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CAS Handbook

American International School Kuwait










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Creativity, Action and Service (CAS)
The Diploma Programmeaims to encourage
students to be knowledgeable and inquiring, but
also caring and compassionate (CAS Guide, 1).
Creativity, action, service involves students in
experiential learning through a range of artistic,
sporting, physical and service activities.


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CAS and the DP
Creativity, action,
service (CAS) is at
the heart of the
Diploma
Programme. It is
one of the three
essential elements
in every students
Diploma
Programme
experience.

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What Do They Mean?
Creativity: arts, and other experiences that
involve creative thinking.
Action: physical exertion contributing to a
healthy lifestyle, complementing academic
work elsewhere in the Diploma Programme.
Service: an unpaid and voluntary exchange
that has a learning benefit for the student.
The rights, dignity and autonomy of all those
involved are respected.
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The Overarching Goals of CAS
CAS enables students to enhance their
personal and interpersonal development
through experiential learning.
It provides an important counterbalance to
the academic pressures of the rest of the
Diploma Programme.
A good CAS programme should be both
challenging and enjoyable, a personal journey
of self-discovery.
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What Can I Gain From CAS?
New skills
New experiences
Great potential job references
Great material for scholarships
Plus, the fact is, you will have done a good
thing and made a difference in your
community. Thats always a good thing!

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The Nature of CAS/Basic Expectations
For student development to occur, CAS should involve:
real, purposeful activities, with significant outcomes
personal challengetasks must extend the student
and be achievable in scope
thoughtful consideration, such as planning,
reviewing progress, reporting
reflection on outcomes and personal learning.
All proposed CAS activities need to meet these four
criteria. It is also essential that they do not replicate
other parts of the students Diploma Programme work.
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CAS Rules The Basics
Concurrency of learning is important in the Diploma Programme.
Therefore, CAS activities (not every activity, but CAS activities in
general) should continue on a regular basis for as long as possible
throughout the programme, and certainly for at least 18 months.
Successful completion of CAS is a requirement for the award of the
IB diploma. CAS is not formally assessed but students need to
document their activities and provide evidence that they have
achieved eight key learning outcomes. The final reflection will be a
summary of how students have achieved the outcomes and aims.
It is essential that CAS activity is an extension to subject work not a
part of subject work. To attempt to count the same work for both a
subject or extended essay and CAS would constitute malpractice.
It is desirable that students, rather than teachers, initiate the
service activity. This is in accordance with the greater expectations
of autonomy and maturity in Diploma Programme students.
No CAS = No Diploma
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International Dimensions of CAS
The aim of all IB programmes is to develop internationally
minded people who, recognizing their common humanity
and shared guardianship of the planet, help to create a
better and more peaceful world.
- IB Learner Profile Booklet (March 2006)
Creating a better and more peaceful world is a large aim.
Working towards it should be seen as involving many small
steps, which may be taken locally, nationally or
internationally.
It is important to see activities in a broader context, bearing
in mind the maxim think globally, act locally. Working
with people from different social or cultural backgrounds in
the vicinity of the school can do as much to increase
mutual understanding as large international projects.

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Aims of CAS
Within the Diploma Programme, CAS provides the main opportunity to
develop many of the attributes described in the IB learner profile. For
this reason, the aims of CAS have been written in a form that highlights
their connections with the IB learner profile.
The CAS programme aims to develop students who are:
reflective thinkersthey understand their own strengths and
limitations, identify goals and devise strategies for personal growth
willing to accept new challenges and new roles
aware of themselves as members of communities with
responsibilities towards each other and the environment
active participants in sustained, collaborative projects
balanced they enjoy and find significance in a range of activities
involving intellectual, physical, creative and emotional experiences.
Before initiating an CAS project you must ask of it. wheres the
challenge in this activity? There must be one.
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CAS Guide
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CAS Additional Guidance
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CAS-Who is Who?
CAS Coordinator: Mrs. Murray
CAS Advisor: Supervised Study
Teacher in H Block
CAS Supervisor: the adult (who is not
a relative) who is supervising your
activity
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Creativity
Creative activities should have a definite goal or outcome.
They should be planned and evaluated like all CAS
activities.
This can present something of a challenge where, for
example, a student is a dedicated instrumental musician. It
would be artificial to rule that something that is both a
pleasure and a passion for the student could not be
considered part of their CAS experience.
How, though, can it help to fulfill CAS learning outcomes? If
we looked back at the The Nature of CAS slide (#8),
particularly to the second principle: personal challenge
tasks must extend the student and be achievable in scope.
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Creativity Continued
Perhaps the instrumental musician can learn a
particularly difficult piece, or a different style of
playing, in order to perform for an audience. The
context might be a fund-raising activity, or the
student might give a talk to younger children
about the instrument, with musical illustrations.
Appropriate CAS activities are not merely more
of the same.
This excludes, for example, routine practice
performed by IB music or dance students, but
does not exclude music, dance or art activities
that these students are involved with outside the
Diploma Programme subject coursework.
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Examples of Creativity
Designing a nice CAS logo for the AIS DP
Programme
Learning to play an instrument
Writing poetry or prose
Joining an art club (see Mrs. Hani)
Creating a work of art
Designing posters and advertisements for a CAS
project
Doing the artwork for an awareness campaign
Make a video or documentary

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Action
Similar considerations that apply to creativity apply also apply to
action.
An athlete will not stop training and practising in order to engage in
some arbitrary, invented CAS physical activity.
Modern approaches to sports coaching emphasize the notion of the
reflective practitioner.
Setting new goals, and planning and reflecting on their
achievement, is vital.
Extending may go further than setting new athletic goals,
students could possibly pass on some of their skills and knowledge
to others by offering a class or working with younger children.
If your chosen sport is entirely individual, perhaps you should try a
team game, in order to experience the different pleasures and
rewards they offer.
If your not the athletic type your goal may be to simply engage in
an athletic activity however limited that may be.
Action can also includes physical activity involved in carrying out
creative and service projects.
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Examples of Action
Some excellent action activities are not sporting
or competitive but involve physical challenge by
demanding endurance (such as long-distance
trekking) or the conquest of personal fears (for
example, rock climbing).
In CAS, action relates specifically to physical
activity. More studying, no matter its purpose,
does not qualify.
Examples? Simply, try to work up a sweat at
anything new or old; if it is something you have
always done, set new goals and work to reach
new heights.
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Service
Service projects and activities are often the most
transforming element of the Diploma Programme; they
have the potential to nurture and mold the global
citizen.
Service involves interaction that should build links with
individuals or groups in the community.
The community may be the school, the local district,
or it may exist on national and international levels
(such as undertaking projects of assistance in a
developing country).
Service learning should not only involve doing things
for others but also doing things with others and
developing a real commitment with them.
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Service
It is essential that service activities have
learning benefits for the student. Otherwise,
they are not experiential learning (hence not
CAS) and have no particular claim on students
time.
This rules out mundane, repetitive activities,
as well as service without real responsibility.
Move from being a Personally Responsible
Citizen to a Social Justice Oriented Citizen

