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The Master Game

BookTwo
eremy James and William Hartston
The Master Game, the only international chess tournament played for
television
,
has established itself as a firm favourite among both viewers
and the world
'
s leading grandmaster participants. This book contains the
complete games of the first six series of The Master Came. Those from
the fourth, fifth and sixth series are illuminated by the players' running
commentaries, recapturing their thoughts and emotions at the time of
making critical decisions.
The fourth series culminated in a thrilling final between Larsen and
Hort which needed five games at ever-increasing speed before a winner
finally emerged. The following year was still more dramatic, ending in
victory for the West German Lothar Schmid who had started the
tournament as a complete outsider. The 1981 series was the most exciting
and surprising of all with a fifteen-year-old stealing the limelight from
seven grandmasters.
The players' comments to their own games not only show the
contrast between their widely differing personalities and chess styles, but
provide unique insight into the thought processes of some of the best
players in the world today. Quite apart from its educational value,
however
,
this collection is a thoroughly enjoyable and entertaining trip
through some marvellous games in the company of such players as
Viktor Korchnoi
,
Bent Larsen
,
Vlastimil Hort, Tony Miles and, of course,
the astonishing English teenager Nigel Short.
Jeremy James introduces the players with some revealing tales of their
attitudes to chess and life in general, and Bill Hartston adds his own
comments to the games.
3.95
Round One
Alberik Q'Kelly 0-1 Tony Miles
John Nunn Yl,O- Yl, 1 Vlastimil Hort
Walter Browne 0-1 Jan Hein Donner
Gyozo Forintos 0-1 Bent Larsen
So, curiously, all players who drew the
black pieces for their first games
succeeded in passing through to the
semi-finals.
Game 1:
Alberik O'Kelly - Tony Miles . ./
Queen's Indian Defence
A game which was made to look really
one-sided by Miles's powerful attacking
play, but the Belgian grandmaster played
far too passively throughout.
1 c4 b6 2 d4 e6.
Q'KELL Y: So he's trying to playa
Nimzo-Indian without the move Nf6. What
shall I do? Well, the normal move is e4 but
I expect that he must have found an
improvement on the game that he lost a
few days ago against Browne in Tilburg, so
let's play simply, Nf3.
3 Nf3.
MILES: Qh, we're going to transpose into a
boring Queen's Indian. Still, nothing can
be done about it. I must move Nf6.
3 Nf6.
Q'KELL Y: Perhaps I should consider playing
Bf4, that's my opponent's speciality. He
won a good game against Spassky in the
wine tournament in Montilla, but I prefer
to play simply. Let's go to the Queen's
Indian with g3.
4 g3.
MILES: Now there are many possibilities.
Bb7 is normal - let me see - he writes a lot
about the game and probably knows most
about what's currently fashionable. That's
Bb7 and Be7 so I'll play something
different. I'll attack c4.
4 Ba6.
Q'KELL Y: So you're attacking my pawn; I
have to protect it. There are several
possibilities. I can protect with Qa4 or Qc2,
but I'll play simply: b3.
5 b3.
MILES: Yes, now White wants to develop
his bishop to b2, so I'll give him an
annoying little check on b4 and try to
deflect him.
5 .. Bb4+.
Q'KELL Y: I just remember a game won by
Smyslov with Black against Uhlmann when
6 Nbd2 was played. It's probably safer to
interpose the bishop.
6 Bd2.
MILES: That's good. Now I don't want to
exchange on d2 because that would only
develop another white piece, so I play my
23
Round One
Alberik O'Kelly 0-1 Tony Miles
John Nunn Vi,0- Vi, 1 Vlastimil Hort
Walter Browne 0-7 Jan Hein Donner
Gyozo Forintos 0-1 Bent Larsen
So, curiously, all players who drew the
black pieces for their first games
succeeded in passing through to the
semi-finals.
Game 1:
Alberik O'Kelly - Tony Miles -
Queen's Indian Defence
A game which was made to look really
one-sided by Miles
'
s powerful attacking
play, but the Belgian grandmaster played
far too passively throughout.
1 c4 b6 2 d4 e6.
O'KELLY:
So he's trying to play a
Nimzo-lndian without the move Nf6. What
shall I do? Well, the normal move is e4 but
I expect that he must have found an
improvement on the game that he lost a
few days ago against Browne in Tilburg, so
let's play simply, Nf3.
3 Nf3.
MILES: Oh, we're going to transpose into a
boring Queen's Indian. Still, nothing can
be done about it. I must move Nf6.
3 . . . Nf6.
O'KELLY:
Perhaps I should consider playing
Bf4, that's my opponent's speciality. He
won a good game against Spassky in the
wine tournament in Montilla, but I prefer
to play simply. Let's go to the Queen's
Indian with g3.
4g3.
MILES: Now there are many possibilities.
Bb7 is normal - let me see - he writes a lot
about the game and probably knows most
about what
'
s currently fashionable. That
'
s
Bb7 and Be7 so I'll play something
different. I'll attack c4.
4 . . . Ba6.
O'KELLY:
So you're attacking my pawn; I
have to protect it. There are several
possibilities. I can protect with Qa4 or Qc2,
but I'll play simply: b3.
5 b3.
MILES: Yes, now White wants to develop
his bishop to b2, so I'll give him an
annoying little check on b4 and try to
deflect him.
5 . . . Bb4+.
O'KELLY:
/ just remember a game won by
Smyslov with Black against Uhlmann when
6 Nbd2 was played. It's probably safer to
interpose the bishop.
6Bd2.
MILES: That's good. Now I don't want to
exchange on d2 because that would only
develop another white piece, so I play my
23
bishop back to el and hope that his bishop
is misplaced.
6 Be7.
O'KELLY: My bishop is not so nice on d2,
but I won't move it again at this stage.
Let's develop simply.
7 Bg2.
MILES: Now Bbl is possible, dS is possible,
c6 is an interesting move; play dS later and
if necessary recapture with the c-pawn. I
quite like it.
7 ... e6.
O'KELLY: Interesting idea. My Q-side is a
little bit weak so it's not so easy to develop
the Q-Knight because he might jump in on
the weak squares with a bishop. Let's
castle.
8 0-0.
MILES: Now my idea's to play dS, but I
also need to castle. Which move do I play
first? I don't think it makes any difference.
I'll play dS.
8 ... dS.
O'KELLY: He's threatening my pawn again.
Well, let's ignore the threat for one move.
9 Ne3.
MILES: Now if I take on c4, he recaptures
and after Bxc4 he has NeS. That attacks my
bishop and my pawn on c6 and I can't play
BdS because of e4, so I'd have to move the
bishop back and then Nxc6 and I lose
material. So I can't take on c4 for the
moment, but if I castle first then I think I'm
really threatening him.
9 ... 0-0.
O'KELLY: Now I must do something about
24
the c-pawn. It's not pleasant to take in the
centre but I've probably no option. I
remember a game that I won with Black
against the late Ossip Bernstein about
twenty-five years ago. He also took in the
centre, but here I've no option.
10 exdS.
MILES: That's nice. I expected NeS but I
would have played Nfdl with a fairly easy
position. Now White releases the tension -
I'm sure Black has a very easy position -
probably a little better already. Now I like
cxdS, that's my style. I think the American
Grandmaster Lombardy claimed that exdS
was good for Black but I don't believe that.
10 .. exdS.
With both Black bishops more aggressively
placed than White's, the central pawn
exchange has left him with the easier
game. The next few moves saw O'Kelly
adopting defensive measures against Ne4
and Ba3.
11 Qb1 Nc6 12 a3 Re8 13 Re1.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
a bed e 9 h
MILES: Now a plan, my kingdom for a
bishop back to el and hope that his bishop
is misplaced.
6 . . . Be7.
O'KELL
Y: My bishop is not so nice on d2,
but I won't move it again at this stage.
Let's develop simply.
7Bg2.
MILES: Now Bb7 is possible, d5 is possible,
c6 ;s an interesting move; play d5 later and
if necessary recapture with the c-pawn. I
quite like it.
7 . . . c6.
O'KELLY:
Interesting idea. My Q-side is a
little bit weak so it's not so easy to develop
the Q-Knight because he might jump in on
the weak squares with a bishop. Let's
castle.
8 0-0.
MILES: Now my idea's to play d5, but I
also need to castle. Which move do I play
first? I don't think it makes any difference.
I'll
play d5.
8
. . .
65.
O'KELL
Y: He's threatening my pawn again.
Well, let's ignore the threat for one move.
9 Nc3.
MILES: Now if I take on c4
, he recaptures
and after Bxc4 he has Ne5. That attacks my
bishop and my pawn on c6 and I can't play
Bd5 because of e4, so I'd have to move the
bishop back and then Nxc6 and I lose
material. So I can
'
t take on c4 for the
moment, but if I castle first then I think I
'
m
really threatening him.
9 . . . 0-0.
O'KELL
Y: Now / must do something about
the c-pawn. It's not pleasant to take in the
centre but I
'
ve probably no option. I
remember a game that I won with Black
against the late Ossip Bernstein about
twenty-five years ago. He also took in the
centre, but here I
'
ve no option.
10 cxd5.
MILES: That's nice. I expected Ne5 but I
would have played Nfd7 with a fairly easy
position. Now White releases the tension -
I
'
m sure Black has a very easy position -
probably a little better already. Now I like
cxd5, that
'
s my style. I think the American
Grandmaster Lombardy claimed that exd5
was good for Black but I don
'
t believe that.
10 . . . cxd5.
With both Black bishops more aggressively
placed than White
'
s, the central pawn
exchange has left him with the easier
game. The next few moves saw O
'
Kelly
adopting defensive measures against Ne4
and Ba3.
11 Qbl Nc6 12 a3 Rc8 13 Rcl.
1
8
5
-
.
1
a b c d e f g h
MILES: Now a plan, my kingdom for a
24
plan. Maybe Nd7 and Bf6, but I don't
know. On Nd7 maybe he can play e4. I
can't give him so much time yet. That's
annoying, but he hasn't got any sensible
moves either. Possibly another idea for me
is Bd6 and Qe7, then I have some pressure
against the Q-side. I don't know; against
Bd6 he might still be able to play e4, then
maybe he'll have Ng5 attacking h7. I need
a good waiting move, maybe ReB. The rook
will be useful there later on; it may allow
me to regroup.
13 . .. Re8.
O'KELLY: What are you up to? Seems to be
waiting for a mistake. /t's not easy, my
bishop is out of play, the d-pawn needs
protection from the knight. I have two
possibilities here: either Bf1 or e3. If I play
e3 it locks in the bishop on d2. What shall
I do? Let's play e3 and have a look at what
will happen later.
14 e3.
MILES: Now that I like. Both his bishops
are now fairly bad. Can I play Bd6? I don't
know, maybe he can still play e4 and if I
take twice he'll recapture with the queen;
my knight on c6 is loose and he may still
have Ng5. I think I need another waiting
move. Maybe just h6 so that I won't have
the worry of Ng5 at the end. He's still not
doing anything. He's having terrible trouble
finding moves and he's taking a long time
over it. Another waiting move is good.
14 . .. h6.
O'KELLY: He just waits. What shall I do?
Probably the safest way is Bf1, proposing
an exchange, but it's very passive because
he might enter on the white squares later.
It's not easy to find a move. I might even
play Ne5 - it's no good, he would take it
off and his knight would attack my pawn.
Let's wait and see.
15 Qb2.
MILES: That's nice, there's no longer
control over e4. I can even think of putting
my knight there, but I like myoId plan,
Bd6 and Qe7 looks nice. I don't have to
worry about e4 any more and I get nice
pressure against the Q-side.
15 . .. Bd6.
O'KELLY: That's unpleasant, he's
threatening e5. I should have thought
about that before. My two bishops are bad.
Maybe I could playa counter-attack on the
Q-side. That's the general strategy against a
central thrust. Let's try it.
16 b4.
Strange logic by O'Kelly; the normal
recommendation is for action in the centre
to counter a wing attack. This move puts
his last pawn on a black square. The threat
of b5 is easily countered and White is left
with disastrous weaknesses on the light
squares.
16 ... Bd3 17 Nel Bc4 18 Bfl Bxfl
19 Kxfl e5!
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e 9 h
25
plan. Maybe Nd7 and Bf6, but I don
'
t
know. On Nd7 maybe he can play e4. I
can
'
t give him so much time yet. That's
annoying, but he hasn
'
t got any sensible
moves either. Possibly another idea for me
is Bd6 and Qe7, then I have some pressure
against the Q-side. I don
'
t know; against
Bd6 he might still be able to play e4, then
maybe he
'
ll have Ng5 attacking h7. I need
a good waiting move, maybe Re8. The rook
will be useful there later on; it may allow
me to regroup.
13 . . . Re8.
O'KELLY:
What are you up to? Seems to be
waiting for a mistake. It
'
s not easy, my
bishop is out of play, the d-pawn needs
protection from the knight. I have two
possibilities here: either Bfl or e3. If I play
e3 it locks in the bishop on d2. What shall
I do? Let's play e3 and have a look at what
will happen later.
14 e3.
MILES: Now that I like. Both his bishops
are now fairly bad. Can I play Bd6? I don
'
t
know, maybe he can still play e4 and if I
take twice he'll recapture with the queen;
my knight on c6 is loose and he may still
have Ng5. I think I need another waiting
move. Maybe just h6 so that I won
'
t have
the worry of Ng5 at the end. He's still not
doing anything. He's having terrible trouble
finding moves and he's taking a long time
over it. Another waiting move is good.
14 . . . h6.
O'KELL
Y: He just waits. What shall I do?
Probably the safest way is Bfl, proposing
an exchange, but it
'
s very passive because
he might enter on the white squares later.
It's not easy to find a move. I might even
play Ne5 - it
'
s no good, he would take it
off and his knight would attack my pawn.
Let's wait and see.
15 Qb2.
MILES: That's nice, there's no longer
control over e4. I can even think of putting
my knight there, but I like my old plan,
Bd6 and Qe7 looks nice. I don't have to
worry about e4 any more and I get nice
pressure against the Q-side.
15 . . . Bd6.
O'KELLY:
That's unpleasant, he's
threatening e5. I should have thought
about that before. My two bishops are bad.
Maybe I could play a counter-attack on the
Q
-side
.
That's the general strategy against a
central thrust. Let
'
s try it.
16 b4.
Strange logic by O'Keily; the normal
recommendation is for action in the centre
to counter a wing attack. This move puts
his last pawn on a black square. The threat
of b5 is easily countered and White is left
with disastrous weaknesses on the light
squares.
16 . . . Bd3 17 Nel Bc4 18 Bfl Bxfl
19 Kxfl e5!
8
3
.
v.
.
;
3 a
:
1
a b c d e f g h
25
Exchange of bishops has left the white
squares defenceless. Miles opens the ~ m e
for the decisive attack. O'Kelly's men, In
their draughts board posture, are in no
position to offer much resistance.
O'KELLY: Very strong move. He might
enter on the e-fiJe. If I take, the knight
takes back and enters on the white
squares. It's very bad, probably already
lost. Well, let's try Nb5.
20 Nb5.
MILES: Now I could probably play e4 and
then build up on the K-side. That's
probably strong but I'd like to open the
position a bit because his pieces are all
stuck on the Q-side.
20 .. exd4.
A' KELL Y: If I play Nxd6, Qxd6 then b5, he
takes on e3. The king's too exposed. I
must take back.
21 Nxd4.
MILES: Right, I take on d4 and he can't
take with the queen because of Be5.
21 Nxd4 22 exd4.
MILES: Now in such positions my queen
belongs on a white square and there's only
one for it. That's d7, it's very strong.
22 Qd7.
O'KELLY: Let's exchange one of the rooks.
23 Rxc8.
MILES: Now RxcB is normal but I want the
rook on the e-fi/e. If the queen takes on cB
I threaten Qh3 and Re2. This is very strong,
he must let one of my pieces in.
23 Qxc8.
26
O'KELLY: There's probably no defence. He
threatens Qh3+ with a winning attack.
Well, let's play Kg2.
24 Kg2.
MILES: That stops Qh3 +, but Re2 looks
very strong. Then I pin his bishop and
pawn. My knight's going to e4 and the
queen's coming to f5. That must be
winning.
24 ... Re2.
O'KELLY: Very unpleasant. Many threats
here, the main one being Ne4. The
position is lost.
25 Nf3.
MILES: Now Ne4100ks very strong, but
wait, Ng4 is much better. Then the only
way to protect the f2 pawn is Rf1, when I
have Ne3+. His pawn's pinned against his
king, and the bishop against the queen. So
he can't take it and I win the exchange.
No, more! He must play Kg1 and then I
have Qh3 and that's mate next move on g2
or f1. Check once more: Ng4 and if he tries
Rc1, I have Qf5. That doesn't help.
25 .. Ng4.
O'KELLY: I overlooked that. I cannot play
Rf1 to protect the f-pawn because of Ne3+.
There's nothing to be done.
26 Resigns.
Exchange of bishops has left the white
squares defenceless. Miles opens the game
for the decisive attack. O'Kelly's men, in
their draughts board posture, are in no
position to offer much resistance.
O'KELLY:
Very strong move. He might
enter on the e-file. If I take, the knight
takes back and enters on the white
squares. It
'
s very bad, probably already
lost. Well, let's try Nb5.
20 Nb5.
MILES: Now I could probably play e4 and
then build up on the K-side. That's
probably strong but I
'
d like to open the
position a bit because his pieces are all
stuck on the Q-side.
20.. . exd4.
O'KELLY:
If I play Nxd6,Qxd6 then 65, he
takes on e3. The king's too exposed. I
must take back.
21 Nxd4.
MILES: Right, I take on d4 and he can't
take with the queen because of Be5.
21 . . . Nxd4 22 exd4.
MILES: Now in such positions my queen
belongs on a white square and there's only
one for it. That
'
s d7, it
'
s very strong.
22. . . Qd7.
O'KELLY:
Let's exchange one of the rooks.
23 Rxc8.
MILES: Now Rxc8 is normal but I want the
rook on the e-file. If the queen takes on c8
I threaten Qh3 and Re2. This is very strong,
he must let one of my pieces in.
23... Qxc8.
O'KELLY:
There's probably no defence. He
threatens Qh3+ with a winning attack.
Well, let's play Kg2.
24 Kg2.
MILES: That stops Qh3+, but Re2 looks
very strong. Then I pin his bishop and
pawn. My knight
'
s going to e4 and the
queen
'
s coming to f5. That must be
winning.
24 . . . Re2.
O'KELLY:
Very unpleasant. Many threats
here, the main one being Ne4. The
position is lost.
25 Nf3.
MILES: Now Ne4 looks very strong, but
wait, Ng4 is much better. Then the only
way to protect the f2 pawn is Rfl, when I
have Ne3+. His pawn's pinned against his
king, and the bishop against the queen. So
he can't take it and I win the exchange.
No, more! He must play Kg! and then I
have Qh3 and that's mate next move on g2
or fl. Check once more: Ng4 and if he tries
Rcl, I have Qf5. That doesn't help.
25. . . Ng4.
O'KELLY:
/ overlooked that. I cannot play
Rfl to protect the f-pawn because of Ne3 + .
There's nothing to be done.
26 Resigns.
26
Game 2:
John Nunn - Vlastimil Hort /
Petroff's Defence
Hort made it clear at the start that he was
not willing to take any chances playing for
a win with the black pieces. Adopting the
solid Petroff, he played for equality but
found himself very much on the defensive
after the opening.
1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nf6 3 d4 Nxe4 4 Bd3 d5
5 Nxe5 Bd6 6 0-0 0-0 7 Nd2 Nxd2
8 Bxd2 Nc6 9 Nxc6 bxc6 10 Qh5.
White makes good use of his extra tempo
to threaten mate and induce a weakness in
the black king's defences.
10 g6 11 Qh6 Re8.
NUNN: If I could get rid of Black's only
active piece, I would have a distinct
advantage, so I think I'll go Bg5 here. Then
if he interposes his bishop on e7, I can
swap them off.
12 Bg5.
HaRT: I was afraid of this. Now I cannot
play f6 because White sacrifices his bishop
on g6 and wins immediately, I will be
mated. I have to exchange the black-colour
bishops.
12 Be7.
NUNN: I can exchange immediately here,
but he recaptures with the queen and I
can't occupy the e-file with my rook. I
think a little trick is in order; I'll play the
rook to the e-file straight away. Then if he
takes on g5, I'll exchange rooks on e8 and
recapture with the queen on g5. That way I
exchange off his active rook on e8 as well
as his active bishop.
13 Rae1.
HORT: I expected this move and I have to
be very careful because White threatens to
win the game immediately with Rxe7 and
Qh4. I can't play Bd7 and I'm afraid to play
Be6 because the f-pawn starts to march, f4
and f5 and that is very bad for me. I don't
like it much but I have to change the
bishops.
13 Bxg5 14 Rxe8+ Qxe8 15 Qxg5.
HaRT: What shall I do? I succeeded to
change some pieces but still I am afraid my
pawn structure is very unsatisfactory. My
Q-side is a little weak and so I have to
defend. I am afraid to play Bd7 because
then White has Qf4 attacking the pawn on
c7. Better to play to e6.
15 Be6.
NUNN: I must decide how to make
progress. It's very tempting to advance my
f-pawn; if I manage to get it as far as f5
then Black will have serious problems. That
looks the most effective idea.
16 f4.
HaRT: Now I have to change queens.
16 Qd8.
NUNN: Well, he's offering the exchange of
queens. I have to think what combination
of pieces I want left on the board. I think
that in view of Black's slightly weakened
K-side, it will be better for me to have
queens on the board to preserve some
attacking possibilities. I'd like also to
preserve the pin on the g-pawn to make
the threat of f5 stronger, so I'll retreat my
queen down the g-file.
17 Qg3.
27
Game 2:
John Nunn - Vlastimil Hort J
Petroffs Defence
Hort made it clear at the start that he was
not willing to take any chances playing for
a win with the black pieces. Adopting the
solid Petroff, he played for equality but
found himself very much on the defensive
after the opening.
1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nf6 3 d4 Nxe4 4 Bd3 d5
5 Nxe5 Bd6 6 0-0 0-0 7 Nd2 Nxd2
8 Bxd2 Nc6 9 Nxc6 bxc6 10 Qh5.
White makes good use of his extra tempo
to threaten mate and induce a weakness in
the black king's defences.
10 . . . g6 11 Qh6 Re8.
NUNN: \f I could get rid of Black's only
active piece, I would have a distinct
advantage, so I think I
'
ll go Bg5 here. Then
if he interposes his bishop on el, I can
swap them off.
12 Bg5.
HORT: / was afraid of this. Now I cannot
play f6 because White sacrifices his bishop
on g6 and wins immediately, I will be
mated. I have to exchange the black-colour
bishops.
12 . . . Be7.
NUNN: / can exchange immediately here,
but he recaptures with the queen and I
can
'
t occupy the e-file with my rook. I
think a little trick is in order; I'll play the
rook to the e-file straight away. Then if he
takes on g5, I'll exchange rooks on e8 and
recapture with the queen on g5. That way I
exchange off his active rook on e8 as well
as his active bishop.
13 Rael.
HORT: / expected this move and I have to
be very careful because White threatens to
win the game immediately with Rxe7 and
Qh4. I can't play Bd7 and I'm afraid to play
Be6 because the f-pawn starts to march, f4
and f5 and that is very bad for me. I don
'
t
like it much but I have to change the
bishops.
13 . . . Bxg5 14 Rxe8+ Qxe8 15 Qxg5.
HORT: What shall I do? I succeeded to
change some pieces but still I am afraid my
pawn structure is very unsatisfactory. My
Q
-side is a little weak and so I have to
defend. I am afraid to play Bd7 because
then White has Qf4 attacking the pawn on
c7. Better to play to e6.
15 . . . Be6.
NUNN: / must decide how to make
progress. It
'
s very tempting to advance my
f
-pawn; if I manage to get it as far as f5
then Black will have serious problems. That
looks the most effective idea.
16 f4.
HORT: Now / have to change queens.
16 . . . Qd8.
NUNN: Well, he's offering the exchange of
queens. I have to think what combination
of pieces I want left on the board. I think
that in view of Black's slightly weakened
K-side
,
it will be better for me to have
queens on the board to preserve some
attacking possibilities. I
'
d like also to
preserve the pin on the g-pawn to make
the threat of f5 stronger, so I'll retreat my
queen down the g-file.
17 Qg3.
27
HORT: That move is very clever because I
cannot now attack the pawn on d4. If I
attack this pawn by Qf6 then f5 comes and
I'm under very strong attack. I can take on
d4 with check, but after Kh1 my pawn on
c7 is still hanging and I'm almost losing. I
have only one move.
17 . .. Qd6.
NUNN: He prevents me from playing f5
because of the possible exchange of
queens. I have to keep running away with
the queen. Where can it find a good
square? f2 looks promising because that
supports the thrust f5 and also prevents
Black from playing c5. First of all I think I'll
force him to put his queen on a more
passive square by going to h4 with my
queen. I think he'll oppose queens by
going back to dB and that will make it
more difficult for him to play his rook on
aB over to the e-fi/e.
18 Qh4 Qd8 19 Qf2.
HORT: That's now very dangerous. f5 is a
threat and I have to do something about it.
Well, I am not afraid to come to the rook
endgame with my bad pawn structure.
Lasker once said that all rook endgames are
drawish so I will try to make a little attack
against d4 as well.
19 . .. Qf6.
NUNN: Well, if I play f5 here, that just
leads to everything being exchanged off. I
do have a definite advantage here, but it's
difficult to make progress.
20 Re1.
Hort was clearly very worried by his
position at this stage. With Q-side pawn
weaknesses and White threatening an
28
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e 9 h
attack on the other wing by means of ReS
and fS he is forced to defend precisely.
Usually attacking chances on both wings
together with the superior bishop will give
excellent winning chances to White in such
positions.
20 ... Rb8 21 b3 Re8 22 ReS Kf8.
NUNN: I didn't expect to get such a good
position against a strong player like
Vlastimil Hort, but again White has trouble
making progress. It would be rather nice to
play c4 in some positions. If he exchanges,
his Q-side pawns are more exposed. Of
course, my own d4 pawn would be rather
weak, but perhaps that's not so important.
First of all, I think I must consolidate. I'll
put my queen on the e-file behind the
rook.
23 Qe3.
Well, White had to make his choice now. I
think I was a little bit lucky because I was
afraid very much of the move Qd2 and
then the queen would come to the e1-a5
diagonal and my pawns would be very
exposed. I don't know what I would do
after 23 Qd2. I am a little bit happy now
HORT: That move is very clever because I
cannot now attack the pawn on d4. If I
attack this pawn by Qf6 then f5 comes and
I
'
m under very strong attack. I can take on
d4 with check, but after Khl my pawn on
c7 is still hanging and I
'
m almost losing. I
have only one move.
17 . . . Qd6.
NUNN: He prevents me from playing f5
because of the possible exchange of
queens. I have to keep running away with
the queen. Where can it find a good
square? f2 looks promising because that
supports the thrust f5 and also prevents
Black from playing c5. First of all I think I'll
force him to put his queen on a more
passive square by going to h4 with my
queen. I think he
'
ll oppose queens by
going back to d8 and that will make it
more difficult for him to play his rook on
a8 over to the e-file.
18Qh4Qd8 19 Qf2.
HORT: That's now very dangerous. f5 is a
threat and I have to do something about it.
Well, I am not afraid to come to the rook
endgame with my bad pawn structure.
Lasker once said that all rook endgames are
drawish so I will try to make a little attack
against d4 as well.
19 . . . Qf6.
NUNN: Well, if I play f5 here, that just
leads to everything being exchanged off. I
do have a definite advantage here, but it's
difficult to make progress.
20 Rel.
Hort was clearly very worried by his
position at this stage. With Q-side pawn
weaknesses and White threatening an
8
1
A
abcdefgh
attack on the other wing by means of Re5
and f5 he is forced to defend precisely.
Usually attacking chances on both wings
together with the superior bishop will give
excellent winning chances to White in such
positions.
20 . . . Rb8 21 b3 Re8 22 Re5 KfB.
NUNN: / didn't expect to get such a good
position against a strong player like
Vlastimil Hort, but again White has trouble
making progress. It would be rather nice to
play c4 in some positions. If he exchanges,
his Q-side pawns are more exposed. Of
course, my own d4 pawn would be rather
weak, but perhaps that
'
s not so important.
First of all, I think I must consolidate. I'll
put my queen on the e-file behind the
rook.
23 Qe3.
Well, White had to make his choice now. I
think I was a little bit lucky because I was
afraid very much of the move Qd2 and
then the queen would come to the e1-a5
diagonal and my pawns would be very
exposed. I don
'
t know what I would do
after 23 Qd2. I am a little bit happy now
28
because I see that my opponent might not
find the right plan. Of course, I move my
bishop right away.
23 . 8d7.
Having missed the right plan of preparing
an attack on the Q-side pawns with Qd2
and a later QaS, Nunn was given no
further chance to increase his advantage.
By move 26 Hort thought his position good
enough to offer a draw. Nunn declined,
but seven moves later realised that there
was no point in continuing.
24 c4 dxc4 25 8xc4 Qd6 26 RxeS+ 8xeS
27 Qe5 f6 2S Qc5 8f7!
Exchanging queens would have left Black
with a very difficult bishop endgame to
defend. Hort realises that he can ignore
the attack on a7.
