BISWA

Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

Another step forward…

Annual Report

2006-07

BISWA

Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

Community Empowerment

Micro-enterprise

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Health Camp

CONTENTS
SECTION – 1: ABOUT US Genesis, Mission, Vision, Code of Ethics and BISWA Model Chairman’s Reflection (Looking back and Years ahead…) BISWA- current profile The Advisory Board and Governing Council SECTION – 2: ABOUT OUR FLAGSHIP PROGRAMME Livelihood Promotion & Social Security Micro Finance Micro Enterprise Micro Insurance Social Development Innovative Schools Water & Sanitation Hatibari Health Home Swadhar & Family Counseling Centre Health & Nutrition Waste Plastic Recycling Emergent Sectors Artisan Cluster Development Grain bank Tribal Development Minority Empowerment Disaster Response-Flood Relief Niwano Peace Foundation Project BISWA-Chhatisgarh Civil Society Network Advocacy, Capacity building, Networking Network members list SECTION – 3 : SUCCESS STORIES & GOOD PRACTICES Success Stories & Good Practices SECTION – 4 : EVENTS, ACTIVITIES & RECOGNITION Eventful years 2006-07 Accomplishments (award and reward) SECTION – 5 : PARTNERS, HR & FINANCE Partners and Associates Micro-finance Operational Disclosures Future Plans (major thrust areas) Human Resource ( Staff structure ) BISWA Offices Audit Report & Financial statements 16 19 21 23 25 26 27 29 30 31 32 33 34 34 35 35 36 37 38 6 7 9 14

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BISWA

Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

Seminar on Gender Issues

Handicraft Cluster Development

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AIDs Awareness Rally

Section - 1

About us

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BISWA

Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

BISWA
GENESIS
BISWA is a community based organization in the voluntary sector, working directly with the poor and marginalized. We are registered under Society Registration Act XXI of 1860 and FCRA-1976. BISWA is also exempted under section 12A and 80G-5(F) of Indian Income Tax Act. Our strategic focus is to create enabling environment in which people have access to opportunities- to maximize their potential, to participate actively in the development process and shape the present and future of their communities and country.

Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

OUR CODE OF ETHICS
In accordance with the National Policy on voluntary organizations, BISWA will:
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Encourage and adopt transparent and accountable systems of governance and management. Respect and practice internal democracy and functional autonomy Follow legitimate methods to mobilize necessary resources for programme support and sustenance Promote gender equity and social justice in all its programme initiatives Strengthen constructive relations with civil societies and private sectors Bridging the gap between government and civil societies. BISWA will not be involved directly or indirectly in party-based political activities

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OUR MISSION
To make a real and lasting social, economic, psychological and spiritual impact on individuals; help build strong cohesive communities and generate substantial productive employment opportunities by increasing the availability of a wider range of services.

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BISWA MODEL
Phase – I Phase – II Phase – III Phase – IV Community Mobilizations Convergence and Integration (MF, ME, MI, SD), Capacity building, Networking Institution building, Good governance, Sustainability Civil Society Development, Achievement of MDG Achievement of BISWA’s shortterm GOAL Fulfillment of BISWA’s Mission and Vision

OUR VISION, VALUES & BELIEFS
Our vision encompasses a just and equitable society with emphasis on sustainable development, peace and harmony, compassion and spirituality. Our work is inspired by a set of beliefs that include respect for diversity and human dignity and opposition to all forms of discrimination. We believe that human development goals can be achieved by joint initiatives of an effective state and an engaged civil society. We reiterate our faith in the right to development as a basic human right for all.

Chairman’s Reflection…
With immense pleasure, I deliver this report of our activities before you, the stakeholders. BISWA is committed to you all- the back bone of all our achievements, the strength of our endeavor and the inspiration behind all the advancing steps. You will be happy to note that we are marching ahead to fulfill the long cherished vision of BISWA. We have many feathers in our cap, but at the same time, we do remember the challenges ahead. We are committed to generate 10 lakhs self-employment opportunities through our various employment generation programmes by the end of 2011. We know, the journey is not easy, but our continuous efforts to reach the goal will fulfill this vision. Zonal Office to look after the 10 districts of Western Orissa. This posting was the turning point of my life. My in-depth involvement with these districts made me determined to stay back in Sambalpur and pursue my social service objectives. Initially we concentrated on organizing women into groups for their empowerment, making them aware of their strengths and motivating them to take up small ventures on their own. BISWA initiated thrift and credit activities among the women, when the SHG movement was not known in the area. Besides doing plantation with the community’s help, we also supplied improved stoves and latrines to a few villagers. The first grant to BISWA amounting to Rs. 25,000 was received from NABARD for running a tailoring centre at Barmunda. In 1998, we expanded our activities to the neighboring district of Baragarh and subsequently to Sonepur, Boudh and Deogarh. In the same year, BISWA worked for the Reproductive Child Health project in Sambalpur district. In order to empower women with financial freedom, we formed SHGs among them and encouraged saving and internal loan among the members. We also realized that our core competency lay in the SHGs movement. We concentrated on similar activities in Bargarh, Sonepur, Deogarh, Boudh and Malkangiri districts. The mega health camp, organized by BISWA in the year 2002 in Sambalpur was the most effective programme of those days; more than 10,000 patients were treated with medicine and food for three continuous days. This programme improved BISWA’s

Looking back….
I remember the year 1971, when my home district Jajpur was affected by a severe cyclone. As a student, I rendered voluntary service of providing relief and shelter to the affected. I saw the sufferings of the people, especially the poor. In 1976, I joined the State Bank of India at Khariar in the newly formed Nuapada district where I observed what poverty in Orissa meant. It was then that I perceived the need to start a social service organization. My dreams were realized on 1st January 1994 with the formation of BISWA at the nondescript tribal village of Barmunda and Ghungotipada slum in urban Sambalpur. As fate would have it, I was given the responsibility of being the Nodal Officer, Community Services Banking and posted at Sambalpur

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BISWA

Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

image. In 2002, we became a partner of the Care-Cashe project of SHG movements and Microfinance activities for SHPI in Orissa. That was the real turning point and the focus on our Microfinance activities in the state strengthened. Ever since its constitution, BISWA has been keen towards meeting social needs and demands. We decided to act in a focused and sustainable manner. Soon, Microfinance, Microenterprise, Micro-insurance and Social Development became the four pillars of BISWA’s plan and programme. We owe our gratitude to Care-Cashe, Dikonia, My Heart, Smt. Jayshree Mohanty, Sri M R Mishra and many others who extended to us the required support during the strugglefilled initial phases of BISWA. Today, we have grown to be one of the largest MFIs in the Asian subcontinent with more than 23,000 SHGs and over 3,75,000 members. We have crossed borders to extend our services to 10 more states and thus graduated as a national organisation. The reason behind this growth and success is the commitment and dedication of my dedicated staff, encouragement from various developmental and funding agencies, besides the support from the people and media. I owe my gratitude to all of them.

The biggest challenge before us remains the elimination of extreme poverty, hunger and capability gaps. We have to spread education, training and enterprise for selfemployment, self-help and sustainable livelihood. Moreover, we have to empower women and promote equity; and ensure improvement in maternal, adolescent and child health; these and combating HIV/AIDS, TB, malaria and other communicable diseases are among the major concerns. We have to conserve common property sources and ensure coexistence of ecology and economy. We have to fight injustice and exploitation, promote human rights and build partnerships and alliances for development. BISWA is committed. We have to mold and move our organization to match the trends of social needs. Microfinance is just a means for our development strategy, not the end. All the SHGs we have formed will be federated, and each of the federations will be linked directly with BISWA-promoted NBFC for their micro-credit operations. BISWA believes in the total empowerment of the communities. All members of these federations have to take up different micro-enterprises for self-employment; thus reducing poverty. These exercises need a lot of training and many capacity-building activities. With an integrated approach, BISWA will also give emphasis to education, improvement of skills and techniques in the poor, betterment of health conditions, total sanitation( by adoption of villages and urban slums), waste management (to keep the environment clean) and of course to whatever is needed for making life smoother. Yet, along with all these, we need your continuous support to fulfill this dream.

The years ahead…

8 We understand what our people expect from us. We are also
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aware of the commitments made. We realise our contribution towards the development of the county upholding the democratic structure of our country. We have to respect basic human rights and to contribute our share of efforts to the 8point Millennium Development Goals (MDG). It’s a challenging task and our plans and programmes are structured accordingly. The BISWA MODEL, will be the guiding force towards the fulfillment of this achievement.

[ Khirod Chandra Malick ]

BISWA Current Profile - Past & Present
Acronym : BISWA Complete postal address : Danipali, Budharaja Sambalpur - 768004, Orissa, INDIA Telephones : +91-663-2533597 +91-663-3096538 +91-9437056453 +91-9861016663 +91-9337300631 Tele-fax : +91-663-2533597 +91-663-2520198 E-Mail : b_wa@rediffmail.co kc_malick@yahoo.com kcmalick@biswa.org Website : www.biswa.org Legal Status 1. Registered under Societies Registration Act XXI of 1860, Government of India vide Registration number 20060-41 of 2005-06 dated 01.07.2005 (issued against old registration no. 4824-22 of 1996 dated 15.07.1995) 2. Registered under Foreign Contributions (Regulations) Act 1976, Government of India vide Registration number 105060053 dated 05.07.2000 3. Exempted under section 12 A and 80G of Indian Income Tax Act 4. Income Tax Permanent Account Number (PAN): AAATB 4843L 5. Registered under Orissa Sales Tax Act 6. Registered under Central Sales Tax Act 7. Registered under Disabilities Act of Department of Women and Child Development, Government of Orissa 8. Licensed to export handicrafts 9. Registered under Indian Labour Act Outreach Orissa-30 districts, Chhattisgarh-16 districts, Rajasthan-1 district, Uttaranchal– 1 district, Madhya Pradesh-1 district, Uttar Pradesh1 district, Nagaland-1 district; West Bengal and Jharkhand through partner NGOs, and NCT of Delhi. BISWA BISWA’s approach for social development is integrated with Microfinance, Micro-enterprise and Micro-insurance. It believes in community laid and community driven institution building. BISWA aims to generate 10 lakhs self employment opportunities by 2011.

MICRO FINANCE
BISWA aims to make financial services available to women from the lower income group at the lowest possible cost at their doorsteps; and revive the roots of banking besides making a lasting social & financial impact on individuals. It is also working towards generating substantial job opportunities and economic benefits for the society at large. Objectives
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To bridge the gap between demand and supply To provide collateral free loan to the poor To bring changes in public policies and practices in favor of the poor and deprived, particularly in the areas- economic, fiscal and social administration To encourage & collaborate with people and institutions with objectives similar to those of BISWA mFI 1. By M-CRIL as 2. By CRISIL as 3. By Mix Market ß+ mFR3 ****

Ratings:

An Overview of BISWA Micro-Finance Sector (31.06.2007)
No of districts covered Total number of Self Help Groups Total members Total Federations formed Total saving mobilized Number of loans disbursed Amount of loan disbursed Average loan size Total outstanding Rate of repayment (cumulative) Operational Self Sufficiency Portfolio at Risk Sector wise distribution (%) Agriculture Small Business Consumption Total NGOs supported 62 27 11 33 51 (in nine states) 23,418 3,76,249 191 154.63 million Rs. 20,739 1,818.046 million Rs. 87,663 Rs. 897.28 million Rs. 98 % 115 % 2%
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BISWA
BISWA NBFC

Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

BISWA started its microfinance activities in 1994. Initially the activity was concentrated in Sambalpur district. The external credit facilities to the SHGs were either by directly linking the SHGs to the Banks or BISWA availing small loans to extend the credit. NABARD was first apprised of the SHG promotion of BISWA and it extended promotional grant support. During the year 2002, CARE-India (Orissa) conducted PACT Study. In June-2002, CARE-India (Orissa) came up with the Credit and Savings for Household Enterprise (CASHE) Project to be partnered with BISWA for Sambalpur District. The main thrust of the partnership was to promote BISWA’s microfinance program to become a separate legal entity with increase in the outreach, scale & microfinance program performance. During the four years of partnership, BISWA was able to achieve many milestones on the SHG promotion & strengthening front. The community-based institutions in the form of small associations called MBTs were formed and legalized. The journey never ended there. With continuous mentoring and support from CARE-CASHE team, BISWA could think of legalizing its mF operation as an NBFC for profit- the first of its kind in Orissa. In this context, the support of a consulting firm from New Delhi called Nimbus Consultancy and venture capital by Bell Whether are noteworthy.

fair and level playing field for every micro-entrepreneur, so that they need not be permanently dependent, just because they do not qualify for mainstream finance. Objectives
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Imparting skill-development trainings Creating community capital base to undertake production and activities Establishing forward and backward linkages for smooth operation Control and development of quality of produce with value addition Export promotion of SHG products Networking among firms and Institutions Capacity-building of the rural, tribal & urban youth. Conducting technological workshops to impart technological training Visits by of experts from recognized institutions Workshops on good health & work safety

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Common Facility Centres BISWA has established three Common Facility Centres (CFCs) for different crafts. They include two CFCs for brass and bell-metal artisans at Rengali in Sambalpur and Katapali in Bargarh and another for leaf cup-plate makers at Boudh. The CFCs have been beneficial for the artisans to produce finer objects with semimechanised process. Common problems like raw-material, marketing, new designs and finance have been solved. Cluster Development BISWA is presently developing 6 artisan clusters- four in Bamboo and two in Dhokra. The Bamboo clusters include ones at Jhankarbahali in Sambalpur Kudumulguma and Ghanabeda in Malkangiri, and Gariabandh in Raipur. The Dhokra clusters of Kishore Nagar in Angul and Bairapari in Malkangiri have also been adopted. Training cum Production Centers: As of now BISWA has established 14 training cum production centres in various parts of the state. They include ones on soap, soft toys, tailoring, Badi and Papad making, weaving, candle making, sisal fiber craft, Sambalpuri sarees, brass and bellmetal, readymade garments, paper-plate making, tie and dye, leaf-cup plate making and bamboo craft.

MICRO ENTERPRISE
BISWA has promoted micro-enterprise among the target groups in its operational area irrespective of their membership in the SHGs promoted by it or otherwise. The objectives of the MicroEntrepreneurship development programmes of BISWA are to bring recognition, legitimacy, respect and opportunity to the 100,000 skilled micro-entrepreneurs in Orissa. It also intends to create a

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Micro Enterprise

Micro Enterprise Development Institute (MEDI) BISWA plans to establish a Micro Enterprise Development Institute that shall act as a resource center for development of micro enterprises. The institute shall facilitate forward and backward linkages for micro-enterprises. It would also promote export of SHG products. The proposed entity is to be registered as a not-for-profit company under Companies Act.

to be covered within the next two years. The following thrust areas have been identified and intervened to better the situation.
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Availability of safe drinking water Establishment of innovative schools Enhancing health status Extension of credit service Livelihood support programme for SHGs

SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT
Basic Needs Programme The Basic Needs programme deals with drinking water, education, food and healthcare. However the unique aspect of the programme is its drive to provide all the four needs together and thus uplift the marginalized to a basic standard of living. The programme was initiated by Mrs. Joyasree Mahanti, a renowned social worker residing in Michigan in the USA, after she came in contact with BISWA in 2002. Since then, she has been working in association with BISWA for the overall development of 48 villages. Sixteen of these villages have already been covered and the rest are intended

Socialization of Leprosy Cured Persons Padmashree Dr. Isaac Santra, an eminent Gandhian social worker, established an Ashram for persons affected by leprosy, at Hatibari in the year 1951. The centre was named after the village as Hatibari Kusthashram, which later came to be known as ‘Hatibari Health Home’. The Home provides an opportunity to the leprosy affected as well as cured persons to lead a normal life with self-respect, dignity and without the feeling of being socially excluded. Earlier, the infrastructure available at the Home viz. the cultivable land, the industrial sheds (for black-smithy/ rope making/ tailoring/ handloom weaving), the fish ponds and the orchards enabled the lepers to work with confidence and lead a respectable life. However,

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Blood Donation Camp

Rehabilitation Camp

Soya Milk Production

Agro-farming at Hatibari

BISWA

Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

after the demise of Dr Santra, the maintenance of the infrastructure went down gradually. Subsequently, the Hind Kushta Nivaran Sangha advised BISWA to take over the infrastructure available at the Home. Presently, the Home has 192 inmates out of which 97 are male and 95 are females. The inmates are now being imparted functional vocational training support. BISWA has also involved three other NGOs in the programme. Reproductive and Child Health BISWA, since 1999, has been implementing the Government of India’s Reproductive and Child Health (RCH) program through its Bhubaneswar based mother-NGO, My Heart. The activities have been carried out in 20 Gram Panchayats of Sambalpur covering a total population of more than 80,000. Till date, BISWA has implemented programmes pertaining to reproductive and child health benefiting more than 1,50,000 people across the district. Similarly in Chhattisgarh, BISWA has covered Nawagarh block of Janjgir Champa district under its RCH programme. As many as 375 households have been covered under three PHCs with one each at Bargaon, Kukuda and Rigni. Health camps Conducting Health Camps has been an efficient method to ensure quality in the health standards of the rural mass. BISWA has so far conducted 76 camps in which almost 12000 persons have been examined and provided medicines free of cost. Special emphasis has been laid on population control, and the control of prevailing diseases in rural and urban slum habitats.

In a follow up, 94% were found to be successful operations. This activity was organized in collaboration with National Blindness Control Programme and the Chief District Medical Officer. Family Counseling Center The Central Social Welfare Board, through the State Social Welfare Advisory Board extended its support to establish a Family Counseling Center (FCC) covering Sambalpur district. The Center was established on March 1, 2004. In 2007 alone there have been as many as 28 cases pertaining to dowry, marital maladjustment, extramarital affair etc. The subjected families are duly counseled and a majority of them have overcome their differences. Swadhar The Department of Women and Child Development, Government of India has supported BISWA to establish a SWADHAR home for destitute women. The home is meant to provide shelter, food, clothing, medical and legal assistance to the inmates. Besides, it also provides counseling services and economic rehabilitation. The home currently houses 50 inmates. Urban Sanitation Programme Sanitation within urban limits remains the responsibility of the local self-governance system, the Municipality or the Notified Area Council (NAC). Working in association with these bodies, BISWA has been carrying out sanitation activities at Sambalpur, Bargarh, Hirakud and Brajarajnagar areas. The sanitary workers have been organized into Self Help Groups where they are no more employees. What they do is what they own. The sanitation activities in the wards under the control of BISWA are done with more sincerity & involvement and therefore cost less. Total Sanitation Campaign BISWA has been identified as the key resource center of Orissa State Water and Sanitation Mission for Sambalpur, Jharsuguda, Bargarh, Sonepur, Deogarh, Sundargarh, Mayurbhanj and Boudh. The broad programme components are:
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CBD Centers ‘Heath for all’ has been a global cry for more than 10 years now. Responding to this, BISWA in association with the community has established a Community Based Dispensing system to gradually empower the community and identify their health needs. In addition to 10 CBDs covered under RCH, BISWA has established another 110 CBD centres covering Maneswar and Jujumora blocks of Sambalpur district. Ophthalmic Care
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IEC Campaign Installation of Individual Household Latrines (IHL) Building up community level infrastructure for sanitation

1856 patients were treated in various eye camps of BISWA 1626 patients were provided with medicines for their treatment 840 patients were provided with spectacles (glasses) 362 eye patients were operated in the eye ward of district headquarters hospital; 562 cataract cases operated.

By the end of May 2007, BISWA had covered 80 villages in 13 districts and constructed 2000 IHLs. BISWA has ensured households access to a clean and secure supply of water besides safe and convenient sanitary facilities.