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Examples of Service
Raising Awareness (Bullying, Environmental Issues, Human Rights Abuses, Etc.)
Assisting and organizing tournaments that our school hosts
Tutoring program
Environmental or KIVA Group
Help organise a 30 Hour Famine
Help organise an Independence Day Ceremony
Start or join (NHS) a Social Justice Group
Help recently arrived students understand Kuwaiti culture and the AIS
environment
Set up a program for the children of newly arrived teachers during the two
weeks leading up to school
Developing an events days for the PYP and MYP students
Set up language classes
Neighbourhood clean-up
Organizing intra-mural activities of all sorts
Initiating a program or working within an already established program at your
religious institution
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Learning Outcomes
All eight outcomes must be present for a student to complete the CAS
requirement.
Some may be demonstrated many times, in a variety of activities, but
completion requires only that there is some evidence for every outcome.
What does some mean?
The learning outcomes are not assessed, either they are there or they are
not. The completion decision for the school in relation to each student is,
simply, Have these outcomes been achieved?
To assess whether or not the learning outcomes have been achieved the IB
says: as a result of their CAS experience as a whole, including their
reflections, there should be evidence that students have:
INCREASED THEIR AWARENESS OF THEIR OWN STRENGTHS AND AREAS
FOR GROWTH: They are able to see themselves as individuals with various
skills and abilities, some more developed than others, and understand that
they can make choices about how they wish to move forward.
UNDERTAKEN NEW CHALLENGES: A new challenge maybe an unfamiliar
activity, or an extension to an existing one.
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Learning Outcomes/CAS Project
PLANNED AND INITIATED ACTIVITIES: Planning and initiation will
often be in collaboration with others. It can be shown in activities that
are part of larger projects, for example, ongoing school activities in
the local community, as well as in small student-led activities. This is
where you demonstrate your leadership capabilities and learn what is
means to be a leader (leadership activity).
WORKED COLLABORATIVELY WITH OTHERS: Collaboration can be
shown in many different activities, such as team sports, playing music
in a band, or helping in a kindergarten. At least one project, involving
collaboration and the integration of at least two of creativity, action
and service, is required. THIS IS THE CAS PROJECT!
SHOWN PERSEVERANCE AND COMMITMENT IN THEIR ACTIVITIES:
At a minimum, this implies attending regularly and accepting a share
of the responsibility for dealing with problems that arise in the course
of activities.
ENGAGED WITH ISSUES OF GLOBAL IMPORTANCE: Students may be
involved in international projects but there are many global issues
that can be acted upon locally or nationally (for example,
environmental concerns, caring for the elderly).

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Learning Outcomes/Number of Hours
CONSIDERED THE ETHICAL IMPLICATIONS OF THEIR ACTIONS: Ethical
decisions arise in almost any CAS activity (for example, on the sports
field, in musical composition, in relationships with others involved in
service activities). Evidence of thinking about ethical issues can be
shown in various ways, including journal entries and conversations
with CAS advisers.
DEVELOPED NEW SKILLS: As with new challenges, new skills may be
shown in activities that the student has not previously undertaken, or
in increased expertise in an established area.
This focus on learning outcomes emphasizes that it is the quality of a
CAS activity that is of most importance (its contribution to the
students development).
The guideline for the minimum amount of CAS activity is
approximately the equivalent of half a day per school week (three to
four hours per week), or approximately 150 hours in total, with a
reasonable balance between creativity, action and service. Hour
counting, however, is not encouraged.

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CAS Rules: The Details
There are no two for one deals. This means if you
cleaned the beach for two hours you cannot claim two
hours of service and two hours of action. You would
either have to pick one of the two areas or allocate one
hour to action and one hour to service.
Limit the number of hours allocated to any one activity to
30. This has been done to encourage more breadth and
in recognition that after 30 hours of any one activity a
certain amount of repetitive action is being done which is
less in the spirit of the learning outcomes.
CAS hours before the start of DP1 year cannot be
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What is CAS Isnt
Any class, activity or project that is already part of the students
academic classes.
An activity for which a student is personally rewarded either
financially or with some other benefit (unless this benefit is
passed on in full to a worthy cause).
Doing simple, tedious and repetitive work like returning school
library books to the shelves or doing monotonous clerical work.
Any religious activity which can be interpreted as proselytizing
An activity where there is no leader or responsible adult on site
to evaluate and confirm student performance.
A passive pursuit such as visiting a museum, theatre, art
exhibition, concert, etc.
All forms of duty within the family
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Simply Put
CAS is unpaid
CAS is planned
CAS is varied
CAS often has a global touch
CAS projects pose a challenge
CAS has you dealing with others
CAS is accompanied by written reflections

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Responsibilities of the Student
As far as possible, students should own their personal CAS
programmes by developing and choosing what they would like to
do at the local or international level.
With guidance from their mentors/advisers, students should choose
activities for themselves, initiating new ones where appropriate.
Students are required to:
self-review at the beginning of their CAS experience and set
personal goals for what they hope to achieve through their CAS
programme this is the summary on Managebac.
plan, do and reflect (plan activities, carry them out and reflect
on what they have learned). This is to be completed during and
shortly after the completion of the activity.
CAS activities that are completed without reflection in a timely
manner will no longer be approved and will therefore not count
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Responsibilities of the Student Cont.
undertake at least one interim review and a final review
with their CAS adviser
take part in a range of activities, including at least one
project, some of which they have initiated themselves
keep records of their activities and achievements,
including a list of the principal activities undertaken
show evidence of achievement of the eight CAS learning
outcomes.
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Activity Examples
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Reflection, Recording and Reporting
Reflection needs to be developed. It should not
be assumed that it comes naturally.
The fundamentals are simple. Of any activity, it is
appropriate to ask the following questions.
What did I plan to do?
What did I do?
What were the outcomes, for me, the team I was
working with, and others?
Writing is by no means the only possible outcome
of reflection. Students can present their activities
orally to peers, parents or outsiders. They can
make scrapbooks, photo essays, videos/DVDs,
weblogs, journals or make up varied portfolios.

