Mountain Guide

Your official guide to discovering Canada’s
mountain national parks
2014 - 2015
Également offert en français
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Exceptional places. Endless opportunities.
On behalf of Canadians, Parks Canada protects a network of remarkable places from coast to coast to coast.
The mountain national parks are more than just unique places to visit – they are experiences awaiting your discovery.
Four of the mountain national parks – Banff, Jasper, Yoho and Kootenay – have been recognized by UNESCO as part
of the Canadian Rocky Mountain Parks World Heritage Site, for the benefit and enjoyment of all nations. Among the
attributes that warranted this designation were vast wilderness, floral and faunal diversity, outstanding natural beauty
and features such as Lake Louise, Maligne Lake, the Columbia Icefield and the Burgess Shale.
Waterton Lakes National Park is the Canadian portion of the internationally acclaimed Waterton-Glacier
International Peace Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
Welcome
to the mountain national parks and national historic sites
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Map Legend
Things to Do
Attraction
Canoeing
Exhibit
Golf
Gondola
Hiking Trail
Horse Riding
Lookout
Picnic Area
Playground
Skating
Ski Hill
Theatre
Campground
Cooking Shelter
Disabled Access
Electrical
Firepit
Flush Toilets
Full Hook-up
oTENTik
Pit Toilets
Showers
Tent Camping
Trailer Camping
Do Not Drink
Camping
Accommodation
Bus Station
Gas Station
Hospital
Hostel
Information/Visitor Centre
Parking
Police
RV Parking
Sani Dump
Train Station
Washroom
Services
National Historic Sites 4
What’s Inside...
Banff
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Yoho
Icefields Parkway
Mount Revelstoke
& Glacier
Jasper
Kootenay
oTENTiks
Mountain Learning
Mountain Nature
Mountain Wildlife
Mountain Safety
Park Regulations
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13
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16
30
21
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38
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Waterton Lakes
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For Destination Information
Banff
Banff Visitor Centre:
403-762-1550
Lake Louise Visitor Centre:
403-522-3833
Banff Lake Louise Tourism:
403-762-8421
banfflakelouise.com
Jasper
Jasper Information Centre:
780-852-6176
Tourism Jasper:
780-852-6236
jasper.travel
Kootenay
Kootenay Visitor Centre:
250-347-9505
Tourism Radium Hot Springs:
1-888-347-9331
tourismradium.ca
Friends of the parks
Guidebooks and maps, unique Canadian gifts, family activities and much more:
Friends of Jasper: 780-852-4767
Friends of Kootenay: 250-347-6525
Friends of Yoho: 250-343-6393
Waterton Natural History Association: 403-859-2624
The Confluence Heritage Society of Rocky Mountain House: 403-845-6680
Yoho
Yoho Visitor Centre:
250-343-6783
Accommodations, restaurants and
activities in Field:
field.ca
Glacier and Yoho
Tourism Golden:
1-800-622-4653
tourismgolden.com
Revelstoke
Revelstoke Chamber of Commerce:
250-837-5345
seerevelstoke.com
Waterton Lakes
Waterton Lakes Visitor Centre:
403-859-5133
Waterton Chamber of Commerce:
mywaterton.ca
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Remembering Canada’s History...
On the Road to 2017
Canada turns 150 in 2017! On the
road to this momentous celebration,
Parks Canada’s treasured natural
and historic places will host
special programs and events to
commemorate the milestones that
contributed to the Canada of today,
strong and free. Experience what
inspired Canada!
parkscanada.gc.ca
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National Historic Sites
Cave
Lantern
Tours
Saturday nights
from May 17 to
September 6
(except July 26)
Call 403-845-3524 to register.
Discovery
Tour
Guided tours
at 11 a.m. and
2:30 p.m.
Daily July 1 to September 7, 2014
Free with site entry fee.
Hot Water, Cool Stories
The Cave and Basin National Historic Site
The Birthplace of Canada’s National Parks. You’ve got to see this! The impressive rundlestone
architecture, the bubbling mineral waters, and the small cave that gave rise to a huge idea, the birthplace of Canada’s
national parks. All new interactive programs, exhibits and a giant four-screen high definition visual experience lead you
on a journey across the country, including to your favourite national park, historic site or marine conservation area.
Start your visit with a Discovery Tour, honoured as one of the Canadian Signature Experiences from the Canadian
Tourism Commission. Kids, pick up an Xplorers booklet full of fun activities that will get you hunting for treasure boxes
and solving puzzles. Join us after hours for Cave Lantern Tours or Cinema Under the Stars. Or explore the scenic
marsh boardwalk, a favourite destination for local bird watchers and wildflower enthusiasts. Hot water, cool stories!
Leave your mark in Canadian history when you visit the Cave and Basin National Historic Site.
April 2014 - May 13 (Wednesday – Sunday) 12 noon – 4 p.m.
May 14 - June 30 (Tuesday - Sunday) 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
July 1 – September 7 (Daily) 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
September 8 – October 12 (Tuesday – Sunday) 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
October 13, 2014 – May 2015 (Wednesday – Sunday) Noon – 4 p.m.
December 1, 2014 - April 31, 2015 (Saturdays) Noon - 10 p.m.
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National Historic Sites
Banff Park Museum
National Historic Site
Visiting the museum has been a traditional
experience for generations of park visitors!
Come see the “University of the Hills” with over 5 000
natural history specimens, from bees to bears. Discover
how natural history was interpreted in Canada during
the Victorian era in one small, but very special, museum.
Conveniently located in downtown Banff.
May 14 – June 30 (Wednesday – Sunday) 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
July 1 – September 1 (Daily) 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
September 2 – October 12 (Wednesday – Sunday) 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
parkscanada.gc.ca/banffparkmuseum
Rocky Mountain House
National Historic Site
Walk in the footsteps of Aboriginal
Peoples, Fur Traders and David Thompson.
Explore 7 km of nature trails, play in a miniature fort and
marvel at a bison herd. Experience the archeological
remains of four fur trade posts. Drop by the visitor centre
for interactive displays and souvenirs. Stay overnight
and experience heritage camping in a tipi or trapper tent.
Located 167 km (2 hrs) east of Saskatchewan Crossing
along the spectacular David Thompson Highway, #11.
May 12 – September 1 (Daily) 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
September 2 – 28 (Thursday – Sunday) 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
parkscanada.gc.ca/rockymountainhouse
Bar U Ranch National Historic Site
Ranching history comes alive here! Experience
warm western hospitality at its best: take our horse-drawn
wagon tour, immerse yourself in stories of ranching pioneers,
and take part in ranch life activities. Site is located 13 km
south of Longview, Alberta on Highway #22.
May 18 – September 30 (Open daily) 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
403-395-3044 or 1-888-773-8888 parkscanada.gc.ca/baru
Fort St. James National Historic Site
Visit the largest group of original wooden
buildings depicting the fur trade in Canada: chat with costumed
interpreters, help tan a moose hide or make bannock, and enjoy a
fur traders’ lunch in the Old Fort Cafe. Accommodation available,
reservations recommended. Site is located 536 km (6 hrs)
northwest of Jasper via Highway #16 and Prince George.
June 1 to September 21 (Open daily*) 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
250-996-7191 ext. 21 parkscanada.gc.ca/stjames
* The rest of the year by appointment only
Flag raising at Fort St. James NHS
Ranch life at Bar-U
Inside the Banff Park Museum
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Hot Water, Cool Stories
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Comfort
camping
the heritage
way at
Rocky
Mountain
House
Call 403-845-2412
to reserve.
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For site locations, see map on back cover.
5
In 1883, like Aboriginal peoples long before them,
three railway workers stumbled across a series of hot springs on the lower
shoulder of present-day Sulphur Mountain. No doubt they laid down their
shovels and pick axes, stripped out of dusty clothes and gratefully slid into
the waters to soothe their aching muscles. Two years later, even as Canada
was completing its transcontinental railway, Sir John A. Macdonald, Canada’s
first Prime Minister, realized a new national dream: the creation of Canada’s
first national park, which set aside the Cave and Basin hot springs as a small
protected reserve. More than a century later, the park draws millions of people
each year to experience the staggering natural beauty of Banff and Lake
Louise, no less than seven national historic sites and a bounty of wildlife large
and small — from iconic grizzly bears to the Banff Springs snail. With the park’s
long history of mixing innovative conservation with spirited adventure, Canada’s
oldest national park offers mountains of possibilities.