29 Qxa7 8xc4 30 bxc4 Qxf4 31 Qa3+ KeS
32 Qc3 KdS 33 h3 draw agreed.
Game 3:
Vlastimil Hort - John Nunn
Sicilian Defence
Under the rules of the competition, each
player had one hour on his clock for this
replay. Hort wisely chose an opening
variation with which he was more familiar
than his opponent. Nunn ran short of time
trying to solve the problems of his
position, finally succumbing to Hort's
systematic endgame pressure. An
instructive lesson in the art of capitalising
on small positional advantages.
1 e4 c5.
HORT: I don't like normal lines in the
Sicilian; I prefer to play something unusual
for my opponent because now the game
lasts only one hour and so I will try a move
that I always used here in England with
success.
2 c3.
NUNN: This is rather unusual. I won't have
the chance to play my favourite Najdorf
variation. In fact I've never had to face this
move before so I face the problem of
finding the correct moves in something I
don't know very well. I'll try to choose
something which has a fairly strategiC
theme and not get embroiled too much in
opening theory.
2 dS.
HORT: This move I also know quite well; it
is defended by many Soviet players. This
move opens the centre and what I like is
that the game loses its Sicilian character
and gets some character of a game where
my opponent's knowledge might be a little
weaker. I have to take.
3 exdS QxdS 4 d4 e6 5 Nf3 Nf6 6 8e2.
NUNN: I've got to make the decision at
some point when to exchange those pawns
on d4. I prefer not to do it immediately
because if I take on d4 with my pawn, then
White recaptures with his pawn on c3 and
can later gain a tempo attacking my queen
with Nc3. So I think I'll delay this exchange
and just continue development.
6 ... 8e7.
HORT: That's an interesting move. My
opponent still hesitates to take on d4. I
think I might try to change the strategy and
to play for majority on the Q-side. I will get
three pawns to two on the Q-side and later
support it by play of pieces.
29
because I see that my opponent might not
find the right plan. Of course, I move my
bishop right away.
23 . . . Bd7.
Having missed the right plan of preparing
an attack on the Q-side pawns with Qd2
and a later Qa5, Nunn was given no
further chance to increase his advantage.
By move 26 Hort thought his position good
enough to offer a draw. Nunn declined,
but seven moves later realised that there
was no point in continuing.
24 c4 dxc4 25 Bxc4 Qd6 26 Rxe8+ Bxe8
27 Qe5 f6 28 Qc5 Bf7!
Exchanging queens would have left Black
with a very difficult bishop endgame to
defend. Hort realises that he can ignore
the attack on a7.
29 Qxa7 Bxc4 30 bxc4 Qxf4 31 Qa3+ Ke8
32 Qc3 Kd8 33 h3 draw agreed.
Game 3:
Vlastimil Hort - John Nunn
Sicilian Defence
Under the rules of the competition, each
player had one hour on his clock for this
replay. Hort wisely chose an opening
variation with which he was more familiar
than his opponent. Nunn ran short of time
trying to solve the problems of his
position, finally succumbing to Hort
'
s
systematic endgame pressure. An
instructive lesson in the art of capitalising
on small positional advantages.
1 e4 c5.
HORT: / don't like normal lines in the
Sicilian; I prefer to play something unusual
for my opponent because now the game
lasts only one hour and so I will try a move
that I always used here in England with
success.
2c3.
NUNN: This is rather unusual. I won't have
the chance to play my favourite Najdorf
variation. In fact Tve never had to face this
move before so I face the problem of
finding the correct moves in something I
don't know very well. Til try to choose
something which has a fairly strategic
theme and not get embroiled too much in
opening theory.
2 . . . d5.
HORT: This move I also know quite well; it
is defended by many Soviet players. This
move opens the centre and what I like is
that the game loses its Sicilian character
and gets some character of a game where
my opponent
'
s knowledge might be a little
weaker. I have to take.
3 exd5 Qxd5 4 d4 e6 5 Nf3 Nf6 6 Be2.
NUNN: I've got to make the decision at
some point when to exchange those pawns
on d4. I prefer not to do it immediately
because if I take on d4 with my pawn, then
White recaptures with his pawn on c3 and
can later gain a tempo attacking my queen
with Nc3. So I think I
'
ll delay this exchange
and just continue development.
6 . . . Be7.
HORT: That's an interesting move. My
opponent still hesitates to take on d4. I
think I might try to change the strategy and
to play for majority on the Q-side. I will get
three pawns to two on the Q-side and later
support it by play of pieces.
7 c4 Qd8 8 0-0 cxd4 9 Nxd4.
NUNN: I would like to castle in this
position but I'm a little worried that White
might play Nb5. Then if the queens are
exchanged there will be the danger of his
knight coming to c7 and trapping my rook
on a8. I think that if I castle and White
plays Nb5, I can defend by just playing my
knight from b8 to d7. Castles seems safe
enough.
9 . 0-0.
HORT: Actually I received what I wanted in
this game. I have some small advantage as
my opponent had in our first game and I
can play on the Q-side. I have to watch for
e5 and I have to place my pieces very
properly.
10 Nc3.
Black's problem now is the development of
his Q-side pieces. Nunn refrained from
playing Nc6 fearing the weakness of the
isolated pawns resulting from a knight
exchange. The plan he chose avoided
creating weaknesses, but did nothing to
lessen the White pressure against the
Q-side.
10 a6 11 Bf4 Nd7 12 Bg3 (avoiding the
threat of 12 ... e5) Nc5 13 Bf3 Qb6.
HORT: That is an active move. I have to
watch the d-file because now Black
threatens the pawn at b2 and he threatens
to come with his rook to d8. That would be
very uncomfortable, so Qc2 or Qe2. I don't
know - I'll play Qc2 but I am not sure this
move is right.
14 Qc2.
NUNN: The knight on d4 is undefended
but there doesn't seem to be any way to
30
exploit it. I think I must continue with my
plan of development.
14 . Bd7.
HORT: There is no other way how Black
can get his pieces into the game, but now I
have to concentrate on the position of the
knight on c5. So Rb1 preparing b4.
15 Rab1.
NUNN: This is a very awkward move to
meet. The knight on c5 has no retreat
square, and White just threatens to trap it
by advancing his pawn to b4. Perhaps I
could blockade by Qb4, but that would
only delay the evil moment. White would
just defend the attacked pawn on c4 with
b3, and then he will have all sorts of nasty
threats, attacking the queen with moves
like a3 and after Qxa3, b4 hitting the
knight, knight moves, Rb3 and I've lost my
queen. No, I can't allow that. It's a very
difficult decision to make but I think that
unfortunately I must play my pawn to a5.
It's very unpleasant to allow these white
knights to come into b5 attacking the
sensitive black squares. The white bishops
look very active on these diagonals. I think
the position is turning against me but still
a5 must be played.
15 . a5 16 Rfd1 Rac8 17 Qe2 Rfe8
18 Ndb5.
7c4Qd8 8 0-0cxd4 9 Nxd4.
NUNN: / would like to castle in this
position but I
'
m a little worried that White
might play Nb5. Then if the queens are
exchanged there will be the danger of his
knight coming to c7 and trapping my rook
on a8. I think that if I castle and White
plays Nb5, I can defend by just playing my
knight from b8 to d7. Castles seems safe
enough.
9 . . . 0-0.
HORT: Actually I received what I wanted in
this game. I have some small advantage as
my opponent had in our first game and I
can play on the Q-side. I have to watch for
e5 and I have to place my pieces very
properly.
10 Nc3.
Black's problem now is the development of
his Q-side pieces. Nunn refrained from
playing Nc6 fearing the weakness of the
isolated pawns resulting from a knight
exchange. The plan he chose avoided
creating weaknesses, but did nothing to
lessen the White pressure against the
Q
-side
.
10 . . . a6 11 Bf4 Nd7 12 Bg3 (avoiding the
threat of 12 . . . e5) Nc5 13 Bf3 Qb6.
HORT: That is an active move. I have to
watch the d-file because now Black
threatens the pawn at b2 and he threatens
to come with his rook to d8. That would be
very uncomfortable, so Qc2 or Qe2. I don
'
t
know - I'll play Qc2 but I am not sure this
move is right.
14 Qc2.
NUNN: The knight on d4 is undefended
but there doesn't seem to be any way to
exploit it. I think I must continue with my
plan of development.
14 . . . Bd7.
HORT: There is no other way how Black
can get his pieces into the game, but now I
have to concentrate on the position of the
knight on c5. So Rbl preparing 64.
15 Rabl.
NUNN: This is a very awkward move to
meet. The knight on c5 has no retreat
square, and White just threatens to trap it
by advancing his pawn to b4. Perhaps I
could blockade by Qb4, but that would
only delay the evil moment. White would
just defend the attacked pawn on c4 with
63, and then he will have all sorts of nasty
threats, attacking the queen with moves
like a3 and after Qxa3, 64 hitting the
knight, knight moves, Rb3 and I've lost my
queen. No, I can
'
t allow that. It's a very
difficult decision to make but I think that
unfortunately I must play my pawn to a5.
It's very unpleasant to allow these white
knights to come into 65 attacking the
sensitive black squares. The white bishops
look very active on these diagonals. I think
the position is turning against me but still
a5 must be played.
15 . . . a5 16 Rfdl Rac8 17 Qe2 RfeS
18 NdbS.
30
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e 9 h
Since Nunn refrained from exchanging
pawns at move six with cxd4, he had never
felt comfortable. Now the black position
has become critical with the white pieces
all bearing down uncomfortably on the
weakened Q-side.
NUNN: My only hope is to exchange as
many pieces as possible, seeking my
salvation in the endgame just as my
opponent did in our first game. /'11 try to
get rid of bishops first.
18 ... Be6 19 b3 Bxf3 20 Qxf3 Qe6
21 Qxe6 Rxe6.
HORT: Now my endgame is surely better
because of the square b5 and pawn
majority on the Q-side. Still, / have to
cover e4 because Black has an opportunity
to jump there.
22 f3.
NUNN: The rot has certainly set in. / just
don't seem to have any active possibilities
at all. Well, if / can't think of anything
better to do / might as well move my king
nearer to the centre.
22 . .. Kf8.
HORT: / could have expected that, but /
can do the same, so / will come with my
king into the game.
23 Kfl.
NUNN: / have the opportunity here to
exchange one pair of rooks, so /'11 play
rook to dB.
23 . .. Rd8.
HORT: Black defends still very well. He is
trying to exchange all the pieces. / think
that / will still have an advantage but /
don't like it - maybe / already spoiled it a
little bit. / just have to continue and see
what will happen. So / will attack his rook
and a7 pawn.
24 Be7.
NUNN: The only way to avoid losing a
pawn is to exchange.
24 . .. Rxdl+ 25 Rxdl.
NUNN: At last / have the opportunity for
one active move, even if it's only a little
tiny bit active. / can play my pawn to a4
attacking the pawn on b3. White can't take
this pawn because after bxa4 just Na6
attacks both the bishop on c7 and pawn
on c4.
25 . a4.
HORT: Yes that's unpleasant. Black gets rid
of one weak pawn. / think this game may
also be drawn. / can't take on a4 because
my c-pawn is very weak, so / just have to
defend the pawn.
26 Rbl.
The exchange of Black's a-pawn certainly
eased his defensive problems, but now
John Nunn had less than ten minutes
remaining on his clock. As Hort now
31
8
A
A
a b c d e f g h
Since Nunn refrained from exchanging
pawns at move six with cxd4/ he had never
felt comfortable. Now the black position
has become critical with the white pieces
all bearing down uncomfortably on the
weakened Q-side.
NUNN: My only hope is to exchange as
many pieces as possible, seeking my
salvation in the endgame just as my
opponent did in our first game. I
'
ll try to
get rid of bishops first.
18 . . . Bc6 19 b3 Bxf3 20 Qxf3 Qc6
21 Qxc6 Rxc6.
HORT: Now my endgame is surely better
because of the square b5 and pawn
majority on the Q-side. Still, I have to
cover e4 because Black has an opportunity
to jump there.
22 f3.
NUNN: The rot has certainly set in. I just
don't seem to have any active possibilities
at all. Well, if I can
'
t think of anything
better to do I might as well move my king
nearer to the centre.
22 . . . Kf8.
HORT: / could have expected that, but I
can do the same, so I will come with my
king into the game.
23 Kfl.
NUNN: / have the opportunity here to
exchange one pair of rooks, so I
'
ll play
rook to dd.
23 . . . Rd8.
HORT: Black defends still very well. He is
trying to exchange all the pieces. I think
that I will still have an advantage but I
don't like it - maybe I already spoiled it a
little bit. I just have to continue and see
what will happen. So I will attack his rook
and a7 pawn.
24 Bc7.
NUNN: The only way to avoid losing a
pawn is to exchange.
24 . . . Rxd1+ 25 Rxdl.
NUNN: At last I have the opportunity for
one active move, even if it
'
s only a little
tiny bit active. I can play my pawn to a4
attacking the pawn on b3. White can
'
t take
this pawn because after bxa4 just Na6
attacks both the bishop on c7 and pawn
on c4.
25 . . . a4.
HORT: Yes that's unpleasant. Black gets rid
of one weak pawn. I think this game may
also be drawn. I can
'
t take on a4 because
my c-pawn is very weak, so I just have to
defend the pawn.
26 Rbl.
The exchange of Black's a-pawn certainly
eased his defensive problems, but now
John Nunn had less than ten minutes
remaining on his clock. As Hort now
31
demonstrates, the white Q-side pawn
majority, aided by his well-placed pieces,
still make the black position very
uncomfortable.
26 axb3 27 axb3 Ne8 28 8e5.
NUNN: The position is still worse for me
but perhaps not completely hopeless now.
I must still try to exchange some pieces
and of course that horrible knight on b5
which has been annoying me for so long
must be a prime candidate for being
swapped off. So I'll bring this knight on e8
back into the game and also offer the
exchange.
28 Nd6.
HORT: My opponent continues in his plan,
but now I must calculate very properly
because the position starts to be critical. I
cannot, of course, play b4 because then
my c-pawn would be hanging and Black
would play Nxc4 and he would be better. I
have to set my pawns in motion. I will play
for a forced variation; maybe it brings
success, but I cannot risk much. The game
can be drawn, but I don't think that I am in
danger of losing.
298xd6.
NUNN: Vlastimil thought a long time over
that move. I'm sure it's a good one. Still,
I've relatively little time left, so there's no
point in hesitating over obvious moves.
29 . 8xd6.
32
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e 9 h
In fact Hort's exchange of bishop for
knight was the start of a delicately
calculated sequence designed to advance
the pawns to bS and cS. The threat to
create a passed pawn then makes life very
difficult for Black.
30 b4 Na6 31 Nxd6 Rxd6 32 Ne4! Rd4
33 b5 (the knight on e4 takes away the cS
square from Black's knight) Nb8.
HORT: Now I want to see whether my
opponent might fall into the trap I prepare
for him.
34 c5.
NUNN: Not much time to think about my
move here. That knight on e4 is very
strong; I must try to get rid of it at any
costs so that I can counter these dangerous
pawns rushing forward on the Q-side.
34 .. f5.
HORT: Oh, I am lucky, because I think my
opponent is falling into the trap. Let us
play quickly and hope that my calculation
was right. Ng5 trying to hit e6 and hl
simultaneously.
35 Ng5.
demonstrates, the white Q-side pawn
majority, aided by his well-placed pieces,
still make the black position very
uncomfortable.
26 . . . axb3 27 axb3 Ne8 28 Be5.
NUNN: The position is still worse for me
but perhaps not completely hopeless now.
I must still try to exchange some pieces
and of course that horrible knight on 65
which has been annoying me for so long
must be a prime candidate for being
swapped off. So I
'
ll bring this knight on e8
back into the game and also offer the
exchange.
28 . . . Nd6.
HORT: My opponent continues in his plan,
but now I must calculate very properly
because the position starts to be critical. I
cannot, of course, play b4 because then
my c-pawn would be hanging and Black
would play Nxc4 and he would be better. I
have to set my pawns in motion. I will play
for a forced variation; maybe it brings
success, but I cannot risk much. The game
can be drawn, but I don
'
t think that I am in
danger of losing.
29 Bxd6.
NUNN: Vlastimil thought a long time over
that move. I'm sure it's a good one. Still,
I
'
ve relatively little time left, so there
'
s no
point in hesitating over obvious moves.
29 . . . Bxd6.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
In fact Horfs exchange of bishop for
knight was the start of a delicately
calculated sequence designed to advance
the pawns to b5 and c5. The threat to
create a passed pawn then makes life very
difficult for Black.
30 b4 Na6 31 Nxd6 Rxd6 32 Ne4! Rd4
33 b5 (the knight on e4 takes away the c5
square from Black
'
s knight) Nb8.
HORT: Now / want to see whether my
opponent might fall into the trap I prepare
for him.
34 c5.
NUNN: Nof much time to think about my
move here. That knight on e4 is very
strong; I must try to get rid of it at any
costs so that I can counter these dangerous
pawns rushing forward on the Q-side.
34. . .i5.
HORT: Oh
, I am lucky, because I think my
opponent is falling into the trap. Let us
play quickly and hope that my calculation
was right. Ng5 trying to hit e6 and h7
simultaneously.
V/.
A
a
A
f
9
35 Ng5.
NUNN: Threatening Nxe6+ forking my
king and rook. I must defend that e-pawn
even if it means the h7 one going. At least
the white knight will be out of play if it
captures on that square. I'll bring my king
nearer the Q-side pawns.
35 Ke7.
HORT: Everything goes according to plan.
36 Re1.
NUNN: I can' t defend this pawn on e6.
That 's very annoying, but perhaps I have
one little piece of tactics left. I'll advance
my e-pawn and then if White takes it with
his rook, I can play Kf6 hitti ng both rook
and knight. It's my only chance.
36 . e5.
HORT: Oh I am very happy because it
seems to me that my opponent is really
falling into the trap. Of course he has not
so much time left so I have just to
continue to play quickly.
37 Rxe5+
The next few moves confirmed that Hort
had indeed calculated more deeply and
accurately than his opponent.
37 Kf6 38 Re8 Nd7 39 Nxh7 + Kg6
40 c6! bxc6 41 bxc6.
NUNN: It looks very bad now. This pawn
is going to go straight forward and make a
queen. Still, I'll just take the knight and
see what happens.
41 Kxh7.
HORT: Now if I take on d7, Black
recaptures with his rook and even though I
have one pawn more the game should be a
draw. But I have now very strong move
which I saw many moves ago. I think the
win will not escape me. I pin the knight.
42 Rd8!
NUNN: Yes, that's the point. He wins the
knight without losing his pawn. I'll playa
couple more moves.
42 Rc4.
HORT: That was forced move because
otherwise I would play c7 and win the rook
for my pawn. But now I can still make
profit of my advanced pawn.
43 cxd7.
NUNN: He threatens now just to move his
rook away and promote the pawn. /t 's
necessary for me to attack this pawn with
my rook.
43 Rd4.
But the rest was very easy for Hort. He
simply exchanged d-pawn for f-pawn,
leaving himself with an easily won
endgame with two extra pawns. Nunn did
not prolong the game longer than
necessary.
44 Rf8 Rxd7 45 Rxi5 resigns.
Game 4:
Walter Browne Jan Hein Donner
Pirc Defence
Browne's time trouble was the culprit in
this game. The opening was undeniably
favourable to White, though the advantage
was small. Trying to maintain his pressure
cost the American grandmaster too much
time on the clock. A miscalculation at
move 21, followed by an outright blunder
33
NUNN: Threatening Nxe6+ forking my
king and rook. I must defend that e-pawn
even if it means the h7 one going. At least
the white knight will be out of play if it
captures on that square. I
'
ll bring my king
nearer the Q-side pawns.
35 . . . Ke7.
HORT: Everything goes according to plan.
36 Rel.
NUNN: / can't defend this pawn on e6.
That's very annoying, but perhaps I have
one little piece of tactics left. I
'
ll advance
my e-pawn and then if White takes it with
his rook, I can play Kf6 hitting both rook
and knight. It
'
s my only chance.
36 . . . e5.
HORT: Oh I am very happy because it
seems to me that my opponent is really
falling into the trap. Of course he has not
so much time left so I have just to
continue to play quickly.
37 Rxe5+
The next few moves confirmed that Hort
had indeed calculated more deeply and
accurately than his opponent.
37 . . . Kf6 38 Re8 Nd7 39 Nxh7+ Kg6
40 c6! bxc6 41 bxc6.
NUNN: It looks very bad now. This pawn
is going to go straight forward and make a
queen. Still, I
'
ll just take the knight and
see what happens.
41 . . . Kxh7.
HORT: Now if I take on d7, Black
recaptures with his rook and even though I
have one pawn more the game should be a
draw. But I have now very strong move
which I saw many moves ago. I think the
win will not escape me. I pin the knight.
42 Rd8!
NUNN: Yes, that's the point. He wins the
knight without losing his pawn. I'll play a
couple more moves.
42 . . . Rc4.
HORT: That was forced move because
otherwise I would play c7 and win the rook
for my pawn. But now I can still make
profit of my advanced pawn.
43 cxd7.
NUNN: He threatens now just to move his
rook away and promote the pawn. It
'
s
necessary for me to attack this pawn with
my rook.
43.. . Rd4.
But the rest was very easy for Hort. He
simply exchanged d-pawn for f-pawn,
leaving himself with an easily won
endgame with two extra pawns. Nunn did
not prolong the game longer than
necessary.
44 Rf8 Rxd7 45 Rxf5 resigns.
Game 4:
Walter Browne - Jan Hein Donner
Pirc Defence
Browne's time trouble was the culprit in
this game. The opening was undeniably
favourable to White, though the advantage
was small. Trying to maintain his pressure
cost the American grandmaster too much
time on the clock. A miscalculation at
move 21, followed by an outright blunder
33
Semi-Finals
Vlastimil Hort 1-0 Tony Miles
Jan Hein Donner %,0-%,1 Bent Larsen
Game 6:
Vlastimil Hort - Tony Miles
Sicilian Defence
A game of great interest, but spoiled by an
uncharacteristic blunder by Miles. The
Englishman played the opening with great
atcuracy and achieved some advantage.
Hort had to play well to avoid a seriously
weakened position. In a complex
middlegame position, Miles made the
blunder which was to give Hort his free
ri de into the fi nal.
1 e4 c5 2 c3 Nf6 (Varying from the
2 ... d5 which John Nunn had played
against Hort) 3 e5 Nd5 4 d4 cxd4 5 Qxd4.
MILES: It's a long time since I played
against this line, I can hardly remember
anythirig about it. I suppose I have to play
e6 and see what happens.
5 .. e6.
HORT: Now I have to think. I can play Bc4
but I prefer to develop first my knight and
then I will see where to go with bishop.
6 Nf3.
MILES: I remember, I think, Hort won a
game against Polugayevsky with this about
twenty years ago - maybe it was only ten -
I don't know what happens. Nc6 attacks
the queen and gets a piece out with gain
of time. It can't be bad.
6 . Nc6.
HORT: I have to move my queen, but to
what square? My pawn on e5 is a little
exposed. I have to cover him.
7 Qe4.
MILES: I can play normally with d6 but
then White probably has an edge. I like
something more active. What is there?
Be7 . .. No, then the knight on d5 has
nowhere to go. b6 isn't really good. Maybe
f5, and if he takes it I recapture with the
knight kicking his queen again and then I
have a useful pawn centre. If he moves his
queen away, there's lost time again. The
queen hasn't got any good squares.
7 . . . f5 8 exfG Nxf6.
HORT: My queen has no easy life actually,
because she has to move again. I analysed
here, at home, Qc2 but I want to play it
very sharp now. I think that Tony might not
know it well, so I will choose another
move.
9 Qh4.
MILES: Let's see, what next? Be7 looks
natural but maybe he has Bg5. He can then
ignore h6 and he's going to play his bishop
to d3. That will be annoying; maybe he's
39
Semi-Finals
Vlastimil Hort 7-0 Tony Miles
Ian Hein Donner V2,0-V2,1 Bent Larsen
Game 6:
Vlastimil Hort - Tony Miles
Sicilian Defence
A game of great interest, but spoiled by an
uncharacteristic blunder by Miles. The
Englishman played the opening with great
atcuracy and achieved some advantage.
Hort had to play well to avoid a seriously
weakened position. In a complex
middlegame position, Miles made the
blunder which was to give Hort his free
ride into the final.
1 e4 c5 2 c3 Nf6 (Varying from the
2 . . . d5 which John Nunn had played
against Hort) 3 e5 Nd5 4 d4 cxd4 5 Qxd4.
MILES: It's a long time since I played
against this line, I can hardly remember
anything about it. I suppose I have to play
e6 and see what happens.
5 . .. e6.
HORT: Now I have to think. I can play Bc4
but I prefer to develop first my knight and
then I will see where to go with bishop.
6 Nf3.
MILES: / remember, I think
,
Hort won a
game against Polugayevsky with this about
twenty years ago - maybe it was only ten -
I don't know what happens. Nc6 attacks
the queen and gets a piece out with gain
of time. It can't be bad.
6 . . . Nc6.
HORT: / have to move my queen,
but to
what square? My pawn on e5 is a little
exposed. I have to cover him.
7 Qe4.
MILES: / can play normally with d6 but
then White probably has an edge. I like
something more active. What is there?
Be7 . . . No, then the knight on d5 has
nowhere to go. b6 isn't really good. Maybe
f5, and if he takes it I recapture with the
knight kicking his queen again and then I
have a useful pawn centre. If he moves his
queen away, there's lost time again. The
queen hasn
'
t got any good squares.
7 . . .15 8 exf6 Nxf6.
HORT: My queen has no easy life actually,
because she has to move again. I analysed
here, at home, Qc2 but I want to play it
very sharp now. I think that Tony might not
know it well, so I will choose another
move.
9 Qh4.
MILES: Let's see
,
what next? Be7 looks
natural but maybe he has Bg5. He can then
ignore h6 and he's going to play his bishop
to d3. That will be annoying; maybe he's
39
got Bg6+. How can / avoid this? This
position can't be bad surely. I'd like to
advance my pawn centre but d5, Bd3
doesn't look nice. e5, that's very
interesting: then if he plays Bd3, e4; Bxe4,
Qe7; seems to win a piece. That's nice.
After e5 maybe he can play Bg5; then / just
play d5, he can take on f6, / take with the
queen. That must be very good for Black.
Looks very interesting, / think /'11 try it.
9 ... eS.
HORT: What is this? My plan was just to
play Bd3 and then to check on g6,
destroying the position of the black king.
The normal move is 9 ... Be7 or 9 ... d5
but / think Tony has improved the theory.
After Bd3 he looks really pleased by this
simple move e4; Bxe4, Qe7; followed by d5
and / am pinned on the e-file. / think that /
really have to consider my next move very
carefully. Black wants to build up a very
strong centre. / start not to feel easy in this
position. There are many moves like Bb5,
Bg5. It's a very difficult decision. / decide
on Bg5, it still makes some threats later for
black K-side, but / don't like it now much.
10 BgS.
MILES: / have to play d5; otherwise the
bishop will come to d3.
10 . .. dS.
HORT: That's the best move, because now
/ again cannot come out with my bishop.
Bd3, e4; and / will lose my bishop. / have
to attack these black central pawns in some
way, maybe just playing c4. Well, / started
this strange strategy, / think that / have to
continue. / remember that Czechoslovakia
played a tennis match with England lately
and we lost. / would like to take some
revenge from Tony but / don't know
40
whether / can do it now, because / don't
like my position much. But Bb5 still looks
to me quite good.
11 BbS Bd6.
Black's fine pawn centre shows that he has
completely solved the problems of the
opening. Hort now felt obliged to strike
quickly against the d-pawn, before Black
could castle and consolidate. A very sharp
position quickly emerged.
12 c4 0-0 13 0-0 e4.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e 9 h
HORT: / was afraid of this move. / can play
Bxc6, bxc6; Nd4, but then / don't like Qb6
attacking my knight and b2 pawn. Or if I
move my knight away, this loses time and
Black has almost winning move Nd4. So
there is only one move left for me.
14 adS exf3 1S dxc6 fxg2 16 Kxg2 bxc6
17 Bc4+ Kh8.
This forced sequence of moves has left
White's king exposed. Hort must rely on
his active pieces to fight off the Black
attack.
got Bg6 + . How can I avoid this? This
position can
'
t be bad surely. I'd like to
advance my pawn centre but d5, Bd3
doesn't look nice. e5, that's very
interesting: then if he plays Bd3, e4; Bxe4,
Qe7; seems to win a piece. That's nice.
After e5 maybe he can play Bg5; then I just
play d5, he can take on f6, I take with the
queen. That must be very good for Black.
Looks very interesting, I think I'll try it.
9 . . . e5.
HORT: What is this? My plan was just to
play Bd3 and then to check on g6,
destroying the position of the black king.
The normal move is 9 . . . Be7 or 9 ... d5
but I think Tony has improved the theory.
After Bd3 he looks really pleased by this
simple move e4; Bxe4, Qe7; followed by d5
and I am pinned on the e-file. I think that I
really have to consider my next move very
carefully. Black wants to build up a very
strong centre. I start not to feel easy in this
position. There are many moves like Bb5,
Bg5. It's a very difficult decision. I decide
on Bg5, it still makes some threats later for
black K-side, but I don't like it now much.