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Developing Reflection
General Reflection Questions:
How did you feel?
What did you think about the activity?
What did the activity mean to you?
What was the value of the activity (to you or others)?
What did you learn from the activity?
How might what you learned affect you beyond this
activity and into the future?
Other
Outcomes Reflections:
Reflect on EACH of the outcomes you said were related to
the activity.
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Having Trouble Getting Started?
I have learned ________ about myself.
I can use the skills I learned today in other situations such
as
I found todays activity difficult because
I felt good about this activity because
One thing that frustrated me was
I found out that I needed to
I think I have progressed because
I skills I need to continue improving on are
I am looking forward to doing this activity again because
I learned to be a good collaborator because I have been
I was nervous about
See the Vocabulary Aid handout
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Documenting Your Reflections
Students will document their CAS activities in Managebac.
Each reflection must address a few of the suggested general
reflection questions from the previous slide and must include
specific reference to learning outcomes.
Reflections on Managebac should be completed as follows:
www.aiskuwait.managebac.com (login w/email *welcome e-mail)
1. Respond to several of the general reflection questions (slide
37) Add[ing] New Reflection and checking off all of the
outcomes you have selected for this CAS activity.
2. Complete subsequent reflections for EACH of the outcomes.
This means you will Add New Reflection and check only
one outcome, reflect on that particular outcome as it relates
to C,A or S (depending on which one(s) you have chosen)
and then repeat for all of the outcomes you have selected
for this activity.
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Documenting Your Reflections Cont.
1 and 2 combined: The other option is to complete a single
reflection where you combine point #1 with the following:
The specific outcomes must be stated (word-for-word) in
the reflection and must be underlined or highlighted in
some way. Each outcome must be addressed clearly and
separately from other outcomes that were part of your
CAS activity. To do this use paragraphs and any sort of
bolding or underlining to highlight where you have
addressed each outcome.
As previously indicated, documentation can and should
take many forms, including blogs, illustrated displays and
videos, and written notes.
The extent of your documentation should match the
significance of the particular activity to the student.
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CAS Reflection Form
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Student Reflection Example
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Your CAS Advisor = Supervised Study
Teacher
You must formally meet with your CAS adviser
(Supervised Study teacher) at least twice in year 1 and
once in year 2 to discuss your progress.
Your CAS advisor will make a record of this meeting on
Managebac.
You should meet informally with your advisor at least
once a month.
You CAS advisor will be responsible for approving your
CAS activities and ensuring your reflections are being
completed properly.
If you and your advisor have any concerns about
whether or not your activity is appropriate please
consult the CAS Coordinator.
All CAS Projects must be approved by Mrs. Murray(CAS
activities will be approved by your advisor) .

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Suggestions For Organizing Your CAS Activities
All students should be involved in CAS activities that
they have initiated themselves. Other CAS activities
may be initiated by the school.
Activities should vary in length and in the amount of
commitment required from the student, but none
should be trivial.
Some schools have ongoing relationships with local
organizations that offer challenging opportunities for
service activities that may also incorporate elements of
creativity and/or action.
Other schools undertake major, concentrated, one-off
activities that may involve considerable planning and
fund-raising (for example, expeditions or building
projects).

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The CAS Project
Students should be involved in at least one project
involving teamwork that integrates two or more of
creativity, action and service, and is of significant
duration.
Larger scale activities of this sort may provide excellent
opportunities for students to engage with issues of
global importance. This is the CAS Project
The CAS Project is part of your overall CAS hours and
should be incorporated into the appropriate categories
and reflected upon as is done with other CAS activities.
In Managebac, ensure you check off CAS Project
when developing the summary and completing the
reflections for your CAS Project.


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Supervisors and Managebac
Activity supervisors responsibilities include:
monitoring attendance
providing guidance and support related to the activity
alerting the CAS coordinator, administration or relevant CAS
adviser to any problems
reporting, as required, on student performance.
Supervisors cannot be friends in your age-range and, if possible,
should not be family members.
Authenticity and sincerity of reflections are much more important
in legitimizing activities than who exactly your supervisors are.
Supervisors will need to report on your CAS activity.
Open your Managebac Document
Register for Managebac and/or provide me with your email
address.
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How Do I Start?
You must get your CAS activity approved before or around the time you
start working on it. If you want to get going on it and it still needs
approval, see Mrs. Murray or your advisor so you know whether or not it
will be approved. Fill out the activity approval forms and get the necessary
signatures.
To get approved you must demonstrate in your summary that the activity
properly falls into one of the three categories of CAS.
You must also describe how each of the learning outcomes you have
checked off will be accomplished. This will be formatted in the same way
you have been asked to in the reflection instructions.
Finally, remember the four points described in the nature of CAS. CAS
activities must be:
real, purposeful activities, with significant outcomes
personal challengetasks must extend the student and be achievable
in scope
thoughtful consideration, such as planning, reviewing progress,
reporting
reflection on outcomes and personal learning.
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What Do I Do When Im Done?
Click on Request Supervisor Review this will send an email to
your supervisor to comment on your involvement in your CAS
activity.
If your supervisor has computer issues click on the pdf file
underneath the Request Supervisor Review button that says,
CAS Completion Form. You will print this out, have the
supervisor fill in their comments, and then sign it.
Once they have signed the form, scan a copy and upload it to the
Reflections part of this activity and give the original to Mrs.
Murray.
When you think you have completed all of your CAS, email Mrs.
Hull for a copy of the final reflection activity. Add it to your
reflections once you have completed it and let Mrs. Murray know
you have completed your final reflection and would like your CAS
checked off as completed on Managebac.
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Managebac Access
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Managebac User Guide for Students
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CAS Timeline DP 1
September 18 CAS Handbook Expectations
October - Managebac Training Revisited
January - CAS Workshop in H Block Meetings
with CAS Advisors recorded
May 24 All CAS Records due & Summer
Proposals Meetings with CAS Advisors
recorded
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CAS Timeline DP 2
September 18 CAS Handbook Expectations
Review
By end of September - CAS Projects approved
meetings with CAS advisors recorded
January - CAS final meeting with CAS advisor
reported
March 28 CAS Completed Records to IBO

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What is CAS Really About?
The exit of the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa,
Canada, dedicated to a critical history of war,
bears the following inscription:
History is yours to make. It is not owned or
written by someone else for you to learn... History
is not just the story you read. It is the one you
write. It is the one you remember or denounce or
relate to others. It is not predetermined. Every
action, every decision, however small, is relevant
to its course. History is filled with horror and
replete with hope. You shape the balance.