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Banff Area
NOT TO SCALE
TWO JACK
MAIN
TWO JACK
LAKESIDE
Upper
Bankhead
Cascade
Ponds
Lower
Bankhead
CASCADE
FIRE ROAD
Johnson
Lake
Cascade Ponds
Two Jack
Lake
Lake
Minnewanka
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Banff
Two Jack Lake along Lake Minnewanka Road
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Vermilion Lakes Drive
A unique wetland environment
just minutes from the Town of
Banff. On foot or by bike or car discover this
year-round 4.3 km road offering wildlife viewing
opportunities and breathtaking scenery. Sit back,
relax on the docks and benches, and soak up the
sun as you gaze at the impressive Mount Rundle.
While you are here, take some time to learn about
the natural wonders and cultural richness of the area.
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Biking the Bow Valley

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Vermilion Lakes Drive

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Bow Valley Parkway (1A)
A 48 km scenic drive highlighting
one of the most naturally and
historically rich areas in the park.
The parkway offers wildlife viewing, learning opportunities
and hiking trails. Rustic campgrounds, unique cottage
accommodations, dining and natural attractions enhance
this experience. From March 1 to June 25, travel is not
permitted between 8 p.m. and 8 a.m. on the section of
the parkway between the Trans-Canada Highway/
Bow Valley Parkway Interchange and Johnston Canyon
Campground. This ensures the area remains a high quality
home for wildlife.
Lake Minnewanka Road
This area is a snapshot of Banff National Park – majestic mountains, waterfalls, meadows,
old town remnants and the largest lake in the park - a great place to camp, picnic by the water, dive, or to put road bikes,
hiking boots and cross-country skis or snowshoes to work. It is also important habitat for bears. To ensure visitor safety
and to protect wildlife, the Lake Minnewanka shoreline trail just past Stewart Canyon and Alymer trails is closed to cyclists
and dogs from July 10 to September 15. Hikers are permitted in tight groups of four or more and must carry bear spray.
In the winter, the western section of the road is closed to vehicles and human use. Speed limit is 50 km/h.
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Banff Area
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Banff Legacy Trail. A three-season trail
for outdoor enthusiasts. From cyclists, strollers,
rollerbladers to runners - it is a great way to
experience the park. Twenty-six kilometres of paved
paths and roadways span from Banff National Park’s
East Gate to the Bow Valley Parkway. The trail winds
past breathtaking views, picnic areas, the Town
of Banff, Vermilion Lakes, and connects to other
popular trails.
Hiking and Biking. Want to get outdoors
for exercise? The Banff area has a variety of terrain
for all hikers and bikers. Choose from 21 hiking and
25 biking trails rated easy, moderate and difficult.
Top favourite local hikes are Tunnel Mountain
Summit, Sundance Canyon, Sunshine Meadows and
Cory Pass. If a mountain bike ride is on your list, try
Tunnel Bench Loop, Tunnel Technical Trails or Lower
Stoney Squaw. Trails wind through scenic mountains
and river routes with perhaps a view of wildlife along
the way.
RV Camping. Options are as diverse as the
landscape. From rustic, well treed and natural settings
for smaller RVs to open area, full service camping for a
50 feet unit; Banff has options. Families looking to spend
an active weekend can choose from sites that offer
accessible activities. Couples seeking all the comforts
away from home, can choose sites that are close to
amenities. All campgrounds are set within the most
picturesque mountain vistas.
The oTENTik Experience. Are you
interested in a lakeside cottage getaway in one of the most
picturesque campgrounds in the park? oTENTiks, located
along the shores of Two Jack Lakeside Campground, are
a cross between a prospector’s tent and an A-frame cabin.
Tents are equipped with a spacious living room with a table
and chairs, and high density foam mattresses for up to six
people. For added convenience, lighting, electrical and heat
features provide a restful night’s stay. Ten tents are available
for booking by calling 1-800-RESERVE or visiting
reservation.pc.gc.ca.
A peak
performance
- Canada’s
most scenic
outdoor
concert
Call 1-800-413-8368 for tickets.
Performance in the Park
Winter in the Park
Winter in Banff is tons of fun! Explore
the frozen walls of Johnston Canyon on ice cleats with a guide
or strap on snowshoes for a traditional way to travel the trails.
With over 15 trails to choose from, Banff offers cross-country
ski options for easy and moderate skiers, and winter walking
choices for everyone. Travel by foot to enjoy the scenery up
close and personal. You may even spot some wildlife. Spend a
day at one of three world-renowned downhill ski resorts. Winter
in the mountains beckons one to explore the trails.
Events and Festivals
Enjoy natural and cultural events
year-round like Parks Day, Canada Day and
Performance in the Park. Participate in SnowDays where
a plethora of winter events and activities await. Enjoy a
summer day in the mountains at the Bike Fest. During spring
and fall, The Banff Mountain Film Festival and The Banff
Summer Arts Festival are a local’s delight.
oTENTik
Banff Legacy Trail
Tunnel Mountain Summit
Winter walk in Johnston Canyon
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Industrial area
HOODOOS
VIEWPOINT
Tunnel
Mountain
1692 m
5551'
Stoney Squaw
Mountain
1868 m
6129’
Mount Norquay
Interchange
LAKE
MINNEWANKA
(SEE MAP PAGE 7)
Mount
Rundle
2949 m
9675'
Cascade
Mountain
2998 m
9836'
RECREATION
GROUNDS
THE
BANFF
CENTRE
Sulphur
Mountain
2451 m
8042'
Sanson
Peak
2256 m
7402'
CAVE AND
BASIN NATIONAL
HISTORIC SITE
BANFF GONDOLA
FAIRMONT
BANFF SPRINGS
UPPER HOT
SPRINGS
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MOUNT NORQUAY
SKI AREA
Bow
Falls
BOW VALLEY PARKWAY,
SUNSHINE VILLAGE AND
LAKE LOUISE SKI AREA
TRAIL
FENLAND
TRAIL
MARSH
SUNDANCE
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NOT TO SCALE
GOPHER
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VILLAGE II
VILLAGE I
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TRAILER COURT
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BANFF PARK MUSEUM
NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE
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Town of
Banff