Total Sanitation Campaign is also being implemented in the Nawagarh block of Janjgir Champa district of Chhattisgarh. BISWA has been maintaining 37 Sauchalayas and Bath Complexes in Dhanmantari and Sibinarayan area of Chatisgarh. In Chatisgarh BISWA has constructed 2500 toilets for BPL families. In Swacha Chatisgarh Abhijan, BISWA already installed 500 latrines to the BPL families of Ambikapur District This apart, BISWA has undertaken sanitation training programmes targeting Anganwadi workers, auxiliary nurses, mid-wives and primary school teachers in the target area. Also, 25 village Water & Sanitation Committees (WSC) have been promoted by BISWA. Plantation As a special measure to restore greenery, BISWA has taken up intensive plantation in its operational area. The programme concentrates on replenishing existing forest-cover and creating new vegetation in the wasteland. It has carried out:
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Supply of Drinking Water

Plantation of 16,500 bamboo shoots in the jungle adjacent to Jhankarbahali Plantation of lemon, mango, bamboo, lichee, guava, papaya and sisal fiber in 196 acres at Hatibari Health Home Plantation of lemon saplings at Maneswar

Waste Plastic Recycling

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Plastic Recycling Unit Since long, BISWA has been working for environmental protection; the latest on the cards being waste management, especially for the non-biodegradable kind (i.e. waste plastic products). It has established an environment-friendly waste plastic recycling unit at Sambalpur. The waste plastic materials collected from Sambalpur and other nearby towns are molded and transported to other parts of the country to be re-cast. The unit gives special attention to generate mass awareness among the common public about the plastic use in Sambalpur and nearby areas. Condensed course school The Central Social Welfare Board has supported BISWA to establish and run a school to impart education to school dropouts and non-enrollees belonging to the age group 10-16. The course offered is condensed and concerns to girl children alone. The school has been established at Jahankarbahali village which is situated in a remote and difficult area, far from heath and education facilities.
Staff Training

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Unwed mother Urkuli’s marriage with her lover Daktar Bhoi at Swadhar

BISWA
Intervention for the disabled

Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

Networking of NGOs BISWA is also into identifying civil society bodies nourishing similar dreams with an aim to bring them together and work collectively. BISWA utilising its available skills, experience, work force and other resources has been enhancing the capabilities of such NGOs. It has already established a network of civil society organizations in Orissa, West Bengal and Chhatisgarh. Presently there are 137 NGOs with the BISWA NETWORK to take up the social development activities in a partnership model.

BISWA and the District Disability Rehabilitation Center (DDRC) jointly organized an “Identification and Follow-up Camp on Disability” in different blocks of Sambalpur District where both community awareness and Parent Counseling programmes were conducted. As many as, 304 persons with different disabilities were identified and referred to the District Treatment and Rehabilitation Center, Sambalpur.

Our Leaders

Board of Advisors
Dr. Bhagbanprakash-Chief Advisor, Dr. Debi Prasanna Patnaik, Sri Bibek Pattnaik, Dr. Diptibala Pattnaik, Sri Maguni Jena, Sri Raghunath Mishra, Sri Pravakar Rout, Sri Prafulla Kumar Dhal and Sri Khirod Chandra Malick.

Dr. Bhagbanprakash

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Governing Council
Sri Khirod Chandra Malick, Chairman, Sri Pahelu Dip, President, Mrs. Jagadamna Rao, Vice President, Sri Niranjan Tripathy, Vice-President, Sri Pitabas Sethi, Secretary, Sri Sunil Kumar Panda , Asst. Secretary, Ch. Bijayabati, Treasurer, Mrs. Phula Sibil, Member, Ms. Rajasini Sibil, Member and Rahil Sibil, Member

Sri Khirod Chandra Malick

Section - 2

About our Flagship Programme

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BISWA

Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

Livelihood Promotion & Social Security
Micro Finance
2.1.1 Micro-finance involves mobilization of savings, extension of small loans, micro-insurance and essentially an element of capacity building of the beneficiaries to label them more pre-bankable than non-bankable. Micro-finance services have been rendered under different models; Individual lending, Joint Livelihood Group (JLG) lending, Self Help Group (SHG) lending and Co-operative lending. The formal financing institutions including banks with international origin and presence operating in India have a large stake in the micro-finance sector owing to two main factors; regulatory demand by the central bank of the country (RBI) to invest with the rural and urban poor, and a visible strength of the sector in generating a sizeable profit for the bankers. In the early part of the century, international development agencies such as CARE launched their micro-finance programmes in different states, which not only channeled a large amount of finance to reach the poor, but also built up capacities of small mFIs in terms of professional approach to micro-finance. 2.1.2 In 1996, BISWA started forming SHGs, for which, it mobilized grants from NABARD and linked these to banks for credit. The same year, it started on-lending activity after receiving loans from the State Bank of India amounting to Rs.10,000 per borrower. In 2002, BISWA entered a successful partnership with the Credit and Savings for Household Enterprises (CASHE) programme of CARE India, which has given a thrust to its microfinance programme. on a declining basis (until September 2006, the lending rate was 13 per cent per annum). These MBTs and NGOs lend to SHGs at the same rate. As of March 2007, though BISWA had promoted 164 MBTs, it had given credit to 26 MBTs only; its loan outstanding in this segment was Rs. 88.89 million. Moreover, it has a partnership with 83 NGOs across three states – Orissa, Chattisgarh and West Bengal. As of March 2007, it had outstanding loans of Rs. 85.97 million towards its NGO partners. As on March 2007, BISWA had 22,768 SHGs on its rolls (including federated SHGs), covering 19.718 villages with a loan outstanding of Rs. 856.22 million (own portfolio of Rs. 276.43 million and serviced portfolio of Rs. 579.79 million) from 192,810 borrowers. Out of Rs.942.19 million outstanding (as on 31 March 2007), 82 per cent was towards the SHG segment,5 per cent towards the partner NGO segment, and the remaining 13 per cent towards the MBT segment. 2.1.3 Promotion of Federations of SHGs During 2005, as a consolidation process and a part of the expansion plans, the Self Help Groups were formed into Self Help Federations. Each Federation would have 11 to 50 SHGs operating in a compact geographic area as its constituent member and would have its legal entity as a Mutual Benefit Trust under the Indian Trusts Act. By the end of September 2006, 98 such Federations were formed having 2829 SHGs as constituent with 34,064 members and 28 out of them have already been registered under the said act. Features include:
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geographies cover all the 30 districts of Orissa and 18 districts of Chattisgarh. Though it has only 42 branches, it operates in a number of districts and states through partner NGOs and Mutual Benefit Trusts (MBTs). During 2005-06, the NGO-MFI piloted the microfinance programme in six new states, namely, Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh, West Bengal, Jharkhand and Nagaland, with the help of partner NGOs. Going forward, BISWA plans to intensify its microfinance operations in these states. The NGO-MFI also started its microfinance programme in Bihar in June 2006. BISWA lends to SHGs, NGOs and MBTs. MBTs are networks of SHGs in a village. These MBTs are registered as trusts under the Indian Trust Act, 1882. Each MBT has 11 to 50 SHGs (each SHG consisting of 10-20 members) as its members. BISWA lends to SHGs at a rate of 20 per cent per annum (on a declining balance basis), and to MBTs and NGO partners at 15 per cent per annum

It is a client-owned and managed institution with authorized legal status It is a bigger platform to address social and other common issues It is also a common platform for sharing experiences, knowledge and skills Empowerment of SHGs and development of leadership quality Bringing SHGs to a common mindset Minimizing operational cost Creation of a profit center at community level Empowering community members to address their socioeconomic needs at their own level

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Utilization of capital of the SHGs rather than keeping them idle with a bank or other institution Close monitoring of SHGs Ensuring sustainability of SHGs Use of leadership quality, and conflict resolution Recognition of local resources and its use for development Value addition to traditional activities

2.1.4 Promotion of Non-Banking Financial Company (NBFC) Pursuing the road map prepared in 2003 for BISWA micro-finance programme, a Non-banking Financial Company (NBFC) was established to cater to the financial needs of the clients: the Federations promoted by BISWA, the SHPIs and BISWA. Under BISWA’s present legal status, it is very difficult to meet the financial needs of the promoted SHGs, the promoted Federations and the SHPIs. This is due to the volume and enhanced intake capacities of the clients and the growth plans of the organization in the next 5 years. Gradually, steps were taken for the new entity and advice was sought from experts and consultancy firms. For the Business Development Plan of the new entity, assistance was availed from Nimbus Consultancy Pvt. Ltd, New Delhi. Similarly, legal assistance was hired from Mr. V. Nagarajan, Chartered Accountant, New Delhi. Following the experts’ opinion and constraint of equity deposit of Rs. 2 Crores with RBI for registration of a new NBFC, BISWA decided to take over an existing NBFC titled “Credible Securities & Finance Pvt. Ltd’’, registered within the meaning of Section 2 (35) and 3 (1) (iii) of Company Act 1956, having its registered office at New Delhi. To know the financial and legal status of any existing NBFC, due diligence needs to be exercised which was done for “Credible Securities & Finance Pvt. Ltd’’ by Nagarajan & Co., Chartered Accountants; and analyzing the status and the recommendation of Nagarajan & Co., BISWA took over “Credible Securities & Finance Pvt. Ltd” a Delhi based NBFC. An agreement was reached

for the takeover. As per the guidelines of RBI, the NBFC needs to have a paid-up capital of Rs. 2 crores. For the equity part, invaluable support from some NRIs in the form of a loan fund amounting to Rs. 51 lakhs was extremely helpful in taking over the NBFC. With this loan fund, BISWA was able to generate the major equity of Rs. 76.5 lakhs (including the loan fund from the NRIs) and Rs. 73.5 lakhs was generated from Bellwether Micro Finance Fund (A Netherlands-based Institution) which took the paid-up equity up to Rs. 1.5 crores. With Rs. 2 crores convertible debt from Bellwether Micro Finance Fund, the NBFC’s capital now stands at Rs.3.5 crores. The lending structure of this NBFC will be:
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Lend money to BISWA. Lend money to BISWA-promoted Federations Lend money to network NGO-MFIs involved in micro finance activities.

By 2010 BISWA will have a portfolio of 250 Crores while BISWA NBFC will have a portfolio of Rs.200 crores. Gradually the portfolio at BISWA will go on decreasing from the year 2010 while the portfolio of BISWA NBFC will increase. By the year 2015, BISWA will have a portfolio of around Rs.5 crores that will be with respect to the newly promoted Self Help Groups that would not have been federated. In due course of time, the NBFC met all paraphernalia/ compliances and submitted all the forms in prescribed formats to the RBI, the Registrar of Companies and to the Ministry of Company Affairs for the smooth operation of the NBFC. The NBFC has also applied for the change of its title from ‘Credible Securities & Finance Pvt. Ltd’ to ‘BISWA Micro Finance Services Pvt. Ltd’. Although the NBFC was taken over on 5 April 2006, due to these legal compliances it could extend a loan on 16 November 2006 to its first client “BISWA Self-Help Federation Dhankauda-01”, to the tune of Rs. 89 lakhs.

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Annual Report
2006-2007

450,000

SHG

MBT

NGO

400,000 350,000 300,000

365,325

13

5

250,000 200,000 150,000 100,000

SHGs

Members

186,478

71,845 14,338 982 2002-03 2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 33,522 2,265 4,699 12,437 22,768

82

50,000 -

Growth in terms of numbers of SHGs/ members over last 5 years

BISWA
Delivery channels

Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

A Glimpse of BISWA’s Micro-Finance Programme as of 31 March 2007
1. Self Help Groups (SHGs) 2. Self Help Federations (SHFs) 3. Self Help Promoting Institutes (SHPIs) Total SHGs Total members Total SHGs credit linked Total members credit linked Total SHGs having outstanding Total members having outstanding Total SHFs Total SHFs credit linked Total SHPIs credit linked Total SHPIs having outstanding Total credit extended during the year Total outstanding end of FY Operational Self Sufficiency Debt Equity Ratio Return on Performing Assets Yield on Portfolio Cost per Unit Money Lent Average portfolio per credit officer Average loan size Portfolio at risk Life Insurance Health Insurance Assets Insurance 1. State Bank of India 2. Rashtriya Mahila Kosh 3. ICICI Bank Ltd. 4. HDFC Bank 5. UTI Bank 6. ABN Amro Bank 7. National Minorities Development Finance Corpn. 8. Friends of WWB of India 9. Small Industries Development Bank of India 10. Credible Securities & Finance Pvt. Ltd. 11. United Bank of India 12. Swayamsree 13. SDCC 22,768 365,325 19,994 253,737 15,170 192,810 196 26 83 83 1103.76 mn. 942.19 mn. 118% 11.25 17.6% 17.3% 0.36p. 3,520,929/87,615/0.3% 60,196 153,223 62,178

No. of SHGs

No. of SHFs No. of SHPIs Extension of credit Some key ratios

Insurance Coverage

Financing Institutions Linked

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Annual Report
2006-2007

2.1.5 Impact of the programme
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Change in expenditure pattern. The intervention has enabled households to spend adequately on the education of children, address health issues, better housing conditions and above all, save for rainy days. Reduce vulnerability to social exclusion and poverty

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Assets creation Enhanced status of women Participation in social & political process Collective efforts for various social issues Elevation from being housewife to entrepreneur

Micro-Enterprise
2.2.1 India is being recognized as a country that has the potential to emerge as a superpower and only economic prowess can accelerate its journey to the group of developed countries. However, a country recognized for its economic potential, also shares the distinction of being the country with the largest section of people below the poverty line. India seems to be inhabited by two kinds of people living far apart. Micro-enterprise is one of the initiatives to provide support and develop effective strategies to improve the livelihood situation of the poor. Generally, micro-enterprise refers to a small scale business unit that starts with a budget between Rs. 25,000 to Rs. 75,000 and operates within this range. Micro-enterprise aims at reducing poverty by providing opportunities for self-employment and developing skill and entrepreneurial attitude. Micro-enterprise is responsible for the betterment of SLF model (sustainable livelihood framework) in clusters/communities. It covers the all round development of various livelihood assets (social, natural, physical, financial and human). 2.2.2 BISWA has already optimized resource support to more than one lakh skilled micro–entrepreneurs in Orissa. It aims at creating entrepreneurial attitude, reducing income poverty and generating opportunities for self-employment. BISWA is into promotion of the Micro Enterprise Development Institute (BMEDI), a resource center for developing micro-enterprises. Besides promoting agro and forest based micro-enterprises, three common facility centers for artisans have been established at Rengali, Kantabanji and Balkati (in Sambalpur, Bargarh and Boudh districts of Orissa). 2.2.3 Objectives of BISWA in micro-enterprise
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Empanelled master craftsmen in as many as 33 trades and assured to support producer SHGs not promoted by BISWA.

2.2.5 Laxmipriya BISWA has its own production unit called Laxmipriya. It is a chain of marketing outlets that facilitates marketing of SHG and microenterprise products. More than 1000 SHGs are linked to the Laxmipriya chain which sells more than a hundred kinds of items such as tailor-made garments, handicrafts and handloom ,brass and bell-metal, Dhokra, processed food materials, leaf plates/cups etc. Poverty is often related to inadequate income, lack of livelihood and employment. Micro-enterprise provides access to credit and covers the larger part to support these three types of micro enterprises.
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Home-based producers– produce items such as; candle, soap, badi, papad, etc. Petty traders – Small, seasonal vendors of vegetables and fruits Employment – provides services for the youth, who may be engaged in activities such as doing local laundry, catering etc.

2.2.6 Training cum Production Centers (TCPC) BISWA has developed a chain of training and production centers to facilitate micro-enterprise training and productions in various regions. Those are: Soap Making: At Budapada village of Baduapali GP, Maneswar Block, a soap production cum training unit has been formed with financial assistance provided by one of BISWA’s allied organizations in USA. The unit produces 200 kgs of washing soap per day and can impart training to 20 trainees in a single batch. The unit was established in February 2004. Presently the capacity utilization is 65% in terms of production and 80% in terms of imparting training. The produce is distributed through wholesale and retail.

BISWA aims to reduce poverty by encouraging entrepreneurship with focus on rural development and gender equality. To enhance the human and institutional capacities required to foster entrepreneurial dynamism and productivity. To organize rural artisans by networking them and spread awareness on skillful business practices and knowledge on market strategy. To set up a production centre for local and international requirements with the available natural resources and skill.

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Annual Report
2006-2007

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2.2.4 Progress/Achievements
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BISWA has created direct employment opportunities for 67,814 persons and indirect opportunity for around 47,137 persons. It has established training cum production centers at rural and urban locations and extended a credit limit of Rs 37 million to artisans.

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Soap Making

BISWA

Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

Badi-Papad Making: The products of this unit located at Kamli Bazaar of Sambalpur Municipality are marketed under BISWA’s own brand name ODDISSI. The unit trains women entrepreneurs and rehabilitates successful trainees as production assistants in the unit. Soft toys making: This unit is situated at Kamli Bazaar and has been operating since 2002. Since its inception, it has trained 84 ladies in the trade and rehabilitated 14 women in the center. Around 20 women of a minority community are being trained at a satellite unit established at Pensionpada, Sambalpur. Candle Making: This unit functions at Hatibari Health Home for the economic rehabilitation of the leprosy cured persons. Since 2002 the unit has trained 33 persons in the trade. It produces fancy as well as utility candles for the local market. Tailoring Unit: This unit operates as a local intervention. It provides training to newcomers and then provides the trainees with employment opportunities. In the past year, the unit has imparted sewing and embroidery training to 23 women from Sambalpur urban area. Weaving Unit: This unit functions from Hatibari Health Home and provides training as well as employment opportunities as a rehabilitation measure. With minimum input, the inmates are able to produce and market clothing for households at a reasonable price. Leaf Cup/Plate Unit : This unit utilizes locally available Siali leaves, a minor forest product. It engages 20 lady inmates of the Health Home in the making of leaf-cup/plates with the help of machines, which caters to the local market on demand. Bamboo Craft Unit : With an aim to promote the traditional handicraft in bamboo, 120 artisans have been formed into 12 Self Help Groups at Jhankarbahali and are being given latest inputs to produce quality products with optimum use of raw materials. With support from NABARD and the Government of Orissa, under its Skill Development Program; the targeted people were imparted skill development training. Training has been imparted to members

of 7 SHGs in Kudmulguma and 5 SHGs in Ghanbeda of Malkangiri district in bamboo craft trade. Sisal Fiber Unit: BISWA has established a training cum production unit for Sisal Fiber at Hatibari Health Home. Fiber is obtained from Sisal by an extractor, which can then be used to make various utility and decorative items. The product has a high demand in local as well as national markets. Sambalpuri saree unit: Sambalpur is famous for its handloom sarees. BISWA has established a saree weaving training cum production center at Katapali of Bargarh. This unit imparts training to around 100 traditional artisans and has ensured sustained income for the traditional artisans of the area. Brass and Bellmetal Unit: BISWA has established training cum production center for brass and bellmetal artisans in Katapali, Bargarh. With support from NABARD, this unit imparts training to around 100 metal craft artisans under Rural Entrepreneurship Development Programme. A Common Facility Center is to be set up at Katapali in the Rengali cluster. Readymade Garments Unit: The unit provides training to the SHG members of Diptipur, Bargarh on readymade garments. So far around 68 members from a minor community have received training and are earning their livelihood successfully. Tie and Dye unit : The Tie and Dye unit has been imparting training to SHG members at Bheden and Marikel of Bargarh district. 2.2.7 Cluster Development BISWA has been following the cluster model of development to address the needs of the people in project areas. Three villagesGanesh Nagar, Rampela Camp and Chauladipo have been adopted under the cluster building programme. The artisans have been greatly benefited by the Common Facility Centers set up in these villages.
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20
Annual Report
2006-2007

Bamboo cluster at Jhankarbahali, Sambalpur Dhokra cluster at Kishorenagar, Angul Dhokra cluster at Bairapari, Malkangiri Bamboo cluster at Kudumulguma, Malkangiri Bamboo cluster at  Ghanabeda, Malkangiri Bamboo craft (kandi) in Gariabandh of Raipur district (focusing Kamar tribe)

2.2.8 Impact of the Programme BISWA has till date assisted 4,259 entrepreneurs in self employment and engaged 596 wage earners. The organization has also created indirect employment opportunities for a population of around 16,693 in rural areas by way of encouraging agrohorticulture, promotion of handicrafts and encouraging petty businesses.
Papad Making

Micro-Insurance
2.3.1 Micro-Insurance is the recent intervention in the development sector. It is the provision of Insurance to low-income families. Poor households are especially vulnerable to risk, in both the form of natural calamities as well as more regular occurrences of illnesses and accidents. Micro-finance institutions (MFIs) have played an active role in reducing or protecting them against such situations by providing credit for increasing income-earning opportunities; and by providing savings services to build up resources that can be utilized in cases of emergencies. However, such events still translate into crisis for many poor households and erode the economic gains they have made as clients of microfinance programs. Credit and savings services are inadequate when households are exposed to risks that cause losses beyond their means. Insurance can serve as a promising response to such client needs. Today micro insurers are providing different forms of insurance for life, health, property, disability, agriculture (crop) etc. Poor households pay a small premium for a limited coverage in the event of losses. As one of its development interventions and as a social security measure, BISWA covers its clients under three micro-insurance schemes. l For Life with LIC’s Janashree Bima Yojana (JBY) and with TATA-AIG; l For Health with ICICI Lombard; and l For Assets with Oriental Insurance Company BISWA’s continuous pursuance has resulted in a massive growth in its micro-insurance operation. As a recognition of BISWA’s pioneering work in the field of micro-insurance, it was conferred the national award by Planet India and ING Vysya Bank in 2007. Three departments are working in BISWA Insurance cell
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LIC insurance cell ICICI Lombard insurance cell Tata AIG insurance cell

2.3.2 LIC insurance cell BISWA initiated this cell in 2003-2004. This cell provides insurance to people in the age group of 18-60 years in rural areas. Facilities provided under this scheme:
l

The nominee gets Rs 30,000 on natural death of the policyholder and Rs 75,000 in case of accidental death. In an accident case with total disability, the policyholder gets Rs 75,000.

l

BISWA has developed the social security of people by convincing the SHG members to be insured. The organisation has covered all 30 districts in Orissa. A total of 69,250 members are covered under this scheme. 2.3.3 ICICI Lombard health insurance cell BISWA started this cell in October 2005. BISWA is working as the partner organization of ICICI Lombard in implementing the health insurance scheme in Orissa. It helps disseminate promotional materials, product literature and helps in monitoring the scheme. Each member has been offer a bouquet of four products. As of now, 1,53,262 members from various SHGs are being covered under the health insurance scheme.