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Welcome to CAS

CAS is the heart of the IB program. Through CAS you get to explore
your creative side and put to use the academic skills you have
acquired through many hours of hard work and study.

Did you know that failing to fulfill the CAS requirement is the #1
reason that students fail to get their IB diploma? Like all your
courses, it is an aspect of the IB program that should not be taken
lightly.

The CAS program is made up of three parts:

C Creativity
An activity engaged in the arts or that requires creative thinking.
This includes participation in the arts or creating for others, where
the CAS participant learns something new.

A Action
Involves physical activity where the student sweats. It is a
physical activity to realize a preset goal in a new role.

S Service
This means doing things, and working, for others with others;
sharing and extending positive values to others; or giving time and
service in a non-profit way while focusing on making life better for
others.

CAS INVOLVES:
real, purposeful activities, with significant outcomes
personal challenges the tasks must extend you and be
achievable in scope
thoughtful consideration, such as planning and reviewing your
progress and reporting
reflection on outcomes and personal learning

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LEARNING OUTCOMES:
Through your CAS experiences and reflections, you should
demonstrate that you have met each of the following learning
outcomes:

increased your awareness of your own strengths and areas for
growth
undertaken new challenges
planned and initiated activities
worked collaboratively with others
shown perseverance and commitment in your activities
engaged with issues of global importance
considered the ethical implications of your actions
developed new skills

In order to meet the CAS requirement, you must provide evidence
of having fulfilled each of these. In addition, at least one of your
projects involving collaboration must integrate creativity, action and
service.

CAS must be sustained over an 18 month period during your
Diploma Programme.


DURATION OF CAS
CAS must last a total of 18 months.

Please note that not all projects must last that time, some may last a
few months because they are seasonal in nature. However, one
should definitely avoid short term activities that only last an
afternoon or a week.

CAS, therefore can be projects where you begin small, learn the
ropes and then move on to a more leadership orientated role.

CAS SUPERVISION
You will be supported through your CAS projects by Mrs. Murray,
your Coordinator. She will meet with you in early September of your
Gr. 11 year to conduct an interview, ask you about your interests and
areas of development. She will offer guidance and support on
potential CAS projects or help you modify ideas so that they honour
the spirit and letter of CAS. She will meet with you and your group on
a regular basis (once every two months, or as required).
Your supervised study teacher is your CAS advisor who will help you
during H block to complete your planning and reflecting on your
activities.
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The Basics of CAS are:
CAS needs to be done in the form of projects. The projects should
go over a reasonable time period and not just an afternoon or a few
days.

All CAS hours must be under the supervision of an adult. This adult
can not be a family member or someone you are living with.

All CAS projects must not have any compensation to the student
other than intrinsic rewards.

All CAS projects must have a minimum of 150 hours.

All CAS projects must be human interactive.

All CAS projects must have a healthy blend of C, A and S.

All CAS projects must have goals.

CAS is a Diploma requirement!


Documentation - Managebac
It is important to document your ongoing activities and reflections.

This documentation can take many forms. Among these are a
written journal and various ICT media.

Your documentation should provide evidence for:
Your initial goals and plans for your CAS programme
The CAS activities that you have undertaken
Your plans for each activity or project
Your reflections on each activity (before, during and
afterwards)
Which learning goals have been achieved and how

For each activity, you should also provide short report from your
activity supervisor.

From your documentation, it should be possible for the reader to tell
what happened, why it happened, how it happened, what its value
was and what you learned from it.

Together with your CAS Advisor, you will fill in:
A CAS progress form
A CAS individual student completion form
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Reflecting

Reflection is a skill. Like any other skill, it is developed by practice.

The fundamental questions for any activity are:

What did I plan to do?
What did I do?
What were the outcomes, for me, for the team I was working
with, and for others?

The answers to these questions can be complex.


Your reflection can be:

Public or private
Individual or shared
Objective or subjective

Most activities will involve a combination of these.


Reflection can be expressed in many forms. In the course of your
CAS experience, you may find yourself reflecting:

In private thoughts that you keep for yourself
In writing, such as in your diary or journal, in the planning and
evaluation forms, etc.
In oral presentations to other students and to parents, such as
in the CAS fair.
In photo essays, DVDs, weblogs, or some other ICT medium.


Deeper questions

As you develop your skills of reflection, you may begin to consider
some of the following:

How did I feel?
What did I perceive?
What did the activity mean to me?
What value did the activity have?
What did I learn from this activity?
How could this new insight be applied more widely?
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Examples

The following serves as examples only to help guide you. You are
responsible to ensure your projects are acceptable and have been
approved by your CAS coordinator prior to starting them.


Does not qualify for
CAS hours

Acceptable for CAS hours
I volunteer in a library
filing paper, restocking
book shelves etc.
I volunteer in a library filing paper, restocking
book shelves, reading to children, helping
people find books and helping students look
up references.

I get pledges and take
part in our schools 30
hour famine.
I helped plan and organize our schools 30
hour famine. I get pledges, take part in our
schools 30 hour famine, count money, get
supplies and organize and lead activities for
the famine.

I play soccer / hockey. I am a soccer / hockey player. I use these
skills to coach a team of little league players.

I am a soccer / hockey player. I started a
volunteer service to teach people who do not
know how to skate / play soccer.

I play guitar and am in a
band.
I play guitar and am in a band. I used my
talents to visit a seniors home every Sunday
at 11:00 am and play for them.

I play guitar and am in a band. I used my
talents to teach a 7 year old how to play a
guitar. I was able to get a local company to
sponsor a free guitar for her.
I shovel my neighbours
drive in the winter and I
only get $5.00 That is
pretty cheap for 2 hours
work.
I shovel my neighbours driveway in the
winter. She keeps insisting on paying, but
instead I suggested a cup of a cup of hot
chocolate and a cookie. When I am done, I
spend about 30 minutes having my cookie
while she talks about all sorts of stuff and
shows me pictures.

To get my World Issues
credit, I tutor a refugee in
reading and writing.
At lunch / after school, I tutor a refugee in
reading and writing.


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Guiding questions for the proposed activity

Your answers these questions will help you decide whether the
activity qualifies as CAS. They should also help you better
understand your goals and expectations for the activity. Discuss the
questions with you CAS Advisor, if you are unsure of how to answer
any of them.