Banff Area
Banff Upper Hot Springs
Soothing hot mineral water and
spectacular mountain scenery
have been providing visitors from around the world
with a memorable experience for generations. Find
out why soaking in the famous hot springs amidst
the peaks is an unforgettable experience. Rent a
heritage swimsuit for the ultimate photo opportunity.
The heritage bathhouse, spa and pool are open daily.
Heritage swimming at Upper Hot Springs
Participate in our
summer interpretive
programs. For more
information, visit
parkscanada.gc.ca/banff
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Mount Temple
Mount Rundle
Mount Bourgeau
Cascade Mountain
Castle Mountain
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Banff
Lake
Louise
Egypt Lake
Moraine
Lake
Lake
Louise
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J ohnston Canyon
(summer services only)
Castle Mountain J unction
See
Page 7
See
Page 9
Road open
in summer
only
to Radium Hot Springs,
Kootenay National Park
(132 km from Banff,
130 km from Lake Louise)
to Field, Yoho
National
Park
(27 km from
Lake Louise,
85 km from
Banff)
to Jasper
National
Park
(233 km from
Lake Louise)
to Canmore
(26 km
from Banff)
Calgary (128 km
from Banff)
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See
Page 12
0 4 8 2 kilometres
0 2 4miles
Ü
Camping
CAMPGROUNDS AND SERVICES OPEN DATES SITES
Tunnel Mt. Village l* May 15 - Oct. 5 618
Tunnel Mt. Village ll* Open Year Round 188
Tunnel Mt. Trailer* May 15 - Oct. 5 321
Two Jack Main June 26 - Sept. 2 380
Two Jack Lakeside* May 15 - Oct. 5 74
Johnston Canyon* May 29 - Sept. 15 132
Castle Mountain May 29 - Sept. 28 43
Protection Mountain June 27 - Sept. 1 89
Lake Louise Tent* May 30 - Sept. 29 206
Lake Louise Trailer* Open Year Round 189
Camping season dates are approximate. Please confirm at the visitor centre prior to
heading out. Arrive early. Non-reservable sites are available on a first-come,
first-served basis. Daily fire permits cost extra. Camping permitted in designated
campgrounds only.
*Interpretive programs offered. Visit parkscanada.gc.ca/banff-interpretation.
Highlighted campgrounds may be reserved: 1-877-RESERVE or reservation.pc.gc.ca
THE LEGEND FOR ALL MAP SYMBOLS IS LOCATED ON PAGE 3.
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Banff
National Park
Banff and Lake Louise
parkscanada.gc.ca/Banff facebook.com/BanffNP twitter.com/BanffNP
Wildlife Overpasses
Have you noticed arched shaped
bridges covered with trees along the
Trans-Canada Highway? They are for
wildlife only, built to allow bears, cougars,
wolves, elk, deer, moose and other
wildlife to safely cross the highway.
Are they working? Yes.
Remote cameras tell the story. Visit
parkscanada.gc.ca/transcanada.
Pick up one of
Banff or Lake
Louise area guides
on hiking or biking
for more detailed
information.
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Lake Louise Area
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Bike the Terrain
Start your adventure on two
wheels. Explore one of several mountain
biking trails in the Lake Louise area or enjoy the
roadways at a gentler pace. Soak in the views along
the Bow River trail and learn about the local fauna
or find solitude on the Pipestone trail. Challenge
yourself up the Tramline trail to Lake Louise for a
rewarding view at the end of the road. Take a longer
journey along the Bow Valley Parkway for a chance
to see some wildlife.
Hike the Spectacular
Travel on foot amongst
impressive glaciers, famous lakes,
ancient mountains, lush forests and the headwaters
of great rivers. The Lake Louise area is famous for
its hiking experiences. Feel small amidst glaciers on
the Plain of Six Glaciers trail. Enjoy refreshments at
a mountain teahouse. Climb into the alpine on the
Saddleback trail. From short interpretive walks within
the village, to moderate hikes leading to spectacular
vistas and a myriad of unique overnight backcountry
experiences, Lake Louise is the place to hike.
RVing Comfort
Skiing Lake Louise
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Tramline Trail
Winter Activities
Early snowfall makes Lake Louise the
premier destination for cross-country
skiing. Visitors can easily access the network of groomed
and track-set trails designed for beginner to advanced skiers.
Want to try something new? Grab a pair of skates or snowshoes
to explore the trails or twirl on natural ice. Up for downhill skiing?
The Lake Louise area has one of the largest ski areas in North
America set amongst the most scenic mountain vistas.
RVing in the Mountains
From serviced sites to rustic
“roughing it”, the most scenic camping experiences
await you in the Lake Louise area. While Lake Louise offers
electric hook-ups, sani-dump and water service, self-contained
campers may enjoy the big views along the spectacular Icefields
Parkway. Units less than 30 feet are easily accommodated at
most campgrounds. If you are over 35 feet aim for Lake Louise or
Silverhorn Campground for that extra elbow room.
11
Lake Louise Area
Group of Four Hiking
Camping
CAMPGROUNDS AND SERVICES OPEN DATES SITES
Protection Mountain June 27 - Sept. 1 89
Lake Louise Tent* May 30 - Sept. 29 206
Lake Louise Trailer* Open Year Round 189
Camping season dates are approximate. Please confirm at the visitor centre prior to
heading out. Arrive early. Non-reservable sites are available on a first-come,
first-served basis. Daily fire permits cost extra. Camping permitted in designated
campgrounds only. *Interpretive programs offered. Visit parkscanada.gc.ca/banff-
interpretation for information.
Highlighted campgrounds may be reserved: 1-877-RESERVE or reservation.pc.gc.ca
THE LEGEND FOR ALL MAPS AND SYMBOLS IS LOCATED ON PAGE 3.
9
10
8
Recreation
centre and
grounds
Village of
Lake Louise
The Lake Louise area is one of
three key nurseries for Banff’s
grizzly bears. The requirement for a “tight”
group of four hikers on some trails gives the bears
the space they need to make a living and reduces
the likelihood of a surprise encounter. Come as a
group or join up with other hikers at the trailheads
when this requirement is in place.
Female grizzly bear
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At the end of the 19th century, J. Norman Collie,
a British chemist turned mountaineer, brought two friends for a return
expedition to the Canadian Rockies. Collie and Herman Woolley—a one-
time boxer—fought their way up a peak that had never been scaled, which
Collie named Mount Athabasca. At the summit, the weary climbers had their
breath taken away again, becoming the first non-native people to gape at a
magnificent field of ice resting on a wide plateau. The Columbia Icefield, an
echo from the last ice age, spans the Continental Divide and the boundary
between Jasper and Banff national parks. Headwaters to three major river
systems, the icefield feeds eight major glaciers and brushes against some of
the highest mountains in the Rockies. Winding 232 glorious kilometres through
the heart of the mountain parks, the Icefields Parkway has been called the
most scenic drive in the world. Around every corner, the route offers fresh
wonders— from pristine lakes and broad sweeping valleys brimming with
flora and fauna to the venerable and ever-receding Athabasca Glacier.
Icefields
Parkway des Glaciers
Promenade
13
Icefields Parkway Area
Snowshoeing near Bow Lake
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Bow Summit is the height of land
between the Bow River system, flowing south-east
to Banff, and the Mistaya River flowing north-west.
A short uphill walk from the parking area leads to
a view of the glacial-fed, brilliantly turquoise Peyto
Lake. 42 km (30 min) from Lake Louise.
Beauty Flats
Be amazed at several spectacular pull-offs that provide big
views and plenty of peaks from gravel flats left behind by
glaciers past. Reduce speed in this area for caribou in winter.
See

4

page 15.
Sunwapta Falls and
Lower Sunwapta Falls
A torrent of plunging water not far from the highway. The main falls
are just steps from the parking lot while a short hike (2 km one way)
to Lower Sunwapta Falls offers additional chances to admire this
rugged gorge. See 5 page 15.

Athabasca Falls
Feel the spray of the Athabasca River as it thunders into the canyon
below. Stay on designated trails and behind railings. The rock
beyond is slippery and dangerous. See

6

page 15.
Bow Summit and Peyto Lake
Herbert Lake
A photographer’s favourite. The still waters of Herbert Lake
provide a perfect panoramic reflection of the stunning Main
Range peaks, including Mount Temple. The area provides an
ideal place for a picnic stop. See
1
page 15.

Crowfoot Glacier
A century ago when this was named, three “toes” of the ice
clung to the mountainside. The lower toe has since melted
and the middle toe is slowly disappearing. See
2
page 15.
Bow Lake and Bow Glacier
Bow Lake is one of the more scenic and accessible lakes
for fishing. The turquoise blue water is the source of the
Bow River. In winter it is ideal for ski touring. From here you
can view the majestic Bow Glacier. See
3
page 15.

A magical area that includes the Athabasca
Glacier and numerous easy to moderate alpine
day hiking opportunities. Explorations with a
commercial guide, bus tour or glass-bottomed
viewpoint are also available. Walking on any glacier
is not recommended: crevasses and other hazards
can be deadly.
Columbia Icefield Area
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Athabasca Falls
Bow Lake
Peyto Lake
Hiking Wilcox Pass
14
#
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Snow Dome
Howse Peak
Mount Temple
Mount Hector
Sunwapta Peak
Dolomite Peak
Maligne Mountain
*+
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Lake
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Egypt Lake
Lake
Louise
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Columbia
Icefield
Saskatchewan
Crossing J unction
(summer only)
Columbia
Icefield Centre
Valley of The
Five Lakes
Glacier Crowfoot
Bow Summit
a
to Banff,
58 km from
Lake Louise)
to Rocky
Mountain House
National Historic Site
and Campground
(167 km from
Saskatchewan Crossing)
a
to Jasper
a
to Field, Yoho
National Park
(27 km from
Lake Louise,
85 km from
Banff)
a
0 10 20 5 kilometres
0 5 10miles
Ü
Camping
CAMPGROUND AND SERVICES OPEN DATES SITES
Mount Kerkeslin
June 20 - Sept. 1
Honeymoon Lake
Jonas Creek May 16 - Sept. 1
Columbia Icefield (tents only) May 16 - Oct. 13
Icefield Centre RV April 1 - Oct. 31
Wilcox Creek * June 6 - Sept. 28
Wilcox (winter) Oct. 13 - May 15
Rampart Creek June 6 - Oct. 14
Waterfowl Lakes June 27 - Sept. 1
Silverhorn June 27 - Sept. 1
Camping season dates are approximate. Please confirm at the visitor
information centre prior to heading out. Arrive early. Daily fire permits cost
extra. Sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Camping permitted
in designated campgrounds only. *Interpretive programs offered.
THE LEGEND FOR ALL MAP SYMBOLS IS LOCATED ON PAGE 3.
42
35
25
33
100
46
46
50
116
50
7
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9
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13
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Icefields
Parkway