BISWA’s Micro-Insurance Coverage and Benifits
Sl. Insurance No. Company 1 LIC Details of policy coverage Life coverage 1. Janashree Bima Yojana 2. Scholarship for 2 children Health coverage Assets coverage 1. Janata Personal Accident Policy 2. Kisaan Package Policy 3. Shopkeepers Insurance 4. TATA-AIG Life coverage Sampoorna Bima Yojana Premium details by the SHG members Rs. 100 per annum No extra premium Rs. 325 per annum Claim from Rs. 50,000 to Rs. 1,00,000 Rs. 60 to Rs. 250 Rs. 60 to 250 As per the age but sum assured is Rs. 10,000 Support provided by BISWA Role of Insurer and intermediary facilitation for early claim settlement Role of Insurer and intermediary facilitation for early claim settlement Role of Insurer and intermediary facilitation for early claim settlement

21
Annual Report
2006-2007

2 3

ICICI Lombard Oriental Insurance

Role in Insurer and intermediary facilitation for early claim settlement. Advance premium payment, if necessary

BISWA
Sl. No. 1 2 3 4 Police Coverage LIFE LIFE HEALTH ASSETS Insurance Company and when started LIC March 2003 TATA AIG June 2007 ICICI Lombard January 2006 ORIENTAL February 2006

Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

BISWA’s Micro-Insurance Achievements Total clients covered up to Sept’07 69,250 5,106 1,53,262 62,178 Number of claims made upto Sept’07 78 NA 314 14 Claims settled and payment received 58 Rs. 13,40,000 NA 204 Rs. 12,42,334 5 Rs. 8,21,357

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22
Annual Report
2006-2007

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TATA-AIG Insurance officials field visit

Oriental Insurance Awareness Workshop

Social Development
Innovative School
2.4.1 Aims and Objectives Aiming at furthering the goal of education, change and social development in Sambalpur, BISWA with the help of “Asha for Education”, a philanthropic trust in USA and friends from abroad, launched 20 schools in rural Sambalpur and Kalahandi titled the “Innovative Schools”. These schools were conceptualised with the vision of undertaking support, sponsor study and spread education in its different forms. It aimed to;
l

2.4.2 Activities These schools impart elementary education from class one to seven according to the state course curriculum. In addition, traditional systems in land-use, water-use and water harvesting, agriculture, animal care, food preservation and herbal medicine are taught. A host of other activities like bamboo work, pottery, and broom-making have invariably proved to be ecologically sound and innovative for the students. BISWA attempts to prove that traditional systems are extremely important even in the so-called world of modern science and technology.  Their ecological rationality remains valid even in the modern context.  School children and the illiterate villagers know their environment very well and experts in fact should learn some basics from the villagers. The students are made aware of their livelihood pattern and its impact on the environment and ways and means of regenerating the lost component. The schools run from 7 AM to 10 AM on every working day and each school is managed by a single teacher. The students are provided with a mid-daymeal consisting of a balanced diet, as healthy children are effective learners. The students are also supplied with study materials free of cost. Girl students, who get promoted from these innovative schools are distributed cycles, so that they can commute comfortably to different schools for further studies. 2.4.3 Monitoring & Evaluation To continue in the right direction and implement better strategies, there will be a half-yearly evaluation of the project’s progress, which would indicate the position of BISWA on the set objectives. This evaluation may suggest a need to change the plan of action charted at the beginning of the project. 2.4.4 Project sustainability Mrs. Joysree Mohanty (NRI), the promoter of this project has already raised the required funds through generous donations made by several US based non-resident Indians. She has also ensured proper utilization of the donated funds as well as effective implementation of major plans. During project implementation, BISWA has sensitized the villagers about the advantages of being educated and their responsibilities in securing the future of their children. Meanwhile BISWA through its micro-credit support has been improving the standard of livelihood by supporting the families of these students through several income generation activities. In the long run, BISWA plans to motivate the village community to contribute towards the running of these schools on their own.

Impart all types of formal & non-formal education with constant search for innovative ideas & techniques. Facilitate total development, in body, mind and spirit through provision of external stimulation based on the inner urge and motivation of target groups. Development and strengthen the necessary institutional framework in rural & tribal areas which will initiate, promote & sustain the objective of education & social transformation. Establish open communication channel between people and policy makers. Equip children with the knowledge necessary to become active participants and positive contributors to their communities. Provide children with a joyful and creative school atmosphere that incorporates the education and skills relevant to a meaningful and dignified existence.

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23
Annual Report
2006-2007

A frend from USA discussing with school children

BISWA
2.4.5 Details of the Innovative Schools Sambalpur Sl. No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Kalahandi Sl. No. 1 2 Location of the School RUDIPADA GOHIRAPADA Location of the School JHANKARBHALI RATHIPADA TANGARJURI BUDAPADA KANKUDIPALLI MENDALIPALI KUNDEBAHAL BOLBANGA ANTAPALLI BALARANGA BASUNMURA JADULUSINGH MAHULPALLI MATIKHAI KANBAR TABLOI BABUPALLI Dharakhaman

Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

Grampanchayat Baduapalli Baduapalli Baduapalli Baduapalli Batemura Baduapalli Baduapalli Dakara Baduapalli Batemura Sahaspur Dakara Baduapalli Batemura Huma Degaon Jujumara Dakara

Total students 59 20 31 28 42 45 19 27 30 34 30 30 50 28 27 40 26 40

Classes I to V I to V I to V I to V I to V I to V I to V I to V I to V I to V I to V I to V I to V I to V I to V I to V I to V I to V

Started on 15 December ‘02 15 December ‘02 15 December ‘02 15 December ‘02 15 November ‘03 15 November ‘03 15 November ‘03 15 November ‘04 15 December ’04 15 December ’04 15 December ’04 15 December ‘04 15 December ‘04 15 December ‘04 17 January ‘05 25 December ’06 25 December ’06 17th January ‘07

Grampanchayat Rugidipa Takarla

Total students 36 42

Classes I to VI I to VII

Started on 6th February’06 6th February’06

24
Annual Report
2006-2007

Prayer meeting

Personnel counselling

Soya milk breakfast

Water and Sanitation Mission
2.5.1 Orissa has a population of around 37 million of which 86% live in rural areas (Census 2001). Less than 20% of the rural population of the state has access to protected water. While less than 1% have an access to piped water supply, less than 5% have access to sanitation. Lack of access to safe drinking water is a major factor leading to health and loss of productivity. BISWA has striven to prove that communities can lead a healthy and dignified life by working together to address the issue of water supply and sanitation. 2.5.2 BISWA’s Approach l Provide drinking water and sanitation facilities to every rural household and thus, develop the quality of life in the state through collaboration with the Governments of Orissa and India for their programmes. l Ensure that each household in its operational area has access to safe drinking water and convenient sanitation facilities through water and sanitation programme. l Every household be equipped with separate sanitation facilities and should have a source of clean and safe drinking water. l Hygiene promotion in schools to create conditions where children themselves are agents of change in their families, community and living environment 2.5.3 Broad Program Components of BISWA l IEC Campaign: An integrated approach for maintaining the health and hygiene in rural areas. Bhubaneswar based BGVS (Bharat Gyan Vigyan Samiti) has been selected to act as the state co-coordinating agency for the IEC project. l Installation of Individual Household Latrines (IHL) l Building community level infrastructure for sanitation 2.5.4 Awareness Campaign l Diseases and infections resulting from contamination of water l Drinking water supplies that contain high amounts of certain chemicals (like arsenic and nitrates) causing serious health conditions.
l l l

Reckless over-consumption and misuse Restrict pollution of natural and ground water sources Check depletion of underground water levels

2.5.5 Swajaldhara BISWA plays a key role in successful implementation of the Swajaldhara programme at various locations in its area of operation on priority basis.  BISWA has launched the Swajaldhara programme in 40 villages of Maneswar Block, and has targeted to cover another 50 in 22 districts by the end of 2007. 2.5.6 Construction and Maintenance of Souchalaya Apart from water sanitation program, BISWA is also involved in construction and maintenance of Janata Souchalaya in Orissa. Recently, BISWA completed the construction of Janata Souchalaya at Atachakipada, Burla with strong collaboration with the Health and Urban Development Departments of Orissa. At present, BISWA maintains 37 souchalayas cum bath complexes in Dhanmantari and Sibinarayan area besides constructing 7 new souchalayas in Chhattisgarh. BISWA is also into construction of individual lowcost sanitation (ILCS) units in the slum areas of Birgaon and Raipur in Chhatisgarh. It has already constructed 2500 toilets for BPL families where the sanitation facilities were lagging behind. In the Swacha Chhattisgarh Abhiyan, BISWA has installed 500 latrines for the BPL families of Ambikapur District. 2.5.7 Roof Top Water Harvesting Structure Roof top water harvesting is highly encouraged in BISWA’s operational area. A RTWHS has been constructed at Jujumura girl’s high school of Sambalpur and handed over to the management committee for proper maintenance. More RTWHSs are being encouraged in other areas. 2.5.8 Water Harvesting Structure (WHS) BISWA is taking initiatives to encourage construction of waterharvesting structure in the rural pockets of Western Orissa to increase surface storage capacity. This will lead to increase in groundwater level and easy availability of water during off-season for human consumption. 2.5.9 Management activities & Micro credit initiatives towards water & Sanitation BISWA provided micro credit facilities to the SHGs for the construction of toilets. It also provided loans for drinking water program for BPL and APL families in rural areas. The village health and water sanitation committee that undertakes the management consists of members of Self Help Groups and PRI members of the village with close collaboration with BISWA. Sanitation loan were also provided through SHGs and village sanitation committee to make the programme a complete success. BISWA has already constructed 2,000 Individual Households Latrines(IHL) in many villages of twelve districts of Orissa.

25
Annual Report
2006-2007

Individual Household Latrine

BISWA
Hatibari Health Home

Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

2.6.1 Lepers have sores and wounds on their bodies. But, these ugly wounds of society are seldom cured. The best they receive from family, friends and neighbors is rejection. The disease called leprosy affected more than just the body. It bought immense mental pressure resulting from the unemployment, loss of respect and eventual inequality. Only death could free them from a life of begging and hiding. But that was when Hatibari had not proved itself. An inspiration spread over 563 acres of rural hinterland amply demonstrates the strength of human will. Turning the tables, BISWA has healthy people following rehabilitated patients cured of leprosy, inspired by the success of Hatibari Health Home in socialization of these real untouchables. Every aspect of this Home is worthy of recognition and replication. The center has been unique from its very inception. The founder, Dr Santra had foreseen an economic backbone for the inmates of this home. Therefore, along with the usual barracks and medical facilities, one sees a planned layout aimed at improving the financial condition of the cured patients. From 1951 until his death in 1968, Dr Isaac Santra nurtured the home and saw it grow beyond proportions. When the upkeep started suffering in the subsequent years, the organisation then in control of the home seriously reviewed the situation and suggested steps. Consequently, BISWA took over the charge under mutually agreed terms and conditions.

making, handloom weaving and sisal fiber work, it has revived gainful employment and hope of life for them. By providing them with an enhanced stipend of Rs 250 and a decent meal consisting of rice, dal and curry, it has striven to raise their standard of living. This is reflected in their level of confidence. Of the 102 acres of land available for cultivation, only 5 acres had been utilized. BISWA’s efforts brought another 81 acres under productive utilization. 46 inmates are engaged in agricultural activities. Such small farming and manufacturing activities constitute micro enterprise development. Proper training for manufacturing and development of work-related skills has made them experts in practices like agriculture, pisciculture, goat-rearing, cloth weaving, sisal work, candle making, toy making etc,. For this, they receive wages ranging from Rs 350 to Rs 150. Credit linkages have been established with formal financing institutions for extension of credit to the members of the SHGs under DRI scheme of the State Bank of India, Hatibari. The three SHGs formed by BISWA among the women at the Health Home and one in Santrapalli (a village outside Hatibari for completely cured people) have regular meetings and awareness sessions. 2.6.2 Basic Statistics: Hatibari Gram panchayat Block District Distance Capacity Total inmates Males Females Hospitalization ward (beds) Description Cultivable land Residential land (Two colonies, barracks, kitchen, hospital, roads, etc.) Forest coverage Tanks (four) Land available to BISWA for agriculture / horticulture purposes Total Area Nrusinghagarh & Jhankarbili Jujumara Sambalpur 25 kms from Sambalpur city 194 192 97 95 20 (Male-12 Female-8) Total 102 acres 149 acres 200 acres 26 acres 86 acres 563 acres

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Annual Report
2006-2007

Statue of the founder Dr. Isaac Santra at Hatibari Health Home

BISWA found much of the infrastructure in shambles and morale among the inmates extremely low. The sheds meant for industrial activity, cooking and residence were dilapidated and needed repair. The income-generation programmes had lost steam and government aid was meager. Of the four industrials sheds, only two were usable. Five of the 17 looms were dysfunctional and all 10 sewing machines were useless. With no proper backup for earning, the inmates once cured of the disease went back to beg. The restoration of dignity was still incomplete. BISWA, in its short span of management has set the wheel of change turning. Through training and production facilities in candle-

Involvement of inmates in various income-generating activities: Goat-farm 03 Cow-shed 06 Rope-making 07 Sisal fiber Candle-making 03 Weaving 13 Agriculture 46 Other 33

As the lease period has been extended by 3 years, BISWA has proposed certain activities with an intention to make the Home self-sustainable. l Agro-forestry to be the prime concern l 5000 saplings to be planted in the existing forest land and orchards l Provide adequate infrastructure such as irrigation/ water harvesting structure/ repair of sheds and roads for better yield from the fields.

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Imparting vocational and skill development training in a more effective manner Three phase electrification for industrial processes Preparation of a product catalog Planting other plant species to maintain bio-diversity Tourism plans for sites in the Home area Construction of sales and parking area by the authorities

Candle making by the inmates at Hatibari Health Home

Weaving by the inmates at Hatibari Health Home

SWADHAR – the home for destitute
2.7.1 Women constitute half of the world’s 7 billion people. However, a simple check on the number of oppressed reveals a startling ratio. The sufferers are pre-dominantly women and the tormentors are no strangers; it is their own men- husbands and lovers, who wrong them. In some cases, the indifference by the families aggravates the situations. Recognizing the gravity of such situations, BISWA set up SWADHAR. It is much more than just a shelter for the women deprived of their basic rights. Supported by the Department of Women and Child Development Govt. of India, BISWA established SWADHAR- a home for destitute women. The Home is meant to provide shelter, food, clothing, medical and legal assistance, counseling services and economic rehabilitation to the inmates. It has a housing capacity of 50. 2.7.2 SWADHAR is open to l Widows deserted by their families and relatives.
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Women with HIV/AIDS deserted by family/or lost husbands to AIDS

2.7.3 Objectives l To provide the primary needs; shelter, food, care and clothing l To facilitate emotional support and counseling l To rehabilitate these women socially and economically through education, awareness, skill upgradation and personality development l To arrange medical and legal support 2.7.4 A day at SWADHAR... For the inmates, there is a planned schedule of activities to make them feel at home. They avail recreational facilities and other valuebased support systems. 2.7.5 Management The project is managed by a dedicated team consisting of a superintendent, a fulltime counselor, an accountant, a cook, a peon and security personnel. A lawyer has also been engaged for legal support. The Home has its own neighborhood committee for smooth functioning of the centre. The functioning of SWADHAR will be monitored and evaluated by a district level committee. The SWADHAR scheme aims at addressing the specific vulnerability of such women in difficult circumstances through a Home-based holistic and integrated approach.

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Female prisoners released from jails and without family support Women survivors of natural disasters, who have been rendered homeless and are without any socio-economic support Trafficked women/girls escaped/rescued from brothels etc. Women/girls who are victims of sexual crimes and disowned by family Mentally challenged women(except psychotic cases that require special attention) without caregivers

BISWA
2.7.6 Family Counseling Centre – Activities : 2007 Sl.No. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27
Annual Report
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Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

Name of Beneficiary Subarnamanjari Nayak Kartik Gadtia Bijayini Hota Anta Samal Sombari Suna Pramila Sahu Tapaswini Beriha Anjali Sethi Santosini Panda Aushmati Bag Bhagabati Barala Gomati Barik Nandini Deep Pratima Behara Liwan Kashyap Anu Mohanty Haripriya Pradhan Jipa Bag Puspa Meher Sandhyasini Pradhan Gulapi Kumbhar Nilam Pradhan Rukmani Jipuria Menka Tandia Nandini Mahanand Rajiv Dash Urkuli Bhua Nitu Mishra

Date ofAdmission 02.04.07 18.04.07 19.04.07 27.04.07 11.05.07 17.05.07 26.05.07 25.09.07 28.05.07 04.06.07 04.06.07 04.06.07 07.06.07 08.06.07 14.06.07 29.06.07 22.06.07 10.07.07 17.07.07 23.07.07 12.07.07 28.07.07 16.08.07 06.09.07 29.08.07 04.09.07 05.09.07 22.09.07

District Sambalpur Sambalpur Sambalpur Sambalpur Sambalpur Bargarh Sambalpur Sambalpur Sambalpur Sambalpur Sonepur Sambalpur Baud Sambalpur Unknown Dhenkanal Sambalpur Sambalpur Bargarh Sambalpur Sambalpur Sambalpur Sambalpur Sambalpur Sambalpur Bargarh Sambalpur Bargarh

Age 27 28 36 24 21 34 37 32 26 24 33 32 27 32 12 21 38 33 41 30 21 24 26 29 20 18 27

Type of Case Marital Maladjustment. Marital maladjustment Extramarital affair Dowry torture Dowry problem Deserted by her in-laws Deserted by her family Extramarital affairs Deserted by husband Problem with in-laws Deserted by husband Marital adjustment Marital maladjustment Deserted by husband Missing Deserted by husband Marital maladjustment Extramarital affair Marital maladjustment Dowry problem Marital maladjustment Marital maladjustment Deserted by the society Deserted by husband Came for job Earlier registd. marriage Maladjustment Marital maladjustment

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Activities by the inmates at Swadhar

Family Counselling at Swadhar

Health and Nutrition
2.8.1 In order to deliver the wealth that comes with good health, BISWA has taken many initiatives such as health camps, RCH fairs and other health awareness programmes including CBD centers and Malaria control programmes. 2.8.2 Healthcare through Community Based Drug Distribution Centres (CBDs) BISWA emphasizes on establishing Community Based Drug Distribution Centers (CBDs) under RCH programme in Sambalpur district. In addition to 10 covered under RCH, BISWA has established another 110 CBD centres covering Maneswar and Jujumora blocks of Sambalpur district. Health activities are being carried out by BISWA to check prevailing health disorders and generate awareness on healthy living, hygiene and sanitary practices. The CBD Centres are established in the villages having Self Help Groups (SHGs) promoted by BISWA and selected members are provided with necessary training on health grounds to run the CBD. 2.8.3 Activities Medicines for common ailments, equipment for childcare etc. are provided at the centres. These CBD centres have proved to be very useful in the control of prevalent common diseases, reproductive and child health, healthful living practices etc. As a strategic application, governmental health programmes have been merged with the programs of these centres and information. Communication and education materials have been extensively used to disseminate information, educate the mass and establish effective communication with the community. 2.8.4 Malaria Control Programme Every year, malaria claims countless lives in India, especially in Orissa. Fever, body ache and chill are the main symptoms of this disease. Malaria may precipitate in miscarriage, abortion, or stillbirth and may complicate pregnancy by causing severe anemia and low birth-weight infants, and in severe cases, death of the newborn or/and its mother. 2.8.5 Prevention measures for malaria Mosquitoes are the only known vectors responsible for transmitting this disease. Therefore, one of the most important malaria prevention measures is to avoid mosquito bites. Bed nets/mosquito nets are used to keep off mosquitoes. It works even better when treated with an insecticide. BISWA provides ITNs to all households to cover beds and sleeping areas. As the nets need to be retreated with insecticide chemicals every six months to remain effective against mosquitoes; volunteers from BISWA retreat the nets with insecticide free of cost. BISWA provides two types of loans for these nets. The first type pays only for the nets on purchase, but demands cash payments in six months and in 12 months. The second type of loan pays both for the net and for the next six retreatments. 2.8.6 EYE CAMPS in 2005-06
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1856 patients were treated in various eye camps in BISWA 1626 patients were provided with medicines for their treatment 840 patients were provided with spectacles (glasses) 362 eye patient were operated in district headquarters hospital 562 cataract cases also operated

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Awareness Rally for Safe Motherhood

Health Camp

BISWA
Waste Plastic Recycling

Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

2.9.1 Waste management is an important step to improve environmental conditions, community health and living standards. BISWA initiated Waste Plastic Management project with a slogan: ‘For a Greener and Better Environment’. 2.9.2 BISWAs’ Approach The modern world generates tons of plastic waste everyday. BISWA believes in creating wealth by proper utilization of waste that communities generate, through the intelligent process of waste collection and recycling. BISWA also aims at generating employment opportunities among urban youth through waste management and plastic recycling. 2.9.3 Objective: Motives of Waste Plastic Management are to: l Create awareness on the threat that plastic waste poses to the community’s well-being. l Encourage and promote enterprise-based solutions for effective management of plastic waste. l Make utility oriented products by improvising the use of waste plastic. 2.9.4 This project works in three stages: Recover: Plastic wastes are recovered Recycle: Plastic wastes are processed, refined and recycled Reuse: New objects are made from the recycled materials for reuse. 2.9.5 Intervention The Urban Waste Management project initiated by BISWA covers 3 urban bodies, i.e. Sambalpur Municipality, Notified Area Councils of Hirakud and Burla.