1. Is it a real task that I am going to undertake? What is this
task?



2. What are my personal goals for this activity?



3. Does it have real consequences for other people and for me?
What are these?



4. How will the task extend me as a person?



5. Will the task be achievable?



6. How will I plan the activity?



7. How will I review my progress in the activity?



8. How will I reflect on the outcome and on my personal
learning?
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Student Reflection example

Journal entry # 1
Jane Doe

Activity:
Book club (Creativity)

Target skill:
Im looking to broaden my reading and literary horizons. Ive tended
to only read those books which my teachers have required me to
read for course work. In fact, I think Id have to go back to middle
school to think of a book I read for my own pleasure. I believe the
book was A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine LEngle. That book was a
fantasy, science fiction work and we tend not get such works of
literature to read in class. In addition, Ive never been part of a Book
Club. (CAS Coordinator notes the new challenge) In class, when there
are 30 of us, its easier to remain quiet and listen to other peoples
opinions about a book now, however, Ill have to actually speak up
because there will only be about nine or 10 of us. So, Ill have come
out of my comfort zone in order to really experience the Club
properly. (CAS Coordinator notes the students increased awareness
of her strengths and areas for growth)

Activity to date:
Ive read the first nearly half of the book by now and have met with
the Book Club once to discuss our thoughts on the book until this
point. Frankly, Im surprised at how much I like both the book and
sharing my thoughts. Comic books I used to love them all the
superheroes and the villains of course. This, however, is a true
graphic novel. Im getting a real sense of what life must have been
like for the protagonist and it seems shocking. I have so many
thoughts and so many themes Id like to touch on, I dont even know
where to begin. For todays entry, Ill focus on one aspect:
Feminism. At the same time, this topic leads into others. Ill try to
focus!

Lots of material here! In the West we tend to say that women have a
lot of power and individual freedoms. In many ways, were right.
However, I sometimes wonder if women are held to the same sexism
as those in many other countries just in an opposite way. In the
graphic novel, Marjane is forced to cover her hair and wear loose
fitting clothing. No tight clothes or revealing outfits. Nothing
Western is permitted not even a loose fitting t-shirt! Its almost as
if her femininity is denied to her. Now, on the surface, this seems
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horrible and shes being punished for simply being female. Then I
started thinking in North America, its almost if women are punished
if they dont wear revealing or tight clothing. Every makeover show
says that we have to show some leg or a fair mount of skin or
cleavage. Plus, how many times have we heard of a singer getting a
contract because she looks good as opposed to singing well! In
French class, Id heard about France banning the veil in its schools.
(CAS Coordinator notes engagement in issues of global importance)
So, I thought I would look the issue up about why some cultures
require its women to cover their heads this way. My research
showed that a lot of people find it sexist. However, at the same
time, a few said that this was a way to ensure that women werent
objectified and required to be sexy or sexual. How? Well, women
then dress in a way that didnt draw attention to their breasts or hips.
This forced people to focus on the ideas coming out the womans
mouth and not her body! At the same time, I learned that men have
their own particular dress code. Now, I still believe that requiring a
person to wear something and allowing them the freedom to wear
something are essential. Whats new for me is the other side of the
coin on this maybe the veil isnt something that promotes sexism
maybe its even a way to counter sexism. This is true provided that
the women are given choice to wear it. So, already while reading
just a bit of Persepolis Ive picked up on the fact that the next time I
see a woman wearing a veil in the shopping centre, I wont
automatically pity her or assume that shes forced to do it. It very
well may be her choice and that shes not treated like an object
because of it. Now, she very well may be forced I dont know. The
fact is I dont know and I need to have a more open mind to her
action/ choice/ decision/ custom. (CAS Coordinator notes that the
student considers the ethical implications of her actions)
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Student Reflection example

Journal entry # 1
Jane Doe

Activity:
Volleyball (Activity)

Target skill:
I really like sports and Ive always felt comfortable doing those sports which require
a lot of physical exertion and is high impact. Football, rugby and soccer are sports
that keep me going. Plus, I like being able to work with others. However, Ive
never really done anything low impact. Anyway, I was at a Winnipeg Blue Bombers
practice and one of the players was coming off an ACL tear. He lost a lot of time
(and money) through the injury and he wasnt up to his usual performance today.
I found out a lot of people tear their ACL because theyre not very flexible. Their
muscles are strong, but their joints and ligaments are stiff. So, I thought I would
kill two birds with one stone and do some individual athletic activity and try
YOGA!

Activity to date:
Ive signed up with a few friends to try Hot Yoga at a nearby studio. I was
expecting a bunch of older people to be there, but there were actually about half a
dozen people in their early 20s. So, Ive realized Im really not nearly as flexible
as I used to be. In Bio, the teacher mentioned that when babies are born they
have about 30 more bones than we as near adults do. Those bones fuse, and while
I worked on developing my muscles, I never tried to be more flexible. So, here
goes.

I can barely touch my toes without bending my knees. In fact, in all honesty, I
cant! My goal is to be able to be able to be a LOT more flexible than now. I dont
know if theres any scientific proof that being more flexible leads to more ligament
injuries, but it seems logical to me. Hmm... something to ask my Bio teacher.

All in all, the first lesson was interesting and a nice start to the day. It was cold
outside, but the heat of the studio was a warm welcome. I think its a physical
workout I was definitely sweating by the end and feeling more limber, but a
mental workout as well. There are 26 poses to remember. We only covered about
a dozen this a.m. The toughest part, however, was when the instructor asked us
to cleanse our mind of all stress. All I could do was think about my assignments.
Guess Ill have to work on that one! I do get the logic of taking oneself out of the
tornado of thoughts and find ones quiet place inside. I guess, turning ones mind
off for a bit will allow me to concentrate better later on when Ill need to do more of
that.

So... no toe touching today without bending my knees and I think Ive only
memorized the first five postures properly. I think Ive got my goals for the next
week. Who would have thought that ones toes could seem so far away!
(Coordinator notes increased your awareness of your own strengths and areas for
growth, undertaken new challenges, developed new skills)






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CAS Activity Approval Form

Student Name:______________________________________

Activity Category Hours
(Name of Project) (You may circle more than one.)(Estimate)

1. _______________________________ C A S _______

2. _______________________________ C A S _______

3. _______________________________ C A S _______

4. _______________________________ C A S _______

Schedule

Give a brief description of each project above, identify supervisor for
activity, and provide estimated beginning and completion dates.

Description Supervisor Dates (MM/YY)

1. ____________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________

2. ____________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________

3. ____________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________

4. ____________________________________________________
______________________________________________________
______________________________________________________

Students Signature _______________________________
Parent Signature _________________________________
CAS Advisor Signature _____________________________
CAS Coordinator Signature__________________________
Date Approved ___________________________________


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CAS Project Proposal

Student Name:
___________________________________________

Project Name:
___________________________________________

Project Start Date Project Completion Date Estimated hrs

______________________ ______________________ __________

Project Description: (May be typed and attached to this form)











Supervisor Name: _________________ Title ________________

I agree to supervise this student and agree with the estimated hours and
description noted above.