Jasper
National Park

Banff
National
Park
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
14
IMPORTANT
The Icefields Parkway (Highway
93N) traverses high elevation
(2,088 m/6,850 ft) mountain
terrain. In the winter, there are
special considerations for driving
this road including the absence of
services. Snow tires are required
November 1 to March 31 or any
other period during which the
highway is covered with snow or
ice. Winter and summer guides
can help you plan a safe trip.
A park pass is required.
Icefields Parkway Area
Mosquito Creek 14 May 16 - Oct. 14 32
13
Rocky Mountain House NHS 15
15
Icefields Parkway
WINTER ON THE
There is no road maintenance
on the Icefields Parkway
from 3:30 pm to 7:00 am
duri ng the wi nter months
(November to April).
The parkway is not “salted”
as most transportati on
corridors are, it is left as
a “compact snow” road.
During long periods of stable
weather, even smooth sanded compact snow
can result in poor driving conditions.
Road reports are based on the worst condition
that a driver may encounter over the road’s
entire 230 kilometre length. As in any mountain
environment, weather can change very quickly,
often changing the road conditions.
Driving conditions are subjective: your
experience, tires and speed are all factors that
can change “good” winter driving to “poor”.
Drivers should travel based on comfort level
and within the confines of their experience and
equipment.
There is no cell phone coverage on the Icefields
Parkway and, during the winter months,
there is no gas available.
Check the road conditions and the weather
forecast before you leave town.
ROAD CONDITIONS:
Banff 403-762-1450 • Jasper 780-852-3311
• www.ama.ab.ca
• www.pc.gc.ca
• Visit an information centre
WEATHER FORECAST:
Banff 403-762-2088 • Jasper 780-852-3185
• www.weatheroffce.gc.ca
• www.theweathernetwork.com
• Visit an information centre
Tell someone your route, when you are leaving
and when you plan on arriving.
Have a safety kit in your vehicle that includes:
cell phone, water, energy bars,
candles, extra clothing
and blankets.
road conditions
plan ahead
Également offert en français

Km from
Jasper
Km from
Lake Louise
Metres from
Road
Beckers Lodge
4
226
50
HI-Athabasca Falls Hostel
32
198
0
Kerkeslin
34
196
200
Honeymoon Lake
50
180
500
Bubbling Springs
60
170
0
Sunwapta Station
72
158
0
Jonas Creek
77
153
50
HI-Beauty Creek Hostel
85
145
0
Icefield Centre
(bottom of stairs)
103
127
200
Icefield Campground
104
126
150
Wilcox Creek
106
124
500
Saskatchewan River
Crossing Station
156
74
0
payphones
See table below for
payphone locations along
the Parkway. Dial 911 in
case of emergency.
parkscanada.gc.ca/Icefieldsparkway
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May 12 - Sept 28 35
The warm and dry bottoms of the
Athabasca and Miette valleys have traditionally
offered a natural travel route for animals like grizzly bears,
who descend from alpine areas in search of red and
orange buffaloberries. Humans, too, have also passed this
way — from First Nations and early fur traders in moose-
hide moccasins to railway workers in heavy boots laying
ties for two transcontinental routes. Since the creation of
Jasper Park Forest Reserve in 1907, the valleys have also
witnessed millions of modern-day visitors decked out in
outdoor gear. Drawn to the largest, most comprehensive
trail network of any Canadian national park, adventurers
can journey through valleys flush with wildlife, lose
themselves in the vastness of subalpine forest or seek out
the stirring beauty of alpine zones. From elk, deer and four
distinct herds of Woodland caribou to wolves, cougars
and bighorn sheep, the “gentle giant of the Rockies” offers
an eclectic mix of wildlife.

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Jasper Area
Rough it
without
getting ruffled
– oTENTik
walled
tents
reservation.pc.gc.ca
Need a pretty place to eat? Jasper
National Park has many conveniently located picnic
sites equipped with restrooms and tables. Local
favourites include Mount Christie Viewpoint (Hwy 93),
Goats and Glaciers Viewpoint (Hwy 93) and Fifth and
Sixth Bridges (via Hwy 16 and Maligne Lake Road).
Animal sightings are common in
Jasper. In the summer, chipmunks hang out
near campgrounds, in the fall, you will likely hear elk
bugling during their rut, and in the winter sheep are
often spotted along roadways. See page 36 for
more information.
Maligne Canyon
This beautiful limestone canyon can be explored from
above in the summer, and from below in the winter. The
Tea House is open April to October. Maligne Road,
11.5 km (15 min) from Jasper. See 4 page 20.
Maligne Lake
Purple-tinged mountains and turquoise water make
Maligne Lake legendary. Enjoy the spectacular scenery
while fishing, boating, hiking and picnicking. Maligne
Road, 48 km (1 hr) from Jasper.
See
5
page 20.
Mount Edith Cavell
Enter a world of hanging glaciers and alpine meadows.
For a quieter time come before 10 a.m. or after 3 p.m.
Ask information staff about vehicle restrictions. Hwy 93A,
29 km south of Jasper. Winding road; allow 45 min.
See 6 page 20.
Picnic-Pit-Stops Wildlife Viewing
Miette Hotsprings
Soak your weary muscles while taking in the rugged
beauty of Jasper National Park’s eastern mountain
ranges. Open mid-May to October. 61 km (1 hr) east
from Jasper via Hwy 16, 1-800-767-1611. See

1

page 20.
Talbot Lake
Paddlers will enjoy exploring by canoe or kayak.
Glide by a beaver lodge, or bring your fishing gear to
catch one of the legendary northern pike that make
their home in this clear, shallow water. Hwy 16,
21 km (20 min) east of Jasper. See 2 page 20.
Jasper House Viewpoint
A short interpretive walk through the forest leads
to a viewing platform on the Athabasca River.
Across the water is Jasper House National
Historic Site, the remains of an early fur trading
hub. 35 km from Jasper via Hwy 16. See

3

page 20.

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Jasper National Park has the most extensive trail
network in the mountain national parks. Whether you
seek an easy stroll or a backcountry adventure, our information
centre staff can help you pick the trail that is right for you.
With over 300 km of bike-friendly, multi-use
trails, Jasper National Park is a mountain biker’s
paradise. If you are new to trail cycling, try out Jasper’s Easy Trails
System. These trails will get you to nearby lakes, campgrounds and
viewpoints with little technical difficulty. Road riders will enjoy the
Icefields Parkway (Hwy 93), Hwy 93A and Maligne Lake Road.
Hiking
Biking
Jasper is well suited to all levels of paddling ability.
Rentals are available in the town and at several locations throughout
the park. Prime locations include a wide variety of lakes and ponds
while the mighty Athabasca River offers good opportunity for
experienced paddlers.
Paddling
Valley of the Five Lakes
Five small, brilliantly blue green lakes are the highlights of
this outing, considered a local family favourite. Watch for
beavers as you cross the boardwalk over Wabasso Creek.
See
10
page 19.
Jasper’s Easy Trails System
Completed in 2013, these easy walking and biking
trails link up the best of Jasper’s scenery and special
locations. Gently rolling and widely graded. Easy Trails
begin from Wapiti and Whistlers Campgrounds, Old Fort
Point, Lake Annette, Pyramid Lake or the Jasper Discovery
Trail. See page 19.
Pyramid Bench Trails Network
A favourite local spot for daily recreation, the extensive
trail network of the Pyramid bench offers many options
for long or short hikes for all abilities. Stops of note:
Marjorie Lake, Caledonia Lake, Cottonwood Slough and
the Mina-Riley hiking loop. See page 19.
Old Fort Point
Old Fort Point is a prominent bedrock hill standing 130 m
above the Athabasca River. The steep loop trail provides
an excellent view of Jasper and its surroundings. Old
Fort Point Road via Hwy 93A, 2 km (5 min)

from Jasper.
See
7
page 19.
Pyramid Lake and Island
Pyramid Lake is a short drive from town and a
hub for all kinds of great year-round activities.
Check out the namesake island and its charming
footbridge-accessible to everyone. Pyramid Lake
Road, 7 km (8 min) from Jasper. See
8
page 19.
These lakes offer what might be the best sandy
beach for swimming or sun-tanning in the mountain
parks! A fully accessible trail encircles Lake Annette.
Bring your BBQ supplies and set up for the day.
Head east on Hwy 16, turn right towards Jasper
Park Lodge, and take next left, 10 min. See
9

page 19.
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Biking Jasper’s Easy Trails
Hiking Sulphur Skyline
Jasper Area
Lake Edith and Lake Annette
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Day Hiking Jasper
Jasper Celebrates
2014 - join in
the fun!
jaspercelebrates.ca
11
18
#myjasper
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Cottonwood
Slough
Lake
Edith
TO HORSE
CORRALS (3 KM)
Old Fort
Point
93
16
16
93A
MUSEUM
LIBRARY
RAILW
AY
STATION &
BUS DEPOT
JASPER
INFORMATION
CENTRE
JASPER
PARK
LODGE
REC
FIELD
POOL &
ACTIVITY
CENTRE
Industrial
Area
MALIGNE
ROAD
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PATRICIA &
PYRAMID LAKES
(5 AND 7 KM)
PYRAMID
BENCH TRAILS
LAKE EDITH
AND ANNETTE
TRAILS
OLD FORT
POINT
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PYRAMID
BENCH TRAILS
LAKE
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Beauvert Lake
Mildred
Lake
Trefoil
Lake
Lake
Annette
P
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7
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9
ED
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TO
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MAXIMUM
MAXIMUM
Jasper Area
The darkest sky on earth
Are you a stargazer? A hobby
astronomer? You’ve come to the
right place! Jasper National Park is one of the
worl d’s l argest dark sky preserves, the maj ori ty
of the park bei ng free from arti fi ci al l i ght. Al most
any pl ace i n the park i s good for stargazi ng, but
for an amazi ng fi rst experi ence try a ni ght ti me
vi si t to Pyrami d Isl and or Mal i gne Lake. Learn
more about viewing opportunities and our family-
friendly dark sky festival: jasperdarksky.org.
P
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Biking Jasper’s Easy Trails
Hiking Sulphur Skyline
Town of
Jasper