Specialists from BISWA analyzed the land, assessed the quantum, the location of waste that needs collection, suitable recycling technologies and the interest and involvement of the community in this regard. 2.9.6 Recycling Process Process of recycling occurs in six stages:
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Collection and Segregation Cleaning and Drying Sizing / Chipping Agglomerating / Coloring Extrusion Fabrication into end product

2.9.7 Impact of Biswa’s Intervention On the environmental front, the Waste Plastic Management project has helped to improve baseline information on plastic waste management in projected areas and generated awareness among the locality. The project resulted in building up of a hygienic, clean and healthy environment. It was also found helpful in restoring soil fertility and conservation of national energy. This project had a notable impact on the socio-economic development in the project region. Being productive by nature, the Waste Plastic Management project generates enterprise opportunities in all municipalities. BISWA plans to rehabilitate beggars and needy people by extending employment opportunities under this project.

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Waste Plastic Recycling

Ingots from Plastic Waste

Emergent Sectors
2.10.1 Natural Resource Management This is not a paradigm shift in BISWA’s structural programmes, rather an addition to the existing. Integration at this level is an indication of our readiness to accept innovation while thriving to uphold the organizational vision and mission. This sector is being explored keeping in mind the intrinsic values of community involvement, participatory approach and need based intervention. Soil, water and vegetation are the three basic natural resources and BISWA recognizes their importance. While the earlier attempts were limited to organizing awareness campaigns and plantation drives, the present stage has taken a number of programmes into its fold. Our firm belief rests on the notion that regeneration and restoration of degraded ecosystems will increase their productivity; and that there can be generation of employment through these activities. Forest conservation programmes can make headway now, as it has become a major thrust of the Central Government. Many forest development and conservation projects have been initiated throughout the nation (e.g. NFDP, NFIP, CFCP and OFADP). We have collaborated with district administration functionaries in forest conservation projects. At present, Orissa Forest Area Development Programme is being run in two districts – Deogarh and Keonjhar; and we are to begin in Sundargarh and Angul too. The programme aims at integrated forest development and biodiversity conservation through people’s participatory approach. Focal Areas l Water Management: Application of innovative techniques for maximizing availability of water and optimizing its use l Watershed Development: Efficient use of rainwater and balancing the ecological cycle for land development resulting in increased soil productivity. l Forest Management: Mobilization of SHGs and VSS for entrepreneurship development on forest products and forest waste utilization/ Utilization of forestland inside forest, without disturbing the ecology l Aquaculture, dairy and poultry development 2.10.2 Alternate Energy Energy is an essential requirement for every household, be it power for irrigation or fuel for lighting and cooking. However, in the easy utility of the so-called traditional energy, we tend to ignore its finite presence and effects on the environment. Our initiative to this end has been two-pronged – protect ecology on one hand and provision of alternate energy for the people on the other. Our project on setting up a biomass unit has been initiated with support from BE Foundation, Bangalore and HIVOS India. In the last three months, extensive feasibility study has been done in 20 villages across Sambalpur district and approaches have been made to different agencies for carrying the project forward. Focal Areas l Biomass unit: Utilising animal dung supplemented with kitchen waste and dry leaves to provide smoke free cooking system to rural women l LED: Reaching the areas where grid electricity is not a visible reality, with LED lamps, a cost effective and efficient form of energy 2.10.3 Industrial Relationship Building Industrial Relationship Building (IRB) envisions a future model of finance flow to the development sector. As is widely practiced, the Non-Governmental Organisations depend upon external/ foreign funding to meet the programme costs. However, as we cast an eye on the ever-shrinking funds, its unreliability is realized. Considering this, a programme on Industrial Relationship Building was formulated, which we expect to be a replicable model. Focal Area l Human Resource Assistance: Utilising our personnel for capacity building of industry staff and training modules for mutual benefit It is a step forward in bringing relevance to the programmes. Our intervention in these unexplored sectors is expected to direct the attitude of the people towards gaining benefits from the government projects.

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Watershed Development

In the area of water management, BISWA has envisaged plans for integration of water sources with static water bodies; in which the degraded land in the command area of the static water body is converted to cultivable and the farmers can plan a second crop. The initiatives are in accord with the Government of India’s declaration of 2007 as the Year of Water Productivity and the prioritization of Development of Water Resources in the 11th fiveyear plan. Work has started Maneswar Block of Sambalpur, where community mobilization has been done for efficient land use and forest conservation.

BISWA
Artisan Cluster Development

Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

2.11.1 Research in the field of industrial clusters of Small and Microenterprises indicates that they have shown ability to grow, innovate and compete successfully under recessionary conditions. The clusters have assumed further significance in the wake of liberalization. The handicraft sector has experienced many difficulties. The muchrequired expansion in business commonality developed a collective approach towards the market and this approach resulted in interfirm linkages. This approach is the main reason behind the success of clusters. Along with the competition in production and domestic marketing, the clusters observe a co-operative behavior, such as establishing common facility centers and common brand building for the export market on some fronts. The requirement of support may not be usually in terms of commercial activities, but more in terms of contributing towards awareness generation, developing cluster vision and action plan, creation of common facilities, marketing under a common brand, encouraging network formation and in capacity building. 2.11.2 Cluster Development Programme BISWA has initiated Cluster Development Programmes with an aim to reduce poverty, generate self-employment opportunities and to nurture entrepreneurial attitude among the traditional artisans. Under this programme, BISWA has optimized resource support to more than one lakh skilled micro–entrepreneurs in Orissa and formed 3 common facility centers for the artisans in Rengali, Kantabanji and Balkati (Sambalpur, Bargarh and Boudh districts in Orissa). Katapali, Bargarh

2.11.3 Brass initiatives in cluster development BISWA has established training cum production center for the brass and bellmetal artisans at Katapali in Bargarh. There are 280 enterprises in this cluster that provide employment to 1500 people; NABARD supports 15 Rural Entrepreneurship Development programmes and skill upgradation. The basic objective of this programme is to ensure holistic development of the cluster through intervention in various strategic areas. Activities carried out as a part of cluster development programme: Diagnostic study of all 280 enterprises was undertaken to understand the updated status of the clusters and to figure out the scope of improvement.
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Diagnostic study results revealed that the area of technology upgradation lacks business development services and accessibility to new technology. In order to overcome this problem, BISWA provided exposure facilities to a group of artisans in various technological areas at Moradabad, Uttar Pradesh. Industry Structure Analysis and SWOT analysis to understand the growth potential of clusters An awareness workshop was organized to circulate the findings of the diagnostic study and to chalk out a new action plan Seminars were designed to address cluster-generic problems to improve the performance of the enterprises. Importance on buyer-seller meets to strengthen backward linkages for the clusters. These links provide a platform for both the buyers and sellers to understand market requirements. A databank of business-development service-providers has been developed with the purpose of helping entrepreneurs in sourcing quality BDS. A cluster map was developed with the information about all stakeholders in the cluster and their linkages. This map also furnished updated institutional matrix that proved useful in network building. BISWA has introduced the provision of personal counseling on an average of 2-3 hours for the entrepreneurs by its staff members. BISWA scrutinizes the progress as to whether the suggestions and guidelines are properly followed by these entrepreneurs.

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32 Katapali is an industrial city in Bargarh district. It is famous for
Annual Report
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manufacturing household articles with brass and bellmetal along with fancy and decorative pieces.

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2.11.4 Future course of action BISWA has visualized the project with the following activities:
l Dhokra Cluster Development Inauguration

BISWA has plans to carry on conducting workshops covering technology, marketing, export, ISO 9000, etc.

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BISWA plans to organize buyer-seller meets to strengthen linkages for the clusters Importance to be given to strengthening of local industry associations and promoting of capacity-building activities for cluster actors. Documenting best practices to facilitate demonstration for other pro-active entrepreneurs

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Technological implementations leading to improvement in quality and productivity Seminars on technology, diversification and marketing have been planned to make entrepreneurs aware of the ‘best practices’ to improve their performance. Developing a better market linkage for the enterprises, BISWA is exploring the possibility of direct export linkages.

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Grain Bank
2.12.1 Concept: Though India is a land of agriculture, every year this country suffers from food shortage due to natural calamities like floods and droughts. It makes people, especially the poor ones in rural area prone to exploitation by wealthy moneylenders exploited them. BISWA initiated the Grain Bank concept as a support to farmers and people related to agriculture to meet the scarcity. 2.12.2 Goal: Through the Grain bank project, BISWA aims to ensure food security during lean period of 3 to 4 months every year (from July to October) and to meet the emergency needs of the community. 2.12.3 Objectives § Form & strengthen Grain Banks in all operational villages and § Meet food deficiency in the lean period 2.12.4 Strategy: BISWA has plans to meet the situation on community basis. The organisation is keen to involve each household of the community. 2.12.5 Member Composition: A Grain Bank will be formed with a minimum of 10 members involving all households of the community. Priority will be given to the poor and needy persons. 2.12.6 Saving: Individual savings may vary from 5 tambis to 10 tambis. Therefore, the saving quantity will be fixed by the community, which will be decided after considering the saving capacity of the poor members. The saving benefit will always be added to groups and the group will decide about the individual benefits. 2.12.7 Loan: The Grain Bank can disburse loans in case there is a need and the community will decide whether the need for loan is genuine or not. Repayment will be made after harvesting. In case of drought/emergency, the group will decide on future action. No recurring loan will be entertained. Priority will be given to non-loaners and the upland beneficiaries of the respective villages will return the support amount to the Grain Bank after harvesting. The interest rate will be fixed at 25% per Year i.e. 5 tambi per 20 tambi grain. Matching grant will be provided for a period of minimum three years as against the deposit of the members, which may be extended after observing the availability of fund. 2.12.8 Records: Grain Bank members need to maintain proper record with all details. Each Grain Bank needs to maintain records on: § Meetings (Resolution) § Saving § Loan disbursement § Grain bank member’s details § Matching grant (Contribution register) § Loss & Benefit § A single register for all above the records 2.12.9 Management: Grain Banks need to form a managing committee for smooth operation and management. There should be at least 10 members in a committee. One member will be nominated from GS executive body to look after all grain bank related matters along with a member from the grain bank. The EC member would be called ‘Sasyagar Parichalak’ and the member from grain bank ‘Sasyagar Upaparichalak’. Rotation of management will be done every two years. A general meeting of Grain Bank members must be held quarterly i.e. four times in a year. In case of necessity, it can be more than that. 2.12.10 Storage & Utilisation: Proper storage of grains will be ensured with indigenous practices at a common place. Grains need to be well preserved. The stock can be used for emergency purposes of the community and individuals. So far, BISWA has formed 8 Grain Banks in Maltideipur block.
Sl. No 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Name of the Grain Bank BISWA Gramyadevi Grain Bank BISWA, Maa Mauli Grain Bank BISWA Bira Bajrangbali G.Bank BISWA Radhamadhaba G. Bank BISWA Ramji Grain Bank BISWA Maa Jogipali BudharajaG.B. BISWA Maheswari Grain Bank BISWA Laxmi Grain Bank Village / Block Jhankerbahali Budapada Tangerjuri Antapali Mahulpali Jogipali Mendhalipali Rathipada Members 34 10 36 24 34 10 17 20

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BISWA
Tribal Development

Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

2.13.1 With a vision to create a poverty-free society, BISWA has started intervening in the tribal areas of Gariabandh, Manipur and Chhura blocks in Raipur district of Chhatishgarh. BISWA conducted a baseline survey and found that economically, these regions are much below the national average and this moved BISWA to intervene. The survey report reflects that the per-capita income of a Kamar Tribe family is Rs. 300 per month. This tribe is dependent on the bamboo trees in the Maleiba Hills, a nearby forest to earn their livelihood. Not only this, the tribe had to live in a detrimental condition and therefore bound to face various health hazards. 2.13.2 Initiatives from BISWA As a part of its intervention in Kanthidadar village of Gariabandh block, BISWA imparted training to 20 SHGs on making bamboo stick (khadi) that is used in incense sticks. Many women in the area were trained on making cup and plates with Siali leaves. A

small manual machine was provided to the incense stick makers and the other group received 40 machines for making leaf cup plates. These groups were then linked to the market. It comes out as a completely different story in just six months. Few days of training and support increased the per-capita income of these tribal women to Rs. 40 per day. Aided by the training, a blind lady of 62 years age earns Rs. 20 to Rs. 25 per day now. As the market for their products is booming, the per-capita income of this tribal community has increased. For example, the weekly sale of a local vendor has increased from Rs. 300 per week to Rs. 3000 per week. This micro-enterprise development program from BISWA has not only supported the poor tribes women with a better livelihood opportunity, but also proved helpful in checking deforestation and enhanced forest revenue for the government.

Leaf Plate making by a Tribal Girl

Bamboo Stick for Incense Stick by a tribal

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Minority Empowerment
2.14.1 People of the minority Muslim community are under extreme hardship in almost all ways of life. Lack of proper livelihood is the main cause behind this hardship. BISWA has initiated a programme for the empowerment of this minority community under NPF programmes in Sambalpur and Jharsuguda districts. These two districts have a Muslim population of 23.4% and 21% respectively. Bamra, a block headquarters in Sambalpur district with 68% Muslim population, gets special attention. BISWA has established a Muslim Cell at Motijharan, Sambalpur and formed seven SHGs with an aim to empower the women there. The members of these groups get vocational training to improve their economic status by enhancing various livelihood opportunities. Under the Innovative School Project, BISWA runs an Islamiya Innovative School in Motijharan, Sambalpur for the upliftment of children. This school is managed by BISWA’s Minority Cell. School’s Name: Islamia Innovative School / Location: Motijharan, Sambalpur / Number of Students: 54 / Teacher: Ms. Gajala Parween (B.A.) / Project coordinator: Ms. Mumtaz Parwin / Management: Minority Cell, BISWA BISWA has always shown interest in the betterment of the minority community and upliftment of the children in this community as they are the least cared for. From the experience of Islamia Innovative School in Motijharan and observations of BISWA coordinators, children from the minority community in Motijharan are not interested to go to school or attracted by food, recreation and healthcare. Therefore, BISWA is to implement other ambitious plans for them.

Disaster Response - Flood Relief
2.15.1 A flash flood hit Sambalpur town on 21 August 2006 and the calamity caused severe damage in urban and rural areas. As the Mahanadi swelled with flood water, frothing flood water of one of its tributaries Haradjori was forced back into Kuluthkani, Putibandh areas and Dhanupali and Gobindtola situated on its banks in Sambalpur urban area. This unprecedented situation caused havoc in the affected area forcing hundreds of households to evacuate to safer temporary camps. Around 9422 persons in 65 villages in 38 Gram-Panchayats of 7 blocks and Sambalpur and Rairakhol urban areas were affected. The affected had lost their homes and livelihood. Most of these were daily labourers, rickshaw pullers and belonged to the working class. So, the damage was precarious to them. Different voluntary organisations along with the administration extended aid to the stranded people. But, just after 2 days, the relief operations got affected in 6 camps except the one at Guru Nanak Public School (GNPS). To mitigate the impact of the disaster, the district administration of Sambalpur asked BISWA to provide relief in 7 relief centres in Sambalpur town. As a leading NGO, BISWA contributed its services as and where required. With a team of 19 volunteers, BISWA started its services round the clock to assuage the sufferings of the affected people. The district administration decided to run the relief centre at the GNPS until 3 August 2006. BISWA decided to restore the minimum household needs such as utensils, clothes, beddings with blankets and not to forget, study material for the school-going children. Though the administration had declared a compensation of Rs. 6,000 for each fully damaged house, Rs. 2,000 each for partially damaged houses and each severely damaged house between these two limits depending on the severity. BISWA found this amount insufficient to construct a house of minimum standards and decided to arrange some funds to complement this meagre compensation. As most of the affected persons were from the lower income group, BISWA helped those distressed people with a small amount to restart their livelihood with micro-finance support in the form of SHGs.

Niwano Peace Foundation Project
2.16.1 BISWA joined hands with Niwano Peace Foundation for its project for effective and sustainable approaches to eliminate poverty and ensure food security as adopted in the drought-prone areas of Sambalpur district. 2.16.2 Activities & Achievements of the project Livelihood Pattern Analysis: BISWA has chosen 20 themes from local issues like; Community development, Socio-economic development, Empowering rural women, Water conservation, Forest management, Income generating opportunities , Micro finance, Grain banking, and such others. It intends to generate awareness. Every month, two Focus Group Discussions are conducted in each of the project villages. 2.16.3 Awareness Camps: Every month, one awareness camp is organised in each village. The subject for awareness camp was same for all villages in a particular month. Adult Education, literacy, child rights and such other issues are discussed in the project villages. This programme has made the villagers well aware of various schemes and facilities available for their sustainable development. They can now meet the district administration, local governance and discuss their problems and needs. 2.16.4 Water Harvesting Structure: The water harvesting structures in Budapada, Jhankarbahali and Tangarjuri village were completed by 31st March 2006. The core committee has imparted training on effective water management to enhance the knowledge base of members on effective management of water in terms of storage, seepage, ground water recharge, etc. 2.16.5 Enhancement of role of SHGs as Peer Health Educators (PHE): BISWA has provided health training to SHG members to provide health facilities in the project villages lacking health facilities. Around 100 SHG members have been trained as PHEs to attend to the health disorders in their respective villages. 2.16.6 Establishing and Managing Grain Banks in the Villages: Grain Banks are developed to ensure food security during stress periods and to meet emergency needs of the community. In all, ten grain banks have been formed in the project villages to mitigate food scarcity. 2.16.7 Promotion of Role Play & Dance: BISWA had organised role-play based on local issues to sensitise the local community of the project area. The theme of the play was the roles and responsibilities of different persons in a community towards integrated and sustainable livelihood development. This play motivated the villagers to get involved in the project interventions.