Signature: _______________________ Date ________________

Hours Completed Year 1
Sept. 1
st
Jan. 31
st
Feb 1
st
June 30
th

Hours Completed Year 2
July 1
st
Aug 31
st
Sept. 1
st
Jan. 31
st
Feb 1
st
April 30
th



Signature ______________________ Date _____________
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CAS PROGRESS FORM
(to be filled in together with the CAS advisor)
Student: __________________
CAS ADVISOR:

EVENT DATE SIGNATURE COMMENTS
Student has
declared an
acceptable
plan for CAS

First
consultation
between CAS
advisor and
student

Second
consultation
between CAS
advisor and
student

Student has
submitted
reflective work

Third
consultation
between CAS
advisor and
student

Student has
submitted final
reflections

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CAS completion form
[To be filled in together with the CAS Advisor]

Name of student: ______________________________

There is evidence that the student has fulfilled each of the following
learning outcomes.


Learning outcome

Achieved
(x)

Nature and location of evidence
(weblog/date, journal/page, etc)


Increased their
awareness of her/his
own strengths and
areas for growth




Undertaken new
challenges




Planned and initiated
activities




Worked collaboratively
with others



Shown perseverance
and commitment in
his/her activities



Engaged with issues of
global importance



Considered the ethical
implications of her/his
actions



Developed new skills




Name of CAS advisor: Mr. S. Srivastava Signature of CAS advisor:
Date:
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CAS Activity Log


Student Name


Activity
Brief Title and Description
Date Hours C A S



















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Basic Description (Name, Date, Hours)

Name: Click here to enter text.

Todays Date: Click here to enter a date.

Description of Activity (2-3 sentences): Click here to enter text.

Activity Start Date: Click here to enter a date.

Activity End Date: Your end date does not have to mean your activity is over. Any activities that span
more than three weeks need multiple reflections (IMPORTANT NOTE: If you are completing this
reflection more than one month after the end of your activity, you must consult the CAS Coordinator to
ensure this activity and reflection will be accepted. Reflections must be completed during and/or
immediately after the end of a CAS activity): Click here to enter a date.

Is this the end of this CAS activity? Clicking no will mean you will be submitting subsequent reflections
because this is a longer CAS activity. Choose an item.

How many hours was your activity? Select a number from the appropriate list; enter a zero for any CAS
categories you did not address in the activity:
Creativity: Choose an item.
Action: Choose an item.
Service: Choose an item.

Add your total number of Creativity, Action and Service Hours and select your number of hours for this
activity from the list (no combination of creativity, action or service for any one activity may exceed 30
hours): Click Here to Choose Total Hours For This Activity





Why Is It CAS?











What Qualifies As Creativity, Action or Service?
Creativity: arts, and other experiences that involve creative thinking; creativity involves the artistic
such as painting, writing, learning a musical instrument and so on.
Action: physical exertion contributing to a healthy lifestyle; the expectation here is that you get your
heart rate up and maybe break a sweat.
Service: an unpaid and voluntary exchange that has a learning benefit; this cannot be part of any of
your courses

Creativity, Action and Service (CAS) Reflection Form

CAS Hour Requirements: Remember, you require 150 hours over the course of the programme and
approximately 50 hours in each of the three areas. No Diploma will be awarded if the hour requirements
are not achieved.

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Choose one or more of the areas your CAS activity fulfills. The box above provides a brief explanation of
what qualifies as creativity, action or service; consult the CAS presentation or guide for further details (if
this is a second reflection on the same activity, simply cut and paste your responses to this question
from your first reflection):

Creativity: explain why this activity should qualify as creativity (1-2 sentences, leave blank if you did
not address this area in your activity): Click here to enter text.
Action: explain why this activity should qualify as action (1-2 sentences, leave blank if you did not
address this area in your activity): Click here to enter text.
Service: explain why this activity should qualify as service (1-2 sentences, leave blank if you did not
address this area in your activity): Click here to enter text.

Challenging Yourself In New Ways
Is this your first time doing an activity of this type (for example, is this the first time you have played
football?) Choose an item.

If you chose no, explain how you will be challenging yourself in a new way: Click here to enter text.

Reflecting on the Learning Outcomes




























Common Questions About Reflecting on the Learning Outcomes
All of the learning outcomes must be addressed at least three times over the course of the
programme, failure to do so will result in no credit for CAS and as a result no Diploma.
How long should my reflections be?
o It depends on the activity. If it was a one to two day activity, you should expect to write
3-4 sentences on EACH of the learning outcomes addressed in your activity. However, if
it is an activity like being part of a team or a CAS project that lasts a month or more,
each Learning Outcome reflection should be more like eight to ten sentences in length.
Remember, an issue of global importance doesnt have to involve ending world poverty. Losing
weight, for example, is addressing the global obesity epidemic .
Remember also that ethical implications are not only how your activity affects the world
around you but also the ethical decision making that occurs within the interpersonal
relationships you have with those around you. How are you treating others, your opponents,
how are they treating you, etc.? A broad definition of ethical implications is encouraged as
part of this learning outcome.

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Choose the learning outcomes you addressed in your CAS activity from the list below. You may choose
anywhere from 1-8 learning outcomes.

1. CLICK HERE TO SELECT A LEARNING OUTCOME
Reflect on the how this Learning Outcome was addressed in your CAS activity (read above to see
how long your reflection should be): Click here to enter text.

2. CLICK HERE TO SELECT A LEARNING OUTCOME
Reflect on the how this Learning Outcome was addressed in your CAS activity (read above to see
how long your reflection should be): Click here to enter text.

3. CLICK HERE TO SELECT A LEARNING OUTCOME
Reflect on the how this Learning Outcome was addressed in your CAS activity (read above to see
how long your reflection should be): Click here to enter text.

4. CLICK HERE TO SELECT A LEARNING OUTCOME
Reflect on the how this Learning Outcome was addressed in your CAS activity (read above to see
how long your reflection should be): Click here to enter text.

5. CLICK HERE TO SELECT A LEARNING OUTCOME
Reflect on the how this Learning Outcome was addressed in your CAS activity (read above to see
how long your reflection should be): Click here to enter text.