10 Bg5.
MILES: / have to play d5; otherwise the
bishop will come to d3.
10 . . . d5.
HORT: That's the best move, because now
I again cannot come out with my bishop.
Bd3, e4; and I will lose my bishop. I have
to attack these black central pawns in some
way, maybe just playing c4. Well, I started
this strange strategy, I think that I have to
continue. I remember that Czechoslovakia
played a tennis match with England lately
and we lost. I would like to take some
revenge from Tony but I don
'
t know
whether I can do it now, because I don
'
t
like my position much. But Bb5 still looks
to me quite good.
11 Bb5 Bd6.
Black's fine pawn centre shows that he has
completely solved the problems of the
opening. Hort now felt obliged to strike
quickly against the d-pawn, before Black
could castle and consolidate. A very sharp
position quickly emerged.
12c4 0-0 13 0-0 e4.
8
3
1
a b c d e f g h
HORT: / was afraid of this move. I can play
6x06, bxc6; Nd4, but then I don't like Qb6
attacking my knight and b2 pawn. Or if I
move my knight away, this loses time and
Black has almost winning move Nd4. So
there is only one move left for me.
14 cxd5 exf3 15 dxc6 fxg2 16 Kxg2 bxc6
17 Bc4+ Kh8.
This forced sequence of moves has left
White's king exposed. Hort must rely on
his active pieces to fight off the Black
attack.
40
1B Nc3 Qc7 19 Rad1 Bb7 (The bishop has
little future on this diagonal. Instead
19 ... BfS would have preserved Black's
advantage) 20 Bd3.
MILES: That's slightly irritating. There's a
possibility of his taking on f6 now, but'
recapture with the pawn so it's not too
bad. What do , want to play? Be5 is nice to
aim at the Q-side a bit. Just a minute,
though, then he takes on f6, , take back
with the pawn, then he takes on h7 with
the bishop, , take twice and he has Rd7+
picking up the bishop on b7. We'll have to
stop that.
20 . .. RadB.
HORT: Yes, Tony saw the trap, but still'
am now quite happy. , think' can play for
traps. , will make a move' prepared earlier.
21 BfS.
MILES: That's a bit uncomfortable. c5+; f3,
still doesn't do anything. Maybe' haven't
got anything any more. Perhaps' should
offer a draw and try to get him with the
white pieces. , don't know, maybe' might
still get his king later. Don't know what to
play. Be5 again, back with the Q-side. Yes,
, still have some play.
21 ... BeS.
MILES: Oh, just a minute, have 'left h7 en
prise? Oh dear.
HORT: This move, , think, opens the
combination for me, because the rook on
d8 might be hanging. So, what about Bxh7?
If Rxd1 then' have check with the bishop
{5, and of course' can check again on e6.
If Black takes the bishop in h7 with his
knight, , am winning an exchange. Now'
am for the first time satisfied with my
position in this game.
22 Bxh7.
MILES: That was stupid, what can' do?
Nxh7, Rxd8 and that loses an exchange and
a pawn. If' take on d1 he has Bf5+ and
Be6+. Okay let's try and rush him.
22 ... cS+ 23 f3.
..
MILES: Some way to complicate . .. Rd4
looks interesting. If he takes, , take with
the pawn. Might get some counterplay.
Seems' have to lose the exchange; let's
hope he gets short of time.
23 . .. Rd4.
HORT: Now' really have to play for mating
attack or to win the exchange, because I'm
also short of time.
24 Rxd4 cxd4 2S BfS+ KgB 26 Be6+ Rf7
27 Ne4.
Miles's blunder on move 21 has left his
position in dire straits. The white pieces
are now closing in for the final attack, and
Black can only hope for some error from
his opponent.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e 9 h
MILES: That looks strong, what can' do
41
18 Nc3 Qc7 19 Radl Bb7 (The bishop has
little future on this diagonal. Instead
19 . . . Bf5 would have preserved Black's
advantage) 20 Bd3.
MILES: That's slightly irritating. There's a
possibility of his taking on f6 now, but I
recapture with the pawn so it
'
s not too
bad. What do I want to play? Be5 is nice to
aim at the Q-side a bit. Just a minute,
though, then he takes on f6, I take back
with the pawn, then he takes on h7 with
the bishop, I take twice and he has Rd7+
picking up the bishop on 67. We
'
ll have to
stop that.
20.. . Rad8.
HORT: Yes, Tony saw the trap, but still I
am now quite happy. I think I can play for
traps. I will make a move I prepared earlier.
21 Bf5.
MILES: That's a bit uncomfortable. c5+; f3,
still doesn
'
t do anything. Maybe I haven't
got anything any more. Perhaps I should
offer a draw and try to get him with the
white pieces. I don
'
t know, maybe I might
still get his king later. Don
'
t know what to
play. Be5 again, back with the Q-side. Yes,
I still have some play.
21 . . . Be5.
MILES: Oh
, just a minute, have I left h7 en
prise? Oh dear.
HORT: This move, I think, opens the
combination for me, because the rook on
d8 might be hanging. So, what about Bxh7?
If Rxdl then I have check with the bishop
f5, and of course I can check again on e6.
If Black takes the bishop in h7 with his
knight, I am winning an exchange. Now I
am for the first time satisfied with my
position in this game.
22 Bxh7.
MILES: That was stupid, what can I do?
Nxh7, Rxd8 and that loses an exchange and
a pawn. If I take on dl he has Bf5+ and
Be6+. Okay let's try and rush him.
22. . . c5+ 23 f3.
*
MILES: Some way to complicate . . . Rd4
looks interesting. If he takes, I take with
the pawn. Might get some counterplay.
Seems I have to lose the exchange; let's
hope he gets short of time.
23. . . Rd4.
HORT: Now I really have to play for mating
attack or to win the exchange, because I
'
m
also short of time.
24 Rxd4 cxd4 25 Bf5+ Kg8 26 Be6+ Rf7
27 Ne4.
Miles's blunder on move 21 has left his
position in dire straits. The white pieces
are now closing in for the final attack, and
Black can only hope for some error from
his opponent.
8
1
1
a b c d e f g h
MILES: That looks strong, what can I do
now? Qc2+, Rf2; no that's nothing; d3 is
nothing. I've got to make him take my
rook to free my game.
27 Qc6.
HORT: I can understand that Tony wants
to get rid of my bishop even for the rook,
but I think I can play stronger now. I must
calculate whose attack goes first. My king
is now a little safer than Black's and, yes, I
see it, I see the deciding combination.
28 Nxf6+ gxf6 29 Bxf6.
MilES: That's a problem. I can't take on e6
because QhB is mate. Why did I play that
ridiculous move? It's hopeless. What is
there? Qc2+ is something and if Rf2,
Qg6+. Well, there's a couple of chances
for him to go wrong.
29 Qc2+.
HORT: I must play exactly. His queen
wants to come back to g6 and I must be
very careful not to lose my bishop. I still
have one good square for my king and I
think this will win. Black has no sufficient
counter-attack.
30 Kh1.
MilES: I'm falling apart everywhere. If I
take on f6 he just recaptures. I can't move
any of my pieces. Well, Bxf3+, no other
moves.
30 Bxf3+.
But this was, of course, just desperation.
With careful moves, Hort escaped the
checks and finished the game with no
further problems.
31 Rxf3 Qd1+ 32 Kg2 Qc2+
33 Qf2 Qg6+ 34 Rg3! Bxg3 35 Qxg3
resigns.
42
Game 7:
Jan Hein Donner - Bent Larsen
Nimzo-Indian Defence
This was an exciting and well-played draw,
with both sides producing interesting
ideas. larsen sacrificed two pawns in a
bold bid for the initiative, but Donner
chose the correct moment to return the
material. The tense endgame which
resulted finally settled down to a peaceful
conclusion.
1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 e6 3 Nc3 Bb4 4 e3 c5
5 Bd3 Nc6 6 Nf3 Bxc3+.
This variation was very popular at the time
of the present game. In pure Nimzowitsch
style, Black doubles the white c-pawns.
The question remains whether White's
bishops and powerful pawn centre will
counterbalance the pawn weakness.
7 bxc3 d6 8 e4 e5 9 d5 Ne7.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e f 9 h
DONNER: Well, there's probably no player
in the world who has lost so many games
with this variation as I did, but I must play
now? QC2+, Rf2; no that
'
s nothing; d3 is
nothing. I
'
ve got to make him take my
rook to free my game.
27 . . . Qc6.
HORT: / can understand that Tony wants
to get rid of my bishop even for the rook,
but I think I can play stronger now. I must
calculate whose attack goes first. My king
is now a little safer than Black's and, yes, I
see it, I see the deciding combination.
28 Nxf6+ gxf6 29 Bxf6.
MILES: That's a problem. I can't take on e6
because Qh8 is mate. Why did I play that
ridiculous move? It
'
s hopeless. What is
there? Qc2+ is something and if Rf2,
Qg6 + . Well, there's a couple of chances
for him to go wrong.
29 . . . Qc2+.
HORT: / must play exactly. His queen
wants to come back to g6 and I must be
very careful not to lose my bishop. I still
have one good square for my king and I
think this will win. Black has no sufficient
counter-attack.
30 Khl.
MILES: I'm falling apart everywhere. If I
take on f6 he just recaptures. I can't move
any of my pieces. Well, Bxf3+, no other
moves.
30 . . . Bxf3+.
But this was
, of course, just desperation.
With careful moves, Hort escaped the
checks and finished the game with no
further problems.
31 Rxf3 Qd1+ 32 Kg2 Qc2+
33 Qf2 Qg6+ 34 Rg3! Bxg3 35 Qxg3
resigns.
Game 7:
Jan Hein Donner - Bent Larsen
Nimzo-lndian Defence
This was an exciting and well-played draw,
with both sides producing interesting
ideas. Larsen sacrificed two pawns in a
bold bid for the initiative, but Donner
chose the correct moment to return the
material. The tense endgame which
resulted finally settled down to a peaceful
conclusion.
1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 e6 3 Nc3 Bb4 4 e3 c5
5 Bd3 Nc6 6 Nf3 Bxc3+.
This variation was very popular at the time
of the present game. In pure Nimzowitsch
style, Black doubles the white c-pawns.
The question remains whether White's
bishops and powerful pawn centre will
counterbalance the pawn weakness.
7 bxc3 d6 8 e4 e5 9 d5 Ne7.
a
2 A
1
a b c d e f g h
DONNER: Well, there's probably no player
in the world who has lost so many games
with this variation as I did, but I must play
42
it. I can play the knight to d2, but I must
play Nh4. It's fairly complicated but it must
be good for White.
10 Nh4.
LARSEN: This position became famous
after one of the match games
Spassky-Fischer, but I remember I knew
the position before that. I think there was a
Hungarian game: Black played h6 and later
I looked at it. h6 is okay, but I want to play
something else, something I looked at
years ago.
10 . .. Qa5.
DONNER: That's a mad move; usually they
play h6 or Ng6. Now it is probably best to
sacrifice the pawn and just castle, Qxc3;
Rb1, threatening RbS. But why should I
play difficult moves when there is a simple
answer? I must play the queen to c2, she is
well placed there.
11 Qc2.
LARSEN: I remember analysing a pawn
sacrifice here: Ng6; NfS, BxfS; exfS, and
then e4. It's quite interesting I remember,
but apart from that I don't remember very
much. I can also play h6 as they do in the
other position now the white queen has
gone from d1. Because the black queen is
out, I'm one move closer to castling
Q-side.
11 h6.
DONNER: If I castle now, he plays gS and
his pawns at h6 and gS are in a strong
position. That's the reason I must not
castle, so that after a later gS I have the
possibility to operate with pawn to h4. I
must make a neutral move, that's the best.
12 f3.
LARSEN: Now I haven't got these tricks
with gS followed by taking his knight on fS
and playing e4. Ng6 is probably not so
good now, but I can prepare 0-0-0 with
Bd7. I can also play gS; NfS, BxfS; then
0-0-0, but I don't like it much. Then I have
to keep the position very closed because
he has the two bishops against two
knights. I think I'll play Bd7 and see what
he does; if he castles I'll play gS.
12 . .. Bd7.
DONNER: He does not play gS; that is
interesting. Shall I play a4 to prevent bS in
some variations? It's a good possibility, but
the best is probably to prevent gS for good
by playing NfS immediately. This must be a
little better, though after he takes on fS he
has possibilities with bS. I'm a little behind
in development but he must give up at
least two pawns. No, I don't believe that.
13 Nf5 Nxf5 14 exf5.
LARSEN: I have several possibilities now.
e4 is probably not a correct pawn sacrifice:
he takes it and when I try to get my knight
to eS via g4, he plays Bf4 and then he's a
good pawn up. Then there is Ba4 or Qa4.
On Qa4 he plays Qe2 then later drives my
queen away with Bc2. There's Ba4, his
queen goes somewhere and I prepare a6
and bS and get counterplay on that side.
But the most interesting is bS; he takes, I
recapture; or I can also make it a pawn
sacrifice, a double pawn sacrifice with c4,
he takes, then RcB. That looks very
interesting indeed. Well, in a game like this
one must play actively.
14 ... b5 15 cxb5 c4 16 Bxc4 Rc8.
43
it. I can play the knight to d2, but I must
play Nh4. It
'
s fairly complicated but it must
be good for White.
10 Nh4.
LARSEN: This position became famous
after one of the match games
Spassky-Fischer, but I remember I knew
the position before that. I think there was a
Hungarian game: Black played h6 and later
I looked at it. h6 is okay, but I want to play
something else, something I looked at
years ago.
10 . . . Qa5.
DONNER: That's a mad move; usually they
play h6 or Ng6. Now it is probably best to
sacrifice the pawn and just castle, Qxc3;
Rb1, threatening Rb5. But why should I
play difficult moves when there is a simple
answer? I must play the queen to c2, she is
well placed there.
11 Qc2.
LARSEN: / remember analysing a pawn
sacrifice here: Ng6; Nf5, Bxf5; exf5, and
then e4. It's quite interesting I remember,
but apart from that I don't remember very
much. I can also play h6 as they do in the
other position now the white queen has
gone from d1. Because the black queen is
out, I
'
m one move closer to castling
Q
-side
.
11 . . . h6.
DONNER: If I castle now, he plays g5 and
his pawns at h6 and g5 are in a strong
position. That
'
s the reason I must not
castle, so that after a later g5 I have the
possibility to operate with pawn to h4. I
must make a neutral move, that
'
s the best.
LARSEN: Now / haven't got these tricks
with g5 followed by taking his knight on f5
and playing e4. Ng6 is probably not so
good now, but I can prepare 0-0-0 with
Bd7. I can also play g5; Nf5, Bxf5; then
0-0-0
,
but I don't like it much. Then I have
to keep the position very closed because
he has the two bishops against two
knights. I think I'll play Bd7 and see what
he does; if he castles I'll play g5.
12 . . . Bd7.
DONNER: He does not play g5; that is
interesting. Shall I play a4 to prevent b5 in
some variations? It
'
s a good possibility, but
the best is probably to prevent g5 for good
by playing Nf5 immediately. This must be a
little better, though after he takes on f5 he
has possibilities with b5. I'm a little behind
in development but he must give up at
least two pawns. No, I don't believe that.
13 Nf5 Nxf5 14 exf5.
LARSEN: / have several possibilities now.
e4 is probably not a correct pawn sacrifice:
he takes it and when I try to get my knight
to e5 via g4, he plays Bf4 and then he's a
good pawn up. Then there is Ba4 or Qa4.
On Qa4 he plays Qe2 then later drives my
queen away with Bc2. There
'
s Ba4, his
queen goes somewhere and I prepare a6
and b5 and get counterplay on that side.
But the most interesting is b5; he takes, I
recapture; or I can also make it a pawn
sacrifice, a double pawn sacrifice with c4,
he takes, then Rc8. That looks very
interesting indeed. Well, in a game like this
one must play actively.
14 . . . b5 15 cxb5 c4 16 Bxc4 Rc8.
12 f3.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e 9 h
Larsen's bold sacrifice of two pawns has
given him a strong initiative. White has
weaknesses at bS, c3, dS and fS and his
king is exposed. Nevertheless, as Donner
shows, White can still hope to consolidate
his position, return the material and keep
his pair of active bishops.
17 Qb3 0-0 18 Bd2 a6 19 a4.
White could not stand 19 bxa6 Ba4. Now,
however, there follows a general
liquidation leaving Larsen still appearing to
have a fine attack.
19 ... axb5 20 Bxb5 Bxb5 21 Qxb5 Qa7.
DONNER: Now he's threatening e4. My
king is kept in the centre. It's an extremely
dangerous position. I must exchange
queens at all costs, even if it costs me two
pawns.
22 Qd3.
LARSEN: Perhaps e4 immediately, I think
he can take it; he can also play Qd4, I
don't know what that is. I think it's better
to prepare it.
22 Rfe8.
44
DONNER: That is the move, I see it. On
Be3 he plays Qa5 against c3 again. I'm in
trouble; I must exchange queens.
23 Qe3.
LARSEN: Now I can exchange queens or I
can play Qa6. Qa6, that's not so bad, but
also if I exchange queens I win back the
second pawn. Difficult; Qa6 or Qxe3. Yes,
I think I'll win back the pawn.
23 ... Qxe3+ 24 Bxe3.
LARSEN: Now I can take on d5 or on c3.
The more important pawn is the one on d5
because the other one blocks his bishop.
24 ... Nxd5.
DONNER: I lose the two pawns back, but
nevertheless this happening gives me hope
for the future. I have a strong passed pawn
there on the a-file.
25 Bd2.
LARSEN: Now I have to choose between
Nxc3, Rc6 and Rc4. Rc4 is a nice move, but
he plays his king up to d3; I probably
cannot keep the blockade there; then he
advances his a-pawn. Rc6 defends d6;
that's very nice. I can take on c3, but then
his a-pawn is very dangerous. I think I'll
play Rc6 and try to win his a-pawn. His
a-pawn is the only dangerous one.
25 Rc6.
With Larsen enjoying his active rooks and
knight, and Donner happy about his
bishop and passed a-pawn, we were clearly
in for an interesting endgame. Both sides
in the ensuing moves made the most of
their advantages.
26 Kf2 Ra8 27 as ReS 28 Rhd1.
A clever defence to the a-pawn;
8
a a a
a
1
a b c d e f g h
Larsen's bold sacrifice of two pawns has
given him a strong initiative. White has
weaknesses at bS, C3, d5 and f5 and his
king is exposed. Nevertheless, as Donner
shows, White can still hope to consolidate
his position, return the material and keep
his pair of active bishops.
17Qb3 0-0 18Bd2a6 19 a4.
White could not stand 19 bxa6 Ba4. Now,
however, there follows a general
liquidation leaving Larsen still appearing to
have a fine attack.
19 . . . axb5 20 Bxb5 Bxb5 21 Qxb5 Qa7.
DONNER: Now he's threatening e4. My
king is kept in the centre. It's an extremely
dangerous position. I must exchange
queens at all costs, even if it costs me two
pawns.
22 Qd3.
LARSEN: Perhaps e4 immediately, I think
he can take it; he can also play Qd4, I
don't know what that is. I think it's better
to prepare it.
72... Rfe8.
DONNER: That is the move, I see it. On
Be3 he plays Qa5 against c3 again. I'm in
trouble; I must exchange queens.
23 Qe3.
LARSEN: Now / can exchange queens or I
can play Qa6. Qa6, that
'
s not so bad, but
also if I exchange queens I win back the
second pawn. Difficult; Qa6 or Qxe3. Yes,
I think I'll win back the pawn.
23. . . Qxe3+ 24 Bxe3.
LARSEN: Now / can take on d5 or on c3.
The more important pawn is the one on d5
because the other one blocks his bishop.
24 . . . Nxd5.
DONNER: / lose the two pawns back, but
nevertheless this happening gives me hope
for the future. I have a strong passed pawn
there on the a-file.
25 Bd2.
LARSEN: Now / have to choose between
Nxc3, Rc6 and Rc4. Rc4 is a nice move, but
he plays his king up to d3; I probably
cannot keep the blockade there; then he
advances his a-pawn. Rc6 defends d6;
that's very nice. I can take on c3, but then
his a-pawn is very dangerous. I think I'll
play Rc6 and try to win his a-pawn. His
a
-pawn is the only dangerous one
.
25 . . . Rc6.
With Larsen enjoying his active rooks and
knight, and Donner happy about his
bishop and passed a-pawn, we were clearly
in for an interesting endgame. Both sides
in the ensuing moves made the most of
their advantages.
26 Kf2 Ra8 27 a5 Rc5 28 Rhdl.
A clever defence to the a-pawn;
44
28 ... Rxa5 29 Rxa5 Rxa5 30 c4! would
lose Black a piece.
28 Ra6 29 Ra3 Ne7 30 f6 gxf6 31 c4
(Finally jettisoning this pawn which
obstructs his bishop) Rxc4 32 Bxh6 d5
33 Bd2 f5 34 Rc1 Rxc1 35 Bxc1 d4
36 Ke2 e4.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e f 9 h
The position has suddenly become very
tense, Black's powerful centre pawns trying
to prove their superiority over White's
passed pawn at the edge.
DONNER: He has two connected passed
pawns and I must do something to break
that. Nobody likes to play against two such
pawns in the centre. The only possibility I
see is g4.
37 g4.
LARSEN: That's a funny move. I can let him
take on f5. I can also begin with d3 + but
then all the pawns are hanging and he gets
his bishop to d2 to stop the pawns and
protect his own pawn. No, I think Nd5 is
very strong: then if he takes on f5, I play
e3, then on Kd3, I play Nb4+ and he
cannot take on d4 because of Nc2+. It's
difficult; I would like to have more time. I
would like to play Rh6 attacking his king
from that side, but he controls that with a
bishop. That's an idea for later. Nd5 must
be right; he takes on f5, I play e3, then his
bishop is very badly placed and later I
come on f4 with the knight. I wish I had
more time, but that must be right.
37 Nd5.
DONNER: What else can I do now other
than take on f5? I must break these two
combined pawns.
38 gxf5.
LARSEN: The next one is easy, I must
advance. Nc3+ doesn't make much sense;
he can move the king and when I play e3,
he takes it with the bishop.
38 e3.
DONNER: Now Kd3, he checks me on b4
and I can't take on d4 because he checks
on c2. That is a highly unpleasant position.
I must get a square; Nf4+ is threatening, I
must get a square there.
39 f4.
LARSEN: I would like to have more time
now. Probably there is something strong in
this position. Probably the right move is
Rc6; that's complicated because then his
pawn is ready to run. Rc6, Ra1, I don't
know. It's very complicated. I think I'll take
on f4 then I can go back and I've made 40
moves and passed the time control.
39 Nxf4+.
In fact that was where Larsen missed his
real chance to win this game. 39 ... Rc6!
was after all correct. White's defence with
40 Ra1 is countered by 40 ... Rc2+ 41 Kd3
45
28 . . . Rxa5 29 Rxa5 Rxa5 30 c4! would
lose Black a piece.
28 . . . Ra6 29 Ra3 Ne7 30 f6 gxf6 31 c4
(Finally jettisoning this pawn which
obstructs his bishop) Rxc4 32 Bxh6 d5
33 Bd2 f5 34 Rcl Rxcl 35 Bxcl d4
36 Ke2 e4.
8
A
1
a b c d e f g h
The position has suddenly become very
tense, Black's powerful centre pawns trying
to prove their superiority over White's
passed pawn at the edge.
DONNER: He has two connected passed
pawns and I must do something to break
that. Nobody likes to play against two such
pawns in the centre. The only possibility I
see is g4.
37 g4.
LARSEN: That's a funny move. I can let him
take on f5. I can also begin with d3+ but
then all the pawns are hanging and he gets
his bishop to d2 to stop the pawns and
protect his own pawn. No, I think Nd5 is
very strong: then if he takes on f5, I play
e3, then on Kd3, I play Nb4+ and he
cannot take on d4 because of Nc2+. It
'
s
difficult; I would like to have more time. I
would like to play Rh6 attacking his king
from that side, but he controls that with a
bishop. That's an idea for later. Nd5 must
be right; he takes on f5, I play e3, then his
bishop is very badly placed and later I
come on f4 with the knight. I wish I had
more time, but that must be right.
37 . . . Nd5.
DONNER: What else can I do now other
than take on f5? I must break these two
combined pawns.
38 gxf5.
LARSEN: The next one is easy, I must
advance. Nc3+ doesn
'
t make much sense;
he can move the king and when I play e3,
he takes it with the bishop.
38 . . . e3.
DONNER: Now Kd3, he checks me on b4
and I can
'
t take on d4 because he checks
on c2. That is a highly unpleasant position.
I must get a square; Nf4+ is threatening, I
must get a square there.
39 f4.
LARSEN: / would like to have more time
now. Probably there is something strong in
this position. Probably the right move is
Rc6; that's complicated because then his
pawn is ready to run. Rc6, Ra1, I don
'
t
know. It's very complicated. I think I'll take
on f4 then I can go back and I
'
ve made 40
moves and passed the time control.
39 . . . Nxf4+.
In fact that was where Larsen missed his
real chance to win this game. 39 . . . Rc6!
was after all correct. White
'
s defence with
40 Ra1 is countered by 40 . . . Rc2+ 41 Kd3
(or 41 Kd1 d3 winning easily) Nb4+
42 Kxd4 e2 and either 43 Ba3 or 43 Be3 can
be met by 43 ... Ra2! with Nc2+ to come
to decide the issue. An easy line to
overlook when short of time. Now Donner
takes his chance to save the game.
DONNER: That is quite fortunate, now my
king has some squares. I was most afraid of
Rc6.
40 Kf3.
LARSEN: What can I do? e2 is bad because
of Bd2 which protects his own passed
pawn. My knight must go back. I have to
move quickly, I wouldn't like to lose on
time.
40 .. NdS.
DONNER: It looks drawish now, but I must
be careful. Ra4 is probably the easiest.
41 Ra4.
LARSEN: Strange, why didn't he play Bb2?
Well, everything is rather drawish; the
pawns are disappearing. What can I do? e2
is a nice trick, if he takes it then I win his
rook, but he plays Bd2 then he keeps his
a-pawn and I have nothing. Must be
careful. Ne7 is nice, because when I take
on f5 I protect d4. So he probably takes on
d4 at once and then his a-pawn is not
protected.
41 Ne7 42 Rxd4 RxaS Draw agreed.
All the dangerous pawns are exchanged
and there is nothing left for either player.
46
Game 8:
Bent Larsen - Jan Hein Donner
Queen's Gambit Declined
This was a truly terrible game by Donner.
He has often admitted a tendency to panic
when short of time and here the fast replay
rules - all the moves in one hour - seemed
to throw him off-balance from the start.
Perhaps he felt that he had done his duty
by reaching the semi-final and drawing the
fi rst game against Larsen.
1 c4 e6 2 Nc3 dS 3 d4 Nf6 4 BgS Be7
5 Nf3 h6 6 Bh4 0-0.
LARSEN: Now e3 is normal; then he
probably plays b6, that's the Tartakower
variation, he likes that. I can also play Rc1
first. That's what Korchnoi did in one of his
games. I like that idea because if he plays
b6 then later I take on f6 and I take on d5,
then I play g3 as Korchnoi did. I've not
played that idea before but it's a type of
position I think I understand very well.
7 Rc1.
DONNER: That is what Korchnoi played
and it is an important improvement
because the Tartakower variation is difficult
to play against for White, but with
fianchetto of the bishop it works. I'll play
the old Lasker, I wanted that and I'm going
to do it.
7 Ne4.
LARSEN: Oh, that's surprising, the Lasker
variation. Does he play that too? Well, the
first move is easy.
8 Bxe7 Qxe7 9 e3 c6.
LARSEN: This is all like a game in the last
round of the Lone Pine tournament.
(or 41 Kdl d3 winning easily) Nb4+
42 Kxd4 e2 and either 43 Ba3 or 43 Be3 can
be met by 43 . . . Ra2! with Nc2+ to come
to decide the issue. An easy line to
overlook when short of time. Now Donner
takes his chance to save the game.
DONNER: That is quite fortunate, now my
king has some squares. I was most afraid of
Rc6.
40 Kf3.
LARSEN: What can / do? e2 is bad because
of Bd2 which protects his own passed
pawn. My knight must go back. I have to
move quickly, I wouldn
'
t like to lose on
time.
40 . . . Nd5.
DONNER: It looks drawish now, but I must
be careful. Ra4 is probably the easiest.
41 Ra4.
LARSEN: Strange, why didn't he play Bb2?
Well, everything is rather drawish; the
pawns are disappearing. What can I do? e2
is a nice trick, if he takes it then I win his
rook, but he plays Bd2 then he keeps his
a
-pawn and I have nothing
.
Must be
careful. Ne7 is nice, because when I take
on f5 I protect d4. So he probably takes on
d4 at once and then his a-pawn is not
protected.
41 . . . Ne7 42 Rxd4 Rxa5 Draw agreed.
All the dangerous pawns are exchanged
and there is nothing left for either player.
Game 8:
Bent Larsen - Jan Hein Donner
Queen's Gambit Declined
This was a truly terrible game by Donner.