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BISWA
BISWA in Chattisgarh

Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

2.17.1 With a vision to ensure a socio-economic development of the society, BISWA extended its network to Chattisgarh in May 2005. BISWA was appointed a Nodal Agency for the state of Chattisgarh by the Rashtriya Mahila Kosh under the aegis of Dept. of Women and Child Development, Govt. of India. Presently BISWA covers 16 districts. 2.17.2 Objectives - BISWA aims to:
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Janjgir-Champa district, BISWA launched the Water and Sanitation Programme under groups, Group A and Group B. BISWA Chhatishgarh held training on ‘Gram Swachhatta Aviyan’ for the Group-B people on 11 August 2006. The training of Trainers (TOT), ANMs, Anganwadi Workers, (AWW), Village Level Water and Sanitation Members (VWSCs), Block Level Water & Sanitation Members (BWSCs) was completed successfully. The Block Level Water & Sanitation Members will explicate the work and the Village Level Water and Sanitation Campaign members will help them in successful implementation of this programme in villages. The ANMs are to create awareness for proper sanitation. 2.17.9 Integrated development: To promote income-producing activities among the tribal population, BISWA has paid special attention to a tribe called ‘Kamara’ for integrated development. The activities are concentrated in 4 blocks; Gariabandh, Chura and Mainpur in Raipur district and Nagri block of Dhamtari district. 2.17.10 Support to micro-enterprises: BISWA is working as a leading NGO for Micro-Finance activities in the state of Chhatishgarh. Though BISWA has its own chain of SHGs, it also helps several small NGOs with finance and guidance. BISWA has organized two Business Development Workshops on behalf of the Rashtriya Mahila Kosh and one training programme on Participatory Rural Appraisal (PRA) for 60 women SHG leaders at Raipur to promote its micro-finance activities. The Bamboo artisans, farmers and micro-entrepreneurs of Basna, Saraipali and Pithora blocks of Mahasamund district have been receiving support for their microenterprise activities on technical and financial aspects. 2.17.11 Achievements In the last 12 months, BISWA, Chattisgarh has thrived by building raport with the state administration and working in close association with local NGOs in all 16 districts. BISWA has initiated a network with 13 NGOs working in different districts and supported them with Micro-Finance and capacity building facilities. BISWA, Chattisgarh has been able to create a base for its microcredit activities and women empowerment. It has promoted more then 350 Self Help Groups in Durg and Mahasamund districts, along with 237 SHGs under SGSY in Janjgir Champa district. 2.17.12 Conclusion BISWA aims at a developed, educated and healthy Chhattisgarh, having sufficient employment opportunities and enough capital to invest in income-generating activities. It targets to create at least 10 lakh job opportunities in the next fiscal, extend at least Rs 10 crores as credit and strengthen the state’s economy to come out of poverty. BISWA dreams of seeing everybody in the state without fear of hunger, illness and illiteracy.

Create maximum job opportunities with special attention to women, youth and artisans To enhance the social status of women To ensure healthful living standards in rural and slum habitats To ensure a friendly environment

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BISWA’s activities in Chattisgarh reflect these objectives. The activities have received much attention and approval in the state. 2.17.3 Activities - BISWA has already established an NGO network there. BISWA has implemented the following programmes in the state since its interventions begun in 2005: 2.17.4 Promotion of Self Help Groups: By the end of February 2006, BISWA had extended financial help to 97 SHGs in Berla block of Durg district and 237 SHGs in 4 blocks; namely Nawagarh, Pamgarh, Akaltara and Sakti in Champa district under SGSY special campaign. Various income generation activities such as leaf cup/ plate making, plastic moulding and petti-coat making have been undertaken in this district. 2.17.5 Capacity building of NGOs in micro-credit activities: BISWA is keen to organise interface programmes for the NGOs to sensitize them regarding the micro-credit program of BISWA/ RMK. This program focuses on one of the most backward districts, Bastar. 2.17.6 Extension of credit: Credit has been extended to as many as 17 partner NGO MFIs for on-lending to SHGs promoted by them and to 22 SHGs to pursue income generation activities such as petticoat making, leaf plate/cup making, plastic toys making etc. The bulk lending to NGOs amounts to Rs. 96,21,750/- and the lending amount to SHGs is Rs.20,66,300/-. 2.17.7 Implementing Reproductive & Child Development programme: BISWA has taken initiatives to implement Reproductive and Child Health (RCH) programme in Nawagarh block in Janjgir Champa district. 2.17.8 Total Sanitation Campaign: With an objective to create awareness among the people about potable drinking water and proper sanitation, BISWA has initiated its Total Sanitation Campaign (TSC) in the state of Chhatishgarh. Initially, BISWA in Chhatishgarh runs the Total Sanitation Campaign in four districts; Raipur, Durg, Mahasamud and Janjgir-Champa district. In Nawagarh block of

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Civil Society Network

Biswa Network
2.18.1 BISWA NETWORK, a national network of civil society organizations is promoted by BISWA to undertake various developmental work at the grass root level with the joint effort of its partner NGOs. The prime objective of the network is to develop the capacities, management abilities and good governance of the partners. 2.18.2 Establishment of BISWA Civil Society Study Centre To achieve this goal, BISWA is also planning a centre for civil society studies (BCCSS) that will work towards strengthening local democracy, panchayati-raj institutions, good governance system for pro-poor development issues and democratic accountability. The centre would also work towards documentation, publication, research, and dissemination of best practices in social sector development, microfinance and micro enterprise. 2.18.3 Mission Statement To create an association of responsible civil society organizations, working for socio-economic development in the state of Orissa and play the role of a facilitator in optimizing livelihood initiatives through various interventions. The BISWA NETWORK will help its member-organizations, to serve the poor, destitute and downtrodden, for a better quality of life with a stable livelihood. 2.18.3 The Objectives BISWA NETWORK will identify issues, open dialogues with partners and create a common platform to advocate/lobby the common cause and find out solutions for issues affecting all. The network would handhold partners, upscale their activities through various resources support both in terms of finance and experience sharing. To fulfil the above objectives, the scope of work for BISWA NETWORK, are as follows...
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To provide a common forum for organizations involved in livelihood, finance and income generation activities for both rural and urban poor. To strengthen the capacities of organizations (NGOs) through research, consultancies and training in different aspects of livelihood finance. To establish linkages between members and resource institutions, such as funding agencies, financial institutions, training, research and consultancy firms. To disseminate and publish documents, papers, journals, newsletters relevant and useful for the members. To co-ordinate and cooperate with similar networks and coalitions. To make representation in Government and other regulatory and policy making bodies to promote the cause of the partners and help create favorable policy environment for livelihood finance and income generation initiatives. To advocate for enhanced credibility, acceptability and recognition of the work done by the voluntary sector in the eyes of the government, the donor community, the corporate sector, the media and the public. To act on establishing an accreditation system for the voluntary sector. To carry out other actions, that may be conducive to and beneficial for the members to fulfil the broad objectives of the BISWA NETWORK.

2.18.4 Members Within a year of operation, BISWA NETWORK has enrolled 152 members from four state. Ninty NGOs from Orissa, twenty seven from West Bengal, ten from Chhatisgarh and one from Jharkhand.

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Consultation Meeting with partner NGOs

NGO Leaders at the Partners Meet

BISWA
Network Member List
List of Members: Orissa
Sl No. 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 Name of the NGO

Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

District Cuttack Kendrapara Kandhamal Kandhamal Kandhamal Khurda Kalahandi Kalahandi Kandhamal Khurda Boudh Bhadrak Bhadrak Puri Bhadrak Kalahandi Baragarh Cuttack Jagatsinghpur Nawarangpur Boudh Bhadrak Jajpur Kalahandi Kalahandi Puri Ganjam Malakangiri Kendrapara Nayagarh Cuttack Kalahandi Rayagada Rayagada Sundargh Khurda Khurda Keonjhar Mayurbhanj Kendrapara Gajapati Khurda Cuttack

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Banki Adivasi Harijan Kalyan Parishad (BAHKP) Gram Utthan Sambala Vikas Swayang Sahayak Samabaya Kendra People Awareness & Hilly Area Development (PAHAD) Society for the Aggrieved & Vulnerated Earthlings (SAVE) The Eastern Multipurpose Cooperative Society Ltd. Lok Sampark Jan Kalyan Sanstha Manab Vikash Niyojan Samiti (MANI) Mahila Vikash Prathamika Sanchaya Samabaya Ltd. Orissa Women Development Association (OWDA) Society for promotion of Rural Technology & Education (SOPORTE) Free Duty of Mankind (FREEDOM) DRUSTI SAKSHYAM Mahasakti Foundation Debadutta Club Swayamshree Gateswar Multipurpose Co-operative Society Ltd. India Peoples Service (IPS) Gramya Vikash Parishad Utkal Social Service Association (USSA) Biswa Kalyan Sevak Samaj (BKSS) Parivartan Sanginee Secondary Co-operative Gopabandhu Kalashree Club Organisation for Development Integrated Social & Health Association (ODISHA) Organisation for Development Coordination (ODC) Budhanath Yubak Sangha Dr. Ambedkar Adibasi Harijan Gramya Unnayan Seva Parishad Palli Unnayan Parishad (PUP) Visionaries for Integrated Social Intiatives of Network (VISION) ARUNI Universal Service Organisation (USO) Mahila Adhikar Surakhya Samity (MASS) ANGNA Gramya Shree Seva Sangha (GSSS) Indian Management and Technical Society (IMTS) VIKASH SHEVA Gramya Mangal Parishad (GMP) Janakalyan Pratistan Human Resource Development Organisation (HRDO) Netajee Multipurpose Co-operative Society Ltd.

List of Members: Orissa
Sl No. 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88 Name of the NGO Social Awareness and Research Centre(SARC) SRADHA Raghunath Pathagar (RNP) Biswa Swayam sahayak Bunakar society The Adult Education Family Planning & Environment Society Indira Gandhi Mission India (IGMI) Help Line SRADHA Pratikar Ama Gaon Prakalpa Bapuji Jana Seba Club (BJSC) Society for Regular Information Planning Awarness and Thousand Initiation National Environment & Education Development (NEED) Service Association for Rural Progress (SARP) Jana Sahajya Peoples Legal Aid Association Network (PLAAN) ASHA YUBA Chetana Kendra Rural Research and Development Conucil Sundargarh Zilla Mahila Parishad SURAKSHA Social Development Society (SDS) Integrated Social Women’s Awarness & Research (ISWAR) Agency for Social Action (ASA) PRAGATI Human Development Center (HDC) ANUSHREE Maitri Self Help Cooperative Ltd. Indian Women Development Society (IWDS) People’s United for Social Participation and Awarness Centre (PUSPAC) UPKAR Friends United Welfare Organisation Social Action For Humanitarian Assistance & Relief Agency Pankajini Vikash Social Organisation (PVSO) Asian Institute For Rural Regeneration (AIR) Gandhian Institute of Technical Advancement (GITA) Nandini Mahila Samiti PARIVARTAN SAHARA Krushak Nidhi Unnayan THE HUMANITY NAMI ADARSHA District Keonjhar Keonjhar Ganjam Baragarh Sambalpur Puri Rayagada Dhenkanal Cuttack Puri Khurda Nayagarh Koraput Keonjha Kalahandi Puri Dhenkanal Kandhamal Mayurbhanj Sundargarh Gajapati Malkangiri Khurda Puri Dhenkanal Jagatsinghpur Maurbhanj Jagatsinghpur Nabarangpur Malkangiri Puri Jajpur Kandhamal Jagatsinghpur Cuttack Khurda Keonjhar Bolangir Nabarangpur Khurda Khurda Bolangir Dhenkanal Cuttack

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BISWA
List of Members: Orissa
Sl No. 89 90 91 92 93 94 95 96 97 Name of the NGO

Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

District Khurda Khurda Jajpur Puri Khurda Khurda Cuttack Khurda Khurda

ANEWSHA Tribal Art & Crafts CPSW Swami Vibekananda Youth Association Society For Women Empowerment Through Development Action Rashtriya Nari Jagaran Parishad Monomanini Gramya Mahila Vikash Samiti SACHETANA Vishwa Jeevan Seva Sangha

List of Members: West Bengal
Sl No. 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 Name of the NGO Association for Rural development Mahakal Environment & Welfare Society Sunderban Indira Khadi Bhawan Phakrichhak Matrumangal Samiti Tarun Sangha Muldia Bidut Sangha Prayashi Grama Vikash Kendra Neoda Samaj Kalyan Kendra Rageen sangha Ramakrishna Social Welfare Society Santosh Nagar Sandhatara Mahila Samity Ullon Social Welfare Society (USWS) Radhakantpur Kalyan Samity Balarampur Mother Teresa Pally Unnayan Samiti Tara Nagar Tarun Sangha Nimpith Vidyasagar Seva Samity Chak-Kumar Association for Social Service Piparkhali Sukanta Nazrul Memorial Club Fakirchak Govindchak Deshbandhu Club Hariharpur Kazi Nazrul Sangha Sukrullapur Nelua Unnayan Kendra Nimpitha Tulsighat Netaji Sangha Sahapur (south) Gram Unnayan Samity Mallabpur People Rural Development Society Uttar Kasiabad Atul Smriti Seva Sangha Gabberia Sathi Centre Radha nagar Palli Unnayan Samity District Barasat Cooch Behar South 24 Praganas East Medinpur East Medinpur South 24 Praganas South 24 Praganas South 24 Praganas South 24 Praganas New Barrackpur Kolkata South 24 Praganas South 24 Pragans South 24 Praganas South 24 Pragans South 24 Praganas South 24 Pragans West Midinpur South 24 Praganas East Midinpur South 24 Praganas East Midinpur South 24 Praganas South 24 Praganas South 24 Praganas South 24 Praganas South 24 Praganas South 24 Praganas

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List of Members: Chhatisgarh
Sl No. 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 Name of the NGO Pragnya Samanya Seva Sanstha (PSSS) Smart Social Welfare Society Baster Samajik Jana Vikash Samity (BSJVS) Nai Kiran Mahila & Balbikash Samity Kalp Samaj Sevi Sanstha RAHI Samaj Sevi Sanstha Kukuda Shiva Yuba Sangathan Samity Adarshdeep Akshamta Punarwas Kendra Mahila Yuba Sasaktikaran Sanstha Ekata Samity Jan Vikas Parisad & Anusandhan Sansthan Jan Chetana Samity, Tila Chhattisgarh Mahila Bikash Samity Chetana Sangha Kusumdihi Pragatisila Yuba Samity Mahila Mandal Rasali Nirmal Sahayogi Samaj Sevi Sanstha Nav Yubak Mandal Social Organisation for Community Health (SOCH) Vikash Samity District Jagadalpur Dantesarda Raipur Dantewada Durg Janjgirchampa Raipur Bilaspur Bilaspur Raipur Bilaspur Raipur Bhilai Bilaspur Rajnandgaon Mahasamund

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Chairman making a presentation to Funding Agency

Visit of Development Partners to Network Office

BISWA

Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

Malnutrition Remediation Initiative

Technology Intervention

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School Uniform Distribution

Section - 3

Success Stories & Good Practices

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BISWA

Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

Success Stories & Good Practices
Dhankoda Federation ..
Finding women at the helm of affairs managing crores of rupees themselves, in some lesser known pocket of underdeveloped Orissa is a rare achievement indeed. No surprise, the Dhankoda block in Sambalpur has earned the coveted title of being the most successful SHG federation in the state. Dhankoda has every reason to rejoice as it continues to weave stories of success one after another. This all-woman federation consisting of 250 SHGs was started by BISWA’s Chairman K C Malick in January 1994. Today, the federation stands strong with 3025 members and is divided into five sub federations, all of which are managed by the federations’ internal governing body. Recognizing the expertise and experience of the members, BISWA has included two federation members in its own governing council. The members who were initially finding it difficult to save even Rs 10, today easily manage to save Rs 60 to Rs 100. Not limiting itself to credit and thrift, the women members have taken up the challenge of social empowerment as well. Villages have been electrified, roads have been constructed, education stressed, sanitation improved and all the credit goes to these women who have gained confidence over the years. They now realize their rights and are fighting for it. The federation had already disbursed Rs 6.61crores and has a saving of Rs 30.69 lakh. Striding towards a secure future…… Of the many successful stories the federation has to relate is one on the Talab SHG. In 2005, this 13 member group was extended a loan amount of Rs 1.69 lakh. The money was invested on cultivation of paddy. Accessing the timely repayment of loans, performance, and the profits made by the SHG members, the Dhankoda federation extended another Rs 6.5 lakh to the group in a span of two years. Most of the members in the group are landless and have been cultivating on land taken on lease. Currently 80 acres of land is under cultivation and each member saves Rs 100 on an average every month. “Earlier it was difficult to celebrate festivals even. Now we celebrate each one. We are happy and feel more secure about our future,” said Laxmi Bishal of the SHG. We now save around Rs 10,000 every year, she added The women have also formed the Nari Shanti Sena that works towards fighting alcohol intake. Besides, a community drug distribution centre has been formed. Empowerment has also shed the communal feelings that existed earlier. Tribals, non tribals and people from all castes now stay together. Girl child education is being encouraged and migration checked. Thrift and Credit Operation of Dhankoda Federation Federation 01 02 03 04 05 Total Loan Total Saving
Successful Talab SHG

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BISWA, after handing over the entire governance to the federation has limited its activities to providing credit support to the federation. The federation itself pays for the salary of the staff support provided by BISWA to maintain record on accounts. The federation has been registered under the Mutual benefit trust act.

Staff 14 14 14 14 14 70

SHG 50 50 50 60 40 250

Loan sanction 320,68,332 187,88,700 80,02,000 68,21,000 5,00,000 661,80,032 30,69,540

Innovative Schools
BISWA initiated the concept of innovative schools with an aim to introduce students to elementary education besides training them on subjects ecologically relevant to them. Well wishers from USA, institutions and individuals together supported BISWA to establish 20 schools under this program in 16 villages and two urban slums in Sambalpur and Kalahandi. The Budhapada innovative school was initiated by the efforts of Mrs. Joysree Mohanty, NRI on 15 December 2002 and was implemented by BISWA. The Budhapada School and four similar innovative schools at Jhankarbahali, Rathipada & Tangarjuri are supported by Asha for Education-USA.The schools follow the state course curriculum to impart elementary education from class-I to class-VII. The students are also trained on water harvesting, agriculture, animal care, food preservation, herbal medicine, bamboo work, pottery, and broom making etc. In addition the students are provided with a mid-daymeal consisting of a soymilk and bread. A learning with difference Bahamani Lagoon now loves going to school. She is ten and a student of Class V in the Budhapada innovative school. Bahamani learns medicine, health and general knowledge and studying was never so much fun for her. Renu madam, the only teacher in the school is a graduate and receives a salary of Rs. 2,000 every month. Classes start from 7 AM to 10 AM and the routine include two hours study on main course and half an hour on general knowledge. Every afternoon, Bahamani and her friends have their fair share of soymilk and bread. It’s tasty and nutritious. Satyaram Dibi and Lilyani Gudia, who study in the same school, supply the soymilk and bread for the students. They too are happy and enjoy studying.

Learning while playing

Village Sanitation Program
Identified as a key resource center of Orissa water and sanitation mission for western Orissa under the total sanitation campaign BISWA works with the Government and other partners to create conditions for change and ensure the effectiveness of all water and sanitation campaigns. BISWA has taken initiatives to construct & maintain IHLs for effective sanitation. Towards hygiene …towards health….. About 128kms drive from Bargarh in Gaisilet block, is the Raisalpadar village. Not long ago, the entire population of about 519 households followed the age-old practice of open defecation. There were just 12 IHL then. But the same village today stands out for the successful adoption of village sanitation programme. All community centers including the school, the Anganwadi center and the Panchayat office is now well equipped with modern day sanitation facilities. The cleanliness of the village would impress any visitor. Eighty percent of the villagers now have Individual House-Hold Latrines (IHL) –thanks to BISWAs’ efforts BISWA began the initiative by consulting the senior members of the village and the SHG members asking them to find out a solution to the problem. Though every one expressed their embarrassment on the situation, they were clueless about how to get out of it. The villagers admitted that the practice of open defecation was leading to many diseases. The Sarpanch, PRI members, schoolteachers and senior members of the village were then personally contacted. They were sensitized on the long-term consequences of open defecation and the benefits of good hygiene practices. The impact was encouraging and many SHG members came together and agreed upon installing Individual Household Latrines (IHL). Today the village wears a new looks. Most of the villagers are comfortable having a toilet of their own. Hygienic practices are gradually developing. Now, these villagers themselves ensure to maintain a healthy and hygienic environment. The Sarpanch, Ms Kshirabati Sahu requested for the construction of a toilet in the Panchayat office that further helped in creating interest among the villagers here. The installation of IHLs in the school and Anganwadi centers also developed hygienic toilet habits among students. Now, these students in turn, do their bit by spreading awareness about the necessities of toilet in every household for a healthier life. With the support from BISWA, 387 IHLs have already been installed in the village. The success can be attributed to the innovative credit support approach through SHGs of BISWA for having IHLs.