6. CLICK HERE TO SELECT A LEARNING OUTCOME
Reflect on the how this Learning Outcome was addressed in your CAS activity (read above to see
how long your reflection should be): Click here to enter text.

7. CLICK HERE TO SELECT A LEARNING OUTCOME
Reflect on the how this Learning Outcome was addressed in your CAS activity (read above to see
how long your reflection should be): Click here to enter text.

8. CLICK HERE TO SELECT A LEARNING OUTCOME
Reflect on the how this Learning Outcome was addressed in your CAS activity (read above to see
how long your reflection should be): Click here to enter text.

The CAS Project
Is this your CAS Project? Every CAS student is required to complete one CAS project during the two years
of the programme: Choose an item.







If this is your CAS Project, enter which aspects of C, A or S are part of this activity (minimum of two):
Click here to enter text.
Common CAS Project Questions
Is the CAS Project part of my 150 hours? Yes
What are the unique features of a CAS project:
o it must be collaborative in nature (working with others)
o It must involve at least two of the three areas of creativity, service and action.
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Final CAS Reflection
Upon completing your CAS hours and activities, you will be required to complete one final reflection.
Your reflection will involve a ten paragraph response.

In your first paragraph you are to reflect on your CAS experiences and the corresponding lessons
learned. In your next eight paragraphs you will address how, in general, you have achieved each of the
eight CAS learning outcomes (one paragraph per outcome, outcomes are listed below). Finally, write
one short summary paragraph explaining why, in the context of the aims of CAS (listed below), you
believe you should have your CAS coordinator and advisor check-off that you have completed the CAS
component of the Diploma Programme.

LEARNING OUTCOMES
Increased their awareness of their own strengths and areas for growth: They are able to see
themselves as individuals with various skills and abilities, some more developed than others,
and understand that they can make choices about how they wish to move forward.
Undertaken New Challenges: A new challenge maybe an unfamiliar activity, or an extension to
an existing one.
Planned and initiated activities: Planning and initiation will often be in collaboration with
others. It can be shown in activities that are part of larger projects, for example, ongoing school
activities in the local community, as well as in small student-led activities. This is where you
demonstrate your leadership capabilities and learn what is means to be a leader.
Worked collaboratively with others (the CAS project): Collaboration can be shown in many
different activities, such as team sports, playing music in a band, or helping in a kindergarten. At
least one project, involving collaboration and the integration of at least two of creativity, action
and service, is required.
Shown perseverance and commitment in their activities: At a minimum, this implies attending
regularly and accepting a share of the responsibility for dealing with problems that arise in the
course of activities.
Engaged with issues of global importance: Students may be involved in international projects
but there are many global issues that can be acted upon locally or nationally (for example,
environmental concerns, caring for the elderly).
Considered the ethical implications of their actions: Ethical decisions arise in almost any CAS
activity (for example, on the sports field, in musical composition, in relationships with others
involved in service activities). Evidence of thinking about ethical issues can be shown in various
ways, including journal entries and conversations with CAS advisers.
Developed new skills: As with new challenges, new skills may be shown in activities that the
student has not previously undertaken, or in increased expertise in an established area.

AIMS OF CAS
real, purposeful activities, with significant outcomes
personal challengetasks must extend the student and be achievable in scope
thoughtful consideration, such as planning, reviewing progress, reporting
reflection on outcomes and personal learning.




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Final Reflection Prompts

Creativity:
Before we complete your CAS I would like you to complete the following.

As you may be aware the description for the creativity component in CAS is: "arts, and other
experiences that involve creative thinking." As part of a typed written response that is no fewer than
250 words, explain how the activities you have allocated as "creativity" would fall under the description
noted above.

Please post your response to Managebac as a new activity with zero hours allocated and name it, "final
creativity reflection."

Upon satisfactory completion of this, I will be able to complete your CAS.


Action:
Before we complete your CAS I would like you to complete the following.

As you may be aware the description for the action component in CAS is: "physical exertion contributing
to a healthy lifestyle, complementing academic work elsewhere in the Diploma Programme. As part of
a typed written response that is no fewer than 250 words, explain how the activities you have allocated
as "action" would fall under the description noted above.

Please post your response to Managebac as a new activity with zero hours allocated and name it, "final
creativity reflection."

Upon satisfactory completion of this, I will be able to complete your CAS.



Service:
Before we complete your CAS I would like you to complete the following.

As you may be aware the description for the action component in CAS is: an unpaid and voluntary
exchange that has a learning benefit for the student. The rights, dignity and autonomy of all those
involved are respected. As part of a typed written response that is no fewer than 250 words, explain
how the activities you have allocated as "service" would fall under the description noted above.

Please post your response to Managebac as a new activity with zero hours allocated and name it, "final
creativity reflection."

Upon satisfactory completion of this, I will be able to complete your CAS.




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Learning Outcomes Reflection:
As you may be aware, the most important component of CAS is addressing the learning outcomes. For a
variety of reasons your reflections have not adequately demonstrated this. As a result, in order to have
CAS approved so you can obtain your diploma, you will need to complete a final reflection. In this
reflection you will need to explain how, over the course of the CAS programme, you have fully
addressed and met each of the eight learning outcomes. You will do this by writing a minimum 200-
word response for EACH of the eight outcomes. Your final reflection will be emailed to me as a Word
document by Sunday, May 6.

increased their awareness of their own strengths and areas for growth: They are able to see
themselves as individuals with various skills and abilities, some more developed than others, and
understand that they can make choices about how they wish to move forward.
undertaken new challenges: A new challenge maybe an unfamiliar activity, or an extension to an
existing one.
planned and initiated activities: Planning and initiation will often be in collaboration with others. It
can be shown in activities that are part of larger projects, for example, ongoing school activities in
the local community, as well as in small student-led activities. This is where you demonstrate your
leadership capabilities and learn what is means to be a leader (leadership activity).
worked collaboratively with others: Collaboration can be shown in many different activities, such as
team sports, playing music in a band, or helping in a kindergarten. At least one project, involving
collaboration and the integration of at least two of creativity, action and service, is required.
shown perseverance and commitment in their activities: At a minimum, this implies attending
regularly and accepting a share of the responsibility for dealing with problems that arise in the
course of activities.
engaged with issues of global importance: Students may be involved in international projects but
there are many global issues that can be acted upon locally or nationally (for example,
environmental concerns, caring for the elderly).
considered the ethical implications of their actions: Ethical decisions arise in almost any CAS
activity (for example, on the sports field, in musical composition, in relationships with others
involved in service activities). Evidence of thinking about ethical issues can be shown in various
ways, including journal entries and conversations with CAS advisers.
developed new skills: As with new challenges, new skills may be shown in activities that the student
has not previously undertaken, or in increased expertise in an established area.


