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THE AMERICAN POET

ROBERT FROST
ARCHANA PRASAD
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RASHITHA
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PRATHIKSHA
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A PORTRAIT OF ROBERT FROST

Frost had his own demons to battle, and
he understood all too well the darkness
that lurked on the periphery of life. Born to
an alcoholic father and a depressed
mother, Frost was plagued all his years by
the effects of mental illness on himself and
on those he loved. Frost had to commit his
sister Jeanie to a Maine state mental
hospital in 1920, and she died there in 1929
at the age of 53.
DEPRESSED FROST
Frost also suffered from depression, and
often felt himself unhinged by his darker
impulses. His daughter Lesley recalled
waking up one night to find Frost
pointing a gun at Elinor and
threatening, "Take your choice. Before
morning, one of us will be dead." His
fears, angers, and jealousies could be
alarmingly intense.

upon him
THE GRAND MASTER OF
AMERICAN POETRY
By the 1940s, Frost was undisputedly the
grand master of American poetry. In
1943, he won his fourth and final
Pulitzer Prize for the collection, A
Witness Tree. Awards, honorary degrees,
and teaching appointments at the
country's finest universities were heaped
upon him

TO HONOUR ROBERT FROST
In honoring Robert Frost, we therefore can
pay honor to the deepest source of our
national strength," Kennedy said. "That
strength takes many forms and the most
obvious forms are not always the most
significant. Our national strength
matters; but the spirit which informs and
controls our strength matters just as
much."

He knew that even a life as golden as his
would eventually, one day, slide back into
the darkness: "Then leaf subsides to leaf. /
So Eden sank to grief, / So dawn goes
down to day. / Nothing gold can stay."

Quotes By
Robert Frost
QUOTES
Quote #1
"Art is the last of your childhood and may be followed
somewhat irresponsibly."

Quote #2
Whose woods these are I think I know.His house is in the village
though;He will not see me stopping hereTo watch his woods fill up
with snow.My little horse must think it queerTo stop without a
farmhouse nearBetween the woods and frozen lakeThe darkest
evening of the year.He gives his harness bells a shakeTo ask if there
is some mistake.The only other sound's the sweepOf easy wind and
downy flake.The woods are lovely, dark, and deep.But I have
promises to keep,And miles to go before I sleep,And miles to go
before I sleep.
-
Quote #3
"You go to school to learn to read. The further you go
the more you have the attitude that everything is to
study. That is the danger. Once a person has learned
to read, once he has gotten the flavor of it, he should
just let it rest."

Quote #4
Nature's first green is gold, Her hardest hue to hold.
Her early leaf's a flower; But only so an hour. Then
leaf subsides to leaf. So Eden sank to grief, So dawn
goes down to day. Nothing gold can stay.
Quote #5
"The only trouble with dying is not knowing how it will all
turn out."
-Robert Frost, in a conversation with Stewart Udall
Quote #6
"We regret that The Atlantic has no place for your vigorous
verse."
-Robert Frost's rejection letter from Ellery Sedgwick,
editor of The Atlantic Monthly
Quote #7
"The Ellery Sedgwick of the piece is mine ancient enemy,
the editor of The Atlantic."
-Robert Frost, in a note to Sidney Cox

Quote #8
"His poems have helped to guide American thought
and humor and wisdom, setting forth to our minds a
reliable representation of ourselves and of all men."
-Text of a U.S. Senate resolution passed on the
occasion of Frost's 75th birthday
Quote #9
"He has bequeathed his nation a body of imperishable
verse from which Americans will forever gain joy and
understanding."
-President John F. Kennedy, on Robert Frost


4 Pulitzer Prizes for poetry
1. 1924 for New Hampshire
2. 1931 for Collected Poems
3. 1937 for A Further Range
4. 1943 for A Witness Tree
1939- Gold Medal by The National Institute of Arts
and Literature
1953- Awarded The Fellowship of the Academy of
American Poets
1960- Congress awarded Frost a gold medal in
recognition of his poetry
1961- Speaks at the inauguration of John F. Kennedy
1963- Awarded The Bollingen Prize for Poetry
POEMS

Out,Out
The Gift Outright
Acquainted with the Night
After Apple Picking
Birches
Dust of Snow
Fire and Ice
Fireflies in the Garden
For once, the Something
Good-bye, and Keep Cold
Home Burial
Love and a Question
Mending Wall
Mowing

October
Range-finding
Reluctance
Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening
The Death of the Hired Man
The Oven Bird
The Pasture
The Road Not Taken
The Sound of Trees
The Star-splitter
The Turf of Flowers
The Wood-Pile
To E.T.


WRITTEN WORK BY :
Archana Prasad

INFORMATION AND PICTURE
COLLECTING BY:
M.A.Rakshita
POWER POINT PRESENTATION BY :
A.Prathiksha
Thanking
You