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BISWA
Water harvesting

Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

With a vision to provide safe drinking water and sanitation facilities to every rural household, BISWA has been initiating SWAJALDHARA, Rooftop water harvesting structure (RTWHS) & Water harvesting structure (WHS) programs in areas that face shortage of groundwater. BISWA has been initiating SWAJALDHARA, Rooftop water harvesting structure (RTWHS) & Water harvesting structure (WHS) programs at selected areas. Save water, save life Jhankarbahali, a small hamlet under the Baduapalli Gram Panchayat in Maneswar block has a population of 937. Like most villages, people here remained troubled with regular health problems rising out of polluted water. Waterborne diseases such as viral fever, hepatitis, typhoid, cholera, dysentery and diarrhea were common and there seemed no

permanent solution to it. It was then that BISWA with the help of SHGs, motivated the villagers to establish Water Harvesting Structures. By initiating the water-harvesting project in Jhankarbahali and Budhapada village, BISWA motivated the villagers to encourage water recourse, re-use & recycling, develop an efficient distribution system, reduce pollution in surface water system, enhance surface storage capacity, improve underground storage capacity and maintain balance in the existing water resource Villagers were also asked to adopt better sanitation habits by setting up IHLs through microfinance. Water & sanitation problems were analyzed and the investment was calculated. Members of Self Help Groups interacted with the villagers regarding the hurdles the project was facing and BISWA extended micro-credit to those unable to invest. The program conducted in close co-ordination with district officials, executive engineers, rural water and sanitation services department has finally paid dividends. Jhankarbahali now has 46 tube-wells and has access to clean and safe drinking water. Water borne diseases and the hardships villagers faced during summer is a history now.

Hatibari Health Home
Hatibari Health Home is a rehabilitation center for leprosy-cured persons who are trying to live with self-respect and dignity. Padmashree Dr. Isaac Santra, an eminent Gandhian and social worker, established an ashram for persons affected by at Hatibari in 1951. The center later came to be known as Hatibari Health Home. BISWA supports these patients with small farming and manufacturing units training them on agriculture, cloth weaving, sisal work, candle making, toy making etc. The micro-enterprise development project implemented by BISWA plays a vital role in socialization of the leprosy-cured persons. Those working in different production units including handloom weaving, candle making, sisal work get wages around Rs.350 to Rs 150. Besides, BISWA has also appointed its staff to monitor and supervise the projects at Hatibari. BISWA has established three Self Help Groups among the women inmates there and among the women of Santrapalli. The members regularly hold meetings and other awareness programmes. Living with dignity Tapaswini Nath, an inmate of Hatibari health home is a sisal fiber trainer. Thirty five years ago after being diagnosed of leprosy, Tapaswaini was deserted by her family. Ever since, Hatibari has been her home.When admitted, Tapaswini was at an advanced stage of the disease. She recovered gradually and is completely cured now. She was then trained under the Sisal Fiber production cum training unit at Hatibari . She was taught how to extract fiber from Sisal by an extractor and prepare utility and decorative items out of it. Tapaswani picked it up fast and now trains the other inmates on the procedure. The products have a high demand in local as well as national markets and she earns a decent income out of it. There are others who learn candle making and weaving. Yet, she does not want to return to her family and wishes to live at the HHH campus with self-respect and dignity. BISWA provides sustainable livelihood to the inmates of Hatibari Health Home and supports them in income generation.

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Malnutrition remediation initiative in schools
Malnutrition remediation program with Soya-milk is a new concept in Orissa. The programme got acclamation with World Bank’s Development Market Place Award in 2007. Malnutrition Maters, an organization from Canada and their system Vita Goat, provides technological support to BISWA for the implementation of this innovative concept. This programme has enabled BISWA to provide soya-milk to 140 students in 4 schools of Antapalli village for six days a week bringing tremendous impact on their general health conditions. Good nutrition, better education Antapalli has four schools different from other schools in the area. They are special for the students in these schools relish the nutritious soymilk and bread supplied to them. These schools have witnessed 100 percent attendance even on rainy days. Soy milk is a high-quality nutrition diet processed by Vita Goat. Vita Goat runs without electricity and can be operated using locally available fuels, like wood, bottled gas and other biomas It comprises of a steam boiler, a cycle grinder, a cooker and a press. Laxmi and Champa are two SHG members at Antapalli. With assistance from BISWA, the duo now produce high-protein and healthy Soya foods in the form of soya-milk using the Vita Goat processing system. They earn Rs. 75 each for each 2-3 hours of operation. Earlier both the women worked as agricultural laborers. The new enterprise has helped them with a better livelihood. Everyday 14 liters of soymilk is produced by the villagers and distributed to the four schools.The entire process of milk production and distribution takes a maximum of three hours. With minimum investment sans hassles, the children are supplied warm milk with bread.

Swadhar
With support from the Dept. of Women and Child Development and the Ministry of HRD BISWA initiated the SWADHAR home at Sambalpur. SWADHAR is designed in a flexible and innovative approach to address the specific vulnerability of each group of women in distress through a home based holistic and integrated approach Besides emotional support and counseling to we provide food, clothing, shelter and care with social, legal and economic support. BISWA has also taken the responsibility to rehabilitate them and upgrade their skills and personality through behavioral training. As many as 78 destitute women and 44 Children have been admitted in SWADHAR so far. At SWADHAR, the inmates are imparted training on phenyl making, badi making, incense-stick making, papad making and tailoring. The residents with small children are engaged in relatively easier jobs such as packing chana, spices, mattresses, pillow, clothes, cosmetics etc. SWADHAR has so far aided three women in their weddings, provided legal support to two distressed women, reconciliation to 11 and medical support to five. The organization has also helped rehabilitate 20 women besides providing suitable placement to seven destitute women. Accepting challenges… It was 11th April ’07- Urkuli still remembers the date. This was the day when the 18 year old unwed mother was brought to Swadhar. Hailing from the Bijepur village of Bargarh District, this teenager was an expectant mother with a pregnancy of 30 weeks. Deserted by her lover Daktar Bhoi and abandoned by family members Urkuli was still strong at heart. Going against the wishes of Bhoi’s and her own family members’ wishes, Urkuli refused to terminate the pregnancy. The issue went public but neither Bhoi nor his family members agreed to the marriage proposal. Urkuli’s father then lodged an FIR against Bhoi at the Bijepur Police Station but no anvil. In the absence of any accommodation for destitute women at Bargarh, the case was referred to BISWA and Urkuli soon had a shelter at SWADHAR. Urkuli was weak both physically and mentally and members at SWADHAR took up the challenge to provide her the medical care and counseling she requited. With the constsnt efforts of the staff at SWADHAR, the villagers were motivated to pressurize Bhoi’s family to agree to the marriage. Their effort finally succeeded and a formal marriage took place at SWADHAR premises on 2 May 2007. Urkuli now lives a happy family life. SWADHAR is keen to establish a society where no woman gets a feeling that her existence is a curse; rather she is taught to accept the challenges of life with confidence. BISWA provides support to these deserted women at every level.

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BISWA
Micro-finance

Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

BISWA has successfully emerged as a leading Micro finance institution in India, ranking high in micro insurance as well. Microcredit delivery of BISWA MFI program is being carried out through the SHG model. By 3ist June’ 07, BISWA had already promoted as many as 23,418 SHGs across its area of operation and almost 96% of these SHG members belong to the BPL category. We at BISWA, aim to boost the future of micro-finance and utilize it for the socio-economic development of the society. Rekindling hopes…. BISWA brings a few examples from different hamlets in the district of Deogarh to show how Microfinance can play an effective role in changing lives. Villagers of Purunapalli village in the district of Deogarh never knew that even watermelon cultivation could spell wonders. Of the several SHGs operating in the hamlet was one engaged in traditional bamboo work. The earning was insufficient and the members of these had failed to repay their earlier loans on time. After studying the conditions, BISWA considered generating some additional source of income for these people. The land and climatic conditions were examined and found suitable for watermelon cultivation. It arranged for 13 acres of land on lease and extended a loan amount of Rs. 4 lakhs to the group. All 12 members were then engaged in this exercise. The result was a record. The total sale went up to Rs.19,70,000 and the SHG earned a net profit of Rs.9,40,000. The loan was paid back in 18 weeks time. All the 12 members now have personal savings of Rs.5-12,000 each, apart from raising their socio-economic status, the members are now more confident. On October 2006, the SHG members opened a school of their own to let their children. Earlier, their children were not allowed to

study at the general school owing to the cast feelings prevalent in the village. The school now has 32 students. The success of this group resulted in the formation of six more SHGs in the village. Another SHG in Jhumpra village in Deogarh with 14 members can be counted as a successful example of how microfinance changed their lives for better. The members were previously dependent on agriculture alone. The meager earning that came out of it was insufficient to cater to their needs. After constant liaison with the district administration, the group was allowed to supply bread and biscuits to 12 govt. schools. In September 2005, BISWA extended a loan of Rs.80,000 to this group who wanted to set up a broiler farm. This was followed by yet another of Rs. 1,20,000 in November 2006. A month later, the group again availed a loan of Rs.1.95 lakhs from BISWA for a biscuit factory and a bread unit The members were optimistic about earning more than Rs.1,80,000 from these three units and opened an account in Barkot Cooperative Bank. They repaid the boiler loan in time. The group members are now self-sufficient and do not have to depend on banks or BISWA for funds. Similarly, The Maa SHG group in Deogarh with a loan of Rs 1 lakh from BISWA began a business on Mahula (an NTFP) and paddy. Soon, the total sales rose to Rs.1,20,000, giving them a profit of Rs.20,000. All the 10 members of this group then went ahead with yet another loan from BISWA, This loan of Rs 2 lakh was used to set up a shop unit. Besides, the SHG set up an STD booth-cum a Xerox and Lamination centre. This apart, a transport vehicle has been purchased that is hired out on demand. All the group members now lead a comfortable life with a monthly income of Rs. 5-7, 000 each.

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Micro-enterprise
BISWA initiated micro-enterprise in a bid to provide support and develop effective strategies to improve the livelihood of the poor. Micro-enterprise basically means a small-scale business unit that starts with an investment of Rs. 25,000 to Rs. 75,000 only. BISWA, through micro-enterprise aims at providing opportunities for selfemployment by developing skill and entrepreneurial attitude to reduce poverty. We have, till date, optimized resource support to more than one lakh skilled micro–entrepreneurs in Orissa. Besides promoting agro and forest based micro-enterprises, three common facility centers for artisans have been established at Rengali, Katapalli and Balakati in Sambalpur, Bargarh and Khurda districts of Orissa. Path to excel Manoj Kumar Maharana is a well known craftsman of Rengali village in Sambalpur district. He works on brass and bell-metal and has his own unit and is popular among the fellow artisans in the area. But things were not the same for Manoj till a few years ago. This 30-year old artisans’ family depended on the traditional brass and bell-metal craft and a small patch of agricultural land for livelihood. With a family of three sons and four daughters, it was a hard task for Manoj’s old father to meet the basic requirements of this oversized family. This drove Manoj’s brothers to Rangoon in search of jobs. Unlike his siblings, Manoj preferred to stay back and help his father with the craft. When Manoj married at an early age of 22, his income was Rs.6,000 per annum with an average of Rs. 500/- per month. In 1999, Manoj learnt about the NABARD cluster development programme and the REDP conducted by BISWA. Soon he joined the BISWA-SHG for artisans and was trained under the upgradation training to be a semi-skilled craftsman in brass and bell-metal craft. After the 45-day REDP training and 15-day training in design development, Manoj skill enhancement helped him make more decorative items as per the market demand. This training also made him eligible as an artisan entrepreneur under which he could avail loan of Rs. 1,00,000. With the loan, Manoj established his own unit in Rengali which boosted his earning to a decent Rs. 20,000 per annum

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BISWA

Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

Workshop on Road Safety

Seminar on Maternal Health Care

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World Disable Day Celebration

Section - 4

Events, Activities & Recognition

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Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

Events of the year
Advocacy
Regional workshop on Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Child) Act - 2000 Sambalpur, March 13; A regional workshop on Juvenile Justice (Care & Protection of Children) Act, 2000 was organized here by BISWA in collaboration with Basundhara, Cuttack. The workshop was conducted at the BISWA Training Institute (BTI), where Dr. Diptibala Pattnaik, consultant, BISWA presided over the meeting. Issues like Quality Institutional Care (QIC) and Alternatives for Children (AC) on Juvenile Justice Act were discussed. Mr. Harihar Naik, Coordinator, Basundhara described the motto of Juvenile Justice Board and the means to protect children in conflict with the law. Mr. Naik described the procedures required in the formation of a Child Welfare Committee (CWC) and the protection of child rights under Juvenile Justice Act-2002. Mrs. Saila Behera from Basundhara summarized the aims and objectives of the workshop besides explaining the measures needed to be followed for the protection of poor, neglected, trafficked and abandoned children. She also described the role and functioning of CWC toward social rehabilitation, reintegration of deprived children, role of press in childcare, alternative family restoration, etc. Salient features of juvenile justice and role of community and civil society organizations in the protection of child rights were also conferred upon in the workshop. Legal Literacy Awareness camp Sambalpur, March 25; BISWA, in association with the District Legal Services Authority (LSA), organized a one-day Legal Literacy/ Awareness Camp. The meeting held at the Naktideul College premises was presided over by Mr. A.K. Bir, President, Bar Association, Rairakhol. Several dignitaries graced the occasion and conferred on the need for legal awareness. Narrating the aims and objectives of the workshop, Mr. M.K. Mishra, Secretary, DLSA remarked that law is essential for social security. He explained the legal procedures and appealed that the participants should go in for one-to-one discussion to generate mass awareness. Apart from the judicial staff, around 400 women members from 40 SHGs attended the meeting. Different Acts and court procedures were discussed in the workshop and the response was overwhelming. Resource persons from the legal field welcomed BISWA for this initiative and cleared the doubts that the participants had on various legal issues. Paribarik Mahila Lok Adalat Sambalpur, April 7; The first state level Paribarik Mahila Lok Adalat (PMLA) was organized by the District Legal Services Authority, in collaboration with BISWA at District Civil Court. Honorable Justice Mr. I.M. Quddusi graced the occasion with his expert guidance. During the session that was held from 11 AM to 1 PM, the counselors of BISWA brought 64 cases to notice, of which six cases were settled with mutual understanding of the parties. At the end of the Adalat, the Chairman of State Legal Services Authority appreciated the efforts of BISWA and expressed interest in future collaboration with the team in other districts.

52 Training on Financial management
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Micro-finance & Micro-insurance
Sambalpur, July 24; A three-day training program on financial management was organized by BISWA from 24th July to 26th July at Panthanivas. This training program supported by CARE, Bhubaneswar aimed to enhance the knowledge of participants on financial management. Mr. K.C. Malick, Chairman, BISWA inaugurated the program and explained the objective of the programme. Resource persons from CARE-CASHE, State Coordinator of BISWA, Chattisgarh and district co-coordinators in Orissa participated in the program. Oriental Insurance workshop Sambalpur, July 5; A Workshop-cum-Awareness meeting was organized by the Oriental Insurance Company at the BISWA Training Institute here. All the state/zonal/district coordinators, second line staff members and other key functionaries of the BISWA Head Office participated in the workshop Federation Training Program Deogarh, July 13: BISWA organized a comprehensive Federation training program at Deogarh on 13 July 2006. The program intended to highlight the importance of federations in future. The program also covered training in record-keeping and other documentation procedures related to federation. All the Area Coordinators and Unit-Coordinators from Deogarh participated in the training program. Workshop on Micro Finance December 2006 : BISWA in December organized three workshops to sensitize the public regarding the benefits of insurance coverage. The first workshop organized on 26 December 2006 at Koraput was attended by ten persons. Similarly the second workshop organized on 27 December 2006 in Kalahandi was participated by 12 people. The third workshop was organized on 28 December 2006 at the central office of BISWA at Danipali, Sambalpur. Fifteen persons participated in the event. The objective of these workshops was to identify the existing norms in micro insurance and to draw a common view on need assessment, product design and delivery mechanism in micro-insurance.

Health & Sanitation
Total sanitation campaign and role of BISWA Safe drinking water and sanitation are critical determinants of public health. Together, they can reduce the burden of fighting communicable diseases. Though central and state governments have extended budgetary support for Total Sanitation Campaign (TSC), the unfinished task, particularly in sanitation, is enormous. BISWA, on 14 Dec 2006 organized a sensitization programme on TSC in collaboration with Gram Vikas at Nuapali village of Bheden Block. More than 300 persons attended the programme including members from SHGs and the ward. The objective of the programme was to ensure availability, use and maintenance of sanitary latrines for safe and hygienic disposal of human excreta in rural areas. A three day programme was held on TSC at three different places namely Balipatna village in Khurda district, Krushnadaspur of Kendrapada district and Barbati village of Nayagarh district on 17, 18 and 19 Jan’ 07 respectively. The objective of the programmes was to create awareness among the villagers on the problem of improper sanitation and diseases caused by using contaminated water. Though it is not an easy task to achieve 100 percent proper sanitation in rural areas, BISWA firmly believes that nothing is impossible. A change of attitude, proper attention and an effective implementation policy can ensure the success of Total Sanitation Campaign. Health camp at Baramunda Federation Office Date: 4-5 February 2007 BISWA with support from ABN-AMRO Bank and Sandoz at Baramunda Federation Office organized a health camp on 4 February 2007. More than 350 patients were treated by a team of doctors headed by Dr. R.C. Agarwal, Dr A.T. Panigrahi and Dr. Kishore Barei. Apart from common cold, cough, anemia and arthritis, the physicians found some patients with TB symptoms. Another health camp was organized by BISWA at Jhankarbahali on 5 February 2007 where more than 350 patients were treated by Dr. Kishore Barei. Most of the patients were suffering from common cold and cough. The camps saw the presence of representatives from BISWA, ABN-AMRO and Sandoz. BISWA in TI program of OSACS Orissa State AIDS Control Society (OSACS) has launched its Phase III Targeted Intervention (TI) program all over the state to control the pandemic, AIDS. The objective of this intervention is to provide care services to the identified core and non-core group s and to create consciousness regarding the pandemic among the public. Field Training of ASHA volunteers 29-30 January 2007 BISWA organized a three-phased training program, in collaboration with the National Rural Health Mission, for Accredited Social Health Activists (ASHA) volunteers at Jujumura and Lipinda CHCs. The first phase was organized on 29-30 January 2007 whereas the other two were organized on 31 January and 1 February 2007 and 14-15 February 2007 respectively. Representatives and health workers from BISWA contributed positively as resource persons in this three-phase training program. Orientation program on water and sanitation 7-8 March 2007 BISWA organized an orientation program on water and sanitation at its district office in Dhenkanal on 7 March 2007. The details of water and sanitation project implementation, plans and procedures were discussed with the DC, the organizers, field staffs and office staffs during the meeting. A similar program was organized at Barbati village in Bhapur block, Nayagarh district on 8 March 2007. A committee was formed during this meeting to raise awareness on health, water and sanitation among the villagers. The meeting attracted wide participation from the villagers. Observation of World Health Day 7 April 2007 BISWA observed the World Health Day at its central office at Danipali, Sambalpur; with the theme given by WHO for 2007. BISWA’s approach towards health is an integrated one, which includes elementary education, skill development, water and sanitation and economic empowerment. A panel discussion was organized where International Health Security was discussed. It is opined that health security needs to be addressed through coordinated action and cooperation between the Governments, corporate sector, civil society and individuals. Workshop on Safe Motherhood Deogarh, April 26: Thousands of women die of various problems related to pregnancy and childbirth. Thousands more experience

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BISWA

Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

complications during pregnancy, many of which are life threatening for them and the newborns, leaving them with severe disabilities at times. These dangers related to childbirth can be reduced with proper health check up during pregnancy. BISWA organized a one-day workshop on ‘Safe Motherhood’ at Parposhi village of Tileibani Block in Deogarh district on 26 April 2007. The workshop was supported by Nehru Yuba Kendra Sangathan in collaboration with UNICEF. Issues related to safe motherhood and related government schemes were discussed in this workshop. The participants actively involved themselves in the event. Resource persons from health sectors explained Janani Surakshya Yojana (JSY) to the participants and a detailed discussion on the facilities extended to mothers was discussed. Safe Motherhood Adalat 18 to 22 July 2007 BISWA coordinated an Adalat on safe motherhood at Sambalpur Auditorium on 14 September 2006. More than a thousand mothers gathered to lodge their grievances before the Orissa State Women Commission (OSWC). Sri K.C. Malick, Chairman, BISWA presided over the function. Speaking on the occasion, the guests outlined their role in organizing programs on safe motherhood. The participants clarified their doubts on safe motherhood during this interactive program. International Voluntary Blood Donors Day 14 June 2007 The ‘International Voluntary Blood Donors Day’ was celebrated worldwide on 14 June 2007 under the theme ‘Safe Blood for Safe Motherhood’. The Day has been endorsed by World Health Organization, which cosponsors the event. This day provides a special opportunity to thank all the voluntary (non-remunerated) blood donors. BISWA organized a meeting to felicitate the voluntary blood donors on this day. Mr. K.C. Malick, Chairman, BISWA informed the house on the existing facilities at BISWA related to

health care and conferred on the plans to enhance these facilities. He assured to provide ambulance service in all the districts of Orissa. A resolution was made to make it compulsory to organize blood donation in every health camp organized by BISWA. As the Chairman, Mr. Malick shared BISWA’s plans to donate contribute 100 units of blood in every district of Orissa. Health camp of RCH-II 23 June 2007 A health camp on Reproductive Child Health-II was organized by BISWA at Tampargarh village in Jujumura block on 23 June 2007. The main objective of this health camp was to create awareness among the villagers on AWW, TBA and ASHA workers. On the same day, another health camp on ANC/PNC was organized by BISWA in Jujumura block Orientation Program on Water and Sanitation 24 September 2006 A two-day orientation program on water and sanitation was held at Nuapali village of Kubedega Gram Panchayat in Bargarh district on 20 September 2006. The main objective of this program was to sensitize the people on water and sanitation related issues. People from Gram Vikas Parishad and BISWA Self-Help Groups members participated in the event. BISWA in world AIDS Day Celebration 1 December 2006 As a part of the daylong celebration in connection with World AIDS Day on 1 December 2006, a motor cycle rally was organized by the Students of N.S.C.B. College in collaboration with BISWA. Leaflets on AIDS awareness were distributed among the public. BISWA Old Age Home 16 February 2007 The foundation stone of BISWA Old Age Home at Huma was laid by Mr. K.C. Malick, Chairman, BISWA. The home will have eight rooms designed for care and comfort of its inmates (elderly persons) referred by the compassionate donors for the cause.

