and Undang
(November, 1984). These typhoons registered winds with
maximum strength of 120 kph and more.
Other Typhoon which occurred in the later year that also went near Barugo is Typhoon
Frank sometime in June 2008. Aside from typhoons, northeast monsoon which occurs from
November to March also unleash heavy amount of rainfall triggering flooding in low lying
barangays.
The photo shown below is a flooding due to rainy season during northeast monsoon. It
occurred last March 17, 2011.








1. TY "Yoling"
(17 to 20 Nov. 1970)
Casualties: 611
Damages : PHP 460M
2. TY "Anding"
(22 to 27 Nov. 1981)
Casualties: 409
Damages : PHP 649.9 M
3. TY "Sisang"
(23 to 27 Nov. 1987)
Casualties: 979
4. TY "Undang"
(3 to 6 Nov. 1984)
Casualties: 1,167
Damages : PHP 1,540.0 M
5. TY "Ruping"
(10 to 14 Nov. 1990)
Casualties: 748
Damages : PHP 10,276.5 M

LEGEND:
=>TD (up to 63 kph)
=>TS (64 - 117 kph)
=>TY (over 117 kph)

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LOCAL CLIMATE CHANGE ACTION PLAN 2011-2021


Future Climate Trends and its Associated Climate Risks

As stated in the National Climate Change Action Plan (NCCAP) 2011-2028, " The
global and local climate is changing. Current climate trends show that the
Philippines, like the rest of the world, has exhibited increasing temperatures,
with observed mean temperature increase of 0.64 C or an average of 0.01 C per
year-increase from 1951-2010. In the last 59 years, maximum (daytime) and
minimum (night time) temperatures are also seen to have increased by 0.36 C and
0.1 C, respectively. Moreover, the analysis on tropical cyclone passage over
Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao using a 30-year running mean shows that there has
been a slight increase in the number of cyclones in the Visayas during the 1971-
2000 period as compared with the 1951 to 1980 and 1960- 1990 periods (PAGASA
2011). Using a mid-range emissions scenario, the climate projections done by the
Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration
(PAGASA) for 2020 and 2050 indicate that all areas of the Philippines will get
warmer, with largest increase in temperatures in the summer months of March, April
and May (MAM). Mean temperatures in all areas in the Philippines are expected to
rise by 0.9 C to 1.1 C in 2020 and by 1.8 C to 2.2 C in 2050.

The German International Cooperation (GIZ) has provided Barugo one of its local
government partners in Environmental and Natural Resource Governance Program
(EnRD) downscaled climate models to be used in the climate change adaptation
planning. The result for Barugo is shown below;






















-25
-20
-15
-10
-5
0
5
10
15
20
25
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
%

[Month]
Precipitation Changes from CC Scenarios in % for 2020s
BARUGO

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LOCAL CLIMATE CHANGE ACTION PLAN 2011-2021



















































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LOCAL CLIMATE CHANGE ACTION PLAN 2011-2021



















































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LOCAL CLIMATE CHANGE ACTION PLAN 2011-2021

























Based on the downscaled models for Barugo, both precipitation and temperature in
the 2020 and 2050 will most likely have significant increase that may result to
climactic abnormalities that will brought slow and rapid onset hazards as claimed by
experts in climatological research worldwide. The evidence are pointing out to new
adaptation measures as contained in the NAtional Climate Change Action Plan
(NCCAP) 2011-2028.

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LOCAL CLIMATE CHANGE ACTION PLAN 2011-2021


II. LOCAL CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION PLAN


















BARUGO, LEYTE DRRM AND CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTATION VISION


"A SAFE AND DISASTER-RESILIENT COMMUNITY WITH CAPACITATED
AND CLIMATE CHANGE ADAPTIVE CITIZENRY THROUGH EFFECTIVE AND
EFFICIENT GENDER RESPONSIVE POLICIES TOWARDS SUSTAINABLE
DEVELOPMENT.















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LOCAL CLIMATE CHANGE ACTION PLAN 2011-2021