He has often admitted a tendency to panic
when short of time and here the fast replay
rules - all the moves in one hour - seemed
to throw him off-balance from the start.
Perhaps he felt that he had done his duty
by reaching the semi-final and drawing the
first game against Larsen.
1 c4 e6 2 Nc3 d5 3 d4 Nf6 4 Bg5 Be7
5 Nf3 h6 6 Bh4 0-0.
LARSEN: Now e3 is normal; then he
probably plays 66, that
'
s the Tartakower
variation, he likes that. I can also play Rd
first. That's what Korchnoi did in one of his
games. I like that idea because if he plays
b6 then later I take on f6 and I take on d5,
then I play g3 as Korchnoi did. I've not
played that idea before but it
'
s a type of
position I think I understand very well.
7 Rcl.
DONNER: That is what Korchnoi played
and it is an important improvement
because the Tartakower variation is difficult
to play against for White, but with
fianchetto of the bishop it works. I'll play
the old Lasker, I wanted that and I'm going
to do it.
1 ... Ne4.
LARSEN: Oh, that's surprising, the Lasker
variation. Does he play that too? Well, the
first move is easy.
8 Bxe7 Qxe7 9 e3 c6.
LARSEN: This is all like a game in the last
round of the Lone Pine tournament.
46
Polugayevsky played White against Lein.
Well, I know what I want to do; I was
wondering during the game why
Polugayevsky didn't take on c4 with the
rook - we'll probably get to that position.
I'm very satisfied with that.
10 Bd3 Nxc3 11 Rxc3.
DONNER: Well, it's an obvious move, now
I change at c4 and then when he takes
with the bishop I play b6 and since years
we know that White has nothing.
11 dxc4.
LARSEN: This is where Polugayevsky took
with the bishop and Black played Nd7.
Then White castled and Black played eS,
and they had a normal position except
Black has the pawn on h6 instead of h7.
Here they agreed a draw which made me
very happy because then I won first prize
without sharing it with Polugayevsky. That
was very nice, $12,000, very nice last round.
Well, this is where Stahlberg always wrote
that you should take with the rook and I
like that.
12 Rxc4.
DONNER: That's an odd move; I've never
seen that before. Yes, I've read something
about it in old tournament books,
somebody said that this was the best. Now
if I play Nd7 and eS, the rook is well
placed and the bishop too. Can I play b6?
He cannot attack immediately with Be4
because there is Ba6 in the position all the
time, especially after he has castled. I don't
know, b6 looks dangerous, but I'm
convinced that after Nd7 and eS White
definitely is a little better. If there is a way
to make a quick draw it must be b6.
12 ... b6.
After this move, however, Donner always
looked in trouble. The weakness of the
pawn on c6, together with White's
possibilities of attacking on the b1-h7
diagonal, gave him severe problems. After
the game both players decided that
12 ... Nd7 followed by RdB, NfB and Bd7
was the right way to develop without
creating points of attack.
13 0-0 Bb7 14 Ne5 Qd6 15 Qf3 f6.
Tired of the pressure against c6, Donner
tries to drive away the strong knight, but
this move already prepares his fatal
blunder.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e f 9 h
LARSEN: That weakens his position, I can
play Ng6, then he plays Rfl protecting his
bishop and he's ready to play cS. Still, it's a
very good position for White, the knight is
strong on g6. But what is Qe4? Of course
he cannot take the knight; Qe4, he plays
fS, then my knight is safe on eS; I can play
then Qf4 or Qf3. Qe4 looks very strong, it's
good to get those pawns on white squares
because he has the white-squared bishop.
47
Polugayevsky played White against Lein.
Well, I know what I want to do; I was
wondering during the game why
Polugayevsky didn't take on c4 with the
rook - we
'
ll probably get to that position.
I
'
m very satisfied with that.
10 Bd3 Nxc3 11 Rxc3.
DONNER: Well, it's an obvious move, now
I change at c4 and then when he takes
with the bishop I play 66 and since years
we know that White has nothing.
11 . . . dxc4.
LARSEN: This is where Polugayevsky took
with the bishop and Black played Nd7.
Then White castled and Black played e5,
and they had a normal position except
Black has the pawn on h6 instead of h7.
Here they agreed a draw which made me
very happy because then I won first prize
without sharing it with Polugayevsky. That
was very nice, $12,000, very nice last round.
Well, this is where Stahlberg always wrote
that you should take with the rook and I
like that.
12 Rxc4.
DONNER: That's an odd move; I've never
seen that before. Yes, I
'
ve read something
about it in old tournament books,
somebody said that this was the best. Now
if I play Nd7 and e5, the rook is well
placed and the bishop too. Can I play 66?
He cannot attack immediately with Be4
because there is Ba6 in the position all the
time, especially after he has castled. I don't
know, 66 looks dangerous, but I'm
convinced that after NdJ and e5 White
definitely is a little better. If there is a way
to make a quick draw it must be 66.
12 . . . b6.
After this move, however, Donner always
looked in trouble. The weakness of the
pawn on c6, together with White
'
s
possibilities of attacking on the b1-h7
diagonal, gave him severe problems. After
the game both players decided that
12 . . . Nd7 followed by Rd8, Nf8 and Bd7
was the right way to develop without
creating points of attack.
13 0-0 Bb7 14 Ne5 Qd6 15 Qf3 f6.
Tired of the pressure against c6, Donner
tries to drive away the strong knight, but
this move already prepares his fatal
blunder.
1
8
i
a b c d e f g h
LARSEN: That weakens his position, I can
play Ng6, then he plays Rf7 protecting his
bishop and he's ready to play c5. Still, it's a
very good position for White, the knight is
strong on g6. But what is Qe4? Of course
he cannot take the knight; Qe4, he plays
f5, then my knight is safe on e5; I can play
then Qf4 or Qf3. Qe4 looks very strong, it's
good to get those pawns on white squares
because he has the white-squared bishop.
47
Qe4, he takes on e5, I take with the
d-pawn. Yes, that's terrible.
16 Qe4.
DONNER: That is a funny move; can I take
the knight? If I take at e5, he checks me at
h7, Kf7; Bg6, Kf6; takes at e5, Qxe5. What
is this? Is that correct, the sacrifice of the
piece? To play f5 - I absolutely don't like,
so I've hardly anything else than to take
that knight. Well, perhaps I am mated but I
don't see it immediately.
16 . fxe5.
LARSEN: I wonder what he's overlooking.
Am I overlooking something? I think it's so
simple; I take on e5 first, he has no good
move for his queen, then I have check,
then check with the bishop or with the
rook. I don't see it, I take on e5, he gives
his queen for my bishop and he wins my
rook with a bishop pin; I still have queen
and pawn against rook and knight. That's
an easy win.
17 dxe5.
DONNER: Oh, that is horrible, of course
he takes it immediately. Oh this is really
horrible, I completely overlooked that, and
so simple. This is absolutely hopeless. I
can as well resign, it's mate in all
variations. The queen has no square;
wherever I go I get a check at h7, a rook at
f4 and the bishop at g6. I lose a rook at
least. There's no difference whatever move
I do here. Qe7 is mate in two; Qd8 is mate
in four or something. Okay I let him give
me mate.
17 .. Qd8 18 Qh7+ Kf7 19 8g6+ Ke7.
LARSEN: I wonder if he's going to resign
now. Naidorf once told me I was a
gentleman because I let him mate me.
48
People resign the move before mate, that's
a funny thing.
20 Qxg7+.
DONNER: Mate or resigning? No I prefer
mate.
20 .. Rf7 21 Qxf7 mate.
Qe he takes on eS, / take with the
d
-pawn
. Yes, that's terrible.
16 Qe4.
DONNER: That is a funny move; can I take
the knight? If I take at e5, he checks me at
h7, Kf7; Bg6, Kf6; takes at e5, Qxe5. What
is this? Is that correct, the sacrifice of the
piece? To play f5 - I absolutely don
'
t like,
so I
'
ve hardly anything else than to take
that knight. Well, perhaps I am mated but I
don't see it immediately.
16 . . . fxe5.
LARSEN: / wonder what he's overlooking.
Am I overlooking something? I think it's so
simple; I take on e5 first, he has no good
move for his queen, then I have check,
then check with the bishop or with the
rook. I don
'
t see it, I take on e5, he gives
his queen for my bishop and he wins my
rook with a bishop pin; I still have queen
and pawn against rook and knight. That
'
s
an easy win.
17 dxe5.
DONNER: Oh, that is horrible, of course
he takes it immediately. Oh this is really
horrible, I completely overlooked that, and
so simple. This is absolutely hopeless. I
can as well resign, it
'
s mate in all
variations. The queen has no square;
wherever I go I get a check at h7, a rook at
f4 and the bishop at g6. I lose a rook at
least. There's no difference whatever move
I do here. Qe7 is mate in two; Qd8 is mate
in four or something. Okay I let him give
me mate.
17 . . . Qd8 18 Qh7+ Kf7 19 Bg6+ Ke7.
LARSEN: / wonder if he's going to resign
now. Najdorf once told me I was a
gentleman because I let him mate me.
People resign the move before mate, that's
a funny thing.
20 Qxg7+.
DONNER: Mate or resigning? No I prefer
mate.
20 . . . Rf7 21 Qxf7 mate.
48
The Final
Bent Larsen Y2,Y2,Y2,Y2,1-Y2,Y2,Y2,Y2,O Vlastimil Hort
Game 11:
Bent Larsen - Vlastimil Hort
Grunfeld Defence
This was a good example of true
grandmaster chess. Playing an unusual
opening variation, Larsen secured a
minimal endgame advantage. He pushed
hard and Hort found himself under
considerable pressure. Despite time
pressure, the Czechoslovakian grandmaster
defended well and managed to save
himself.
1 c4 g6 2 Nf3 Bg7 3 d4 Nf6 4 Nc3 dS.
From an English opening we have reached
a Grunfeld Defence. White is challenged
to form a big pawn centre which Black
hopes to undermine.
S cxdS NxdS 6 e4 Nxc3 7 bxc3 c5
8 BbS+ Nc6
Larsen has adopted a very old variation
considered innocuous by theory. Now 9 d5
brings nothing after 9 .. ."a6, but the Dane
has another idea which he had played in
an earlier game in a Spanish team match
against Oscar Castro.
90-0 QaS.
56
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e f 9 h
LARSEN: Now I have to use my own head.
Castro took on d4 and then castled and I
got a very nice position. What now? Qa4 or
Qb3, or a4 or Rb1. Rb1 I don't even know
what I do if he takes my a-pawn. Qa4 he
takes, then maybe just Bdl, because later
he can play NaS and he gets his knight to
c4. Qb3 looks much better, then if he
castles I can take the knight and play Qa3.
That looks like a very good ending.
10 Qb3.
HORT: This move is probably best. I have
to watch out now for dS. Well, but if I
castle and White plays dS I have still nice
move like NeS. Yes I have some
counterplay on the diagonal: the bishop on
The Final
Bent Larsen l/2,1/2,1/2/1/2,7-l/2/1/2,1/2/y2/0 Vlastimil Hort
Game 11:
Bent Larsen - Vlastimil Hort
Griinfeld Defence
This was a good example of true
grandmaster chess. Playing an unusual
opening variation, Larsen secured a
minimal endgame advantage. He pushed
hard and Hort found himself under
considerable pressure. Despite time
pressure, the Czechoslovakian grandmaster
defended well and managed to save
himself.
1 c4 g6 2 Nf3 Bg7 3 d4 Nf6 4 Nc3 d5.
From an English opening we have reached
a Griinfeld Defence. White is challenged
to form a big pawn centre which Black
hopes to undermine.
5 cxd5 Nxd5 6 e4 Nxc3 7 bxcS c5
8 Bb5+ Nc6
Larsen has adopted a very old variation
considered innocuous by theory. Now 9 d5
brings nothing after 9 . . . a6, but the Dane
has another idea which he had played in
an earlier game in a Spanish team match
against Oscar Castro.
9 0-0 Qa5.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
LARSEN: Now I have to use my own head.
Castro took on d4 and then castled and I
got a very nice position. What now? Qa4 or
Qb3, ora4 or Rbl. Rbl I don't even know
what I do if he takes my a-pawn. Qa4 he
takes, then maybe just Bd7, because later
he can play Na5 and he gets his knight to
c4. Qb3 looks much better, then if he
castles I can take the knight and play Qa3.
That looks like a very good ending.
10 Qb3.
HORT: This move is probably best. I have
to watch out now for d5. Well, but if I
castle and White plays d5 I have still nice
move like Ne5. Yes I have some
counterplay on the diagonal: the-bishop on
i
A
11
f b c d e a
9
56
b5 is not so famous. After d5 I can even
take on c3 with my queen. Yes, d5 is not
possible so I castle.
10 ... 0-0.
LARSEN: Now I have to make a decision. If
I protect my centre pawn with Be3 he
probably exchanges pawns on d4 then
plays Bg4. It's an unclear position; he gets
some counterplay. I like the other variation
better. I can take on c6, then Qa3 and the
bishop will be very strong on a3 and his c6
pawn will be weak. That must be the right
idea.
11 Bxc6 bxc6 12 Qa3.
HORT: White is playing for another
strategic scheme now I see. The game will
be quite hard for me because I have a
disturbed pawn chain. I can't get away with
my queen because if I play Qb6, after Be3
his rooks are coming very cheaply on the
b-line. I have to be satisfied with slightly
worse endgame. I think that I can defend.
12 ... Qxa3 13 Bxa3 cxd4 14 cxd4 Rd8
15 Rac1.
After 15 Bxe7 ReB Black would have
regained the pawn. Now 15 ... Bxd4 is
met by 16 Bxe7. White maintains strong
pressure against c6 and e7, but Hort
continues to find active defensive ideas.
15 ... Rd7.
Now 16 Rxc6 is answered by 16 ... Bb7.
LARSEN: I begin to regret my last move. I
could have played Bc5 and maybe the rook
should not go to c1. But it's quite good
anyway. Rfd1 looks logical, he's coming to
a6 with the bishop so why not move the
rook away?
16 Rfd1.
HORT: I think that Larsen is really playing
for microscopical advantage, but he is
quite strong in this position. He plays
these opposite-coloured bishops positions
very well. I have nothing better than Ba6.
16 ... Ba6.
LARSEN: He's playing it as actively as he
can. Now Bc5, he plays Be2. Oh that's bad
because if I play Rd2 he has Bh6. Well
that's terrible. I probably have nothing
better than Ne5. I think it's still a slight
advantage in spite of the bishops of
opposite colours.
17 Ne5 Bxe5 18 dxe5 Rad8 19 Rxd7 Rxd7.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e 9 h
Despite the simplification, White still has
chances to make progress. Both his pieces
are active, and the pawns at e7 and c6
demand constant attention. Although
opposite-coloured bishops have strong
drawish tendencies in the absence of other
pieces, in the presence of rooks their
attacking potential can be considerably
enhanced. White's first concern is to
improve the position of his king and try to
create an initiative on the K-side.
57
b5 is not so famous. After d5 I can even
take on c3 with my queen. Yes, d5 is not
possible so I castle.
10 . . . 0-0.
LARSEN: Now I have to make a decision. If
I protect my centre pawn with Be3 he
probably exchanges pawns on d4 then
plays Bg4. It
'
s an unclear position; he gets
some counterplay. I like the other variation
better. I can take on c6, then Qa3 and the
bishop will be very strong on a3 and his c6
pawn will be weak. That must be the right
idea.
11 Bxc6 bxc6 12 Qa3.
HORT: White is playing for another
strategic scheme now I see. The game will
be quite hard for me because I have a
disturbed pawn chain. I can't get away with
my queen because if I play Qb6, after Be3
his rooks are coming very cheaply on the
b-line
.
I have to be satisfied with slightly
worse endgame. I think that I can defend.
12 . . . Qxa3 13 BxaS cxd4 14 cxd4 Rd8
15 Racl.
After 15 Bxe7 Re8 Black would have
regained the pawn. Now 15 . . . Bxd4 is
met by 16 Bxe7. White maintains strong
pressure against c6 and e7, but Hort
continues to find active defensive ideas.
15 . . . Rd7.
Now 16 Rxc6 is answered by 16 . . . Bb7.
LARSEN: / begin to regret my last move. I
could have played Bc5 and maybe the rook
should not go to cl. But it
'
s quite good
anyway. Rfdl looks logical, he
'
s coming to
a6 with the bishop so why not move the
rook away?
16 Rfdl.
HORT: / think that Larsen is really playing
for microscopical advantage, but he is
quite strong in this position. He plays
these opposite-coloured bishops positions
very well. I have nothing better than Ba6.
16 . . . Ba6.
LARSEN: He's playing it as actively as he
can. Now Bc5, he plays Bel. Oh that
'
s bad
because if I play Rd2 he has Bh6. Well
that's terrible. I probably have nothing
better than Ne5. I think it's still a slight
advantage in spite of the bishops of
opposite colours.
17 NeS BxeS 18 dxeS RadS 19 Rxd7 Rxd7.
8
1
3
1
abcdefgh
Despite the simplification, White still has
chances to make progress. Both his pieces
are active, and the pawns at e7 and c6
demand constant attention. Although
opposite-coloured bishops have strong
drawish tendencies in the absence of other
pieces, in the presence of rooks their
attacking potential can be considerably
enhanced. White
'
s first concern is to
improve the position of his king and try to
create an initiative on the K-side.
57
20 h4 BbS 21 BeS as 22 Kh2 Bd3 23 f3 a4
24 Kg3 hS 25 Kf4 BbS 26 a3 Kf8 27 g4 Rd3.
At last some signs of activity for Black. He
must counter-attack against f3 to tie down
some of the White force.
28 gxhS gxhS 29 Bb4 Rb3.
Now threatening 30 ... Be2.
30 Re2 Rb1 31 Rd2 Ke8.
LARSEN: I'm beginning to like it. Now I
can threaten mate with BaS. If he goes
back with the king I'll check him and then
Bb4 again and I get a strong attack with my
rook and bishop. In some cases I probably
come with my king also. BaS, e6: that is
the move he has been trying to avoid the
whole game. Then I get the squares d6 and
f6. It looks very good.
32 BaS.
HORT: There is a mating threat now. I
don't think I can play KfB because then I
will be checked RdB+, Kg7; Bb4, e6: Be7
and then there is a famous mate threat Bf6
et cetera. Well, I have to weaken my king.
32 . .. e6.
LARSEN: Now I can check and afterwards I
can play Rd6 threatening BdB+ and Bf6.
But he has a defence. He plays Rb3 and
when I give check and Bf6 he plays Rd3,
then he can hold the ending after
exchange of rooks. How is RdB+, Ke7:
RhB? It's not too clear; maybe he plays Rb3,
then he has a threat of Be2. It's very
unclear. I think /'11 go back with my bishop
and keep the blockade so he still cannot
play cS.
33 Bb4.
The further course of the game showed
58
that Larsen had made as much progress as
was possible. Hart's steadfast defence
continued to be sufficient to keep the
white pieces at bay.
33 . . . Re1 34 Bd6 Re3 3S Rg2 eS.
Finally this pawn manages to advance and
Black's troubles are nearly over.
36 Rg8+ Kd7 37 Rf8 Be2.
The final point of Black's defence. The f3
pawn will need defending and White has
no longer any chances to win.
38 Rxf7 + Ke6 39 Kg3 Rxa3 40 Re7 + Kb6
41 BxeS+ Kxe7 42 Bxa3.
Finally the disappearance of rooks
guarantees a draw.
42 ... Kd7 43 Kf2 Bd1 44 Ke3 Ke8
4S f4 Kf7 46 fS Bg4 47 Kf4 Bd1 48 KgS Bf3
49 Bb2 Bd1 Draw agreed.
The Final - first replay
Game 12:
Vlastimil Hort - Bent Larsen
Ruy Lopez
After the hard draw in the previous game,
both players treated this replay with great
caution. The result never looked like being
other than another draw.
1 e4 eS 2 Nf3 Ne6 3 BbS Nge7 4 d4 exd4
S Nxd4 Nxd4 6 Qxd4 Ne6 7 Qe3 Bb4+
8 Ne3 0-0 9 0-0 d6 10 NdS BeS
11 Qg3 Kh8 12 Bd2 Nd4 13 Bd3 e6
14 Nf4 Ne6 lS Be3 QgS 16 QxgS NxgS
17 Rae1 Ne6 18 Bd2 Nxf4 19 Bxf4 Be6
20 eS dxeS 21 BxeS Rad8 22 a3 Rfe8
23 h3 Kg8 24 Re2 BdS Draw agreed.
20 h4 Bb5 21 Bc5 a5 22 Kh2 Bd3 23 f3 a4
24 Kg3 h5 25 Kf4 Bb5 26 a3 Kf8 27 g4 Rd3.
At last some signs of activity for Black. He
must counter-attack against f3 to tie down
some of the White force.
28 gxh5 gxh5 29 Bb4 Rb3.
Now threatening 30 . . . Be2.
30 Rc2 Rbl 31 Rd2 Ke8.
LARSEN: I'm beginning to like it. Now I
can threaten mate with Ba5. If he goes
back with the king I'll check him and then
Bb4 again and I get a strong attack with my
rook and bishop. In some cases I probably
come with my king also. Ba5, e6: that is
the move he has been trying to avoid the
whole game. Then I get the squares d6 and
f6. It looks very good.
32 Ba5.
HORT: There is a mating threat now. I
don't think I can play Kf8 because then I
will be checked Rd8+, Kg7; Bb4, e6: Be7
and then there is a famous mate threat Bf6
et cetera. Well, I have to weaken my king.
32 . . . e6.
LARSEN: Now I can check and afterwards I
can play Rd6 threatening Bd8+ and Bf6.
But he has a defence. He plays Rb3 and
when I give check and Bf6 he plays Rd3,
then he can hold the ending after
exchange of rooks. How is Rd8+, Ke7:
Rh8? It's not too clear; maybe he plays Rb3,
then he has a threat of Bel. It's very
unclear. I think I
'
ll go back with my bishop
and keep the blockade so he still cannot
play c5.
33 Bb4.
The further course of the game showed
that Larsen had made as much progress as
was possible. Hort
'
s steadfast defence
continued to be sufficient to keep the
white pieces at bay.
33 . . . Rcl 34 Bd6 Rc3 35 Rg2 c5.
Finally this pawn manages to advance and
Black's troubles are nearly over.
36 Rg8+ Kd7 37 Rf8 Be2.
The final point of Black's defence. The f3
pawn will need defending and White has
no longer any chances to win.
38 Rxf7+ Kc6 39 Kg3 Rxa3 40 Rc7+ KbG
41 Bxc5+ Kxc7 42 Bxa3.
Finally the disappearance of rooks
guarantees a draw.
42 . . . Kd7 43 Kf2 Bdl 44 Ke3 Ke8
45 f4 Kf7 46 f5 Bg4 47 Kf4 Bdl 48 Kg5 Bf3
49 Bb2 Bdl Draw agreed.
The Final - first replay
Game 12:
Vlastimil Hort - Bent Larsen
Ruy Lopez
After the hard draw in the previous game,
both players treated this replay with great
caution. The result never looked like being
other than another draw.
1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bb5 Nge7 4 d4 exd4
5 Nxd4 Nxd4 6 Qxd4 Nc6 7 Qe3 Bb4+
8 Nc3 0-0 9 0-0 d6 10 Nd5 Bc5
11 Qg3 KhB 12 Bd2 Nd4 13 Bd3 c6
14 Nf4 NeG 15 Bc3 Qg5 16 QxgS Nxg5
17 Rael Ne6 18 Bd2 Nxf4 19 Bxf4 Be6
20 e5 dxe5 21 BxeS RadB 22 a3 RfeB
23 h3 KgB 24 Re2 Bd5 Draw agreed.
58
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e
48 Rc2+ drawnl!
9 h
But 48 ... e2 wins for Black; after
49 Ra8+ Kf7 50 Re8 Black simply captures
the c-pawn.
The Final - fourth replay
Game 15:
Bent Larsen - Vlastimil Hort
Slav Defence
At last a decision. And it came about in a
similar manner to the previous game.
Again Hort ran short of time defending a
difficult position: and again Larsel1 took
great risks to complicate in the endgame.
This time, however, it paid off, though for
one move Hort was actually winning.
1 c4 Nf6 2 Nc3 c6 3 d4 d5 4 e3 Bf5
5 cxd5 Nxd5 6 Bc4 e6 7 Nge2 Nb6
8 Bb3 c5 9 e4 Bg6 10 Be3.
White has clearly the freer position from
the opening, but Hort's game has no clear
weaknesses. Nevertheless, Black's position
60
is uncomfortable to play under the fast
time limit of this game.
HORT: White has very nice development.
Can I play Nc6? If I do he takes on cS. Nd7
is another possibility, but what happens if
he pushes dS? I don't have much time. I
will play shy and cover my pawn.
10 N8d7.
LARSEN: a4 is probably stupid. I think I'll
just castle and see what he does. I have a
nice development already.
11 0-0.
HORT: Now I'm really not sure what to do.
Maybe I have to play Bd6 but then I am
really afraid of f4 and my bishop can be
very bad. Well, I will try not to allow White
to play f4, so I will first of all take.
11 cxd4.
LARSEN: Oh, he probably wants to
continue with NcS, but that's all right. I
take with the knight, of course.
12 Nxd4.
HORT: Now shall I play NcS or shall I put
the bishop there? I should like to run with
my king: my development is a little bit
shaky, so I think I have to play the bishop.
12 Bc5.
LARSEN: I started wondering about that
while he was thinking. He has only nine
minutes left, I have thirteen. Let's give him
a problem. Na4 is very strong.
13 Na4.
HORT: That's surprising. Now if I take the
knight, Nxa4, Bxa4, 0-0, then Nxe6 and I'm
probably losing a pawn and White is better.
Of course otherwise I lose my bishop.
*
8
*
a b c d e f g h
48 . . . Rc2+ drawn?!
But 48 . . . e2 wins for Black; after
49 Ra8+ Kf7 50 Re8 Black simply captures
the c-pawn.
The Final - fourth replay
Game 15:
Bent Larsen - Vlastimil Hort
Slav Defence
At last a decision. And it came about in a
similar manner to the previous game.
Again Hort ran short of time defending a
difficult position: and again Larsen took
great risks to complicate in the endgame.
This time, however, it paid off, though for
one move Hort was actually winning.
1 c4 Nf6 2 Nc3 c6 3 d4 d5 4 e3 Bf5
5 cxd5 Nxd5 6 Bc4 e6 7 Nge2 Nb6
8 Bb3 c5 9 e4 Bg6 10 Be3.
White has clearly the freer position from
the opening, but Hort's game has no clear
weaknesses. Nevertheless, Black
'
s position
is uncomfortable to play under the fast
time limit of this game.
HORT: White has very nice development.
Can I play Nc6? If I do he takes on c5. Nd7
is another possibility, but what happens if
he pushes d5? I don't have much time. I
will play shy and cover my pawn.
10 . . . N8d7.
LARSEN: a4 is probably stupid. I think I'll
just castle and see what he does. I have a
nice development already.
11 0-0.
HORT: Now I'm really not sure what to do.
Maybe I have to play Bd6 but then I am
really afraid of f4 and my bishop can be
very bad. Well, I will try not to allow White
to play f4, so I will first of all take.
11 . . . cxd4.
LARSEN: Oh, he probably wants to
continue with Nc5, but that
'
s all right. I
take with the knight, of course.
12 Nxd4.
HORT: Now shall I play Nc5 or shall I put
the bishop there? I should like to run with
my king: my development is a little bit
shaky, so I think I have to play the bishop.
12 . . . Bc5.
LARSEN: / started wondering about that
while he was thinking. He has only nine
minutes left, I have thirteen. Let
'
s give him
a problem. Na4 is very strong.
13 Na4.
HORT: That's surprising. Now if I take the
knight, Nxa4, Bxa4, 0-0, then Nxe6 and I'm
probably losing a pawn and White is better.
Of course otherwise I lose my bishop.
60
Maybe I should cover the bishop because
White has a threat, Nxe6, that is very
strong. I don't see another move.
13 . Qe7 14 Nxe5 Nxe5 15 f3 0-0.
As a result of the opening, Larsen has
acquired a useful bishop pair, and Black's
remaining bishop is shut out of the game.
16 Qe2 RaeS 17 Be2 e5 lS Nb5 a6 19 Ne3.
HORT: Of course he wants to get the d5
square, but I think I can still defend. My
position is worse due to White's two
bishops. Well, as Alekhine once said, 'Was
haben Sie gegen zwei Laufer?' It means
'what do you have against two bishops'.
Well I have only the hope that I can
defend. I will play f6 trying to get my
bishop into the game.
19 16.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e 9 h
LARSEN: That spoils one of my ideas
because his bishop is not completely out
of the game. Can I make use of the two
knights hanging there on c5 and b6? Rd1 is
a terrible move. I have more time, I must
make use of that, I must complicate the
game.
20 Rfd1.
HORT: What shall I do? Let's change some
pieces.
20 RfdS.
LARSEN: I think he made a mistake there
because now c5 will be less protected.
21 RxdS+ RxdS.
LARSEN: Now Qf2 with some clever things
on that diagonal. If he protects with Nbd7,
I come to d5 with the knight.
22 Qf2.
HORT: Oh, what shall I do now? My
knights are a little bit hanging and I don't
know what to do. I cannot play Nbd7
because of b4 and I am losing a piece, so I
have to move my rook again.