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World Aids Day Rally

Drug Distribution Camp

Livelihood & Income Generation
Rooftop water harvesting structure 9 June 2006 BISWA organized a handover ceremony of a rooftop water harvesting structure at Jujumura Girls High School of Jujumura block on 9 June 2006. This structure was constructed by BISWA with support from AGRAGAMI, Kashipur, Rayagada. On completion, it was handed over to the Roof Top Water Harvesting Structure Committee (RTWHSC) of Jujumura block. BISWA Intervention in Tribal Development A base line survey conducted by BISWA in the tribal areas of Raipur District in Chhattisgarh revealed that the development in this area is much below the national average. As per the survey, the percapita income of the Kamar tribe in this area was Rs. 300/- per month. The locals were dependant on the nearby forest called Maleiba Hill with bamboo as the only means of their survival. However, in the process they were destroying the forest. These findings moved BISWA to intervene in these areas. The project was initiated from Kantidadar village in Gariabandh block. It imparted training to 20 SHGs on making bamboo stick (Khadi) for incense. Women in these areas were given training on making cups and plates with Siali leaves. BISWA provided 40 machines for this purpose and helped the producers establish a market link. After six months, the per capita income of these tribal women increased to Rs. 40 per day. This project under the micro-enterprise development program of BISWA has brought sustainable change in the economical conditions of these poor tribal women. The process was also found to be helpful in checking deforestation. There is a noticeable boost in the school attendance and the per capita income of the tribal people has also increased. Sisal Fiber Weaving Training 24 April 2007 BISWA, organized a 2-month training programme on ‘Sisal Fiber Weaving’ at Deogarh. It was inaugurated by Mr. Ambika Prasad Mishra, District Magistrate & Collector, Deogarh on 24 April 2007 at Tuhila village of Riamal block. The Training was supported by NABARD. On the same day, another awareness camp on Bamboo cultivation and its benefits was organized by BISWA, at Bamparada village in Barkot block. The main objective of this camp was to raise the financial conditions of the schedule tribes of Bamparada village, whose prime source of livelihood is the sale of bamboo products. Livelihood pattern analysis 24 September 2006 A training program on Livelihood Pattern Analysis was organized at Sambalpur with supports from Newano Peace Foundation (NPF), Japan on 12 July 2006. The main objective of his training program was to analyze the livelihood pattern of people in the Maneswar Block. Various resources (such as human, natural, financial, social and institutional) available in that region that have direct impact on the livelihood of the people were also analysed. Around 15 participants attended the training program and conferred on various measures to promote livelihood. SHG product Exhibition 21- 30 March 2007 An exhibition of SHG products was organized by BISWA, Sambalpur at Panihati Municipal Hall in Kolkata. This exhibition was held from 21 to 30 March 2007. D.C. Handicraft (Ministry of Textile), New Delhi sponsored this exhibition. Five master artisans of bamboo craft, Sambalpuri handloom, palm leaf, Patta Chitra and bell/brass metal exhibited live demonstrations on the crafting procedure of the products. 21 artisans participated in the exhibition. Workshop on Solid waste management 24 April 2007 A workshop on ‘Solid Waste Management’ under National Environmental Awareness Campaign was organized by BISWA on

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Bamboo Craft Training Participants

Income Generation Activities by a Tribal

BISWA

Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

24 April 2007 at Gopal U.G.M.E. School, Gopalmal. Members of SHGs, students of 6th and 7th grade and the teachers of the school participated in this workshop program along with BISWA representatives. Valediction of SJSY training Programme 5 May 2007 BISWA celebrated the valediction of ‘Swarna Jayanti Swarojgar Yojana (SJSY)’ training program on candle making, incense-stick making and food preservation at Kalyan Mandap, Hirakud NAC on 5 May 2007. The training program aimed at providing skills to participants for their economic empowerment through small enterprises. Members from different SHGs in Hirakud NAC participated and benefited from the training. PRI sensitization workshop 31 March 2006 BISWA organized a sensitization workshop for PRI members in Tampargarh Gram Panchayat of Jujumura block on 31 March 2006. My-Heart, a Bhubaneswar based organization supported this event. The main objective of the workshop was to convince the PRI members to contribute in improving the health and sanitation conditions and establish Community Based Drug Distribution (CBD) centers in their villages. PRI members from this locality participated in the workshop. AGP Organizers’ Training at BISWA 20-27 June 2007 A 7-day training programme for the organizers of Awareness Generation Programme (AGP) was held at BISWA Head Office, Sambalpur. The programme was sponsored by Central Social Welfare Board, New Delhi and State Social Welfare Board, Orissa, Bhubaneswar. It was managed by Vishwa Jeevan Seva Sangha (VJSS), Khurda. As many as 30 participants from districts of Western Orissa representing various NGOs, clubs, and unions participated in this training camp. Entrepreneurship Development Program 22-23 June 2006 BISWA organized a two-day training program for SHGs at its central office in Sambalpur on 22 and 23 June 2006. The objective of this training program was to develop entrepreneurship skill among the members of Self Help Groups. The program aimed at providing adequate knowledge and opportunity to people along with financial support at grass root level that would enable them to invest their money for livelihood generation. Sensitization of SHG leaders 16 July 2006 BISWA organized a program on ‘Sensitization of SHG leaders’ at Kala village, Deogarh District on 16 July 2006. This program was supported by NABARD. The main objective of this program was to enhance the leadership qualities of SHG members. All the district

level and block level officials from Deogarh district participated in the program. BISWA SHG Convention 24 September 2006 BISWA and CARE jointly organized an urban convention of women Self Help Groups at Aranyaka Mancha, Sambalpur on 24 September 2006. More than a thousand members were present during the convention. The event was organized under Mr. K.C. Malick, Chairman, BISWA. Earlier, a similar regional-level women SHG convention took place at Rairakhol on 13 September 2006. Relief and Health camp for Fire Victims at Kandheriapada 31 March 2006 An accidental fire mishap rendered about 200 people homeless late on 31 March 2006 at Kandheriaparda near Jamtangi Chowk, Boudh district. BISWA took immediate action and organized relief work with food, clothing and sheltering material (polythene sheets). It also supplied ready-made garments to children on 3 April 2006. BISWA organized a health camp at Kandehriapada on 8 April 2006 for the fire victims who were seriously affected by the tragedy. Around 300 persons were treated in the camp by Dr. Anil Mishra, Asst. Professor, VSS Medical College and Hospital, Burla. Free medication facilities were provided to the fire victims. Smiles at SWADHAR 6-8 March 2007 A three-day training programme was organized from 6-8 March, 2004 through an NGO Ranjai, Pune, with the collaboration of CPCB Zonal Office-Vadodara for the NGOs located in western states, with an overall objective to educate them in the field of environment and pollution control. Observation of Road Safety week 29 April 2007 BISWA celebrated the Global Road Safety Week on 29 April 2007. Speaking on the occasion, Mr. K.C. Malick, chairperson, BISWA expressed concern about road accident situations in India. He highlighted the initiatives taken by BISWA to address road accident victims. The Chief Guest Mr. Agnihotri, Transport Commissioner lodged his concern and highlighted the importance of a control room and help-lines to handle mishaps. He praised BISWA activities and assured BISWA of his support. Observation of ‘World Environment Day’ 5 June 2007 BISWA observed the World Environment Day under the leadership of Mr. K.C. Malick. Showing BISWA’s concern in this regard, Mr. Malick Chairman, BISWA said that the organization would plant at least 1 lakh trees in Sambalpur urban area to protect the environment.

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Women Empowerment
BISWA in MSS movement 14 February 2007 A three-day conference of Mahila Shanti Sena (MSS) took place at Sarnath, Varanasi from 14 February 2007. MSS, meaning the “Women’s Peace Force”, aims at creating a peaceful society by boosting the morale of women. The organization has a strong cadre of 5,000 women members from Bihar, Assam, Arunanchal Pradesh, Tripura and Manipur. Representatives from different states presented notes on the progress of the movement in their respective areas. Considering the fact that more than 98% of members of SHGs being promoted are women, BISWA was included in the movement to further the cause in Western Orissa. Ms. Kiranbala Acharya, APRO, represented BISWA in this conference.

BISWA: Activities in the Districts
Kandhamal: BISWA has joined hands with CMF to carry out antimalaria campaigns in 9 villages of Chakapada, Tikabali, Phiringia, Raikia blocks of Kandhamaal district. It also plans to provide mosquito nets to the locals in these villages under anti-malaria campaign. Cuttack: BISWA has organized three eye camps in Khuntuni, Bali and Kakhadi villages in Athagarh block of Cuttack. By the end of September 2007, three enterprise-training programmes (one on goat rearing and two on diary) were undertaken while three other enterprise-training programmes on vegetable farming and microbusiness training are scheduled to embark in October 2007 in Banki and Mahanga blocks. Bargarh: The training for the first three batches on brass and bell metal in Katapali village has been completed. 60 persons (20 artisans in each batch) have been benefited from this training. Jharsuguda: Around 4,000 locals in Jharsuguda district were benefited though five filaria eradication activities and 10 health camps conducted under the health initiative of BISWA. The organization also arranged for free eye operation to 100 patients and implemented sanitation programmes in Lakhanpur block. BISWA has also provided employment to 45 youths in the area. Nuapada: Under the TCS projects, BISWA assisted the construction of toilets along with water supply at 39 places including the SSD Hospitals and girls’ hostels in Nuapada district. A Bamboo Craft Training unit of BISWA is also functioning in the district to provide training and livelihood support to the needy. Bolangir: A training programme on candle making was held from 18.04.2007 to 02.05.2007 at Burda village in Loisingha block. The programme was financed by NABARD for around 20 SHG members of BISWA. An awareness programme for SHG members was held at Burda in Loisingha block in January 2007 where 100 women SHG members from 40 SHGs (from both BISWA & ICDS) participated. The programme was financed by NABARD. Under its health projects, BISWA held a malaria eradication and awareness campaign in joint collaboration with the Institute for Financial Management and Research Centre (IFMR). A survey on malaria was conducted in 33 villages, covering 1550 members from 132 SHGs. As a part of anti-malaria campaign, free insecticide treated nets were distributed in this area. Malkangiri: Training programmes under the TCPC project was held in various blocks of Malkangiri District. The bamboo craft training programme started on December 2006 with 75 members at Kanbai and 30 members from Panaspur Gram Panchayat. Tribes in Padmagiri Gram Panchayat were trained on Dhokra casting. 180 persons were trained in Bamboo Craft and 75 on Dhaokra casting.

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Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

Jajpur: So far, BISWA has covered seven out of 10 blocks in Jajpur forming 460 SHGs in 231 villages. It is also operating training and marketing unit for the weavers in Gopalpur. A health camp for these weavers was organized in March 2007. BISWA has aided the SHGs to develop small-scale industries and enterprises here. Dhenkanal: Under its health initiatives, BISWA has been organizing eye-camps in Dhenkanal during 2006-07 benifitting around 100

people in this area. This apart, 43 families have had advantage of the sanitation programmes held at the Gondia block under the Water and Sanitation Programme of BISWA. Kendrapara: BISWA has as many as 530 SHGs with 6633 volunteers working in this district. It has provided Water and Sanitation facility at Krushnadaspur and Bhomonda villages in this district besides holding training programmes on micro-enterprises for 20 SHGs in Kendrapara, Mahakalpada and Derabisi.

Visits
Our humble initiatives have had the good opportunity to be noticed by experts in various fields. This can be judged by the visitors we had during the past few months. BISWA thanks all its well wishers for their interest shown. Their visits have inspired us to work more diligently towards fighting poverty. Exposure visit to BISWA January 27: A team of 60 persons from NISWARTH, a Nayagarh based NGO headed by Mr. Arun Kumar Mohanty, Chairman; NISWARTH visited BISWA and had a discussion with Mr. K.C. Malick TATA AIG Officials Field Visit July 17-20 ‘2007" A group of High-level TATA AIG officials visited BISWA to study the health scenario in the region The delegates who took a trip to Kuchinda discussed issues with SHG members. The team also visited Rairakhol that was followed by a meeting at BISWA Head Office Visit to AMBABHONA 12 July 2007:Mr. Abhijit Banerjee, Manager, TATA AIG, Eastern Zone visited Bargarh District Office on 12 July 2007. and discussed the changes that have been observed in the last year with BISWA Self Help Federation. Guests’ visit Eminent guests from CMI and ASA; Mr. Willen Nolem, Mr. Martijn Bollen, Md. Ashraf Ul Choudhury and Md. Azim Hossain visited BISWA for 3 days. They visited BISWA’s CFC at Rengali, and Dhankuda Federation at Barmunda and the Deogarh Branch office of BISWA to study branch and group functions. SIDBI officials visit Mr. Ranjoy Choudhury of Small Industry Development Bank of India (SIDBI), Bhubaneswar, visited BISWA office at Bhubaneswar and SHGs in the villages of Balipatna & Balianta on 9th Dec 2006. The objective was to discuss their activities and plan of action of BISWA for these groups in detail. Visitors from ABN AMRO Foundation Ms. Aletta Dominique Jansen, Member from Holland, ABN AMRO Foundation visited BISWA on 7 July 2007 and stayed here for a week. Mr. N. Sunil Kumar, Head of ABN AMRO Foundation, Mumbai joined Ms Jansen on 10 and 11 July 2007. During this visit, they toured to see the activities carried out by BISWA in rural areas. They went to Hatibari Health Home, Rengali, Laxmipriya, Waste Plastic Unit Baduapali, Dhankuda, Katapali and Chouldipo Para. A small introductory meeting was organized at the Head Office during their visit.

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With Development Partners and Funding Agencies

Accomplishments
Award and Reward

Micro Finance Award
Micro Finance Process Excellence Award 2006
Conferred to BISWA jointly by PlaNet Finance and ABN Amro Bank

Micro Finance Process Excellence Award 2005

Conferred to BISWA jointlyby PlaNet Finance and ABN Amro Bank

Memento

Micro Insurance Award 2006-07
Conferred to BISWA jointly by PlaNet Finance and ING Vysya Bank

In recognition of effective participation in the Credit And Savings for Household Enterprise (CASHE) project of CARE India

1999-2006

As Best Shine in the Micro Insurance sector 2006-07

59

Memento

Micro Enterprise Award
Conferred to Reena Mahanand by Citigroup As Best Entrepreneur Reena Mahanad is a member of BISWA SHG, Stationpada Group No. 1

Annual Report
2006-2007

In recognition of contribution of BISWA in governance sector by Indian Society for Training & Development, Sambalpur Chapter

BISWA

Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

Accomplishments
Award and Reward

Memento

Certificate of Appreciation
For contribution of Mr. K.C. Malick, Chairman, BISWA in social service by Sambalashree An eminent Oriya weekly

In recognition of contribution of BISWA Jointly in Microfinance sector by SIDBI, CARE & Mission Shakti

Memento

BISWA
The winner of Best Organisation Award for contribution in Health, Nutrition and Population

For contribution of Mr. K.C. Malick, Chairman, BISWA in Human Rights by Forum for Fact Finding Documentation and Advocacy An eminent Oriya Weekly

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Certificate of Appreciation

KM Memorial Award
Conferred to BISWA for Outstanding Contribution in Creating Environmental Awareness by Nehru Institute of Youth Affairs

For contribution of Mr. K.C. Malick, Chairman, BISWA in social service by Bharat Drashan An eminent Oriya Daily

Section - 5

Partners, Supports, Human Resources & Finance

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BISWA
International Partners
Name IGSSS Dikonia Emergency Dikonia NOVIB(Through FFDA) FVT-Katholocshe Zentralstelle Sight & Life Misereor Niwano Peace Foundation SEEDS Orissa Foundation Asha for Education CARE-India (Orissa) UNIDO UNICEF

Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

Country Germany Germany Sweden Netherlands Germany Switzerland Germany Japan USA USA USA India India India

Scheme Vocational Training Emergency Relief Integrated Tribal Development Programme Human Rights Protection Vocational Training Ophthalmic care Common Facility Center Integrated Rural Development Plantation Innovative schools Non Formal Education Micro Finance Programme Handicrafts & Handloom Cluster Development Child & Mother Welfare

National Partners
Name CARE-India Orissa CARE-India Orissa Mahila Vikas Samabaya Nigam Development Commissioner (Handicrafts) NABARD Ministry of Health & Family Welfare Family Planning Association of India (FPAI) CPR DSWO, Sambalpur National Child Labour Project (NCLP) OBA Central Social Welfare Board, Govt. of India Directorate of Handicrafts Ministry of Environment & Forest Scheme CARE SHG Training CARE-Micro Finance Vocational Training AHVY SHG promotion RCH Family Planning Programme Environment protection Vocational training Child Labour Education Bignyan Mela Family Counseling center Cluster development NEAC Purpose Promotion of SHGs and their capacity building Micro credit to SHGs and their thrift & savings Employment opportunity creation through tailoring Income generation of the artisans Promotion of SHGs and their capacity building RCH activities throuth MY-HEART Counseling and clinical service to the poor Environment protection Income generation programme for Leprosy Vocational training for better future income Science awareness Family Counseling Training to bamboo artisans Environment awareness

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Other Institutions
l l l l l l l l l l

Financial Institutions & Insurance
l l l l l l l l l l

Entrepreneurship Development Institute of India Forum for Fact Finding & Documentation (FFDA) Opportunity Micro Finance India Ltd. Family Planning Association of India Department of Women & Child Development, GOI Ministry of Human Resources Development, GOI Ministry of Environment & Forest, GOI Mahila Vikas Samabaya Nigam, Govt. of Orissa State Social Welfare Board Orissa Bigyan Academy

State Bank of India ABN AMRO Bank ICICI Bank AXIS Bank HDFC Bank SIDBI Bank of India Citi Bank Utkal Gramya Bank FWWBI

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Rashtriya Malila Kosh LIC of India ICICI Lombard TATA AIG Oriental Insurance Company

BISWA MICRO FINANCE - Operational Disclosure
BISWA MICRO FINANCE PROJECT PROGRESS PERFORMANCE AT THE END OF JUNE-2007
1994-02   As on Mar-03 As on Mar-04 As on Mar-05 As on Mar-06 As on Mar-07 As on May-07 As on Jun-07

 

 

A. 1     558 56               8,055 14 805   2,154,996     268 3,862 0 0   249 3,830 0 0   3,563,644   717 798   8,374,605     333 4,930 0 0 15 15 14,338 33,522 71,845 15 764   15,864,140 3,675,440 19,539,580 272 4,158 3,780   186,478 15 774   38,984,200 17,340,651 19,539,580 105 1,571 14,598 44,852 346,125 15 961   95,456,892 40,280,507 135,737,399 392 5,957 60,196 153,223 593 744 2,736 198 118 136 157 482 1,133 238 244 1,467 5,135 3,084 947 9,166           3 12 67 49 67 50 52 982 2,265 4,699 12,437 22,768 60 164   11,241 6,531 1,280 19,052                 61 61 1 1 1 9 9

GEOGRAPHICAL COVERAGE 9 61 23,411 62 191 12,374 7,264 466 20,104 9 61   23,418 62 191 12,782 7,549 550 20,881

1

No. of State

2

No. of Districts

B.