7
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9
19
parkscanada.gc.ca/Jasper facebook.com/JasperNP twitter.com/JasperNP





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Road open
|n summer
on|y
CAMPGROUNDS AND SERVICES OPEN DATES SITES
Pocahontas May 16 - Sept. 7
Snaring River May 16 - Sept. 14
Whistlers* May 2 - Oct. 13

Wapiti (summer)
May 16 - May 19
June 20 - Sept. 21
Wapiti (winter) Oct. 13 - May 1/2015
Wabasso June 20 - Sept. 1
Mount Kerkeslin June 20 - Sept. 1
Honeymoon Lake June 20 - Sept. 1
Jonas Creek May 16 - Sept. 1
Columbia Icefield (tents only) May 16 - Oct. 13
Icefield Centre RV April 1 - Oct. 31
Wilcox Creek June 6 - Sept. 28
Wilcox (winter) Oct. 13 - May 15
Camping season dates are approximate. Please confirm at the information centre
prior to heading out. Arrive early. Daily fire permits cost extra. Non-reservable sites
are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Camping permitted in designated
campgrounds only.
*Interpretive programs offered.
Highlighted campgrounds may be reserved: 1-877-RESERVE or reservation.pc.gc.ca
THE LEGEND FOR ALL MAP SYMBOLS IS LOCATED ON PAGE 3.
Pick up one
of our guides
for more
information
1
2
3
4
4
5
7
8
6
9
9
10
10
Camping
Jasper
National
Park
1
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9
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66
781
362
93
228
42
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1
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Jasper Area
Large RV or Trailer?
Best bets are Whistlers and Wapiti.
Not all campgrounds are suitable
for larger units.

Details: pc.gc.ca/jasper
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First Nations peoples were
the first to discover naturally-
forming ochre in small streams
flowing through the Vermilion Plain.
Mixing the red clay with fish oil or
animal grease, they painted their
bodies, clothes and tipis, and drew
pictures on the rocks. Nineteenth
century prospectors soon followed,
mining the ochre by hand to create
pigment for paint. The Paint Pots
lie near the north end of the Banff-
Windermere Highway, the road that
runs through Kootenay National Park.
The highway, completed in 1923,
was conceived to draw tourists to the
picturesque scenes on either side of
the road, while opening commercial
links east of the Rockies. Kootenay
is the only national park to feature
both glacier-clad peaks along the
Continental Divide and semi-arid
grasslands in the Columbia Valley.
Apart from ochre deposits, Kootenay
boasts a geological heritage to
inspire any artist — from Burgess
Shale fossils to the dolomite walls of
Marble Canyon and the rust covered
cliffs above Radium Hot Springs.
In 2003, dramatic wildfires in the
Vermilion Valley revealed glaciers
hanging above the flame-scorched
forest, further enhancing the park’s
natural legacy.
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Marble Canyon
Embrace the power and sound of rushing water
cascading through a spectacular limestone gorge.
Follow the bridges to a thundering waterfall. Want
to see more? Enjoy an afternoon hike to the iron-
red Paint Pots mineral springs. See 1 page 23.

Numa Falls
Follow the course of the Vermilion River as it
races through this narrow gorge over a powerful
waterfall. Snap a photo from the bridge and enjoy
a picnic by the rushing turquoise-blue water.
See 2 page 23.
Floe Lake Trail
Marvel at the remnants of the 2003 wildfires.
Wander past young saplings, new plant life and the
fast-moving Vermilion River along the first kilometre of
this trail. The bridge is an excellent turnaround point.
See 3 page 23.
Kootenay Valley Viewpoint
Behold the stunning panorama of the Kootenay River
Valley. Stretch your legs, take some photos and enjoy the
interpretive displays. See page 23.
Olive Lake
Unwind by this clear shallow lake near the summit of
Sinclair Pass. Look for brook trout and other signs of
wildlife as you stroll along the gentle 0.5-km boardwalk
trail. See 5 page 23.
Radium Hot Springs
Make sure your journey includes a peaceful soak in the
odourless Radium Hot Springs. Surrounded by dramatic
cliffs, the hot and cool pools offer opportunities to relax or
play with the kids. Open daily, year-round with towels and
swim suits to rent. For hours of operation and information,
call 1-800-767-1611. See page 23.
Kootenay Area
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Weird and
wonderful fossils
await – Join a
Stanley Glacier
guided hike
Many mountain park ecosystems depend on

fire for renewal. Charred trees from recent wildfires
and prescribed fires are readily visible from the Banff-
Windermere Highway (93S). Compare stages of forest
regrowth within this mosaic of rich habitats that support
many species of wildlife. Watch for stunning bursts of
colour as wildflowers put on their summer displays.
Wildflower Watch
Reservations.pc.gc.ca
oTENTiks
Radium Hot Springs
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Heart-leaved arnica Common fireweed
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Free interpretive programs!
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Mount Wardle
Mount Harkin
Numa Mountain
Mount Whymper
Vermilion
Peak
Mount Sinclair
Redstreak
Mountain
Storm
Mountain
Lake
Louise
Lake
Louise
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Radium
Hot
Springs
Vermilion
Crossing
to Golden
(98 km from
Radium)
a
a
to Fairmont Hot Springs,
Windermere, Cranbrook,
Fort Steele and USA
a
to Lake Louise
and Jasper
National Park
to Banff
(132 km
from Radium)
a
0 4 8 2 kilometres
0 2 4miles
Ü
3
Kootenay National
Park is on Mountain
Time - 1 HR AHEAD
of Pacifc Time
(and most of B.C.)
Kootenay Area
CAMPGROUNDS AND SERVICES OPEN DATES SITES
Redstreak* May 2 - Oct. 13 242
McLeod Meadows
June 27 - Sept. 1
Marble Canyon
Crook’s Meadows
Contact 1-403-522-1203 for
information on non-profit
group camping reservations
and fees.
Camping season dates are approximate. Please confirm at the visitor centre prior
to heading out. Arrive early. Non-reservable sites are available on a first-come,
first-served basis. Fire permits cost extra. Camping permitted in designated
campgrounds only.
*Interpretive programs offered. Visit parkscanada.gc.ca/kootenay-interpretation
for information.
Highlighted campgrounds may be reserved: 1-877-RESERVE or
reservation.pc.gc.ca
THE LEGEND FOR ALL MAP SYMBOLS IS LOCATED ON PAGE 3.
1
2
3
4
Camping
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Main Street West
Main Street East
H
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B
A
Golden
Banff
Invermere
NOT TO SCALE
SINCLAIR
CANYON
R ADIUM HOT
SPRINGS POOLS
REDSTREAK
LOOP TRAIL
REDSTREAK
RESTORATION
INTERPRETIVE
TRAIL
REDSTREAK
CAMPGROUND
TRAIL JUNIPER
TRAIL
Valley
View
Trail
Camp-
ground
Entrance
West Gate
KOOTENAY NATIONAL PARK
Post
Office
Bus
Depot
Hwy 93/95
3
.
2

k
m
2
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2

k
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0.5 km
0
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5