22 ReS.
With Hort defending well but rapidly
running out of time, Larsen now decided
that his principal advantage was the clock.
He had six minutes left to Hort's three.
Consequently, White decided from now on
just to play quickly. Abandoning his
previous strategy, he now settles for
simplification and a long endgame.
23 Rd1 Bf7 24 Bxe5 Rxe5 25 Bb3 Bxb3
26 axb3 Re6 27 h3 Rd6.
LARSEN: I'm stupid. I should have played
Qd2 last move. Well, to make it a little
complicated now I must play Nd5. He
probably takes it, then I get a passed
pawn. That's at least something and he's
short of time.
28 Nd5.
61
Maybe I should cover the bishop because
White has a threat, Nxe6, that is very
strong. I don
'
t see another move.
13 . . . Qe7 14 Nxc5 Nxc5 15 f3 0-0.
As a result of the opening, Larsen has
acquired a useful bishop pair, and Black
'
s
remaining bishop is shut out of the game.
16 Qe2 Rac8 17 Bc2 e5 18 Nb5 a6 19 Nc3.
HORT: Of course he wants to get the d5
square, but I think I can still defend. My
position is worse due to White
'
s two
bishops. Well, as Alekhine once said, 'Was
haben Sie gegen zwei Laufer?' It means
'
what do you have against two bishops
'
.
Well I have only the hope that I can
defend. I will play f6 trying to get my
bishop into the game.
19 . . . f6.
1
8
i
i
a b c d e f g h
LARSEN: That spoils one of my ideas
because his bishop is not completely out
of the game. Can I make use of the two
knights hanging there on c5 and b6? Rdl is
a terrible move. I have more time, I must
make use of that, I must complicate the
game.
20 Rfdl.
HORT: What shall I do? Let's change some
pieces.
20 . . . Rfd8.
LARSEN: / think he made a mistake there
because now c5 will be less protected.
21 Rxd8+ Rxd8.
LARSEN: Now Qf2 with some clever things
on that diagonal. If he protects with Nbd7,
I come to d5 with the knight.
22 Qf2.
HORT: Oh
, what shall I do now? My
knights are a little bit hanging and I don't
know what to do. I cannot play Nbd7
because of b4 and I am losing a piece, so I
have to move my rook again.
22 . . . RcB.
With Hort defending well but rapidly
running out of time, Larsen now decided
that his principal advantage was the clock.
He had six minutes left to Hort's three.
Consequently, White decided from now on
just to play quickly. Abandoning his
previous strategy, he now settles for
simplification and a long endgame.
23 Rdl Bf7 24 Bxc5 Rxc5 25 Bb3 Bxb3
26 axb3 Rc6 27 h3 Rd6.
LARSEN: I'm stupid. I should have played
Qd2 last move. Well, to make it a little
complicated now I must play Nd5. He
probably takes it, then I get a passed
pawn. That
'
s at least something and he
'
s
short of time.
28 Nd5.
61
H ORT: I think that the position is rather
drawish, but still White gets pawn to dS
and I have good blockade. Now I think
that worst time is behind me.
28 NxdS.
LARSEN: Take with the rook? I'll never win
that.
29 exdS.
HORT: Now I must try to be active, so let's
occupy some file for the first time in this
game.
29 .. Qc7.
LARSEN: Let me see. I want to make a
queen move. Qe3, then he can't exchange
queens on b6 because my pawn runs.
30 Qe3.
HORT: What shall I do? Shall I play Qc2? I
am not so sure about this move: maybe it
is good move. I am really short of time
now. I can't play Qc2 because he can
sacrifice pawn maybe. I really don't know
what to do. Well, I will improve my king.
30 . Kf7.
Apart from his clock, Hort would be in no
danger of losing this game now. But Larsen
manages to continue to create problems,
until both sides were again having to make
their moves almost instantaneously.
31 Qe4 QcS+ 32 Kh2 g6 33 Qc4 Qxc4
34 bxc4 Rb6 35 Rd2 Ke7 36 cS.
The white pawns look imposing, but only
one of them is passed and the black rook
is now active.
36 RbS 37 Rc2 fS 38 Kg3 Kd7
39 Kh4 h6 40 g4 Rb3 41 Re2 RbS.
Now 42 Rc2 would repeat moves. Instead
62
Larsen embarks on a wild and incalculable
continuation confident only that he has
perhaps half a minute more to think about
it.
42 gxfS gxfS 43 RxeS RxcS 44 RxfS RbS
4S KhS Rxb2 46 Kxh6 as 47 h4 a4 48 Rf8.
8
7
i_*_
-
6
- - -
5

-
4
i_
- -
3
-

2
- -
abc d e 9 h
48 . bS?
The losing move. Instead 48 ... a3
49 RaB a2 would save a move and even win
for Black.
49 Ra8 Rb3 SO f4 a3 Sl fS b4 S2 f6 Rf3
S3 KgS Kd6 54 hS KxdS 55 h6 Rg3+
S6 Kf4 Rg1 and Black lost on time.
A sad end, but at least after 57 h7 his
position is now hopeless anyway.
HORT: / think that the position is rather
drawish, but still White gets pawn to d5
and I have good blockade. Now I think
that worst time is behind me.
28 . . . Nxd5.
LARSEN: Take with the rook? I'll never win
that.
29 exd5.
HORT: Now / must try to be active, so let's
occupy some file for the first time in this
game.
29 . . . Qc7.
LARSEN: Let me see. I want to make a
queen move. Qe3, then he can
'
t exchange
queens on b6 because my pawn runs.
30 Qe3.
HORT: What shall I do? Shall I play Qc2? I
am not so sure about this move: maybe it
is good move. I am really short of time
now. I can
'
t play Qc2 because he can
sacrifice pawn maybe. I really don
'
t know
what to do. Well, I will improve my king.
30 . . . Kf7.
Apart from his clock, Hort would be in no
danger of losing this game now. But Larsen
manages to continue to create problems,
until both sides were again having to make
their moves almost instantaneously.
31 Qe4 Qc5+ 32 Kh2 g6 33 Qc4 Qxc4
34 bxc4 Rb6 35 Rd2 Ke7 36 c5.
The white pawns look imposing, but only
one of them is passed and the black rook
is now active.
36 . . . Rb5 37 Rc2 f5 38 Kg3 Kd7
39 Kh4 h6 40 g4 Rb3 41 Re2 Rb5.
Now 42 Rc2 would repeat moves. Instead
Larsen embarks on a wild and incalculable
continuation confident only that he has
perhaps half a minute more to think about
it.
42 gxf5 gxf5 43 Rxe5 Rxc5 44 Rxf5 Rb5
45 Kh5 Rxb2 46 Kxh6 a5 47 h4 a4 48 Rf8.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
48 . . . b5?
The losing move. Instead 48 . . . a3
49 Ra8 a2 would save a move and even win
for Black.
49 Ra8 Rb3 50 f4 a3 51 f5 b4 52 f6 Rf3
53 Kg5 Kd6 54 h5 Kxd5 55 h6 Rg3+
56 Kf4 Rgl and Black lost on time.
A sad end, but at least after 57 h7 his
position is now hopeless anyway.
A
A
a b c d e f g h
62
The Master Game 1980- Series Five
The Master Game 1980- Series Five
Order of Play
Group A:
Round One:
Round Two:
Round Three:
Nunn %- % Hort;
Hort 1-0 Pfleger;
Nunn %- % Pfleger;
Pfleger 0-1 Browne
Browne %- % Nunn
Hort 0-1 Browne
B N H P Total
Browne x % 1 1 2%
Nunn 1%
Hort 0 % x 1 1 %
Pfleger 0 % 0 x %
Game 16:
John Nunn Vlastimil Hort
Hungarian Defence
As in their game from the previous year's
series, Hort took few risks with the black
pieces. The blocked centre after the
opening left Nunn with some advantage,
but Hort equalised by careful play.
1 e4 eS 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bc4 Be7.
NUNN: That was an unusual move. The
Hungarian Defence I think it's called. The
alternatives are BcS and Nf6. I was rather
expecting him to play one of those. Now
I've got to remember this old theory. Well
the right move must be d4.
4 d4.
HORT: That is the strongest move. Now I
have to make something in the centre.
4 d6.
NUNN: Weill can either exchange those
pawns in the centre or push on. If I
exchange, the position is very symmetrical
and rather drawish. It'll probably be more
interesting to advance the pawn. It'll gain
time because he'll have to retreat his
knight.
S dS.
HORT: That's another surprise. Now the
game will have a closed character because
of the blockade. I have only one move.
S ... Nb8.
NUNN: I want to form a fairly large centre
here by advancing my c-pawn but the
bishop's in the way, so I'd better move it
somewhere. I think I'll put it on d3
because it'll defend the e-pawn from that
square. Then later on I can push my
c-pawn.
6 Bd3 Nf6 7 c4 cS 8 Nc3 Nbd7.
The game has now assumed the character
of a queen's pawn opening, the Czech
69
Order of Play
Group A:
Round One: Nunn V2-V2 Hort; Pfleger 0-1 Browne
Round Two: Hort 1-0 Pfleger; Browne V2-V2 Nunn
Round Three: Nunn V2-V2 Pfleger; Hort 0-1 Browne
B N H P Total
Browne x 1/2 1 1 2V2
Nunn V2 x V2 V2 Vh
Hort 0 1/2 x 1 Vh
Pfleger 0 y2 0 x V2
Game 16:
John Nunn - Vlastimil Hort
Hungarian Defence
As in their game from the previous year's
series, Hort took few risks with the black
pieces. The blocked centre after the
opening left Nunn with some advantage,
but Hort equalised by careful play.
1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bc4 Be7.
NUNN: That was an unusual move. The
Hungarian Defence I think it's called. The
alternatives are Bc5 and Nf6. I was rather
expecting him to play one of those. Now
I
'
ve got to remember this old theory. Well
the right move must be d4.
4 d4.
HORT: That is the strongest move. Now I
have to make something in the centre.
4 . . . d6.
NUNN: Well I can either exchange those
pawns in the centre or push on. If I
exchange, the position is very symmetrical
and rather drawish. It
'
ll probably be more
interesting to advance the pawn. It'll gain
time because he'll have to retreat his
knight.
5d5.
HORT: That's another surprise
.
Now the
game will have a closed character because
of the blockade. I have only one move.
5 . . . Nb8.
NUNN: / wanf fo form a fairly large centre
here by advancing my c-pawn but the
bishop's in the way, so I'd better move it
somewhere. I think I'll put it on d3
because it'll defend the e-pawn from that
square. Then later on I can push my
c
-pawn
.
6 Bd3 Nf6 7 c4 c5 8 Nc3 Nbd7.
The game has now assumed the character
of a queen
'
s pawn opening, the Czech
69
Benoni, with Black a move behind. He has
lost two moves with his knight, while
White has lost only one with his bishop.
Nevertheless the blocked nature of the
position minimises the effect of this time
loss.
9 h3 Nf8 10 Be2 Ng6 11 Ba4+.
This manoeuvre is calculated to disrupt
Black's development. After 11 ... Bd7 the
exchange of bishops would favour White
since Black would be left with his
remaining bishop impeded by its own
pawns. Hort's clever reply, however,
avoids any trouble and eventually leads to
Black gaining the bishop pair.
11 ... Nd7! 12 Ne2 Nh4 13 Nxh4 Bxh4
140-00-0 15 Bxd7 Bxd7 16 a4 b6 17 Ra3.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e 9 h
Black must now decide how to open the
game for his bishops. The possible plans
are either a6 and bS to break on the Q-side
or fS opening the other wing. Hort chose
the latter.
17 .. fS.
70
NUNN: I thought he was going to open up
the position on the Q-side but he's gone
over to the other side of the board
completely. Well I'll just have to take it as
he's played it. I must take.
18 exfS.
HORT: Oh, I see that what I did was not
the right thing. Now I have to be very
careful, I must cover now the square e6
because a knight can come there from e2
and f4 later. I don't see another move.
18 . BxfS.
NUNN: I'm a little worried about these two
bishops of his, but at least I have the
opportunity to get my rook on f1 into the
game.
19 f4.
HORT: I was afraid of this move. Now the
position changes character. It is not closed
any more. I really have to be careful
because my pawn on d6 can be weak and I
have also to be careful about the square
e6. I have to make a difficult strategical
decision. I think that I have to move my
bishop back.
19 .. Bd7.
NUNN: He's ignoring my pawn advance. I
can give him an isolated pawn here. Well,
I'd better do so or else my last move
doesn't have any point.
20 fxeS dxeS.
White now has something to show for his
concession of the bishop pair. The passed
d-pawn and weakness at eS give Black
some problems but the position is still
more or less equal. The open f-file is sure
to lead to exchanges and a draw was
already looking the likely result.
Benoni, with Black a move behind. He has
lost two moves with his knight, while
White has lost only one with his bishop.
Nevertheless the blocked nature of the
position minimises the effect of this time
loss.
9 h3 Nf8 10 Bc2 Ng6 11 Ba4+.
This manoeuvre is calculated to disrupt
Black's development. After 11 . . . Bd7 the
exchange of bishops would favour White
since Black would be left with his
remaining bishop impeded by its own
pawns. Hort
'
s clever reply, however,
avoids any trouble and eventually leads to
Black gaining the bishop pair.
11 . . . Nd7! 12 Ne2 Nh4 13 Nxh4 Bxh4
14 0-0 0-0 15 Bxd7 Bxd7 16 a4 b6 17 Ra3.
8
4 A
A
i
a b c d e f g h
Black must now decide how to open the
game for his bishops. The possible plans
are either a6 and b5 to break on the Q-side
or f5 opening the other wing. Hort chose
the latter.
17 . . . f5.
NUNN: / thought he was going to open up
the position on the Q-side but he's gone
over to the other side of the board
completely. Well I
'
ll just have to take it as
he's played it. I must take.
18 exf5.
HORT: Oh, I see that what I did was not
the right thing. Now I have to be very
careful, I must cover now the square e6
because a knight can come there from e2
and f4 later. I don
'
t see another move.
18 . . . Bxf5.
NUNN: I'm a little worried about these two
bishops of his, but at least I have the
opportunity to get my rook on fl into the
game.
19 f4.
HORT: / was afraid of this move. Now the
position changes character. It is not closed
any more. I really have to be careful
because my pawn on d6 can be weak and I
have also to be careful about the square
e6. / have to make a difficult strategical
decision. I think that I have to move my
bishop back.
19 . . . Bd7.
NUNN: He's ignoring my pawn advance. I
can give him an isolated pawn here. Well,
I'd b
etter do so or else my last move
doesn't have any point.
20 fxe5 dxe5.
White now has something to show for his
concession of the bishop pair. The passed
d
-pawn and weakness at e5 give Black
some problems but the position is still
more or less equal. The open f-file is sure
to lead to exchanges and a draw was
already looking the likely result.
70
21 Rxf8+ QxfB 22 Rf3 Qd6 23 Nc3 Qg6.
Black prevents the white knight from
coming to e4 and also creates some
attacking possibilities for himself down the
g-file. Nunn continues cautiously.
24 Kh1 RfB 25 RxfB+ KxfB.
NUNN: I'm sure the draw ought to be in
hand here. I've got to find some
constructive plan. I'm a bit worried about
the queens coming off and all those Q-side
pawns of mine becoming very weak and
perhaps prone to attack by the
white-squared bishop. It'd probably be a
good idea if I could exchange some of
them. as looks like the move because then
I get rid of the weak pawn on a4 and after
the exchange on b6 his own b-pawn might
become weak.
26 a5.
HORT: It looks as if he is playing for a
draw, but still his move is very good
because he's changing the pawns that
could be weak. I must be careful, I will try
to exchange queens.
26 . .. Qg3.
NUNN: That looks aggressive. Is he
threatening to sacrifice on h3 now? No,
because I can play Qf1 + and then take the
bishop on h3. So I have the opportunity to
exchange pawns without worrying.
27 axb6 axb6 28 Ne4 Qg6 29 Qf3+ Qf5.
And on making this move, Hort offered a
draw which was accepted. The position is
level and, without a constructive plan
clearly available to either player, neither
felt inclined to take risks in this first round.
Game 17:
Helmut Pfleger - Walter Browne
English Opening
Browne scored the first win in this group
with a good technical performance.
Pfleger's attempt to start a K-side attack
with 12 g4 was convincingly refuted by the
American's accurate play. Once he had
gained the initiative Browne never
slackened the pressure. Finally Pfleger lost
material in time trouble.
1 c4 c5 2 Nf3 Nf6 3 g3 b6 4 Bg2 Bb7
5 0-0 e6 6 b3 Be7 7 Bb2 0-0 B d4 cxd4
9 Qxd4 d6 10 Nc3 a6 11 h3 Qc7.
This is a normal type of position from the
English Opening. White has an advantage
in space, but Black's game is perfectly
solid. The normal way for White to
continue is 12 e4 followed by Qe3 and
Nd4, holding on to the extra space and
preventing Black's freeing moves, dS and
bS. Instead Pfleger embarks on a new plan
of immediate attack.
12 g4 h6 13 g5.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e 9 h
71
21 Rxf8+ Qxf8 22 Rf3 Qd6 23 Nc3 Qg6.
Black prevents the white knight from
coming to e4 and also creates some
attacking possibilities for himself down the
g
-file
.
Nunn continues cautiously.
24 KM Rf8 25 Rxf8+ KxfB.
NUNN: I'm sure the draw ought to be in
hand here. I've got to find some
constructive plan. I
'
m a bit worried about
the queens coming off and all those Q-side
pawns of mine becoming very weak and
perhaps prone to attack by the
white-squared bishop. It
'
d probably be a
good idea if I could exchange some of
them. a5 looks like the move because then
I get rid of the weak pawn on a4 and after
the exchange on b6 his own b-pawn might
become weak.
26 a5.
HORT: It looks as if he is playing for a
draw, but still his move is very good
because he's changing the pawns that
could be weak. I must be careful, I will try
to exchange queens.
26 . . . Qg3.
NUNN: That looks aggressive. Is he
threatening to sacrifice on h3 now? No,
because I can play Qfl + and then take the
bishop on h3. So I have the opportunity to
exchange pawns without worrying.
27 axb6 axbB 28 Ne4 Qg6 29 Qf3+ Qf5.
And on making this move, Hort offered a
draw which was accepted. The position is
level and, without a constructive plan
clearly available to either player, neither
felt inclined to take risks in this first round.
Game 17:
Helmut Pfleger - Walter Browne
English Opening
Browne scored the first win in this group
with a good technical performance.
Pfleger's attempt to start a K-side attack
with 12 g4 was convincingly refuted by the
American's accurate play. Once he had
gained the initiative Browne never
slackened the pressure. Finally Pfleger lost
material in time trouble.
1 c4 c5 2 Nf3 Nf6 3 g3 b6 4 Bg2 Bb7
5 0-0 e6 6 b3 Be7 7 Bb2 0-0 8 d4 cxd4
9 Qxd4 d6 10 Nc3 a6 11 h3 Qc7.
This is a normal type of position from the
English Opening. White has an advantage
in space, but Black's game is perfectly
solid. The normal way for White to
continue is 12 e4 followed by Qe3 and
Nd4, holding on to the extra space and
preventing Black
'
s freeing moves, d5 and
b5. Instead Pfleger embarks on a new plan
of immediate attack.
12 g4 h6 13 g5.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
1
a b c d e f g h
71
18 Nh5 Bh8 19 f4 Bg4.
The correct defence. White's powerful
knight must be eliminated.
20 fxe5 Bxh5 21 exd6 Qxd6 22 Nf3 Bg6.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e 9 h
Curiously, both players were quite
optimistic about their chances at this stage
of the game. White still has hopes of
attacking the exposed black king, while
Black is destroying the white centre pawns.
23 Nxh4 Bxe4 24 Qf2 Qxd5 25 Rg3+ Bg6
26 Nf5.
White threatens 27 Nh6+ Kg7
28 Qxf7+ Qxf7 29 Rxf7 mate, or
27 Nh6+ Kf8 28 Rxg6 winning. Nunn
defends coolly.
26 Bd4 27 Nxd4 cxd4 28 Bh6 Rb7.
Adding to the defence of f7 and enabling
29 Qf6 to be met by 29 ... QeS. Now
White should play 29 RgS maintaining a
dangerous attack. Short of time, Browne
decided to give his king some air.
29 h4 Qh5 30 Bg5 d3 31 Qf6 draw agreed.
A slightly surprising decision, though a fair
78
reflection of the position. Black's extra
pawn is blockaded and he is still worried
about possible mating threats on the long
diagonal. Browne felt it unwise to continue
with insufficient time for the next nine
moves.
Game 20:
John Nunn - Helmut Pfleger
Pirc Defence
This game was important for both players:
Nunn had to win to keep alive his chances
of reaching the final; Pfleger was fighting
to avoid the ignominy of losing all three
games. The game showed that the German
grandmaster had not lost his combative
spirit. He counter-attacked well from a
poor position and scored a good draw.
1 e4 d6 2 d4 Nf6 3 Nc3 g6 4 f4 Bg7
5 Nf3 0-0 6 Bd3 Na6.
Curiously, Pfleger's chosen opening
variation is also a favourite of his
opponent. Black prepares a counter-thrust
in the centre with cS.
7 0-0 c5 8 d5 Nc7 9 a4 e6 10 dxe6 fxe6
11 e5 Nfd5.
White's advance in the centre has given
him the basis for an attack on the K-side.
Now the normal continuation would be
12 Ne4, centralising and maintaining
White's advantage in space. Instead, Nunn
decided to open the position and go for an
immediate attack.
12 exd6 Qxd6 13 Ne4 Qe7 14 Ne5 b6
15 Qg4 Ba6 16 Bxa6 Nxa6.
Black has succeeded in exchanging one of
the attacking pieces, but Nunn's forces are
18 Nh5 Bh8 19 f4 Bg4.
The correct defence. White's powerful
knight must be eliminated.
20 fxe5 Bxh5 21 exd6 Qxd6 22 Nf3 Bg6.
8
i i
4 a
A
:
i
abcdefgh
Curiously, both players were quite
optimistic about their chances at this stage
of the game. White still has hopes of
attacking the exposed black king, while
Black is destroying the white centre pawns.
23 Nxh4 Bxe4 24 Qf2 Qxd5 25 Rg3+ Bg6
26 Nf5.
White threatens 27 Nh6+ Kg7
28 Qxf7+ Qxf7 29 Rxf7 mate, or
27 Nh6+ Kf8 28 Rxg6 winning. Nunn
defends coolly.
26 . . . Bd4 27 Nxd4 cxd4 28 Bh6 Rb7.
Adding to the defence of f7 and enabling
29 Qf6 to be met by 29 . . . Qe5. Now
White should play 29 Rg5 maintaining a
dangerous attack. Short of time, Browne
decided to give his king some air.
29 h4 Qh5 30 Bg5 d3 31 Qf6 draw agreed.
A slightly surprising decision, though a fair
reflection of the position. Black's extra
pawn is blockaded and he is still worried
about possible mating threats on the long
diagonal. Browne felt it unwise to continue
with insufficient time for the next nine
moves.
Game 20:
John Nunn - Helmut Pfleger
Pirc Defence
This game was important for both players:
Nunn had to win to keep alive his chances
of reaching the final; Pfleger was fighting
to avoid the ignominy of losing all three
games. The game showed that the German
grandmaster had not lost his combative
spirit. He counter-attacked well from a
poor position and scored a good draw.
1 e4 d6 2 d4 Nf6 3 Nc3 g6 4 f4 Bg7
5 Nf3 0-0 6 Bd3 Na6.
Curiously, Pfleger's chosen opening
variation is also a favourite of his
opponent. Black prepares a counter-thrust
in the centre with c5.
7 0-0 c5 8 d5 Nc7 9 a4 e6 10 dxe6 fxe6
11 e5 Nfd5.
White's advance in the centre has given
him the basis for an attack on the K-side.
Now the normal continuation would be
12 Ne4, centralising and maintaining
White's advantage in space. Instead, Nunn
decided to open the position and go for an
immediate attack.
12 exd6 Qxd6 13 Ne4 Qe7 14 Ne5 b6
15 Qg4 Ba6 16 Bxa6 Nxa6.
Black has succeeded in exchanging one of
the attacking pieces, but Nunn's forces are
78
still poised near the king. He must now
bring fresh troops into the attack.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e 9 h
NUNN: That exchange has weakened my
attack somewhat. My queen's rook in
particular needs to come into play. It's very
tempting now to play Ra3 and then over to
h3 perhaps with some real K-side threats.
/t's curious that in all three of my games in
this tournament White has developed this
rook via a3. Perhaps it will start a trend.
17 Ra3.
PFLEGER: Oh, I completely overlooked this
move. What shall I do now? I saw John
recently win against Darga, also from
Germany, in rather an impressive manner
and somehow I'm a little bit afraid of being
mated here. If I play Nb4 I think it's too
slow: he simply plays c4 and everything is
in his favour. Maybe I can sacrifice a pawn
with c4, giving my knight the square c5. I
think I have to do it.
17 . .. c4.
NUNN: That's a bit of a shock: I hadn't
realised it was possible. Of course I can
take it off, but then he can play RacB for
example, and my knight is then pinned
against the pawn on c2. He'd get rather a
strong initiative, so I think I'd better ignore
his c-pawn. But his knight on a6 can come
to c5 and exchange yet another potential
attacking piece on e4. If he keeps lopping
my pieces off like this I'll have no attack
left whatsoever. But I don't think I have
much choice; I must continue with my
plan.
18 Rh3.
PFLEGER: He simply neglects my pawn
offer. Is he always like that? Well, some
uncomfortable things threaten here on the
K-side. I think I have to oppose with the
rook.
18 . .. Rf5.
NUNN: My bishop's gone from d3, so this
move is possible. My attack doesn't seem
to be getting quite as far as I'd like.
Perhaps I should change track now and
take off that pawn on c4. It's far moce
possible now because if he plays RcB I
have a knight fork on d6. Well a pawn is
certainly a worthwhile thing to take off, so
let's have it.
19 Nxc4.
PFLEGER: At last he becomes greedy. Well,
it gives my knight the opportunity to come
back into the centre with force.
19 . . Nc5.
NUNN: I feel this is a crucial point in the
game. He's obviously got some
counterplay for the pawn but I'm sure if I
play accurately I should maintain my extra
material. What shall I play? Qe2, Ned6,
Ncd6, there are so many choices I'm sure
I'm going to make the wrong one. The
79
still poised near the king. He must now
bring fresh troops into the attack.
8
A
a
1
a b c d e f g h
NUNN: That exchange has weakened my
attack somewhat. My queen
'
s rook in
particular needs to come into play. It
'
s very
tempting now to play Ra3 and then over to
h3 perhaps with some real K-side threats.
It's curious that in all three of my games in
this tournament White has developed this
rook via a3. Perhaps it will start a trend.
17 Ra3.
PFLEGER: Oh, I completely overlooked this
move. What shall I do now? I saw John
recently win against Darga, also from
Germany, in rather an impressive manner
and somehow I
'
m a little bit afraid of being
mated here. If I play Nb4 I think it
'
s too
slow: he simply plays c4 and everything is
in his favour. Maybe I can sacrifice a pawn
with c4, giving my knight the square c5. /
think I have to do it.
17 . . . c4.
NUNN: That's a bit of a shock: I hadn't
realised it was possible. Of course I can
take it off, but then he can play Rac8 for
example, and my knight is then pinned
against the pawn on c2. He
'
d get rather a
strong initiative, so I think I
'
d better ignore
his c-pawn. But his knight on a6 can come
to c5 and exchange yet another potential
attacking piece on e4. If he keeps lopping
my pieces off like this I
'
ll have no attack
left whatsoever. But I don't think I have
much choice; I must continue with my
plan.
18 Rh3.
PFLEGER: He simply neglects my pawn
offer. Is he always like that? Well, some
uncomfortable things threaten here on the
K-side
.
I think I have to oppose with the
rook.
18 . . . Rf5.
NUNN: My bishop's gone from d3, so this
move is possible. My attack doesn
'
t seem
to be getting quite as far as I'd like.
Perhaps I should change track now and
take off that pawn on c4. It's far moce
possible now because if he plays Red I
have a knight fork on d6. Well a pawn is
certainly a worthwhile thing to take off, so
let's have it.
19 Nxc4.
PFLEGER: At last he becomes greedy. Well,
it gives my knight the opportunity to come
back into the centre with force.
19 . . . Nc5.
NUNN: / feel this is a crucial point in the
game. He
'
s obviously got some
counterplay for the pawn but I
'
m sure if I
play accurately I should maintain my extra
material. What shall I play? Qe2, Ned6,
Ncd6, there are so many choices I'm sure
I
'
m going to make the wrong one. The
79
problem with Qe2 is that he can then take
the pawn on a4 and I can't see how to
exploit his out-of-play knight. If I play
Ned6, his rook just goes back to fB and
then he can attack my knight with RadB
and I'm going to be retreating rapidly. I'll
try the third possibility, though I'm a bit
suspicious of a move I arrive at by a
process of elimination.
20 Ncd6.
But Pfleger was happy with Nunn's choice
because it gave him the chance to create
immediate pressure against the f-pawn.