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Getting Started
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Accessing Your Account
Signing In
After receiving your welcome email and setting your password, you can login to your ManageBac
account at your school's address (e.g. http://yourschool.ManageBac.com). On the login screen, you will
see the following fields:
Log in with your email address and the password you've set.
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Resetting your Password
If you are unable to login but do have an account, click "I forgot my password" and enter your email
address to reset.
Note: If you are not receiving welcome emails, make sure to check your spam folder. If the problem
persists, check with your coordinator to ensure you have been added to the system with the correct
e-mail address.
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Navigating through ManageBac
Via the Tabs
You can navigate through ManageBac by clicking on the tabs in the top navigation bar. You can also
easily access our PDF guide from the right menu of your Dashboard and by clicking Help in green.
The Dashboard tab allows you to view upcoming events & deadlines across your IB groups & classes.
The Profile tab is where you can post your photo and manage your contact information. This section
is only visible to school staff.
The IB Manager (Program) tab is where all of your IB functionality is located. Under the IB Manager
tab, you'll be able to add CAS activities, submit EE proposal information and complete your Diploma
plan worksheet.
The Classes tab is where you'll be able to view and join your classes. Class groups allow you to view
assignments, grades, and Internal Assessment requirements for your subject.
The Groups tab is where you'll be able to join groups. There are five group types, which are
customized for specific purposes: CAS Project, Homeroom, Sports Team, Club or Society, and Other.
The My Account tab allows you to update your e-mail address and password.
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The IB Manager tab
Hovering your cursor over the IB Manager tab will allow you to access the worksheets, which have
been activated for you.
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Updating your E-mail address and Password
Via the My Account Tab
Once you have logged in successfully, you can easily update your e-mail address and password under
the My Account tab.
You can also update your e-mail address and other contact information by accessing Edit Contact Info
under the Profile tab.
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Updating Your Profile Page
Profile Tab
Via the Profile tab, you can see the following:
(1) Personal Info: You can edit your personal information here. This information is linked to your Plans
worksheet, which will be used for your exam registration in your final year. To edit, hover your mouse
over the title "Personal Info" and click the Edit button which appears. You will only be able to edit this
information if a coordinator has not locked your workseet.
(2) Academic Progress: You can review grades & feedback of your completed assignments and
monitor upcoming assignments for each of your classes.
(3) Side tabs: These tabs are detailed in the next section.
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Side Tabs on the Profile page
(1) Summary: This tab is the default-landing page of your profile. This page displays your Personal
Information, Academic Progress, and your IB Diploma Progress.
(2) Reflections: This tab is where you set your goals for each term.
(3) Reports: Any reports generated for you will be displayed in this tab.
(4) Portfolio: All files submitted by you for your class assignments, Extended Essay, ToK, and CAS
deadlines will be organized in this tab as shown in the example below:
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CAS
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Adding CAS Activities
Via the CAS Tab
You can add CAS activities from your CAS worksheet by clicking Add CAS Activity on the right.
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You can enter your activity details, including the:
- Activity name and description
- Activity type and hours (if your coordinator has enabled tracking hours)
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- Location (In-School or Out-of-School)
- Start and end dates
- Activity supervisor information (when yourequest review, an email will be sent to the address they
have entered prompting the supervisor to submit a review on ManageBac)
- Targeted learning outcomes
After adding an activity, it is automatically submitted to the CAS advisor or coordinator for approval.
Via Groups Tab
Students can also add an activity to their CAS worksheet by joining an activity or group under the
Groups tab.
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Working on CAS Reflections
Completing Reflections
Once your CAS activity has been approved, you can start uploading reflections to your activities by
clicking Add New Reflection on the right.
You can also add journals, websites, YouTube videos, photos and files under the Reflections tab.
These must be linked to one or more of your targeted learning outcomes.
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Viewing Your Reflections
After adding reflections to your activity, you can access the Reflections tab on the side to view your
entries.
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You can also view all of your reflections from all of your activities on a single page by accessing View
All Reflections from your CAS Worksheet.
You will be able to (1) sort your reflections by date & time or by activity, and (2) filter reflections by
learning outcomes.
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Completing CAS Questions
Via the CAS Questions tab
The CAS Questions tab will be activated as soon as your CAS Coordinator prepares the questions for
you. Once CAS Questions have been created, you can access the CAS Questions tab on the right
side of your activity page.
Make sure to click Save Changes at the bottom whenever you update this page.
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Obtaining Supervisor Reviews
Via the CAS Page
Once you've finished your activity and added all of your evidence, you can either click Request
Supervisor Review, which will send an email to your activity supervisor allowing them to complete
your activity review online, or CAS Completion Form, which will create a PDF that you can print and
have signed by your activity supervisor.
Note: Once your activity has been marked Complete, you will not be able to add additional evidence or
update any of the details, so you will only want to click Request Supervisor Review once youve
finished documenting your activity.
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Editing & Deleting Your Activity
From the Activity Page
To edit or delete an activity, hover your cursor over the title of the activity, and click Edit to edit or the
trashcan icon to delete the activity.
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Joining Activity Groups
Via the Groups Tab
Under the Groups tab, you'll be able to see a list of groups that have been created. Clicking Join this
Group will add you to the Members roster, and allow you to easily add this activity group to your CAS
worksheet.
It will also allow you to post new messages and view events and photos specific to that group.
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Extended Essay
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Choosing Your EE Topic
Via the EE Tab
Under your EE tab, you'll be able to setup your EE worksheet. First, enter your topic, subject and
research question. You can do this by entering your details, or, if your details have already been
entered, hovering your mouse over the question and clicking Edit.
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Make sure to select your supervisor from the dropdown menu. If you don't see your EE supervisor on
the list, you'll have to wait until your EE coordinator has added them to the system. After saving your
project, you'll be able to see upcoming EE deadlines and To Dos, which you can check off. Once your
EE topic has been approved, you'll see the updated status below. You'll also be able to submit your
outlines, drafts and final copies under the EE Documents section.
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Under the Message Board, you'll be able to leave messages for your EE supervisor. This is ideal for
posting questions and scheduling meetings.
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Submitting your Final Extended Essay Copy
Via the EE Tab
When your EE is done, you can submit it directly to your EE & IB Coordinator by clicking on the Final
EE Deadline in blue.
Next, youll be able to upload your final EE copy by clicking Choose File.
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Once you have uploaded your EE, you will see your submitted file(s) below the Dropbox heading.
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