k
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1
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k
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2.2 km
1
.4
k
m
0.4 km
Redstreak
Campground
Canyon
R.V.
Resort
?
1
95
93
93
98
61
2
4
1
1
2
3
4
5
6
6
parkscanada.gc.ca/Kootenay facebook.com/KootenayNP twitter.com/KootenayNP
Wildflower Watch
Kootenay
National
Park
Kootenay
National Park
(South)
Common fireweed
23
During a celebrated expedition to explore the
west, Dr. James Hector travelled ahead of the group, and
became the first European to discover a steep mountain pass
in 1858. After the surgeon’s trusty steed knocked him over
with a blow to the chest, the spectacular route was dubbed
Kicking Horse Pass. The Canadian Pacific Railway, whose
transcontinental route travelled through the pass, set up
restaurants at the base of Mount Stephen to avoid pushing
heavy dining cars up the mountain. This laid the groundwork
for creating Mount Stephen reserve, renamed in 1901 as Yoho
National Park. Eight years later, a visiting scientist, Dr. Charles
Dolittle Walcott, discovered the Burgess Shale fossils. These
exquisitely preserved marine organisms offer a glimpse back
to more than 505 million years. With fossils designated as part
of a World Heritage Site, 28 peaks soaring above 3 000 m, the
rambunctious Kicking Horse River and numerous breathtaking
waterfalls, it is no surprise Yoho was named after a Cree
expression meaning “awe and wonder”.
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Meet your
ancient
ancestors on
a guided hike
to the Burgess
Shale

reservation.pc.gc.ca
The Spiral Tunnels
Imagine steam trains on the “Big Hill” at Kicking Horse
Pass National Historic Site. Spot trains snaking down the
mountainside through the Spiral Tunnels. Watch for new
interpretive exhibits in the visitor centre and around the
park. See on page 26.
Yoho Valley Area
From late June until early October, drive or bike this steep
scenic road with tight switchbacks to Takakkaw Falls.
Admire the power of nature as you stand at the base of
the thundering waters of one of the highest waterfalls in
Canada. NOTE: Trailers must be left in the parking lot
across from Monarch Campground. See on page 26.
Emerald Lake Area
Discover a jewel of the Canadian Rockies as you paddle,
walk or ski around magnificent Emerald Lake. Pack
a picnic lunch and relax with family and friends at the
Emerald Lake or Natural Bridge day-use areas. See on
page 26.
Burgess Shale
Learn how a 505 million year old ocean ended up on top
of a mountain. Choose from three exciting guided hikes,
and explore the interactive Burgess Shale exhibits at the
Yoho Visitor Centre and Emerald Lake. Hikes are available
from late June until mid-September. Visit parkscanada.
gc.ca/burgessshale for information and reservations.
Hiking and Biking
Gaze at mountaintops and enjoy endless views on Yoho’s
numerous hiking and biking trails. Take a gentle 2.4 km
hike to the impressive Wapta Falls, cycle along the Great
Divide trail or pack your tent for a multi-day backpacking
adventure in the Yoho Valley. Don’t forget your camera.
Wildflowers and sweeping panoramas can be seen
throughout the park.
Lake O’Hara
A quota system protects Lake O’Hara’s fragile
alpine environment. Reservations for the shuttle and
campground are limited and begin April 1, 2014.
Reservations must be made exactly three months in
advance. Call 1-250-343-6433 for reservations or visit
parkscanada.gc.ca/lakeohara for information.
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Participate in entertaining and informative
interpretive theatre and geocaching programs
at Kicking Horse Campground. Watch for interpreter-led
activities at Takakkaw Falls, Emerald Lake and other day-
use areas. Pick up an interpretive events schedule in the
visitor centre or from our website.
Interpretive Programs
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Takakkaw Falls
Camping in Yoho
Roving interpreters
25
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Yoho Peak
Spike Peak
Narao Peak
Mount Vaux
Mount King
Mount Niles
Mount Dennis
Mount Biddle
Amiskwi Peak
The President
Mount Stephen
Mount Victoria
Odaray Mountain
Mount Carnarvon
Mount
Hunter
Goodsir
Towers
Lake
Louise
Lake
O'Hara
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Wapta
Icefield
Field
Burgess
Shale
Road open
in summer
only
to Jasper
National Park
a
to Banff
(85 km from
Field) and
Kootenay National
Park
a
to Golden
(57 km from Field) and
Mount Revelstoke
and Glacier
National Parks
a
0 4 8 2 kilometres
0 2 4miles
Ü
See
Inset
Camping
CAMPGROUNDS AND SERVICES OPEN DATES SITES
Kicking Horse* May 16 - Oct. 13 88
Monarch
May 2 - May 16
June 28 - Sept. 1
Takakkaw Falls (walk-in) Please check online
Hoodoo Creek June 27 - Sept. 1 30
Camping season dates are approximate. Please confirm at the visitor centre prior to heading
out. Arrive early. Sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Daily fire permits cost
extra. Camping permitted in designated campgrounds only. *Interpretive programs offered
visit parkscanada.gc.ca/yoho-interpretation for information.
THE LEGEND FOR ALL MAP SYMBOLS IS LOCATED ON PAGE 3.
1
2
3
4
Yoho Area
44
35
4
1
2
3
parkscanada.gc.ca/Yoho facebook.com/YohoNP twitter.com/YohoNP
1
2
3
0 40 80 120
metres
Post
Office
CPR Bunkhouse
Stephen
Avenue
Avenue
B
urgess
Avenue
Horse
Avenue
Kicking
1st
Ave
2nd
2
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S
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E
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Station
C
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B
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HIGHWAY
CANADA TRANS-
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7
K
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CPR Holdings
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Ball
Diamond
Kicking Horse River
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Village of
Field


Yoho
National
Park
Left-hand turns
on the Trans-Canada
Highway are permitted at
signed intersections only.
26
Forming part of the 180 million year-old Columbia Mountains, the Selkirk and Purcell ranges offer a
dramatic contrast to the wide u-shaped valleys and distant peaks of the much younger Rockies. In 1882, Major Albert
Bowman Rogers overcame the last “impenetrable” barrier to the transcontinental railway when he discovered the pass
through the Selkirks that bears his name. Four years later, with the newly completed railway in place, the government
established two small park reserves to protect the summit of Rogers Pass and fragile areas around the Great Glacier.
Soon after, Glacier National Park was expanded to protect more than 400 glaciers and icefields within the Selkirks
and Purcells. Three hours down the tracks from Rogers Pass, Revelstoke citizens lobbied for their own national
park, achieving their dream in 1914. Mount Revelstoke is the only mountain in the national parks system accessible
by vehicle, with a wildflower-lined parkway that climbs through rainforest and snowforest to a summit of sub-alpine
meadows. The park features the greatest diversity of tree species of any region in British Columbia, including old-
growth cedars nearly 500 years old. Attracting mountaineers who scale the heights and spelunkers who explore the
depths, Glacier and Mount Revelstoke provide an up-close and personal mountain experience.
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Glacier and Mount Revelstoke Area
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Rogers Pass Discovery Centre
Start your park visit at the museum and visitor centre,
where you’ll discover more about the intrepid railroaders
who carved the first path through this wilderness, and the
avalanche scientists and soldiers who keep this wintery
pass open today. 69 km (52 min) east of Revelstoke in
Glacier. See 4 page 29.
Rockgarden Trail
Look down instead of up to discover the miniature
landscapes on each rock alongside this 0.5 km
interpretive trail. 56 km (42 min) east of Revelstoke
in Glacier. See 5 page 29.
Glacier House Site
Imagine the mountain adventures that began at
this pioneering Victorian-era hotel, as you wander
among its stone ruins on a 1.1 km interpretive trail.
66 km (48 min) east of Revelstoke in Glacier. See
6 page 29.
Meadows in the Sky Parkway
Get your day off to a great start with a mountain bike
ride or trail run at the Nels Nelsen Historic Area. In
the afternoon, take a drive up the parkway for
360° panoramic views of the Selkirks and
Monashees.Trans-Canada Hwy, 2 min east of the
main Revelstoke exit. See 1 page 29.