20 Nxe4 21 Nxe4 Raf8.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e f 9 h
With all Black's pieces now enjoying
concerted action, he has clear
compensation for the pawn. Nunn's next
move overlooks a little combination.
22 c4 Bd4+ 23 Kh1 Nxf4.
NUNN: Oh, what have I allowed to
happen? A combination I completely
overlooked. It's so simple when you see it.
If I take on f4 with the bishop, he plays eS
and my rook on f1 is undefended. If I take
80
with the rook on f4, he exchanges rooks,
then once again eS and the bishop can't
move because of mate on f1. What can I
do? I mustn't lose my head. I can no
longer think of winning this game, but
somehow I'm sure I ought to find a way
out to draw. Half a point is better than
none at all. Well, my move seems forced.
24 Rxf4 Rxf4 25 Bxf4.
PFLEGER: Now the planned move eS. His
bishop cannot retreat because he would
then be mated on f1, so I will win back my
piece with, I think, slightly the better
game.
25 e5.
NUNN: My best chance here is to
exchange as many pieces as possible and
try to draw the ending. I want to make sure
that I can exchange off the rooks; that's
the most important thing because then I
cannot be mated on the back rank. So I'll
prepare to swap those rooks down the
f-file.
26 Rf3 exf4 27 Rxf4 Bxb2 28 Rxf8+ Qxf8.
The exchanges have left material level and
both kings too exposed for either player to
have realistic hopes of winning. Neither
can free his pieces from defensive duties
for sufficiently long to create any threats.
29 Qe6+ Kh8 30 h4 Qf4 31 g3 Qf1+
32 Kh2 Qe2+ Draw agreed.
Black has a perpetual check, so there is no
arguing.
problem with Qe2 is that he can then take
the pawn on a4 and I can't see how to
exploit his out-of-play knight. If I play
NedS, his rook just goes back to fd and
then he can attack my knight with Rad8
and I
'
m going to be retreating rapidly. I
'
ll
try the third possibility, though I'm a bit
suspicious of a move I arrive at by a
process of elimination.
20 Ncd6.
But Pfleger was happy with Nunn's choice
because it gave him the chance to create
immediate pressure against the f-pawn.
20 . . . Nxe4 21 Nxe4 Raf8.
8
1
abcdefgh
With all Black's pieces now enjoying
concerted action, he has clear
compensation for the pawn. Nunn's next
move overlooks a little combination.
22 c4 Bd4+ 23 Khl Nxf4.
NUNN: Oh, what have I allowed to
happen? A combination I completely
overlooked. It
'
s so simple when you see it.
If I take on f4 with the bishop, he plays e5
and my rook on f1 is undefended. If I take
with the rook on f4, he exchanges rooks,
then once again e5 and the bishop can't
move because of mate on f1. What can I
do? I mustn't lose my head. I can no
longer think of winning this game, but
somehow I
'
m sure I ought to find a way
out to draw. Half a point is better than
none at all. Well, my move seems forced.
24Rxf4Rxf4 25 Bxf4.
PFLEGER: Now the planned move e5. His
bishop cannot retreat because he would
then be mated on f1, so I will win back my
piece with, I think, slightly the better
game.
25 . . . e5.
NUNN: My best chance here is to
exchange as many pieces as possible and
try to draw the ending. I want to make sure
that I can exchange off the rooks; that's
the most important thing because then I
cannot be mated on the back rank. So I
'
ll
prepare to swap those rooks down the
f-file
.
26 Rf3 exf4 27 Rxf4 Bxb2 28 Rxf8+ Qxf8.
The exchanges have left material level and
both kings too exposed for either player to
have realistic hopes of winning. Neither
can free his pieces from defensive duties
for sufficiently long to create any threats.
29 Qe6+ Kh8 30 h4 Qf4 31 g3 Qf1 +
32 Kh2 Qe2+ Draw agreed.
Black has a perpetual check, so there is no
arguing.
80
Order of Play
Group B:
Round One:
Round Two:
Round Three:
Schmid 1-0 Korchnoi;
Byrne 0-1 Korchnoi;
Korchnoi 1-0 Stean;
Sc K B St Total
Schmid x 1 Y2 1 2Y2
Korchnoi 0 x 1 1 2
Byrne Y2 0 x Y2 1
Stean o 0 Y2 x
Game 22:
Lothar Schmid - Viktor Korchnoi
Ruy Lopez
This game was the major sensation of the
whole tournament. The German
grandmaster, who had been almost totally
retired from competitive play for some
years, beat the favourite and World
Championship candidate. Korchnoi's iron
will to win was the culprit in this game.
Refusing Schmid's draw offer in a level
position Korchnoi tried to squeeze
something out of the game. He ran short
of time and was already probably losing
when his flag fell.
1 e4 eS 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 BbS a6 4 Ba4 Nf6
S 0-0 Nxe4.
This is the Open Defence to the Ruy
lopez, considered a little suspect by most
modern grandmasters, but always a
favourite of Korchnoi. Black accepts a
haggard-looking pawn structure in
exchange for free piece play. The
alternative is the conservative 5 ... Be7.
84
Byrne Y2- Y2 Stean
Stean 0-1 Schmid
Schmid Y2- Y2 Byrne
6 d4 bS 7 Bb3 dS.
Black cannot afford to open the game
totally.with his king still in the centre, so
he must return the pawn here.
8 dxeS Be6 9 c3 Be7 10 Nbd2.
In the twenty-fourth game of their 1978
match, Karpov had played 10 Bc2 against
Korchnoi. Evidently Korchnoi found
Schmid's move less impressive.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e 9 h
Order of Play
Group B:
Round One: Schmid 7-0 Korchnoi; Byrne V2-V2 Stean
Round Two: Byrne 0-1 Korchnoi; Stean 0-1 Schmid
Round Three: Korchnoi 1-0 Stean; Schmid V2-V2 Byrne
Sc K B St Total
Schmid x 1 1/2 1 2V2
Korchnoi 0x11 2
Byrne V2 0 x V2 1
Stean 0 0 V2 x V2
Game 22:
Lothar Schmid - Viktor Korchnoi
Ruy Lopez
This game was the major sensation of the
whole tournament. The German
grandmaster, who had been almost totally
retired from competitive play for some
years, beat the favourite and World
Championship candidate. Korchnoi's iron
will to win was the culprit in this game.
Refusing Schmid's draw offer in a level
position Korchnoi tried to squeeze
something out of the game. He ran short
of time and was already probably losing
when his flag fell.
1 e4 e5 2 Nf3 Nc6 3 Bb5 a6 4 Ba4 Nf6
5 0-0 Nxe4.
This is the Open Defence to the Ruy
Lopez, considered a little suspect by most
modern grandmasters, but always a
favourite of Korchnoi. Black accepts a
haggard-looking pawn structure in
exchange for free piece play. The
alternative is the conservative 5 . . . Be7.
6d4b5 7Bb3d5.
Black cannot afford to open the game
totally-with his king still in the centre, so
he must return the pawn here.
8 dxe5 Be6 9 c3 Be7 10 Nbd2.
In the twenty-fourth game of their 1978
match, Karpov had played 10 Bc2 against
Korchnoi. Evidently Korchnoi found
Schmid's move less impressive.
if
8
a b c d e f g h
84
KORCHNOI: My opponent is not
acquainted with all the subtleties of the
position. Bc2 would be more careful to
prevent me playing the line I prepared.
10 ... Nc5 11 Be2 Bg4.
SCHMID: Now the pawn on e5 is attacked
and I have to protect it with the rook.
12 Re1 Qd7 13 Nb3.
KORCHNOI: The same happened in my
game against Karpov and my opponent was
the main referee of the match at that
moment although probably he doesn't
know well how to play this line.
13 . .. Ne6.
Bya curious transposition we have now
indeed reached a position from game 28 of
the Karpov-Korchnoi match and the chief
referee had been playing closer attention
than Korchnoi imagined. He now plays a
better move than Karpov's.
SCHMID: Here I have an idea which hasn't
been played yet and will maybe give me
quite a good game. Qd3 attacks the pctwn
on h7 so that he cannot castle.
14 Qd3.
KORCHNOI: Oh something new. It looks
much stronger than Karpov played, well he
played a kind of rubbish h3. Now to try the
idea NdB and then c5, but after NdB he
plays Rd1. Maybe RdB is the strongest
move, but then I have to calculate a4. Well
anyhow I have an excellent game with Bh5.
14 ... Bh5.
SCHMID: My knight on f3 is no longer
pinned and I can centralise it, a typical
Spanish move.
15 Nfd4.
Korchnoi met this move perhaps a little too
casually. He initiated a series of exchanges
to free his game, but then realised that he
had made a mistake.
15 . .. Bg6 16 Qe2 Ncxd4 17 Nxd4 Nxd4
18 cxd4 c5 19 dxc5.
KORCHNOI: I overlooked something. This
is a terrible threat. It is too late to go back
now. I must take this pawn.
19 . .. Bxc5.
SCHMID: Now I have a combination. It is
most interesting whether or not Black can
defend; his king is in the centre instead of
being safe after castling. I have the
possibility to take the bishop on g6 or push
the pawn to e6 first. It's not easy to decide.
20 Bxg6.
KORCHNOI: I see the threat. I can take
with the f-pawn, leaving his pawn on e5
very strong, or I can just fall into his trap.
Positionally I don.'t like fxg6 but what can I
do? I should have thought before.
20 . .. hxg6.
SCHMID: Now of course if I want a good
game I have to push the e-pawn.
21 e6.
KORCHNOI: If I take on e6 he plays Qc2
attacking the bishop and pawn on g6: I
retreat the bishop, he takes on g6 and
eventually takes the pawn on e6. My rook
on hB is already developed in a very
strange wayan the h-line. I can attack the
pawn on h2. Qd6, he takes exf7+, Kxf7,
Qf3+, KgB, Bf4. Not a pleasure. So let's
pretend nothing happened.
21 ... Qe6.
SCHMID: Well this is a type of move not
85
KORCHNOI: My opponent is not
acquainted with all the subtleties of the
position. Bc2 would be more careful to
prevent me playing the line I prepared.
10 . . . Nc5 11 Bc2 Bg4.
SCHMID: Now fhe pawn on e5 is attacked
and I have to protect it with the rook.
12 Rel Qd7 13 Nb3.
KORCHNOI: The same happened in my
game against Karpov and my opponent was
the main referee of the match at that
moment although probably he doesn
'
t
know well how to play this line.
13 . . . Ne6.
By a curious transposition we have now
indeed reached a position from game 28 of
the Karpov-Korchnoi match and the chief
referee had been playing closer attention
than Korchnoi imagined. He now plays a
better move than Karpov's.
SCHMID: Here / have an idea which hasn't
been played yet and will maybe give me
quite a good game. Qd3 attacks the pdwn
on h7 so that he cannot castle.
14 Qd3.
KORCHNOI: Oh something new. It looks
much stronger than Karpov played, well he
played a kind of rubbish h3. Now to try the
idea Nd8 and then c5, but after Nd8 he
plays Rd1. Maybe Rd8 is the strongest
move, but then I have to calculate a4. Well
anyhow I have an excellent game with Bh5.
14 . . . Bh5.
SCHMID: My knight on f3 is no longer
pinned and I can centralise it, a typical
Spanish move.
Korchnoi met this move perhaps a little too
casually. He initiated a series of exchanges
to free his game, but then realised that he
had made a mistake.
15 . . . Bg6 16 Qe2 Ncxd4 17 Nxd4 Nxd4
18cxd4c5 19dxc5.
KORCHNOI: I overlooked something. This
is a terrible threat. It is too late to go back
now. I must take this pawn.
19 . . . Bxc5.
SCHMID: Now / have a combination. It is
most interesting whether or not Black can
defend; his king is in the centre instead of
being safe after castling. I have the
possibility to take the bishop on g6 or push
the pawn to e6 first. It's not easy to decide.
20 Bxg6.
KORCHNOI: / see fhe threat. I can take
with the f-pawn, leaving his pawn on e5
very strong, or I can just fall into his trap.
Positionally I don't like fxg6 but what can I
do? I should have thought before.
20 . . . hxg6.
SCHMID: Now of course if I want a good
game I have to push the e-pawn.
21 e6.
KORCHNOI: If I take on e6 he plays Qc2
attacking the bishop and pawn on g6: I
retreat the bishop, he takes on g6 and
eventually takes the pawn on e6. My rook
on h8 is already developed in a very
strange way on the h-line. I can attack the
pawn on h2. Qd6, he takes exf7+, Kxf7,
Qf3+, Kg8, Bf4. Not a pleasure. So let's
pretend nothing happened.
21 . . . Qc6.
15 Nfd4.
SCHMID: Well this is a type of move not
often seen; this is a grandmaster move.
Who else would be so strong not to take
off this e-pawn and to allow me to take on
f7 myself? Suddenly the board is burning.
22 exf7 + Kxf7 23 Qf3+ Kg8.
The simplification has left Black's king out
of danger. Schmid retains hopes of
advantage because the black rooks are
uncoordinated and his pawns look weak,
but as Korchnoi demonstrates these
problems are easily overcome. He had, in
fact, been far more afraid of the move
22 Qg4, maintaining tension instead of
exchanging with 22 exf7+.
24 Be3 Rf8 2S Qg4 Bxe3 26 Rxe3 RhS
27 Rd1 RhfS.
Finally all is content in the Black camp. His
rooks work well together and the
vulnerable pawns are shielded from attack.
28 f3 Re8 29 Qd4 Rxe3 30 Qxe3.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e 9 h
KORCHNOI: Now to prevent him to
penetrate into my camp, I will try to
penetrate with the queen.
86
30 ... Qc2.
SCHMID: My rook is attacked, my pawn is
attacked, I should cover both. There are
only two moves: Qd2 or Qd4. Qd4 is
dangerous: he could even move Rg5. The
queen is not very nice on this square. I
think I should try to get her out.
31 Qd2.
KORCHNOI: Nothing to think about: I
cannot exchange queens.
31 ... QcS+ 32 Qf2 Qe7.
SCHMID: I think I do not have any more
the advantage. I think I shall try to offer
him a draw because he has only a few
minutes left on his clock and still to make
eight moves. I think it would be fair to
offer a draw. I play Kf1 and ask him
whether or not he wants to play for a win.
33 Kf1.
KORCHNOI: Aha, he understands that he
cannot improve his position, but what
about me? Let us pass over the time
trouble and then see if I can improve or
not. I don't accept. I will play for the win,
or vice versa.
33 ... ReS 34 Qd4 gS 3S Rc1 Qe6
36 Rc2 QfS 37 Rd2 Qe6 38 Kf2 Kf7
39 Rc2 Qe7 40 h3 Qd6.
The time control successfully negotiated,
Korchnoi started thinking again about how
he might tempt an error.
41 QcS Qf6 42 Rd2 Kg6 43 Qd4 Kh6
44 Rd3 Qe7 4S Rd2 Kh7 46 Rc2 Qf6
47 Qd3+ g6 48 Rd2.
often seen; this is a grandmaster move.
Who else would be so strong not to take
off this e-pawn and to allow me to take on
f7 myself? Suddenly the board is burning.
22 exf7+ Kxf7 23 Qf3+ Kg8.
The simplification has left Black's king out
of danger. Schmid retains hopes of
advantage because the black rooks are
uncoordinated and his pawns look weak,
but as Korchnoi demonstrates these
problems are easily overcome. He had, in
fact, been far more afraid of the move
22 Qg4, maintaining tension instead of
exchanging with 22 exf7+.
24 Be3 Rf8 25 Qg4 Bxe3 26 Rxe3 Rh5
27 Rdl Rhf5.
Finally all is content in the Black camp. His
rooks work well together and the
vulnerable pawns are shielded from attack.
28f3Re8 29 Qd4 Rxe3 30 Qxe3.
8
i
a b c d e f g h
KORCHNOI: Now to prevent him to
penetrate into my camp, I will try to
penetrate with the queen.
30 . . . Qc2.
SCHMID: My rook is attacked, my pawn is
attacked, I should cover both. There are
only two moves: Qd2 or Qd4. Qd4 is
dangerous: he could even move Rg5. The
queen is not very nice on this square. I
think I should try to get her out.
31 Qd2.
KORCHNOI: Nothing to think about: I
cannot exchange queens.
31 . . . Qc5+ 32 Qf2 Qe7.
SCHMID: / think I do not have any more
the advantage. I think I shall try to offer
him a draw because he has only a few
minutes left on his clock and still to make
eight moves. I think it would be fair to
offer a draw. I play Kfl and ask him
whether or not he wants to play for a win.
33 Kfl.
KORCHNOI: Aha, he understands that he
cannot improve his position, but what
about me? Let us pass over the time
trouble and then see if I can improve or
not. I don
'
t accept. I will play for the win,
or vice versa.
33 . . . Re5 34 Qd4 g5 35 Rcl Qe6
36 Rc2 Qf5 37 Rd2 Qe6 38 Kf2 Kf7
39 Rc2 Qe7 40 h3 Qd6.
The time control successfully negotiated,
Korchnoi started thinking again about how
he might tempt an error.
41 Qc5 Qf6 42 Rd2 Kg6 43 Qd4 Kh6
44 Rd3 Qe7 45 Rd2 Kh7 46 Rc2 Qf6
47 Qd3+ g6 48 Rd2.
86
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e 9 h
48 g4.
Suddenly it looked as though Schmid had
fallen into a trap. After 49 hxg4 Qh4+
Black develops a mating attack from
nowhere: 50 Kf1 Re1 mate, or 50 g3 Qh2+
51 Kf1 Qh1 + 52 Kf2 Re1. But the German
grandmaster remained calm and found the
only way to avoid disadvantage.
49 Qd4.
KORCHNOI: Oh yes. I thought I was
winning already but now he maintains
equilibrium. Let's take on f3.
49 gxf3.
SCHMID: I need to retake. Black has freed
his game: I think both have chances and it
might be a draw.
50 gxf3.
In fact the real result of Schmid's
overlooking 48 ... g4 was to encourage
Korchnoi to think even longer about how
to tempt a further error. In the remainder
of the game he totally mishandled his
clock, having perhaps given insufficient
thought to the unusual time control of one
hour for all his remaining moves. By move
~ he h.ad less than a minute remaining.
Fmally It was the white pieces which broke
through in attack.
50 g5 51 Qg4 Kh6 52 Kg2 Rf5
53 Qd4 Kg6 54 Qd3 Kh6 55 Rc2 Re5
56 Rc7 Qg6 57 Qc3 Qf5 58 Qd2 Kh5
59 Kg3 Re2 60 Qxe2 Qf4+ 61 Kg2 Qxc7
62 f4+ Kh6 63 Qe6+ Kg7 64 fxg5 Qc2+
65 Kg3 Qxb2 66 Qxd5 a5 67 h4 a4
68 h5 Qc3+ 69 Kf2 Qc2+ 70 Ke3 Qcl +
and Black lost on time.
Game 23:
Robert Byrne - Michael Stean
Nimzo-Indian Defence
An amazing escape for Byrne who seemed
bound and gagged and just awaiting
execution. After playing a fine positional
game Stean should never have let this one
slip.
1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 e6 3 Nc3 Bb4 4 e3 0-0
5 Bd3 c5 6 Ne2 d5 7 cxd5 exd5 80-0 b6.
~ t e a n realises that his Nimzo-Indian bishop
IS soon to be exchanged for the knight on
c3. This move prepares Ba6 to rid White of
his bishop pair and leave him with a
bishop somewhat constricted by its own
pawns.
9 a3 Bxc3 10 bxc3 Ba6 11 Ng3 Bxd3
12 Qxd3 Nc6 13 f3.
White's chances lie in the mobilisation of
his centre pawns.
13 Qd7 14 Bd2 Rad8 15 Radl Ne8.
The knight heads for the outpost at c4 via
d6.
16 Bel.
87
8
1 a
1 a
i
a b c d e f g h
48 . . . g4.
Suddenly it looked as though Schmid had
fallen into a trap. After 49 hxg4 Qh4+
Black develops a mating attack from
nowhere: 50 Kfl Rel mate, or 50 g3 Qh2+
51 Kfl Qh1+ 52 Kf2 Rel. But the German
grandmaster remained calm and found the
only way to avoid disadvantage.
49 Qd4.
KORCHNOI: Oh yes. I thought I was
winning already but now he maintains
equilibrium. Let
'
s take on f3.
49 . . . gxf3.
SCHMID: / need to retake. Black has freed
his game: I think both have chances and it
might be a draw.
50 gxf3.
In fact the real result of Schmid's
overlooking 48 . . . g4 was to encourage
Korchnoi to think even longer about how
to tempt a further error. In the remainder
of the game he totally mishandled his
clock, having perhaps given insufficient
thought to the unusual time control of one
hour for all his remaining moves. By move
56 he had less than a minute remaining.
Finally it was the white pieces which broke
through in attack.
50 . . . g5 51 Qg4 Kh6 52 Kg2 Rf5
53 Qd4 Kg6 54 Qd3 Kh6 55 Rc2 Re5
56 Rc7 Qg6 57 Qc3 QfS 58 Qd2 Kh5
59 Kg3 Re2 60 Qxe2 Qf4+ 61 Kg2 Qxc7
62 f4+ Kh6 63 Qe6+ Kg7 64 fxg5 Qc2+
65 Kg3 Qxb2 66 Qxd5 a5 67 h4 a4
68h5Qc3+ 69 Kf2 Qc2+ 70 Ke3 Qc1 +
and Black lost on time.
Game 23:
Robert Byrne - Michael Stean
Nimzo-lndian Defence
An amazing escape for Byrne who seemed
bound and gagged and just awaiting
execution. After playing a fine positional
game Stean should never have let this one
slip.
1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 e6 3 Nc3 Bb4 4 e3 0-0
5 Bd3 c5 6 Ne2 d5 7 cxdS exd5 8 0-0 b6.
Stean realises that his Nimzo-lndian bishop
is soon to be exchanged for the knight on
c3. This move prepares Ba6 to rid White of
his bishop pair and leave him with a
bishop somewhat constricted by its own
pawns.
9 a3 Bxc3 10 bxc3 Ba6 11 Ng3 Bxd3
12 Qxd3 Nc6 13 f3.
White's chances lie in the mobilisation of
his centre pawns.
13 . . . Qd7 14 Bd2 RadB 15 Radl NeB.
The knight heads for the outpost at c4 via
d6.
16 Bel.
87
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e f 9 h
STEAN: He doesn't seem to know what to
do with that silly bishop. Where's it going?
I suppose he wants to put it on f2. Nc7
looks logical, but why should I play so
passively? I can play Nd6 and then if he
takes on cS I can play Nc4 threatening the
fork on b2.
16 . .. Nd6.
BYRNE: Is there any way to take advantage
of that? The knight's obviously on a good
square but it's temporarily blocking support
of his d-pawn. But if dxcS, he interpolates
Nc4 with a fork threat on b2 and the
d-pawn is protected with tempo. I don't
like to disturb the pawn line in the centre
unless I get some clear advantage doing it.
Can I use that momentary block in order to
play e4? It looks a bit risky but I think I'm
going to try it.
17 e4.
STEAN: I'm not really afraid of e4 because
his pieces are on rather funny squares at
the moment. So the knight belongs on c4.
17 . .. Nc4.
BYRNE: The only thing to do about the two
88
threats of Nxa3 and the fork with Nb2 is to
defend the a-pawn.
18 Ra1.
STEAN: I thought he might sacrifice the
pawn. Can I take advantage of the fact that
his pieces are on very strange squares? I
can play Nb2, or I can take first on d4. No,
I need to support the knight on c4 and
then I get some threats. I can't play bS at
once, maybe he takes on cS, so I'll take on
d4 first.
18 ... cxd4 19 cxd4 b5.
Black has established a strong bind on the
Q-side, so Byrne now tries his chances on
the other wing.
20 e5 f6.
The correct response to Byrne's advance.
Now 21 f4 fS leaves the white bishop totally
ineffective.
21 ed6 Rxf6 22 Btl Re8.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e 9 h
BYRNE: I can't go on playing this game
with my queen and rook tied down to the
8
A
abcdefgh
STEAN: He doesn't seem to know what to
do with that silly bishop. Where's it going?
I suppose he wants to put it on f2. Nc7
looks logical, but why should I play so
passively? I can play Nd6 and then if he
takes on c5 I can play Nc4 threatening the
fork on 62.
16 . . . Nd6.
BYRNE: Is there any way to take advantage
of that? The knight
'
s obviously on a good
square but it
'
s temporarily blocking support
of his d-pawn. But if dxc5, he interpolates
Nc4 with a fork threat on b2 and the
d
-pawn is protected with tempo
.
I don't
like to disturb the pawn line in the centre
unless I get some clear advantage doing it.
Can I use that momentary block in order to
play e4? It looks a bit risky but I think I
'
m
going to try it.
17 e4.
STEAN: I'm not really afraid of e4 because
his pieces are on rather funny squares at
the moment. So the knight belongs on c4.
17 . . . Nc4.
BYRNE: The only thing to do about the two
threats of Nxa3 and the fork with Nb2 is to
defend the a-pawn.
18 Ral.
STEAN: / thought he might sacrifice the
pawn. Can I take advantage of the fact that
his pieces are on very strange squares? I
can play Nb2, or I can take first on d4. No,
I need to support the knight on c4 and
then I get some threats. I can't play 65 at
once, maybe he takes on c5, so I
'
ll take on
d4 first.
18 . . . cxd4 19 cxd4 b5.
Black has established a strong bind on the
Q
-side
, so Byrne now tries his chances on
the other wing.
20 e5 f6.
The correct response to Byrne's advance.
Now 21 f4 f5 leaves the white bishop totally
ineffective.
21 exf6 Rxf6 22 Bf2 ReB.
8
i
/ y /
a
abcdefgh
BYRNE: / can'f go on playing this game
with my queen and rook tied down to the
88
defence of that a-pawn. I know he's going
to be very happy if I try to get rid of that
pawn with a4 but if I want to play actively
at all I'll just have to take my chances.
23 a4.
STEAN: I don't believe that, not for one
moment. What's he trying to do to me? I
can just get a tremendous passed pawn
with b4. I don't understand it.
23 . b4.
BYRNE: Now that the b-pawn is advanced,
his knight is not quite as sturdily protected
as it was. Perhaps I can get some
usefulness out of my knight.
24 Ne4.
STEAN: So that was his idea. I don't want
to take that knight. It's going to c5. Let's
move this rook: let's go home.
24 Rff8.
BYRNE: What will getting that knight to a
better square do for my position? I'm worse
anyway but perhaps I can develop some
tactical threats.
25 Nc5.
STEAN: I can change the queens, that
would be lovely, then queen the b-pawn.
If I play Qf5 his queen's got nowhere to
go. If he runs away to b3 I have a fork on
d2 with my knight.
25 Qf5.
BYRNE: Of course, he wants to exchange
queens: he's looking at that beautiful
passed pawn on the b-line, but I'm in no
position to stop him. His pieces are
controlling too many squares. The ending's
going to be bad for me. I'm not going to
be able to avoid an ending in the long run
so I might as well take it now and take
what tempi I can get.
26 Qxf5.
STEAN: That was forced. This endgame is
fantastic, the b-pawn almost queens by
force.
26 Rxf5.
Byrne did manage, in the course of the
following moves, to concoct a barrier to
the progress of the terrible pawn, but his
position still looked dreadful, with the
pawn u ~ t one square from queening.
27 Rfel Rff8 28 Nd7 Rxel + 29 Rxel Re8
30 Nc5 Kf7 31 Kfl N6a5 32 Ke2 b3
33 Kd3 b2 34 Ke3 Re8 35 Rbl Re2 36 Nd3.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e 9 h
White is now so tied up that the black
pieces just have to find something to do
and the game seems won. Having entered
the white position Stean's rook was
described, at the time of the game, as free
to roam while Byrne fiddled.
STEAN: Now I've nearly got him. He still
can't take the pawn on b2 because the
89
defence of that a-pawn. I know he's going
to be very happy if I try to get rid of that
pawn with a4 but if I want to play actively
at all I
'
ll just have to take my chances.
23 a4.
STEAN: / don't believe that
,
not for one
moment. What
'
s he trying to do to me? I
can just get a tremendous passed pawn
with b4. I don
'
t understand it.
23... M.
BYRNE: Now that the b-pawn is advanced,
his knight is not quite as sturdily protected
as it was. Perhaps I can get some
usefulness out of my knight.
24 Ne4.
STEAN: So that was his idea. I don't want
to take that knight. It's going to c5. Let's
move this rook: let
'
s go home.
24... Rff8.
BYRNE: What will getting that knight to a
better square do for my position? I'm worse
anyway but perhaps I can develop some
tactical threats.
25 Nc5.
STEAN: / can change the queens, that
would be lovely, then queen the b-pawn.
If I play Qf5 his queen's got nowhere to
go. If he runs away to 63 / have a fork on
d2 with my knight.
25.. . Qf5.
BYRNE: Of course, he wants to exchange
queens: he
'
s looking at that beautiful
passed pawn on the b-line, but I
'
m in no
position to stop him. His pieces are
controlling too many squares. The ending
'
s
going to be bad for me. I
'
m not going to
be able to avoid an ending in the long run
so I might as well take it now and take
what tempi I can get.
26 Qxf5.
STEAN: That was forced. This endgame is
fantastic, the b-pawn almost queens by
force.