S.H.G ANALYSIS

1

Total SHG Formation

2

Average SHG per SHG Promoter

3

Total S.H federation formed

C.

GRADATION OF SHGs

1

Grade-A

2

Grade-B

3

Grade-C

 

Total

D.

MEMBERS STATUS

1

Total Members

375,272 16 988   107,870,683 43,709,947 151,580,630 404 6,475 68,342 153,223

376,249 16 995   109,476,030 45,162,309 154,638,339 411 6,603 73,222 153,534

2

Average member per SHG/year

3

Average members per SHG Promoter

E.

SAVING ANALYSIS

1

Savings mobilized with the Group

2

Savings with the Institution

3

Total Saving Mobilized

4

Saving rate per member/year

5

Average Saving per SHG/year

6

JBY Insurance Coverage

7
2006-2007

ICICI LOMBARD-Health Insurance
Annual Report

63

Annual Report

2006-2007

64

    114 552,775 4,849 1,318 6 19 220 75,697   114 484,151 3,984 1,318 0.50%   98.00% 99%     99% 1% 1% 4,598 9,111 13,402 15,235 4,985,512 11,305,028 50,451,116 30,429 22,362 1%   99% 372 742 1,658       311,595 452,201 781,410 297 436 753 961 4,357,196   8,044 557,721,112 69,334 101,721 30%   99.80% 23 35 60 77 16 25 42 104 4,598 10,895 31,612 123,027 25,825 26,983 33,909 65,948 87,615 253,737 294 68 863 3,117,095   15,170 942,194,633 62,109 192,810 0.30%   99% 9,606,913 23,610,052 86,027,150 648,007,642 1,751,772,310 372 875 2,537 9,826 19,994          

 

1994-02     20,404 1,798,930,327 88,166 258,563 294 69 879 3,160,113    15,481 929,073,198 60,014 195,200 0.30%    99%

As on Mar-03

As on March 04

As on Mar-05

As on Mar-06

As on Mar-07

As on May-07

As on  Jun-07    20,739 1,818,046,760 87,663 262,801 294 71 894 3,129,729   15,749  899,140,392  58,425  198,950  0.30%    99%

F

LOAN ANALYSIS

1

No of Loan Disbursement

2

Amount of Loan Disbursed

BISWA

3

Loan Size

4

Lonee Members

5

No of Credit Officer

6

No of loan per Credit Officer

7

No. of Loanee per loan officer

8

Portfolio per credit officer

G.

LOAN OUTSTANDING

1

No. of loan outstanding

Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

2

Amount Outstanding

3

Avarage Outstanding

4

No of active members

5

Portfolio at Risk

H

REPAYMENT STATUS

1

Repayment from Borrowers

Outreach Social Development

BISWA has a plan to cover another 5 states by the end of 2008, totaling to 16 states. 26500 SHGs are planned to be formed and nurtured; covering at least 424000 memberships. BISWA shall focus on all its existing social dimensions giving thrust on both vertical and horizontal development. The existing programmes shall be intensified and additional programmes shall be taken up to cover aspects of quality of human lives which have not yet been addressed by BISWA; e.g.; labour issues, reclamation of wasteland, conservation of bio-diversity, technical issues concerning entrepreneurship etc. BISWA plans to establish one Micro Entrepreneurship Development Institute (MEDI) with legal entity under section 25 of Companies Act (not for profit). BISWA has met with all legal paraphernalia for the purpose and the legal sanction is awaited. The title of the MEDI shall be Laxmipriya as accepted by the Registrar of Companies. The proposed MEDI shall be a resource institution in the micro-entrepreneurship development sector in imparting training, providing technical and managerial guidance, provide consultancy on turn-key basis, procurement of raw materials and other marketing facilities to BISWA as well as other institutions active in the sector.

Micro-enterprise

Micro-finance

The micro-finance programme of BISWA follows a well planned road map. Following the map, BISWA has established one Non Banking Financial Company at the apex level to cater the financial needs of the sector. It has also promoted Self Help Federations at the community level. The Federations are conglomeration of SHGs in a compact geographical area having legal entity as Mutual Benefit Trust (MBT) under the Indian Trusts Act. These Federations are community based client owned client managed socio-economic intermediary institutions. BISWA has a plan to promote 250 such Federations by the end of FY 2008 and build up the capacities of the institutions so as to enable them to discharge their own financial and social obligations. The NBFC and the credit programme of BISWA follow a well calculated projection (cash flow) for coming 5 years. Accordingly it is planned to disburse credit to the tune of Rs. 200 crores to as many as 26500 SHGs with an outstanding of Rs 193 crores. BISWA projects the net worth to be about 14 crores by the end of FY 2008. Savings by the clients (which is not utilized by BISWA) is projected to be mobilized to the tune of 28 crores; deposited in various banks or utilized by the respective SHGs as internal lending. Under the social security programme, BISWA envisages to cover all the active members under its Life/ Health and Assets insurance schemes. BISWA is the corporate agent of LIC of India and is also associated with ICICI Lombard and Oriental Insurance Co. Ltd.

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Annual Report
2006-2007

BISWA
Human Resources

Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

Despite being a civil society organization, BISWA stands out for its professionally managed human resource. Our employee work on set goals and are driven by strong human resource plans and policies. The staff at BISWA is categorized into 8 different scales starting from Assistant Manager to General Manager, where each scale maintains a specific function. Besides, the village level organizers working for community development and social empowerment come under the ‘Special group’ category. Presently the total staff strength exceeds 1300, who, besides being a part of BISWA’s payroll enjoy the benefits of health insurance and provident funds. Also they are eligible for staff loans with small interest rate and easy repayment schedules. BISWA follows strict appointment procedures and maintains a personal file for each of its employee where his/her career growth is stressed. In house and out house training of the staff is emphasized and BISWA has its own training cell for the purpose. The staff is also sent out to attend various training and workshops. Every year there is a performance appraisal followed by salary increment and promotion. Our Staff… Professionally educated (PhD holders, MBA & Rural Management) Postgraduate Graduate Undergraduate and Others 7% 14% 61 % 18 %

Our In-house News Letter

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Annual Report
2006-2007

Chairman in discussion with Senior Staffs

BISWA Offices
Head Office
Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency (BISWA) At: Danipali, PO: Budharaja Dist: Sambalpur-768 004, Orissa, India Telefax: +91-663-2533597, Cell: +91 9437056453 E-mail: office@biswa.org, kcmalick@biswa.org Website: www.biswa.org

National Liaison Office
A-16, 4th Floor, Masjid Moth South Extension, Part-II New Delhi - 110049, India Office: +91-11-46035197 E-mail: office@biswa.org, kcmalick@biswa.org Website: www.biswa.org

BISWA Network Office
38 Dharma Vihar Bhubaneswar - 751 030, Orissa, India Office: +91-674-6417338, Cell: +91-9937782343 E-mail: biswanet_mail@yahoo.co.in, sisir@biswa.org Website: www.biswa.org / biswanet

Orissa West-Zone Office
Zonal Office, BISWA At: Danipali, PO: Budharaja Dist: Sambalpur, Orissa, India Office: +91-9238774825, Fax: +91-663-2533597 E-mail: office@biswa.org, Website: www.biswa.org

Orissa East Zone Office
Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency (BISWA) Infront of GGP High School, PO: Rasulgarh, Bhubaneswar Dist: Khurda, Orissa, India Telefax: +91-674-2370544 E-mail: office@biswa.org, Website: www.biswa.org District Offices Deogarh At/Po: Mahuldhipasahi Bolangir At: Barpalipada (3rd Lane) Sundergarh At: D 321, Sector-16, PO: Rourkela Sonepur At: Bagmari, Near Hospital Chowk PO/PS: Birmaharajpur Nawarangpur At: Gaduaguda, (Near Telephone Bhawan) Sambalpur At: Danipali, PO: Budharaja, Kalahandi At: Ram Nagar Pada, Bhawanipatna Boudh At: Batupali NAC (Near Forest Gate) Rayagada At/PO: Balaram Nagar (Gurupur), Nuapada At/PO: Khariar, Near Civil Court

Chhattisgarh State Office
K-7, Agroha Grihanirman Society Sector-II, Ring Road-1 Raipur, Chhatisgarh, India Office: +91-771-6451927, Cell: 09754178349 E-mail: cz_state@biswa.org, Website: www.biswa.org

Jharsuguda Lalobira, PO: Kutarimal, Via: Bamra Bargarh Kali Mandir Chowk, Near College Road Malkangiri At: Post Office Line Angul At: Similipada (Backside of PTC) Koraput At: Lingaraj Nagar, PO: Jaypur Jajpur At: Toramandan Jagatsinghpur At/PO: Tirttol (D.I. Office Grant) Kandhamal At/PO: Tikabali Keonjhar At/PO: Padampur, Via: Karanjia Khurda (Bhubaneswar) Plot No. E/7 (Opp. GGP High School) PO: Rasulgarh

Kendrapada At: Dhuria, Pandri, PO: Jamdar Dhenkanal At/PO: Korian (BISWA) Puri At: Mousima Mandir, Grand Road Cuttack UCO Bank Building, 2nd Floor, BK Road Nayagarh Khandapara Road (near Mishra Colony) Mayurbhanj At: Panchpur Women’s College, Karanjia Ganjam Panobika Sahi, Bhapur Bazar, Berhampur-1 Gajapati Ram Nagar, Hatibari Road, Paralakhemundi Bhadrak Piteipur, Kantapada, Dasharathpur Balasore At: Asimila, PO: Bahanaga

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Annual Report
2006-2007

BISWA

Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

Community Empowerment Training

Chairman with Swadhar Inmates

68
Annual Report
2006-2007

Women Member at Training & Production Centre-Chhatisgarh

1099/3688, Satabdi Nagar, Unit-8, Bhubaneswar Pin-751 003, Ph: 9437003939

M PANIGRAHI & CO.

BHARAT INTEGRATED SOCIAL WELFARE AGENCY (BISWA), SAMBALPUR
AUDITOR’S REPORT TO THE MEMBERS We report that we have audited the attached Balance Sheet of BHARAT INTEGRATED SOCIAL WELFARE AGENCY (BISWA), SAMBALPUR, as at March 31, 2007 and also the Income & Expenditure and the cash flow statement for the year ended on that date, annexed thereto. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Organisation’s Managing Committee. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in India. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatements. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by the management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statements presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion. Further to our comments in the annexure referred to above, we report that: a) b) c) d) We have obtained all the information and explanations which to the best of our knowledge and belief were necessary for the purpose of audit. In our opinion proper of books of account as required by law have been kept by the Organisation, so far as it appears from our examination of those books. The Balance Sheet and Income, Receipt & Payment and Income Expenditure account dealt with this report are in agreement with the books of account. In our opinion, and to the best of our information and according to the explanations given to us, the said accounts together with the notes thereon give the information required by the appropriate Act, in the manner so required and reflects the true and fair view of the state of affairs of the Organisation in conformity with the accounting principles generally accepted in India. in the case of the Balance Sheet, of the state of the Organisation’s affairs as at March 31,2007; and in the case of income & expenditure account, for the year ending on 31st March 2007; and in the case of Receipt & Payment Account for the year ending on 31st March 2007.
Annual Report
2006-2007

i) ii) iii)

69

For M Panigrahi & Co. Chartered Accountants

Bhubaneswar July 11, 2007

M. Panigrahi, ACA Chartered Accountant M No: 60115

BHARAT INTEGRATED SOCIAL WELFARE AGENCY (BISWA), DANIPIALI, BUDHARAJA, SAMBALPUR CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET AS ON 31.03.07
Amount (Rs.) Fy 2005-06) 59,888,594.20 59,888,594.20 2,627,270.58 889,028.00 1,065,020.00 0.00 4,198,582.81 Loan and Advance 65,000.00 557,721,112.00 261,720.00 4,156,436.59 298,901.00 2,575,000.00 942,194,632.47 852,163.00 11,660,205.87 283,913.00 2,575,000.00 480,000.00 2,029,169.34 63,500.00 1,128,520.00 Stock of materials Cash & bank balance Sundry debtors Funds & other receivable 2,085,574.10 42,648,276.71 766,506.50 2,845,052.50 2,563,001.17 12,458,662.93 1,951,079.94 6,580,244.50 63,404,892.78 15,334,187.89 Amount (Rs.) Fy 2006-07 Asset Amount (Rs) Fy 2005-06 Amount (Rs.) Fy 200-07

Annual Report

2006-2007

70

Liabilities

Capital Fund Opening Add during the period (Excess of Income over Exp) Add Transfer FC Account Reserve Reserve Fund for Asset Opening Add during the year Temporary resticted Fund 15,334,187.89 3,464,410.00 2,343,580.94 243,567.00

Fixed Asset Opening Add during the year Less: Depreciation Less: Sale of Asset Current Asset

16,211,449.95

BISWA

Equity Capital (Margin Money)

Reserve for unforeseen expenses

Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

Loans & Advances Loan from FFIs Loan from Gen fund CD Loan Loan from Swadhar Current liabilities & provision Outstanding Expenses Security Deposits Provision for doubtful debt. JBY premium Scholarship to children 516,122,007.63 25,425,082.65 1,528,990.00 841,160,756.68 42,881,874.87 2,072,802.00 32,000.00 17,340,651.00 2,979,249.00 124,790.00 19,800.00 628,692,767.29 997,330,352.83 Total 5,310,676.00 30,994,498.00 7,690,222.16 70,041.00 9,900.00

Loans to SHG Advances Loan to different project Deposits Security deposit Fixed Deposits

Total

628,692,767.29

997,330,352.83

FUND MANAGEMENT ON BEHALF OF ICICI

Loan Fund 329,749,500.72 628,692,767.29 329,749,500.72 997,330,352.83 Loan to SHGs-ICICI Total 407,989,240.69 407,989,240.69 628,692,767.29 329,749,500.72 329,749,500.72
For M Panigrahi & Co sd/K.C. Malick Chairman sd/M. Panigrahi, CCA (Proprietor) Membership No:60115

Loan outstanding-ICICI

407,989,240.69

Total

407,989,240.69

997,330,352.83

For Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency (Biswa)

Place: Bhubaneswar Date: 11.07.07

BHARAT INTEGRATED SOCIAL WELFARE AGENCY (BISWA), DANIPALI, BUDHARAJA, SAMBALPUR CONSOLIDATED INCOME & EXPENDITURE ACCOUNT FOR THE YEAR ENDING 31.03.2007

Expenditure

Amount (Rs.) Fy 2005-06 495,291.00 3,193,524.00 31,940,065.22 11,322,096.72 14,792,758.17 1,912,650.14 2,322,864.00 3,519,282.00

Amount (Rs.) Fy 2006-07 1,998,208.10 3,715,486.00 39,711,916.30 68,680,819.86 34,909,942.98 2,343,580.94 4,710,973.16 5,054,233.00 480,000.00 65,000.00

Income

Amount (Rs.) Fy 2005-06 12,195,265.36 60,693,771.70 3,300,459.00 65,000.00

Amount (Rs.) Fy 2006-07 15,935,548.00 1,821,165.00 5,054,233.00 44,000.00 43,560.00

Stock Rawmaterials Program Cost Financial Cost Administrative & Maintenance Cost Deprictiation Provision & Taxes Organisation Contribution Equity Capital (Margin Money) Reserve for unforeseen expenses Transfer to Various Program Transfer to Reserve Fund for Assets Membership Subscription Transfer to Capital fund FC Accounts Miscellaneous expenses Transfer to mFI as Corpus Fund Transfer to mFI Excess of Income over expenditure Total

Grant in aid Other Donation Organisation Contributions Membership subscription Membership subscription from Network membeers Sale Proceeds Service Charges Loan Processing Fees Intrest Received from bank Interest received from SHG

2,671,959.50 874,540.00 35,125.83 32,717,892.00

6,102,365.44 36,693,500.77 5,287,419.50 688,023.64 87,700,079.40

43,516,267.70 488,200.00

84,850.00 63,500.00 Premium from Individual 889,028.00 Received from other Projects Other Misc. Collection 156,357.00 Provident fund Closing Stock 2,003,158.10 197,311.00 43,516,267.70 1,357,910.00 84,850.00 3,329,618.00 231,168.00 2,475,635.17

29,064,116.70 9,178,268.00 7,883,276.54 159,628,660.19

2,627,270.58 165,491,165.92

71
Total 159,628,660.19 165,491,165.92
Annual Report
2006-2007

For Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency (Biswa) sd/K.C. Malick Chairman

For M Panigrahi & Co sd/M. Panigrahi, CCA (Proprietor)

Place: Bhubaneswar Date: 11.07.07

Membership No:60115

BISWA

Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency

BHARAT INTEGRATED SOCIAL WELFARE AGENCY (BISWA), DANIPALI, BUDHARAJA, SAMBALPUR CONSOLIDATED RECEIPT & PAYMENT ACCOUNT FOR THE YEAR ENDING 31.03.2007
Receipts Amount (Rs.) Fy 2005-06 3,539,239.33 16,114,425.78 61,093,771.70 43,516,267.70 3,519,282.00 35,125.83 32,717,892.00 1,443,241.00 874,540.00 2,084,957.00 1,357,910.00 65,000.00 140,737,646.00 533,682,800.00 33,408,703.65 1,939,000.00 398,476.00 14,789,441.00 19,800.00 1,989,247.00 4,443.00 38,242,384.70 931,573,593.69 Amount (Rs.) Fy 2006-07 42,648,276.71 12,987,583.53 1,821,165.00 94,850.00 5,054,233.00 688,023.64 87,700,079.40 38,019,917.00 4,404,600.00 5,287,419.50 5,087,792.00 38,601,574.77 44,000.00 43,560.00 719,291,147.53 853,617,462.75 13,499,862.09 32,000.00 9,561,105.50 2,648,494.00 243,567.00 231,168.00 583,736.00 46,044,372.00 261,720.00 105,600.00 1,421,544.00 2,057,336.22 14,988.00 1,892,097,177.64 Closing balance Cash at Bank Transfer from general fund for mFI Total Cash in hand Total 931,573,593.69 5,998,849.00 1,892,097,177.64 42,648,276.71 6,459,813.93 Payments Amount (Rs.) Fy 2005-06 11,368,388.00 3,263,069.00 31,728,179.22 11,322,096.72 14,920,844.17 648,007,642.00 2,873,811.50 705,160.00 1,989,247.00 261,720.00 72,112,931.97 1,487,366.00 1,123,140.00 3,519,282.00 43,516,267.70 29,064,116.70 9,178,268.00 2,483,787.00 Amount (Rs.) Fy 2006-07 3,464,410.00 947,976.00 37,173,750.30 68,680,819.86 34,909,942.98 2,928,267.00 1,103,764,668.00 9,561,105.50 2,104,682.00 2,057,336.22 603,700.00 14,107,171.15 517,962,171.70 32,390,525.00 900.00 4,458,449.00 38,268,380.00 115,500.00 5,054,233.00 94,850.00 839,320.00 150,357.00

Opening balance Grant in Aid Other Donation Transfer from other projects Organisation Contributions Interest received from bank Interest received from SHG Premium from Individuals JBY premium from SHGs Loan processing charges Sale Proceeds Miscellaneous Membership Subscription Membership Fees NGO Network Loan collection from SHG Loan from FIs Loan from Individuals Loan from Swadhar Loan and advance CD Loan Sale proceeds- Fixed assets Receipt from the receivable Provident Fund Ins. claim received Security Deposits
Annual Report
2006-2007

Capital Expenses Rawmaterial Program Cost Financial Cost Administrative Expenses Loan to individuals Loan to SHG Loan to Various Programs CD Loan Loan repayment to GF Loan and Advances Refund to ICICI Refund Loan to FIs Security Deposit Refund to Member-JBY JBY Premium Premium deposit Scolarship to children Organisation Contribution Transferred to general fund Transfer to mFI corpus fund Transfer to mFI Loan to NBFC Claim paid Miscelleneous expenses

72

Advance realised Scholarship from LIC Stationary Collection Loan refund Security collection

For Bharat Integrated Social Welfare Agency (Biswa) Place: Bhubaneswar Date: 11.07.07 sd/K.C. Malick Chairman

For M Panigrahi & Co sd/M. Panigrahi, CCA (Proprietor)

Membership No:60115