Skunk Cabbage Trail
Marvel at unique wetland plants and migratory
birds as you stroll along this 1.2 km interpretive
boardwalk. 28 km (25 min) east of Revelstoke in
Mount Revelstoke. See 2 page 29.
Hemlock Grove Trail
Experience the world’s only non-coastal cedar-
hemlock rainforest as you wind your way through an
ancient stand of trees on this barrier-free
0.4 km interpretive boardwalk. 54 km (40 min) east
of Revelstoke in Glacier. See 3 page 29.
Celebrate
Mount
Revelstoke’s
Centennial in
2014!
Pound your stakes into the ground
and put your steaks on the grill at one of Glacier’s
campgrounds. Illecillewaet and Loop Brook offer
great access to the twelve historic hiking trails of
Rogers Pass.
Glacier National Park straddles the crest
of the Selkirk Range, with its legendary steep lines
and deep powder snow. You can ski or board alpine bowls,
glades and icefields—with some descents of more than
1 500 metres. For more information:
parkscanada.gc.ca/skirogerspass
Camping Backcountry Skiing
Hemlock Grove Trail
Skunk cabbage blooms
Skiing Rogers Pass
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Rockgarden Trail
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Glacier and Mount Revelstoke Area
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Nouut Bouue]
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Aooott Ridge
luveruess Peaks
Nouut Jupiter
Nouut Nacdouald
Nouut 8ir Douald







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 
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Mount Revelstoke
National Park
Rockgarden Trail
CAMPGROUNDS AND SERVICES OPEN DATES SITES
Illecillewaet*
June 21 - Sept. 30
Loop Brook*
July 1 - Sept. 2
Mount Sir Donald 15
Camping season dates are approximate because snow lingers at the campgrounds
until mid-June. Please confirm at the visitor centre prior to heading out. Arrive early.
Sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis. Daily fire permits cost extra.
Camping permitted in designated campgrounds only.
*Interpretive programs offered.
THE LEGEND FOR ALL MAP SYMBOLS IS LOCATED ON PAGE 3.
Check the
visitor centre
for our
Souvenir
Guides
60
20
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Glacier
National Park
parkscanada.gc.ca/Glacier parkscanada.gc.ca/Revelstoke
Camping
29
“The scenery here is grand and
picturesque,” wrote Lt. Thomas
Blakiston, the first European to gaze on
three magnificent lakes where the southern
mountains meet the prairie. He named the
spot after Sir Charles Waterton, a celebrated
British naturalist. Some 40 years later, at
the urging of F.W. Godsal—a local rancher
with a heart of gold—parliament created a
forest park reserve around Waterton Lakes
in 1895. No protected area of its size in the
Rocky Mountains has such vast diverse
ecosystems—from rare foothills fescue
grasslands and ancient sedimentary rock to
lush forests and shimmering lakes to imposing
mountains that shed their unique red and
green rock on the plains below. Known for
dazzling wildflowers and oh-so-close wildlife,
Waterton Lakes National Park is the only
place on the planet you can find a UNESCO
World Heritage Site, an International Peace
Park and a Biosphere Reserve all rolled into
one compact package. This special place,
which celebrates connection among peoples,
landscapes and nations, continues to live up
to its original billing.
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Wake up to Natosi
(the rising sun)
in Waterton’s
traditional
Blackfoot-style
tipis
reservation.pc.gc.ca
Explore the park from the saddle
of your bike! Pass under towering mountain
peaks, along crystalline lakes and even into British
Columbia. Akamina Pass, Crandell Loop, Snowshoe,
and Wishbone trails offer a range of scenery and
challenges for many skill levels.
This multi-use trail parallels the
Entrance Parkway and is perfect for
families with bike trailers and young riders. Whether you
are walking, running or cycling, the mountains, lakes and
meadows full of wildflowers that surround you will provide
the perfect backdrop. Be sure to stop and smell the flowers!
Mountain Biking Kootenay Brown Trail
Waterton Townsite
Meander along the lakeshore, visit Cameron Falls and
explore the Peace Park Pavilion. Emerald Bay is a
popular picnic spot; the sheltered bay is also a favourite
spot for swimmers, kayakers and paddle boarders.
8 km from the park gate.
The Bears Hump
One of the most popular trails in Waterton, this
short but steep hike offers spectacular views of the
Waterton Valley. At 1.4 km (one way), it takes most
visitors 30-45 minutes to reach the top.

1 km from
town; trailhead access in the visitor centre

parking

lot.
The Prince of Wales Hotel
Built in 1927 by the Great Northern Railway, this elegant
hotel is now recognized as a national historic site.
Take in a traditional afternoon tea in the lobby, or simply
sit and enjoy the view. 1 km from town, on the
Entrance Parkway.
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Summer special events
Paddling Waterton Lake
Akamina Parkway
This narrow road winds past several trailheads,
scenic pullouts and picnic sites before ending at
the idyllic Cameron Lake. Take a stroll along the
lakeshore and explore the forest, or rent a paddle
boat or canoe and explore the lake instead.
16 km to Cameron Lake.
Red Rock Parkway
Experience the mingling of mountain and prairie
landscapes as you drive up the Blakiston Valley
to Red Rock Canyon. A popular place for
family picnics, this brilliant red canyon shelters a
sparkling mountain stream. Watch for wildlife on
the slopes above the road along the way!
15 km to Red Rock Canyon (Open early May to
Oct. 31).
Winter fun
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Waterton Lakes Area
Free interpretive programs!
31
Waterton Lakes Area
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Vimy Peak
Ruby Ridge
Mount Rowe
Bertha Peak
Mount Galwey
Mount Lineham
Lost Mountain
Lone Mountain
Anderson Peak
Mount Bauerman
Mount Dungarvan
Mount Blakiston
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Middle Waterton
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Lower
Waterton
Lake
Cameron
Lake
Alderson
Lake
Carthew
Lakes
Bertha
Lake
Bertha
Falls
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Blakiston
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Twin
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Waterton
Townsite
Road open in
summer only
Road is partially
open in the
winter
a
to Bar U Ranch
National Historic Site
(175 km from Waterton)
Calgary (266 km from Waterton)
to Lethbridge
(132 km from Waterton)
a
to Glacier National Park
(USA)
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Ü
Camping
CAMPGROUNDS AND SERVICES OPEN DATES SITES
Waterton Townsite* May 2 – October 13 238
Crandell Mountain*
Mid-May - Labour Day
129
Belly River 24
Belly River Group
2
Pass Creek Winter Late Oct. - Late April 8
Camping season dates are approximate. Please confirm at the visitor centre prior to heading
out. Arrive early. Non-reservable sites are available on a first-come, first-served basis.
Daily fire permits cost extra. Camping permitted in designated campgrounds only.
*Interpretive programs offered.
Highlighted campgrounds may be reserved: 1-877-RESERVE or reservation.pc.gc.ca
THE LEGEND FOR ALL MAP SYMBOLS IS LOCATED ON PAGE 3.
For more
information
pick up
our
visitor
guide
Waterton
Lakes
National
Park
1
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4
GLACIER
NATIONAL PARK
parkscanada.gc.ca/Waterton facebook.com/WatertonLakesNP twitter.comWatertonLakesNP 32
Banff
National Park
Jasper
National Park
Kootenay
National Park
Call 1-877-RESERVE or visit reservation.pc.gc.ca to book your oTENTik now!
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Mountain Learning
Join us in discovering the
wonders of the mountains!
Look for our Parks Canada interpreters throughout the
parks: at campground theatres, popular day-use areas,
special events and out on the trails. Discover the park
first hand and take the opportunity to ask your questions
during our programs and activities.
Evening Theatre Programs
Which animals have horns? Which have antlers? What is
a prescribed fire? How did that mountain get its name?
Join us for an evening of entertainment and education as
we explore and make discoveries about the natural and
cultural “coolness” of our parks.
Your park entry fee allows you to attend our programs
for free, so come on out and join us! You do not have to
be staying in the campground to attend. Everyone (that
means you!) is welcome, the more the merrier!
Some of our parks offer guided walks, which may include
a fee—check each park’s website for further details.
Hey Kids! Get your Xplorers booklet!

Complete some of the activities and you will
receive a souvenir to take home and show
your friends. Pick up your booklet at
a Parks Canada visitor centre.
The booklet has tons of fun activities that
you can do on your own or with your family.
Have fun exploring your national parks and
national historic sites, and be sure to share
your smarts with your family—test their
knowledge.
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Mountain Nature
The Mountain Parks are home to a remarkable diversity
of wildlife. Each different ecoregion is home to many
familiar (and maybe some unfamiliar) faces. How many
do you know?
Montane Ecoregion
Warm and dry valley bottoms, winding rivers and clusters of
aspen forest; this area is home to an incredibly diverse array
of plant and animal life. Many animals spend at least part of
their year in this region. It also happens to be where human
activity is centered.
Subalpine Ecoregion
That vast sea of dark green trees swathing the mountain
sides covers around 50% of the mountain parks, more
than any other ecoregion. Although the growing season is
relatively short, winter food is scarce and travel through deep
snow is hard, this is where many of the mountain parks most
recognizable wildlife can be found.
Alpine Ecoregion
The tip-top peaks of the mountains are not an easy
place to call home. The animals and plants that live here
are well adapted to the harsh extreme elements in the
land of ice, rock and snow.
Some animals, like grizzly bears, move through different
ecoregions throughout the year. Depending on the
season, they can be seen munching dandelions in the
valley bottoms or digging in subalpine meadows.
Wolves are the top dogs in the
mountain parks. They live in
family groups, called packs.
Consider yourself lucky to see
one; wolves are wary of people.
Elk spend much of the year living
together in a herd, and can often
be seen grazing along the edges
of aspen forests or around
townsites.
Moose may look awkward, but they are exceptionally well adapted
to life in the subalpine. Their long legs make travel in deep snow a
breeze, and their tough stomachs handle a diet of twigs, buds and
bark with ease.
Pikas are the darlings of the
alpine, with tawny bodies,
short rounded ears and
shiny black eyes. Their
call, a loud “peeeek”, is
often the best clue to pika
activity.
Mountain goats are first-class mountaineers with specially
adapted hooves designed to scale sheer cliffs and balance on
tiny rock ledges. They are rarely seen at lower elevations, but
they can be identified by their fluffy white coats and narrow
black horns.
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Interior Rainforest
In Mount Revelstoke and
Glacier national parks, the
moist and snowier interior
rainforest ecoregion replaces
the montane ecoregion.
This region is home to the
world’s only temperate inland
rainforest and includes the
giant western red cedar and
western hemlock. Unusual
plants such as devil’s club
and skunk cabbage share
the rainforest with endangered mountain caribou,
migratory birds and Coeur d’Alene salamanders.