26 . . . Rxf5.
Byrne did manage, in the course of the
following moves, to concoct a barrier to
the progress of the terrible pawn, but his
position still looked dreadful, with the
pawn just one square from queening.
27 Rfel Rff8 28 Nd7 Rxe1 + 29 Rxel Rc8
30 Nc5 Kf7 31 Kfl N6a5 32 Ke2 b3
33 Kd3 b2 34 Kc3 Re8 35 Rbl Re2 36 Nd3.
8
turn

y.
a
i
a b c d e f g h
White is now so tied up that the black
pieces just have to find something to do
and the game seems won. Having entered
the white position Stean's rook was
described, at the time of the game, as free
to roam while Byrne fiddled.
STEAN: Now I've nearly got him. He still
can
'
t take the pawn on b2 because the
89
bishop will hang. Now the knight on a5 is
doing nothing. I must improve it.
36 . .. Nc6.
BYRNE: I feel as though I've been
embraced by an octopus. Logically this
isn't going to be defended but perhaps I
can dig up a trap or two. I must at least try
to reduce the number of pieces that are
hanging. The first thing is that bishop. I
don't want to be forever defending it.
37 Bg3.
STEAN: He still wants to take my pawn on
b2, but I think I can sacrifice it.
37 ... as.
BYRNE: What a shame. I really didn't
expect him to do something silly such as
opening up the game with Rxg2, Nf4, Rd2,
Nxd5. I would have good counterplay, but
that's all water over the dam. I hardly have
any choice here. I see what his idea is but I
don't see what to do about it. I have
simply got to take off that dangerous
passed pawn, and when I do I'm going to
get into an awful pin, but I can't think of
anything else to do.
38 Nxb2 Re3+.
BYRNE: I can't play Kc2 here, because of
Na3 +, Kd2, Rb3 and I can't guard my
attacked rook without moving it away and
losing my knight. So I have to go into that
pin.
39 Nd3.
STEAN: Well, it's a nice pin but I don't yet
see how I'm winning. I don't see how he's
breaking the pin either. That's his problem.
39 ... Nb4 40 Rd1 Nb6.
BYRNE: That's it: tie him up and then look
90
for the groceries. Now Nxa4+; it's not just
a pawn he's threatening, but also to
separate my king from its protection of my
knight. I can't play Bf4, which I would like
to try to resolve the tension here, but then
comes Nxa4+, Kb3, Rxd3, I have to
exchange rooks, bringing his knight to d3,
and he attacks my bishop and I'm losing a
piece. There's only one thing I can do:
hope he'll give me some air if I play Rd2.
41 Rd2.
STEAN: That's not fair, he found a move.
Now I win a pawn but no more. Well, let's
take it and work the rest out later.
41 ... Nxa4+ 42 Kb3 Nb6 43 Kc3 g5
44 h4.
A really desperate thrust by Byrne, but
surprisingly it paid off.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e 9 h
STEAN: Oh he doesn't believe I'm
threatening g4. Well I think I am.
44 g4.
BYRNE: What's that? I was expecting he
would play h6 and just prevent me from
bishop will hang. Now the knight on a5 is
doing nothing. I must improve it.
36 . . . Nc6.
BYRNE: / feel as though I've been
embraced by an octopus. Logically this
isn't going to be defended but perhaps I
can dig up a trap or two. I must at least try
to reduce the number of pieces that are
hanging. The first thing is that bishop. I
don't want to be forever defending it.
37 Bg3.
STEAN: He sf/7/ wanfs fo take my pawn on
b2, but I think I can sacrifice it.
37 . . . a5.
BYRNE: What a shame. I really didn't
expect him to do something silly such as
opening up the game with Rxg2, Nf4, Rd2,
Nxd5. I would have good counterplay, but
that's all water over the dam. I hardly have
any choice here. I see what his idea is but I
don't see what to do about it. I have
simply got to take off that dangerous
passed pawn, and when I do I
'
m going to
get into an awful pin, but I can
'
t think of
anything else to do.
38 Nxb2 Re3+.
BYRNE: / can't play Kc2 here, because of
Na3+, Kd2, Rb3 and I can't guard my
attacked rook without moving it away and
losing my knight. So I have to go into that
pin.
39 Nd3.
STEAN: Well, it's a nice pin but I don't yet
see how I'm winning. I don
'
t see how he's
breaking the pin either. That's his problem.
39 . . . Nb4 40 Rdl Nb6.
BYRNE: That's it: tie him up and then look
for the groceries. Now Nxa4+; it's not just
a pawn he
'
s threatening, but also to
separate my king from its protection of my
knight. I can't play Bf4, which I would like
to try to resolve the tension here, but then
comes Nxa4+, Kb3, Rxd3, I have to
exchange rooks, bringing his knight to d3,
and he attacks my bishop and I
'
m losing a
piece. There
'
s only one thing I can do:
hope he'll give me some air if I play Rd2.
41 Rd2.
STEAN: That's not fair
,
he found a move.
Now I win a pawn but no more. Well, let's
take it and work the rest out later.
41 . . . Nxa4+ 42 Kb3 Nb6 43 Kc3 g5
44 h4.
A really desperate thrust by Byrne,
but
surprisingly it paid off.
8
A
1
abcdefgh
STEAN: Oh he doesn't believe I'm
threatening g4. Well I think I am.
44 . . . g4.
BYRNE: What's that? I was expecting he
would play h6 and just prevent me from
90
getting that bishop into play. I think g4 is a
weak move. I'm not sure I can draw this
ending, but at least I have a chance now to
finally break that pin. .
45 Bf4.
5TEAN: What's this? That's losing a piece. I
check on a4, he plays Kb3. I take on d3 -
stupid, the bishop on f4 defends the rook
on d2. Serves me right for being too clever.
Well, I've got to exchange.
45 .. Rxd3+.
50 forgetting that after 45 ... Na4+ 46 Kb3
Rxd3+ White is not forced to capture on
d3, but can just take the knight on a4.
5tean suddenly discovered that he has
thrown away his bind. The exchanges now
lead to an endgame which Byrne can just
hold.
46 Rxd3 Nxd3 47 Kxd3 gxf3 48 gxf3 Kg6.
Despite trying to tempt an error from
Byrne for many moves, Stean fi nally had to
give up any ideas of winning. After
suffering for so long in a miserable
position, the American was determined to
come back with half a point.
49 Kc3 Kf5 50 Bg5 h5 51 Kb3 Ke6
52 Ka3 Kd7 53 Kb3 Kd6 54 Bh6 Nc4
55 Ka4 Kc6 56 Bg5 Nd6 57 Kxa5 Nf5.
Black regains the pawn, but material is
now too reduced to permit any serious
winning attempt.
58 Kb4 Nxd4 59 f4 Nf5 60 Bd8 Kd7
61 Bg5 Kd6 62 Bf6 Ke6 63 Bg5 Kd6
64 Bd8 Nd4 65 Bg5 Nc6+ 66 Kb5 Nd4+
67 Kb4 Nf5 68 Bd8 INg3 69 Bb6 Ke6
70 Kc5 Ne+ 71 Kd4 Nd6 72 Kc5
draw agreed.
Game 24:
Robert Byrne - Viktor Korchnoi
French Defence
After the first-round disaster against
Schmid, Korchnoi really showed his class
in this game. Keeping complete control of
a very complex position, he first defended
against Byrne's attacking intentions, then
gradually went on to a full-scale offensive.
A most impressive victory to keep alive
Korchnoi's interest in the tournament.
1 e4 e6 2 d4 d5 3 Nc3 Bb4 4 e5 c5
5 a3 Bxc3+ 6 bxc3 Ne7.
This French Defence variation was a
favourite of World Champion Botvinnik,
but now Korchnoi is its leading exponent.
Conceding the bishop pair, Black obtains
active play against the doubled c-pawns
and down the c-file. White's sharpest reply
is 7 Qg4, but Byrne prefers a more
positional approach.
7 Nf3 Qa5 8 Bd2 Nc6 9 Bd3 c4.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
a bed e 9 h
BYRNE: Be2 is orthodox here, but in some
earlier games I have experimented with
getting that bishop into play. I think g4 is a
weak move. I
'
m not sure I can draw this
ending, but at least I have a chance now to
finally break that pin.
45 Bf4.
STEAN: What's this? That's losing a piece. I
check on a4, he plays Kb3. I take on d3 -
stupid, the bishop on f4 defends the rook
on d2. Serves me right for being too clever.
Well, I've got to exchange.
45 . . . Rxd3+.
So forgetting that after 45 . . . Na4+ 46 Kb3
Rxd3+ White is not forced to capture on
d3, but can just take the knight on a4.
Stean suddenly discovered that he has
thrown away his bind. The exchanges now
lead to an endgame which Byrne can just
hold.
46Rxd3Nxd3 47 Kxd3 gxfS 48 gxf3 Kg6.
Despite trying to tempt an error from
Byrne for many moves, Stean finally had to
give up any ideas of winning. After
suffering for so long in a miserable
position, the American was determined to
come back with half a point.
49 Kc3 Kf5 50 Bg5 h5 51 Kb3 Ke6
52 Ka3 Kd7 53 Kb3 Kd6 54 Bh6 Nc4
55 Ka4 Kc6 56 Bg5 Nd6 57 Kxa5 Nf5.
Black regains the pawn, but material is
now too reduced to permit any serious
winning attempt.
58 Kb4 Nxd4 59 f4 Nf5 60 Bd8 Kd7
61 Bg5 KdB 62 Bf6 KeB 63 Bg5 KdB
64 Bd8 Nd4 65 Bg5 Nc6+ 66 Kb5 Nd4+
67 Kb4 Nf5 68 Bd8 |Ng3 69 BbB KeB
70 Kc5 Ne+ 71 Kd4 NdB 72 Kc5
draw agreed.
Game 24:
Robert Byrne - Viktor Korchnoi
French Defence
After the first-round disaster against
Schmid, Korchnoi really showed his class
in this game. Keeping complete control of
a very complex position, he first defended
against Byrne
'
s attacking intentions, then
gradually went on to a full-scale offensive.
A most impressive victory to keep alive
Korchnoi's interest in the tournament.
1 e4 eB 2 d4 d5 3 Nc3 Bb4 4 e5 c5
5 a3 Bxc3+ 6 bxc3 Ne7.
This French Defence variation was a
favourite of World Champion Botvinnik,
but now Korchnoi is its leading exponent.
Conceding the bishop pair. Black obtains
active play against the doubled c-pawns
and down the c-file. White
'
s sharpest reply
is 7 Qg4, but Byrne prefers a more
positional approach.
7 Nf3 Qa5 8 Bd2 Nc6 9 Bd3 c4.
8
i
a b c d e f g h
BYRNE: Be2 is orthodox here, but in some
earlier games I have experimented with
Bf1. It looks strange to undevelop like that
I know, but often the bishop is better
placed at g2 or h3.
10 Bf1.
KORCHNOI: Now if I play Bd7 with the
idea to castle long, he'll play Ng5. It
doesn't allow me to finish my development
without making new weaknesses. I can try
now f6, it looks dangerous a bit but my
tournament situation is so difficult I
shouldn't be afraid of difficulties.
10 ... f6 11 exffi gxf6 12 Nh4.
White now has the threat of 13 QhS+ and
12 ... Ng6 is still met by 13 QhS. The
black king has no choice but to castle
short, however exposed it may seem there.
12 ... 0-0 13 g3 Rf7 14 Bg2 Bd7
15 0-0 Ng6 16 Nxg6 hxg6 17 h4.
Byrne's attack begins to look dangerous.
His plan is to break open the K-side with
hS.
KORCHNOI: Yes, his position is clearly
better: his king is better protected and he
has the two bishops. They don't play right
now but sooner or later the position will
get open. I have to prevent by all means
opening the position. First Rh7 against h5.
17 . .. Rh7.
BYRNE: I knew I could not expect it to be
so easy to play h5. How can I continue my
attack? Qg4 is just a blow in the air: he can
play Kg7 or Kf7 and eventually my queen is
going to have to get out of the line of that
bishop on d7. I think I will settle for more
mobility first, bring my rook into action.
1B Re1 ReB 19 Qf3 Kg7 20 Bf4.
KORCHNOI: I have to play carefully to
92
protect my black squares on the K-side.
Eventually the bishop can inflict me much
harm.
20 . .. NdB.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e 9 h
BYRNE: That's a good move: it's going to
make possible a very stubborn defence. He
obviously intends to go to f7 with the
knight, it covers all the major squares d6,
e5, g5 and h6, that my bishop bears down
on. I will mobilise a rook, perhaps I can
put some pressure later on the e-line.
21 Re2 Nf7.
BYRNE: It's always a problem, every time I
played this line I found the same thing. It
looks at times as though in this opening
both sides get stuck in a sticky pudding
after about fifteen moves. I wish I had a
marvellous plan that I could just go into
carefree, but I don't see anything obvious.
I'm not ready to play Rael. Viktor takes
pawns, you can't just give them away
blithely, and he'd eat the a-pawn if I were
to double on the e-line without a positive
result. My queen is not free. It's taken over
Bf1. It looks strange to undevelop like that
I know, but often the bishop is better
placed at g2 or h3.
10 Bfl.
KORCHNOI: Now if I play Bd7 with the
idea to castle long, he'll play Ng5. It
doesn't allow me to finish my development
without making new weaknesses. I can try
now f6, it looks dangerous a bit but my
tournament situation is so difficult I
shouldn
'
t be afraid of difficulties.
10 . . . f6 11 exffi gxf6 12 Nh4.
White now has the threat of 13 Qh5+ and
12 . . . Ng6 is still met by 13 Qh5. The
black king has no choice but to castle
short, however exposed it may seem there.
12 . . . 0-0 13 g3 Rf7 14 Bg2 Bd7
15 0-0 Ng6 16 Nxg6 hxg6 17 h4.
Byrne's attack begins to look dangerous.
His plan is to break open the K-side with
h5.
KORCHNOI: Ves, his position is clearly
better: his king is better protected and he
has the two bishops. They don't play right
now but sooner or later the position will
get open. I have to prevent by all means
opening the position. First Rh7 against h5.
17 . . . Rh7.
BYRNE: / knew I could not expect it to be
so easy to play h5. How can I continue my
attack? Qg4 is just a blow in the air: he can
play Kg7 or Kf7 and eventually my queen is
going to have to get out of the line of that
bishop on d7. I think I will settle for more
mobility first, bring my rook into action.
18 Rel Re8 19 Qf3 Kg7 20 Bf4.
KORCHNOI: / have to play carefully to
protect my black squares on the K-side.
Eventually the bishop can inflict me much
harm.
20 . . . Nd8.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
BYRNE: That's a good move: it's going to
make possible a very stubborn defence. He
obviously intends to go to f7 with the
knight, it covers all the major squares d6,
e5, g5 and h6, that my bishop bears down
on. I will mobilise a rook, perhaps I can
put some pressure later on the e-line.
21 Re2 Nf7.
BYRNE: It's always a problem, every time I
played this line I found the same thing. It
looks at times as though in this opening
both sides get stuck in a sticky pudding
after about fifteen moves. I wish I had a
marvellous plan that I could just go into
carefree, but I don
'
t see anything obvious.
I
'
m not ready to play Rael. Viktor takes
pawns, you can
'
t just give them away
blithely, and he'd eat the a-pawn if I were
to double on the e-line without a positive
result. My queen is not free. It
'
s taken over
a b c d e f
9
92
the bishop's function guarding the c-pawn,
but I want to be able to do something with
it. I still can't find a clear plan. I'm going to
try to reorganise my pieces and see what
turns up. I hate to admit my last move was
a lost tempo, but I'm going to play Re3.
Perhaps I can bring the queen behind the
rook without having to sacrifice the
a-pawn, and bring some pressure to bear
on his e-pawn.
22 Re3 Rhh8 23 Qe2.
KORCHNOI: Maybe he can do nothing
because his pawn on c3 is not protected. I
will try Bc6. What is he doing now?
23 Bc6.
BYRNE: Oh that's an aggressive move. I
can't take the e6 pawn: he can exchange
on e6 and take my c3-pawn. My whole
pawn position comes apart. Maybe I'm
going to have to use that other rook on the
e-line after all. Very well, I'll make room for
it.
24 Qd2.
Having consolidated his defences,
Korchnoi now moved surely on to the
attack.
24 Re7 25 Re2 Rhe8 26 g4 e5.
This long-prepared advance secures Black's
advantage. Byrne finally succeeds in
gaining the black squares by advancing his
own pawn to g5, but Korchnoi's white
squares look more impressive.
27 Bg3 e4 28 g5 fxg5 29 hxg5 Bd7
30 Bf4 Bg4 31 Re3 Qa6.
The queen has spent more than twenty
moves tieing White to the defence of his
Q-side pawns. Now at last she moves for
decisive action on the other wing.
32 Rg3 Qe6 33 Qe3 Qf5 34 Kf1 Rh8
35 Ke1 Bf3.
This move marks the beginning of the end
for White. 36 Bxf3 exf3 37 Qxe7 Rh1 +
38 Kd2 Qxf4+ would lose a piece. Byrne
continues to run with his king but his
pieces have lost all semblance of
coordination.
36 Kd2 Rh4 37 Bb8 Bxg2 38 Rxg2 Rh3
39 Rg3 Rxg3 40 Qxg3 Nxg5.
Finally this important pawn falls and the
knight joins the attack. The immediate
threat is 41 ... e3+.
41 Kc1 Nf3 42 Bxa7 Qg5+.
A simple solution, the endgame is
miserable for White.
43 Qxg5 Nxg5 44 Bb8 Rf7.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e 9 h
BYRNE: I don't really have any defence. I
am just giving him a chance to show his
technique. If I play Bg3 here, that doesn't
stop him: he plays e3, fxe3, Rf1 +, Kb2, he
exchanges rooks, plays Ne4 and my extra
e-pawn is meaningless while he queens his
93
the bishop's function guarding the c-pawn,
but I want to be able to do something with
it. I still can't find a clear plan. I'm going to
try to reorganise my pieces and see what
turns up. I hate to admit my last move was
a lost tempo, but I
'
m going to play Re3.
Perhaps I can bring the queen behind the
rook without having to sacrifice the
a
-pawn, and bring some pressure to bear
on his e-pawn.
22 Re3 Rhh8 23 Qe2.
KORCHNOI: Maybe he can do nothing
because his pawn on c3 is not protected. I
will try Bc6. What is he doing now?
23 . . . Bc6.
BYRNE: Oh that's an aggressive move. I
can
'
t take the e6 pawn: he can exchange
on e6 and take my c3-pawn. My whole
pawn position comes apart. Maybe I
'
m
going to have to use that other rook on the
e-line after all
.
Very well, I'll make room for
it.
24 Qd2.
Having consolidated his defences,
Korchnoi now moved surely on to the
attack.
24 . . . Re7 25 Re2 Rhe8 26 g4 e5.
This long-prepared advance secures Black's
advantage. Byrne finally succeeds in
gaining the black squares by advancing his
own pawn to g5, but Korchnoi
'
s white
squares look more impressive.
27 Bg3 e4 28 g5 fxg5 29 hxg5 Bd7
30 Bf4 Bg4 31 Re3 Qa6.
The queen has spent more than twenty
moves tieing White to the defence of his
Q-side pawns
.
Now at last she moves for
decisive action on the other wing.
32 Rg3 Qe6 33 Qe3 Qf5 34 Kfl Rh8
35 Kel Bf3.
This move marks the beginning of the end
for White. 36 Bxf3 exf3 37 Qxe7 Rh1 +
38 Kd2 Qxf4+ would lose a piece. Byrne
continues to run with his king but his
pieces have lost all semblance of
coordination.
36 Kd2 Rh4 37 Bb8 Bxg2 38 Rxg2 Rh3
39 Rg3 Rxg3 40 Qxg3 Nxg5.
Finally this important pawn falls and the
knight joins the attack. The immediate
threat is 41 . . . e3+.
41 Kcl Nf3 42 Bxa7 Qg5+.
A simple solution, the endgame is
miserable for White.
43 Qxg5 Nxg5 44 Bb8 Rf7.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
BYRNE: / don't really have any defence. I
am just giving him a chance to show his
technique. If I play Bg3 here, that doesn't
stop him: he plays 63, fxe3, Rf1+, Kb2, he
exchanges rooks, plays Ne4 and my extra
e
-pawn is meaningless while he queens his
a b c d e f
9
93
g-pawn. Whatever I do I've got to get my
rook into the game.
45 Rb1.
KORCHNOI: He missed his chance: BeS+
was much stronger. After Kh6 he could play
Kb2 threatening to check and nearly mate
from h1. Now I have my chance, e3, and if
he takes on e3 I exchange rooks.
45 . e3.
BYRNE: He can still carry on that plan. It
really isn't useful going on any further here
but 1'1/ playa few moves.
46 f4 Ne4 47 Kb2 g5.
BYRNE: That's even faster than I thought.
Well, I can't permit him to take another
pawn. I have to exchange even though that
opens a line for his rook.
48 fxg5 e2 49 Re1.
KORCHNOI: Yes, after BeS+, Kg6, Bf6 I
would have won by one tempo with NxgS.
Now it is much easier.
49 . Rf2.
BYRNE: This is just impossible, he can take
his good sweet time playing Kg6, KxgS,
Kg4, lf3 and Kd2 if he likes; or even Nd2
to f3. No, I can't continue.
White resigned.
Game 25: \j
Michael Stean - Lothar Schmid
English Opening
A game in which the history of the first
round repeated itself. Once again Stean
established a winning position by fine
94
positional play, but as against Byrne he
allowed his opponent to escape. As in his
game against Korchnoi, Schmid offered a
draw, Stean followed the recipe by
declining and, like Korchnoi, went on to
regret it.
1 c4.
SCHMID: Chess is not a joke; indeed it
can be hard work, but today is such a
lovely day, fine weather and I've purchased
a few old lovely chess sets. I feel in the
mood to playa foolish game.
1 c5 2 Nf3 g6.
STEAN: Now we get some line of the
Sicilian Defence. I can play d4 or e4 first. It
makes no difference. I'll play d4.
3 d4.
SCHMID: He could have played e4. I
remember a book of Professor Becker
written about fifty years ago, I think in '29,
and he said it is more correct to play e4
because now Black can try to equalise in
another way. I'll try it.
3 . cxd4 4 Nxd4 Nf6.
STEAN: Interesting, normally they play Bg7
and Nc6. I wonder what he has in mind.
5 Nc3.
SCHMID: Here to be consistent I have to
try that line, dS instead of Bg7. Let's see
what happens.
5 ... d5.
STEAN: That looks fishy. I'm ahead in
and he wants to open the
position. Nf3 is interesting, strange move,
but not bad. But I like BgS, it's natural.
6 Bg5.
g-pawn
.
Whatever I do I've got to get my
rook into the game.
45 Rbl.
KORCHNOI: He m;ssed his chance: Be5+
was much stronger. After Kh6 he could play
Kb2 threatening to check and nearly mate
from hi. Now I have my chance, e3, and if
he takes on e3 I exchange rooks.
45 . . . e3.
BYRNE: He can still carry on that plan. It
really isn
'
t useful going on any further here
but I'll play a few moves.
46 f4 Ne4 47 Kb2 g5.
BYRNE: That's even faster than I thought.
Well, I can't permit him to take another
pawn. I have to exchange even though that
opens a line for his rook.
48 fxg5 e2 49 Rel.
KORCHNOI: Yes
, after Be5+, Kg6, Bf6 I
would have won by one tempo with Nxg5.
Now it is much easier.
49 . . . Rf2.
BYRNE: This is just impossible,
he can take
his good sweet time playing Kg6, Kxg5,
Kg4, Kf3 and Kd2 if he likes; or even Nd2
to f3. No, I can't continue.
White resigned.
Game 25: v
Michael Stean - Lothar Schmid
English Opening
A game in which the history of the first
round repeated itself. Once again Stean
established a winning position by fine
positional play, but as against Byrne he
allowed his opponent to escape. As in his
game against Korchnoi, Schmid offered a
draw, Stean followed the recipe by
declining and, like Korchnoi,
went on to
regret it.
1 c4.
SCHMID: Chess is not a joke; indeed it
can be hard work, but today is such a
lovely day, fine weather and I've purchased
a few old lovely chess sets. I feel in the
mood to play a foolish game.
1 . . . c5 2 Nf3 g6.
STEAN: Now we get some line of the
Sicilian Defence. I can play d4 or e4 first. It
makes no difference. I
'
ll play d4.
3 d4.
SCHMID: He could have played e4. I
remember a book of Professor Becker
written about fifty years ago, I think in
'
29,
and he said it is more correct to play e4
because now Black can try to equalise in
another way. I
'
ll try it.
3 . . . cxd4 4 Nxd4 Nf6.
STEAN: Interesting, normally they play Bg7
and Nc6. I wonder what he has in mind.
5 Nc3.
SCHMID: Here to be consistent I have to
try that line, d5 instead of Bg7. Let's see
what happens.
5 . . . d5.
STEAN: That looks fishy. I'm ahead in
development and he wants to open the
position. Nf3 is interesting, strange move,
but not bad. But I like Bg5, it's natural.
6Bg5.
94
SCHMID: Now I have two possibilities:
either to take the pawn on c4, which is
certainly the solid way to play, but as I told
myself I have my foolish day. 1'1/ try the
other move which is not quite sound, but
perhaps just playable.
6 . Ne4 7 Nxe4 dxe4 8 NbS.
This strong move must have left Schmid
doubting the wisdom of his choice of
opening variation. After 8 ... Bd7 or
8 ... Nd7 White wins the queen with
9 Nd6+. Black's only alternative is to
submit to an uncomfortable exchange of
queens.
8 ... Bg7 9 Qxd8+ Kxd8 100-0-0+ Nd7
11 Be3 b6 12 g3
Stean quietly completes the development
of his pieces, leaving Black tangled up and
faced with the problem of meeting the
ever-growing pressure against his position.
12 ... Ba6 13 Bg2 Re8 14 Kbl Rxe4 15 b3.
A move which Schmid appeared to have
underestimated. Instead 15 Nxa7 Ke8
would not have been bad for Black. Now
15 ... Rb4 16 Nd4 leaves the black rook
trapped. '
15 ... Re6 16 Nxa7 Rd6 17 Bxe4 Bxe2
18 Rxd6 exd6 19 Rel.
The exchanges have left Black alive, but his
d6-pawn is weak and White's pieces
remain far more effective.
19 ... Ba6 20 Ne6+ Ke7 21 Nb4 Bb7
22 Bxb7 Kxb7.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e f 9 h
STEAN: He's short of time and I stand
better. Maybe I have a forced win here. If I
play Rd1, he can play Be5, f4, Bc3: not
clear. But I can use my rook on the e-file
maybe. Move the bishop on e3, I know the
best square, he won't expect this one.
23 Bel.
SCHMID: Now he's threatening Re7
winning a pawn. I have to defend these
squares. The best might be to get the king
into the centre again and cover my knight.
23 ... Ke7.
STEAN: Oh, he's let the rook to the
seventh and then he plays RfB. I must be
able to do something then. No time to
think.
24 Re7.
SCHMID: Now my f-pawn is attacked. I
have to cover it and then I should try to
put the rook out of my house. I think there
is a good chance to do so.
24 . .. RfB.
STEAN: My God, it looks like Custer's last
stand. How do I get through? I have no
95
SCHMID: Now I have two possibilities:
either to take the pawn on c4, which is
certainly the solid way to play, but as I told
myself I have my foolish day. I
'
ll try the
other move which is not quite sound, but
perhaps just playable.
6 . . . Ne4 7 Nxe4 dxe4 8 Nb5.
This strong move must have left Schmid
doubting the wisdom of his choice of
opening variation. After 8 . . . Bd7 or
8 . . . Nd7 White wins the queen with
9 Nd6+. Black's only alternative is to
submit to an uncomfortable exchange of
queens.
8 . . . Bg7 9 Qxd8+ Kxd8 10 0-0-0+ Nd7
11 Be3 b6 12 g3
Stean quietly completes the development
of his pieces, leaving Black tangled up and
faced with the problem of meeting the
ever-growing pressure against his position.
12 . . . Ba6 13 Bg2 Rc8 14 Kbl Rxc4 15 b3.
A move which Schmid appeared to have
underestimated. Instead 15 Nxa7 Ke8
would not have been bad for Black. Now
15 . . . Rb4 16 Nd4 leaves the black rook
trapped.'
15 . . . Rc6 16 Nxa7 Rd6 17 Bxe4 Bxe2
18 Rxd6 exd6 19 Rel.
The exchanges have left Black alive,
but his
d6-pawn is weak and White's pieces
remain far more effective.
19 . . . Ba6 20 Nc6+ Kc7 21 Nb4 Bb7
22 Bxb7 Kxb7.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
STEAN: He's short of time and I stand
better. Maybe I have a forced win here. If I
play Rdl, he can play Be5, f4, Bc3: not
clear. But I can use my rook on the e-file
maybe. Move the bishop on e3, I know the
best square, he won't expect this one.
23 Bel.
SCHMID: Now he's threatening Re7
winning a pawn. I have to defend these
squares. The best might be to get the king
into the centre again and cover my knight.
23 . . . Kc7.
STEAN: Oh, he's let the rook to the
seventh and then he plays Rf8. I must be
able to do something then. No time to
think.