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Characteristics
Tan colour, tail has white
underside and is held erect
like a flag when alarmed.
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here to find
Mostly valley bottoms.
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hitetail Deer
M
ule Deer
Characteristics
Brown body, darker neck
and large tan rump patch.
Backwards slanting antlers.
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here to find
Valley bottoms and open
areas. Commonly seen
around townsites.
Elk
Characteristics
Black tip on tail, large ears,
white rump, grey colour.
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here to find
Mostly valley bottoms.
Characteristics
Narrow black horns, beard,
long white hair.
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here to find
Near steep rocky terrain.
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ountain Goat
Bighorn Sheep
Characteristics
Long legs, shoulder hump.
Built like a horse with a large
head. Shovel-like antlers.
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here to find
Wet and marshy areas.
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oose
Characteristics
White rump and light brown
fur and horns. Males: thick
curved horns. Females:
short narrow horns.
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here to find
Near steep rocky terrain.
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Wildlife Viewing Tips
Stay three bus lengths away. Getting too close can be
stressful for animals and dangerous for people. Even a
gentle-looking elk can seriously hurt a person. Your best
chance of observing truly wild animals is by quietly giving
them space to feed, rest and keep their young safe.
SizeChart
Moose Elk Caribou Deer Sheep Goat Wolf
NEVER feed wildlife.
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Coyote
Mountain Wildlife
Elk
Wildlife Sightings
For wolf, bear and cougar sightings
and wildlife related incidents call:
Banff: 403-762-1470
Kootenay and Yoho: 403-762-1473
Jasper: 403-852-6155
Revelstoke / Glacier: 1-877-852-3100
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Red Squirrel
Characteristics
Red body, white underside
and very large, bushy tail.
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here to find
Coniferous forests,
scampering up trees.
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Characteristics
Large and silver-brown
in colour with longer
hair.
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here to find
Alpine and subalpine
meadows, rock piles
and scree slopes.
Colum
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Ground Squirrel
Characteristics
Tan-coloured. Longer
body. Has a high-
pitched “squeak”.
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here to find
Meadows, roadsides
and townsites in
underground colonies.
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Characteristics
Darker body with light neck hair.
C-shaped antlers with shovel-
like tines at their base.
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here to find
Alpine and subalpine meadows.
Threatened species. Only exist in
Jasper and Mt. Revelstoke.
Coyote
Characteristics
Medium-sized dog. Thick,
bushy tail. Greyish-brown
in colour.
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here to find
Valley bottoms, well adapted
to humans.
Characteristics
Built like a large German Shepherd,
with longer legs. Colour can vary
from white to black.
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here to find
Mainly valley bottoms.
Caribou
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You are in bear country!
• Be aware you are near a bear!
Watch for fresh scat or large diggings.
• Make noise! Sing, yell or talk loudly.
• Keep your dog on a leash.
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• Keep children nearby and in sight at all times.
• Never approach or feed a bear. Stay ten bus
lengths away.
• Carry bear spray and know how to use it.
Visit: parkscanada.gc.ca/bears-and-people
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Mountain Safety
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Snow in June? Rain
in February?
Unpredictable mountain weather can change road and trail conditions from one minute
to the next, and from place to place. Wildlife can be anywhere, any time. You are in true
wilderness, and some simple precautions will ensure a safe and enjoyable visit to the mountain
national parks.
Driving:
• Before heading out, check the road conditions.
For Alberta, visit www.511alberta.ca. or call 511
toll-free in Alberta. For British Columbia, call
1-800-550-4997 or visit drivebc.ca.
• Take your time. Slower travel will improve your
chances of seeing wildlife, and give you more
reaction time when travelling in winter conditions.
• Please stay on the roads and other hardened
surfaces. Driving on grass and other soft surfaces
damages local flora and increases the risk of
invasive plants establishing themselves in our parks.
While out and about:
• Whether enjoying a mid-day picnic or setting up your
campsite, make sure all food and garbage is put
away when you go. Use storage bins, garbage bins
and your vehicle. Never leave food in your tent.
• Surprised wildlife can be aggressive wildlife. Make
noise on the trails and let them know you are coming.
In the wilderness:
• Research your trip and plan accordingly. Carry extra
clothes and water, and be prepared to survive overnight.
Wilderness passes are mandatory for overnight trips,
and can be obtained at a visitor centre, along with trip
planning advice.
• Cell phones often don’t work in the wilderness. It is
best to let someone know what your plans are. Visit
parksmountainsafety.ca for more information.
• Be careful in old and burned over forests, especially in
high winds that can blow dead trees down.
• Steep terrain can be a risk for rockslides and avalanches.
Avalanche safety tips and condition updates can be
found at: avalanche.pc.gc.ca and
twitter.com/ParksMtnSafety.
• Keep clear of cliffs, ledges and fast moving water.
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Hiking the Tonquin Valley
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Hiking the Tonquin Valley
Parks Canada Mountain Guide 2014 - 2015
©Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada
Catalogue#: R61-78/2014E
ISBN#: 1922-0928
Please follow these simple regulations while enjoying your national parks:
Keep pets on a leash
Unrestrained pets can harass wildlife, provoke wildlife attacks,
and endanger or disturb other visitors. Please collect and
properly discard feces left behind by your dog.
Take only photographs
It is illegal to pick flowers, cut down trees and branches, or
otherwise cause damage to natural objects or living things (like
mushrooms or herbs). The same is true for cultural artifacts.
Leave whatever you find, where you find it, for others to enjoy.
Be considerate of your neighbours
Liquor consumption is prohibited in public places, picnic and
day-use areas, and some campgrounds. Respect quiet hours
and liquor bans in campgrounds, and the rights of others to
enjoy the park in peace and quiet.
Respect area closures and restrictions
During certain times of the year, areas within our national parks
may be subject to closures and/or restrictions. The closures and
restrictions are enforced to ensure public safety and when wildlife
require additional protection. These restrictions are enforced with
the same authority as the regulations in the Canada National
Parks Act – they are the law. Violators will be charged, may be
forced to appear in court, and pay fines of up to $25 000.
Be careful with fire
Fires are permitted only in designated areas. Keep fires
well contained in fireboxes. Completely extinguish your
fire. Do not collect deadwood, bark or branches for fuel.
Obey seasonal restrictions or bans. Report any wildfires
immediately to park staff.
Buy fishing permits
Anglers require a national park fishing permit, available at
most visitor centres. Provincial licenses are not valid within
national parks.
Going boating?
Check with visitor centre staff before you plan your trip.
Motors are not allowed on most lakes.
Be aware of approved park activities
Motorized off-road travel is not permitted within national
parks.
Park Wardens
Park Wardens are peace officers,
responsible for enforcing the Canada
National Parks Act and regulations.
They also enforce other Canadian laws
inside national parks. Help them keep
national parks a special place. To report
national park violations, call:
24 hours, 7 days per week
1-888-927-3367
(Banff, Yoho, Kootenay and Waterton Lakes)
1-877-852-3100
(Jasper and Mountain Revelstoke & Glacier)

Park Regulations
For the Canada National Parks Act visit:
pc.gc.ca/pn-np/ab/banff/plan/reglements-regulations.aspx
39
You are here, now what?
Visit the information/visitor centre in your park for maps and brochures,
passes and permits, trip planning advice and backcountry reservations.
Staff have current trail, road, weather and safety information, as well as
program and event listings. Hours are generally 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.,
but vary seasonally. Phone numbers are listed on page 3.
FOR EMERGENCIES DIAL 911
(Police, Fire and Ambulance)
Cell phone coverage is not reliable in all
areas of the mountain parks.

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