24 Re7.
SCHMID: Now my f-pawn is attacked. I
have to cover it and then I should try to
put the rook out of my house. I think there
is a good chance to do so.
24 . . . RfB.
STEAN: My Cod, it looks like Custer's last
stand. How do I get through? I have no
A
e
95
threats, but neither does he. He can't play
Bf6 because I play Nd5 +, take on d7 and
take on f6. He can't play Be5 because I
play Bh6. So he's got no moves here. I play
Bf4, that looks right.
2S Bf4.
But after Schmid's next move, it became
apparent that Stean's play had been
over-optimistic. Instead of playing the rook
to e7, he would have been better advised
to play the position technically, putting the
rook on d1 and knight on d5, then pushing
the Q-side pawns.
25 hS.
This fine defensive resource had been
completely overlooked by Stean. The idea
is to play Be5, hemming in the white rook.
25 ... Be5 immediately would have lost to
26 Bh6 when the black rook must leave its
defence of f7. After h5 has been played,
White's Bh6 is met by Rh8 attacking the
bishop.
26 Nd3 Bf6 27 Re2 NeS 28 Nb4 Kd7
29 NdS Bd8 30 f3 gS.
With this move, Schmid begins to obtain
counterplay on the K-side. He now offered
a draw which Stean, still hoping to take
advantage of his useful Q-side pawns,
declined. The next ten moves were played
under time pressure by both sides.
31 Bd2 Ke6 32 Nb4+ Kd7 33 Ke2 fS
34 h3 g4.
Fine energetic play by Schmid, creating a
weakness at g3.
3S hxg4 hxg4 36 fxg4 fxg4 37 Rh2 Rf3
38 Bf4 Ne4 39 Rh7 + Ke6 40 Rh6+ Bf6.
96
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
a bed e 9 h
STEAN: What have I been doing with my
position? I should have taken a draw. I'm
worse now, the pawn on g3 is attacked.
Nd3 is the only chance.
41 Nd3.
SCHMID: That is a real trap. I can take the
g-pawn but there is a fork in it. However, I
think it doesn't work.
41 . Nxg3 42 Bxg3 Rxg3.
STEAN: Now I give him a check. Maybe
he'll go to the wrong square.
43 Nf4+.
SCHMID: How tricky. I can't play Kf5
because he would take my bishop with
check and then, if I retake, the knight
gives a terrible fork on h5 winning my
rook. No, there's only one move which is
good.
43 .. KeS.
STEAN: Now my last chance: Rxf6.
44 Rxf6.
SCHMID: And of course not to take the
rook, but Rf3 and his knight is in a pin.
threats, but neither does he. He can't play
Bf6 because I play Nd5+, take on d7 and
take on f6. He can't play Be5 because I
play Bh6. So he
'
s got no moves here. I play
Bf4, that looks right.
25 Bf4.
But after Schmid's next move
,
it became
apparent that Stean
'
s play had been
over-optimistic. Instead of playing the rook
to e7, he would have been better advised
to play the position technically, putting the
rook on dl and knight on d5, then pushing
the Q-side pawns.
25 . . . h5.
This fine defensive resource had been
completely overlooked by Stean. The idea
is to play Be5, hemming in the white rook.
25 . . . Be5 immediately would have lost to
26 Bh6 when the black rook must leave its
defence of f7. After h5 has been played,
White's Bh6 is met by Rh8 attacking the
bishop.
26 Nd3 Bf6 27 Re2 Nc5 28 Nb4 Kd7
29 Nd5 Bd8 30 f3 g5.
With this move, Schmid begins to obtain
counterplay on the K-side. He now offered
a draw which Stean, still hoping to take
advantage of his useful Q-side pawns,
declined. The next ten moves were played
under time pressure by both sides.
31 Bd2 Kc6 32 Nb4+ Kd7 33 Kc2 f5
34 h3 g4.
Fine energetic play by Schmid, creating a
weakness at g3.
35 hxg4 hxg4 36 fxg4 fxg4 37 Rh2 Rf3
38 Bf4 Ne4 39 Rh7+ Ke6 40 Rh6+ Bf6.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
STEAN: What have I been doing with my
position? I should have taken a draw. I
'
m
worse now, the pawn on g3 is attacked.
Nd3 is the only chance.
41 Nd3.
SCHMID: That is a real trap. I can take the
g-pawn but there is a fork in it
.
However, I
think it doesn't work.
41 . . . NxgS 42 BxgS RxgS.
STEAN: Now I give him a check. Maybe
he'll go to the wrong square.
43 Nf4+.
SCHMID: How tricky. I can't play Kf5
because he would take my bishop with
check and then, if I retake, the knight
gives a terrible fork on h5 winning my
rook. No, there
'
s only one move which is
good.
43 . . . Ke5.
STEAN: Now my last chance: Rxf6.
44 Rxf6.
SCHMID: And of course not to take the
rook, but Rf3 and his knight is in a pin.
1
a
f
9
96
44 Rf3 45 Re6+ Kxf4.
Having successfully traversed the
complications arising from his taking the
g-pawn, Schmid is now clearly winning,
thanks to his powerful passed pawn. The
rest is a matter of simple counting.
46 Rxd6 g3 47 Rf6+ Ke3 48 Rxb6 g2
49 Rg6 Kf2 SO Rxg2+ Kxg2.
Now Black wins simply because the white
king cannot advance to support the pawns.
S1 a4 Kg3 S2 as Kf4 S3 a6 KeS 54 Resigns.
After 54 a7 RfB Black picks off the pawns
with king and rook.
Game 26:
Viktor Korchnoi - Michael Stean
English Opening
After spending so many months as a
member of Korchnoi's analytical team
during the World Championship match in
Baguio City, Stean seemed to find great
difficulty in actually playing against him.
Trying to play something slightly out of the
ordinary, the English grandmaster only
succeeded in misplacing his pieces.
Korchnoi's attack crushed through with
surprising rapidity.
1 c4 Nf6 2 Nc3 eS 3 Nf3 Nc6 4 d3 g6
S g3 Bg7 6 Bg2 0-0 7 0-0 Re8.
Already an unusual move from Stean.
Normally Black plays 7 ... d6, but here he
keeps open the option of a less closed
game with d5.
8 Rb1 as 9 a3 dS.
KORCHNOI: My partner today doesn't play
consistently. If he wanted to play d5, that
would be better when the pawns were on
a2 and al. Then if I take twice on d5 he
would attack the pawn on a2. Strange, well
I must take.
10 cxdS NxdS 11 NxdS QxdS 12 Be3.
STEAN: Now my queen must go
somewhere. I obviously can't leave it on
d5. Well Qd6 is very normal, but I want to
play something inventive today. The queen
could go to b5; strange square but it stops
his queen coming out to b3 or a4.
12 ... QbS 13 Qc2 BfS.
Another rather exotic move: normally the
bishop prefers d7 or e6 in such positions.
Now Korchnoi already begins to think
about winning the game by forced means.
8

7
ifl

_ill
.....
6

_1
5
--
_ ... -

4
- - -
3

:",.".
2


X
abc d e 9 h
KORCHNOI: Now I can play a4; he cannot
then play Qb4 or I win a piece: 8c5, Qg4;
h3, Qh5; g4. Or I play a4, he plays Nb4, I
take on cl, he takes on a4 with the queen,
I play Ng5 attacking two pawns and win a
pawn. On the other hand a4 gives him a
square on b4 for the knight, not right now
97
44 . . . Rf3 45 Re6+ Kxf4.
Having successfully traversed the
complications arising from his taking the
g-pawn,
Schmid is now clearly winning,
thanks to his powerful passed pawn. The
rest is a matter of simple counting.
46 Rxd6 g3 47 Rf6+ Ke3 48 Rxb6 g2
49 Rg6 Kf2 50 Rxg2+ Kxg2.
Now Black wins simply because the white
king cannot advance to support the pawns.
51 a4 Kg3 52 a5 Kf4 53 a6 Ke5 54 Resigns.
After 54 a7 Rf8 Black picks off the pawns
with king and rook.
Game 26:
Viktor Korchnoi - Michael Stean
English Opening
After spending so many months as a
member of Korchnoi
'
s analytical team
during the World Championship match in
Baguio City, Stean seemed to find great
difficulty in actually playing against him.
Trying to play something slightly out of the
ordinary, the English grandmaster only
succeeded in misplacing his pieces.
Korchnoi's attack crushed through with
surprising rapidity.
1 c4 Nf6 2 Nc3 e5 3 Nf3 Nc6 4 d3 g6
5 g3 Bg7 6 Bg2 0-0 7 0-0 Re8.
Already an unusual move from Stean.
Normally Black plays 7 . . . d6, but here he
keeps open the option of a less closed
game with d5.
8 Rbl a5 9 a3 d5.
KORCHNOI: My partner today doesn't play
consistently. If he wanted to play d5, that
would be better when the pawns were on
a2 and a7. Then if I take twice on d5 he
would attack the pawn on a2. Strange, well
I must take.
10 cxd5 Nxd5 11 Nxd5 Qxd5 12 Be3.
STEAN: Now my queen must go
somewhere. I obviously can
'
t leave it on
d5. Well Qd6 is very normal, but I want to
play something inventive today. The queen
could go to b5; strange square but it stops
his queen coming out to b3 or a4.
12 . . . Qb5 13 Qc2 Bf5.
Another rather exotic move: normally the
bishop prefers d7 or e6 in such positions.
Now Korchnoi already begins to think
about winning the game by forced means.
8
6
A
IP
1
abcdefgh
KORCHNOI: Now / can play a4; he cannot
then play Qb4 or I win a piece: Bc5, Qg4;
h3, Qh5; g4. Or I play a4f he plays Nb4, I
take on c7, he takes on a4 with the queen,
I play Ng5 attacking two pawns and win a
pawn. On the other hand a4 gives him a
square on b4 for the knight, not right now
97
but later. Maybe I have another way to
obtain the advantage: NgS and what is he
doing? The pressure on the Q-side is
irresistible.
14 Ng5.
STEAN: Viktor's the kind of player who
might just want to take my knight on c6
and double my pawns, but I'm not
frightened of that. Anyway I must kick his
knight because I want to play Nd4 in some
moments and when he takes on c7 I
certainly don't want him to be attacking f7.
14 h6 15 Ne4.
STEAN: I start to feel uncomfortable
because I'm not getting Nd4 in and I know
these positions: when you can't play Nd4
you get into trouble. I'm not quite sure
what to do here. Develop something.
15 Rad8.
KORCHNOI: That's a horrible mistake, it
was his last chance to play Nd4. Now I
have two possibilities to win. One is Nc3,
Qa6; NdS, rook somewhere protecting c7;
b4 and I threaten to win a piece by bS.
Horrible position. There is another way, a4.
What's stronger? Nc3 and NdS I win slowly,
but after a4, well I win quickly, a pawn at
least.
16 a4.
STEAN: He's attacking my queen, where
do I move it? If I go to b4 he has BcS, I
must play Nd4, he takes on b4, I take on
c2, he takes on as. Oh I'm losing too
much. Well, only one move.
16 Nb4.
Note that 16 ... Qa6 would have been
met by 17 Nc5 followed by Nxb7
destroying the support of the knight on c6.
98
KORCHNOI: I can play Qb3, or Qd1, or I
can take on bS, Nxc2, Rfc1 with strong
pressure. Or I can play Qd2, Qxa4, Bxh6. I
don't like the position when there are
several ways to win. If Qb3, Qc6, Rc1 he
has Be6 or Qe6. If Qd1, Qd7; NcS, Qe 7;
Nxb7, e4; oh he's sacrificing everything.
What to choose? I like Qd1.
17 Qd1.
STEAN: Typical Viktor. How to get my
queen out of this mess? Well, Qd7, NcS,
Qe7, Nxb7 and now if I want to get any
play I must play e4. For the exchange and a
pawn I start playing at last, but it's too
much. What's the minimum I'm going to
iose in this position? Qc6 looks very
strange but what to do?
17 .. Qe6.
KORCHNOI: Now I can play NcS, then he
plays e4 or NdS temporarily protecting all
his pawns. No, one intermezzo.
18 Re1.
STEAN: I was hoping for NcS. Now I must
give up the queen, she has no square
again. If I go away he plays NcS winning
everything. Maybe I can resist a bit.
18 ... Bxe4 19 Rxe6 Bxe6.
(see diagram opposite)
but later. Maybe I have another way to
obtain the advantage: Ng5 and what is he
doing? The pressure on the Q-side is
irresistible.
14 Ng5.
STEAN: Viktor's the kind of player who
might just want to take my knight on c6
and double my pawns, but I
'
m not
frightened of that. Anyway I must kick his
knight because I want to play Nd4 in some
moments and when he takes on c7 /
certainly don
'
t want him to be attacking f7.
14 . . . h6 15 Ne4.
STEAN: / start to feel uncomfortable
because I'm not getting Nd4 in and I know
these positions: when you can't play Nd4
you get into trouble. I
'
m not quite sure
what to do here. Develop something.
15 . . . Rad8.
KORCHNOI: That's a horrible mistake
,
it
was his last chance to play Nd4. Now I
have two possibilities to win. One is Nc3,
Qa6; Nd5, rook somewhere protecting c7;
64 and I threaten to win a piece by 65.
Horrible position. There is another way, a4.
What's stronger? Nc3 and Nd5 I win slowly,
but after a4, well I win quickly, a pawn at
least.
16 a4.
STEAN: He's attacking my queen,
where
do I move it? If I go to 64 he has Bc5, I
must play Nd4, he takes on 64, / take on
c2, he takes on a5. Oh I
'
m losing too
much. Well, only one move.
16 . . . Nb4.
Note that 16 . . . Qa6 would have been
met by 17 Nc5 followed by Nxb7
destroying the support of the knight on c6.
KORCHNOI: / can play Qb3, or Qdl, or I
can take on 65, Nxc2, Rfcl with strong
pressure. Or I can play Qd2, Qxa4, 6x66. /
don't like the position when there are
several ways to win. If Qb3, Qc6,
Rcl he
has Be6 or Qe6. If Qdl, Qd7; Nc5, Qe7;
Nxb7, e4; oh he's sacrificing everything.
What to choose? I like Qdl.
17 Qdl.
STEAN: Typical Viktor. How to get my
queen out of this mess? Well, Qd7, Nc5,
Qe7, Nxb7 and now if I want to get any
play I must play e4. For the exchange and a
pawn I start playing at last, but it's too
much. What
'
s the minimum I
'
m going to
lose in this position? Qc6 looks very
strange but what to do?
17 . . . Qc6.
KORCHNOI: Now I can play Nc5,
then he
plays e4 or Nd5 temporarily protecting all
his pawns. No, one intermezzo.
18 Rcl.
STEAN: / was hoping for Nc5. Now I must
give up the queen, she has no square
again. If I go away he plays Nc5 winning
everything. Maybe I can resist a bit.
18 . . . Bxe4 19 Rxc6 Bxc6.
(see diagram opposite)
98
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e
9 h
KORCHNOI: Perhaps there are some
technical difficulties, but the queen is
stronger than rook and knight. So Qc1 and
attack the pawn on h6.
20 Qcl.
STEAN: Yes, if I wanted to lose my queen I
shouldn't have done it against Viktor. He's
very strong in these technical positions. He
wants to come with the queen to b5. I can
see it in his eye. I must defend the
h-pawn. If Kh7 he gets another tempo with
Qc4 at some point.
20 ... h5 21 Bxc6 Nxc6 22 Qc4.
Black is to be given no chance to
consolidate his position. Korchnoi has
spotted the vulnerable point at b7 and
heads straight for it.
22 . . . Re6 23 Rcl b6.
KORCHNOI: The only difficulty which cad
arise in this position is if I allow him to
play Nb4 and c5. Then Black's position is
impossible to break through. I have to play
carefully.
24 Qb5.
STEAN: The knight is attacked again and c7
is a problem. I must defend.
24 . .. Rdd6.
KORCHNOI: And now Qa6. If he plays
Nb4 I can then check him on aB.
25 Qa6.
STEAN: Help, he's threatening QcB. This
pawn on c7 has had it. I can't defend it. If I
play Rd7, he has Rxc6 and check on aB.
25 ... Nd4 26 Qc8+ Kh7 27 Bxd4 exd4
28 Rxc7.
With the fall of this pawn, Black's game
collapses totally. He can only struggle on a
few moves before further losses become
inevitable.
28 ... Rf6 29 Qb7.
STEAN: On KgB he has QbB+, Kh7, Rxf7.
Well, the rook on d6 must move.
29 .. Rde6.
KORCHNOI: I can take the pawn on f7,
but I will protect first. After KgB I have
Rxf7, Rxf7; QcB+ winning rook on e6.
30 Kfl.
STEAN: He doesn't even give me a pawn. I
can't defend this pawn on f7. KgB he plays
Rxf7, Rxf7, QcB+. The position is lost.
Black resigned.
99
8
i
a
1
a b c d e f g h
KORCHNOI: Perhaps there are some
technical difficulties, but the queen is
stronger than rook and knight. So Qd and
attack the pawn on h6.
20 Qd.
STEAN: Yes, if I wanted to lose my queen I
shouldn
'
t have done it against Viktor. He's
very strong in these technical positions. He
wants to come with the queen to b5. I can
see it in his eye. I must defend the
h
-pawn
.
If Kh7 he gets another tempo with
Qc4 at some point.
20 . . . h5 21 Bxc6 Nxc6 22 Qc4.
Black is to be given no chance to
consolidate his position. Korchnoi has
spotted the vulnerable point at b7 and
heads straight for it.
22 . . . Re6 23 Rcl b6.
KORCHNOI: The only difficulty which can
arise in this position is if I allow him to
play Nb4 and c5. Then Black
'
s position is
impossible to break through. I have to play
carefully.
24 Qb5.
STEAN: The knight is attacked again and c7
is a problem. I must defend.
24 . . . Rdd6.
KORCHNOI: And now Qa6. If he plays
Nb4 I can then check him on a8.
25 Qa6.
STEAN: Help, he's threatening Qc8. This
pawn on c7 has had it. I can
'
t defend it. If I
play Rd7, he has Rxc6 and check on a8.
25 . . . Nd4 26 Qc8+ Kh7 27 Bxd4 exd4
28 Rxc7.
With the fall of this pawn, Black's game
collapses totally. He can only struggle on a
few moves before further losses become
inevitable.
28 . . . Rf6 29 Qb7.
STEAN: On Kg8 he has Qb8+, Kh7, Rxf7.
Well, the rook on d6 must move.
29 . . . Rde6.
KORCHNOI: / can take the pawn on f7/
but I will protect first. After Kg8 I have
Rxf7/ Rxf7; Qc8+ winning rook on e6.
30 Kfl.
STEAN: He doesn't even give me a pawn. I
can
'
t defend this pawn on f7. Kg8 he plays
Rxf7/ Rxf7f Qc8+. The position is lost.
Black resigned.
99
The Final
Game 28:
Lothar Schmid - Walter Browne
Sicilian Defence
Fortune had been with Schmid during the
preliminary rounds; it stayed with him
when he drew the white pieces for this
final. He played the opening quietly and
this, apparently, tempted Browne into
trying for too much at moves 14 and 15.
The American grandmaster fell into a trap,
lost a pawn and never really got back into
the game, though the German had to play
some fine moves in the endgame to avoid
letting Browne escape.
1 e4 cS 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 cxd4 4 Nxd4 Nf6
S Nc3 a6 6 a4.
An unusual move which has the merit of
avoiding Browne's good theoretical
knowledge. 6 Be2, 6 Bg5, 6 Bc4 and 6 f4
have all been analysed extensively.
6 ... e6 7 Be2 Be7 8 0-0 Nc6 9 Be3 0-0.
Again a normal position has been reached.
Here, White usually plays for a K-side
attack with such moves as f4, Qe1 and
Qg3. Instead, Schmid takes a more
conservative path, hoping for Q-side
pressure.
10 Qd2 Qc7 11 Nb3 b6 12 Rfdl Rb8 13 f3.
BROWNE: He's playing very passively, I
can't believe this is good for White. Maybe
Ne5 is okay, threatening Nc4, but that's not
so much. If I could get in d5 I think I
should at least equalise. I think I'll play
RdB.
13 ... Rd8.
SCHMID: He can now free his game by d5
and I can't stop it. But there is something
in this position, I should say a real trap.
Let's see whether or not it will come to the
board. I'll make the square f2 free for my
queen.
14 Bfl.
BROWNE: Didn't expect that. /t's a
reasonable move. Nb4 is possible with the
idea of d5, but then if he plays e5 and I
take with the queen, he has Bf4. I'd like to
play d5 with my knight still on c6. If I play
Bbl, he plays Qf2. I feel I should punish
him for his opening moves, they're so
passive. d5 must be good.
14 ... dS.
SCHMID: Natural, but he has to be very
careful because this is just the line with a
trap. I have to take it and see what
happens.
lS exdS.
101
The Final
Game 28:
Lothar Schmid - Walter Browne
Sicilian Defence
Fortune had been with Schmid during the
preliminary rounds; it stayed with him
when he drew the white pieces for this
final. He played the opening quietly and
this, apparently, tempted Browne into
trying for too much at moves 14 and 15.
The American grandmaster fell into a trap,
lost a pawn and never really got back into
the game, though the German had to play
some fine moves in the endgame to avoid
letting Browne escape.
1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 d4 cxd4 4 Nxd4 Nf6
5 Nc3 a6 6 a4.
An unusual move which has the merit of
avoiding Browne
'
s good theoretical
knowledge. 6 Be2, 6 Bg5, 6 Bc4 and 6 f4
have all been analysed extensively.
6 . . . e6 7 Bel Be7 8 0-0 Nc6 9 Be3 0-0.
Again a normal position has been reached.
Here, White usually plays for a K-side
attack with such moves as f4, Qe1 and
Qg3. Instead, Schmid takes a more
conservative path, hoping for Q-side
pressure.
10 Qd2 Qc7 11 Nb3 b6 12 Rfdl Rb8 13 f3.
BROWNE: He's playing very passively, I
can
'
t believe this is good for White. Maybe
Ne5 is okay, threatening Nc4, but that's not
so much. If I could get in d5 I think I
should at least equalise. I think I
'
ll play
Rd8.
13 . . . Rd8.
SCHMID: He can now free his game by d5
and I can
'
t stop it. But there is something
in this position, I should say a real trap.
Let's see whether or not it will come to the
board. I'll make the square f2 free for my
queen.
14Bf1.
BROWNE: Didn't expect that. It's a
reasonable move. Nb4 is possible with the
idea of d5, but then if he plays e5 and I
take with the queen, he has Bf4. I'd like to
play d5 with my knight still on c6. If I play
Bb7, he plays Qf2. I feel I should punish
him for his opening moves, they're so
passive. d5 must be good.
14 . . . d5.
SCHMID: Natural, but he has to be very
careful because this is just the line with a
trap. I have to take it and see what
happens.
15 exd5.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e 9 h
BROWNE: Now if Nxd5, he takes, rook
takes, that's not much; oh, but he could
then play Bf4 and I've got to play Bd6. It's
got to be better than that. I could even
take with the pawn. I'm sure Black is at
least equal. Probably Korchnoi would like
that, he loves isolated pawns. Well, almost
anything's good. Nb4 must be okay in this
position.
15 Nb4.
SCHMID: He plays it rather quickly but this
is a move which is doubtful; I think it is
even a mistake. Did he overlook this next
move, Bf4? He can play e5, but then there
will come a surprise.
16 Bf4.
BROWNE: Really I hadn't considered that
move; I thought, I just play e5 and then he
has to move the bishop. But he can play
d6! No, I can't believe this. I play e5, he
plays d6, I take with the bishop, he plays
Bxe5, then Bc5 + he just takes it. If I play
Bd6 he takes on e6 and he has a pin. This
is terrible. Well I guess I have to play e5 as
bad as it is.
102
16 e5.
At this stage, Browne thought for more
than fifty minutes trying to find a way out
of his problems. There was no answer to
17 d6. After 17 ... Rxd6 18 BxeS Rxd2
19 Bxc7 Rxd1 20 Rxd1 Rb721 Bd6, or
17 ... Bxd6 18 BxeS BcS+ 19 NxcS, Black
loses material. He chose the only way to
make a fight of the game.
17 d6 Qxd6.
SCHMID: I shall win a pawn and should
win the game, at least if my technique is
okay. It will be not as easy as it looks. That
pawn on c2 is my plus but it is not so easy
to advance it. It is no passed pawn, it takes
quite a long time. The best thing is to
exchange queens and then get the pawn
on e5.
18 Qxd6 Rxd6 19 Bxe5 Rxd1 20 Rxd1 Ra8.
After 20 ... Rb721 Bd6 Kf8 White would
have won a piece with 22 Bxb4 Bxb4
23 Rd8+. Now Schmid had to be content
with his extra pawn on c2. The first stage
of his winning plan is consolidation.
21 Bd6 Kf8 22 Bxe7 + Kxe7 23 Nd4 Bd7
24 Be4 Re8 25 Bb3.
The c-pawn is now firmly guarded and
White can begin to think about expelling
the knight from b4.
25 Ne8 26 Ne4 h6 27 Kf2 Ne6
28 c3 NaS 29 Be2 Ne4 30 Re1 Kf8.
A necessary defensive move; 30 ... Nxb2
would have lost to 31 NcS+ Kd8
32 Nxd7 Kxd7 33 BfS+.
31 Rb1 f5 32 Ng3 g6 33 Nge2 Ned6
34 Bd3 a5 35 Bxe4 Nxe4 36 b3 Ne5
37 Rd1 Kf7 38 h3 g5 39 f4!
if
8
a
a b c d e f g h
BROWNE: Now if Nxd5, he takes, rook
takes, that's not much; oh, but he could
then play Bf4 and I've got to play Bd6. It's
got to be better than that I could even
take with the pawn. I'm sure Black is at
least equal. Probably Korchnoi would like
that, he loves isolated pawns. Well, almost
anything
'
s good. Nb4 must be okay in this
position.
15 . . . Nb4.
SCHMID: He plays it rather quickly but this
is a move which is doubtful; I think it is
even a mistake. Did he overlook this next
move, Bf4? He can play e5, but then there
will come a surprise.
16 Bf4.
BROWNE: Really I hadn't considered that
move; I thought, I just play e5 and then he
has to move the bishop. But he can play
d6! No, I can't believe this. I play e5, he
plays d6, I take with the bishop, he plays
Bxe5, then Bc5+ he just takes it. If I play
Bd6 he takes on e6 and he has a pin. This
is terrible. Well I guess I have to play e5 as
bad as it is.
16 . . . e5.
At this stage, Browne thought for more
than fifty minutes trying to find a way out
of his problems. There was no answer to
17 d6. After 17 . . . Rxd6 18 Bxe5 Rxd2
19 Bxc7 Rxd1 20 Rxd1 Rb7 21 Bd6, or
17 . . . Bxd6 18 Bxe5 Bc5+ 19 Nxc5, Black
loses material. He chose the only way to
make a fight of the game.
17 d6 Qxd6.
SCHMID: / shall win a pawn and should
win the game, at least if my technique is
okay. It will be not as easy as it looks. That
pawn on c2 is my plus but it is not so easy
to advance it. It is no passed pawn, it takes
quite a long time. The best thing is to
exchange queens and then get the pawn
on e5.
18 Qxd6 Rxd6 19 Bxe5 Rxdl 20 Rxdl Ra8.
After 20 . . . Rb7 21 Bd6 Kf8 White would
have won a piece with 22 Bxb4 Bxb4
23 Rd8+. Now Schmid had to be content
with his extra pawn on c2. The first stage
of his winning plan is consolidation.
21 Bd6 Kf8 22 Bxe7+ Kxe7 23 Nd4 Bd7
24Bc4Rc8 25 Bb3.
The c-pawn is now firmly guarded and
White can begin to think about expelling
the knight from b4.
25 . . . Ne8 26 Ne4 h6 27 Kf2 Nc6
28 c3 Na5 29 Bc2 Nc4 30 Rel Kf8.
A necessary defensive move; 30 . . . Nxb2
would have lost to 31 Nc5+ Kd8
32 Nxd7 Kxd7 33 BfS-f.
31 Rbl f5 32 Ng3 g6 33 Nge2 Ned6
34 Bd3 a5 35 Bxc4 Nxc4 36 b3 Ne5
37 Rdl Kf7 38 h3 g5 39 f4!
102
A good move to prevent the black pawn's
advance to this square.
39 gxf4 40 Nf3.
An unpleasant move to have to meet with
little time left to reach the forty-move
control. The knight at eS must renounce its
defence of the bishop.
40 Nxf3 41 Rxd7 +.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e 9 h
BROWNE: Made the control, thank God.
Now if I play Ke8, he plays Rh7, I move the
knight, he could even trade rooks and the
knight ending is easy. I'll have to move my
king up; maybe my good king position wilf
give me a chance.
41 Ke6.
SCHMID: I have several moves: to go back
with my rook on the d-fiIe, which should
win because I get the f-pawn with check
then; or to stay at the seventh rank and
attack his pawns. Either Rb7 or Rh7. I attack
his h-pawn.
42 Rh7.
BROWNE: That looks like a mistake. It's
about time he made an error. Should I play
Ng5 to threaten his rook? Maybe Nd2 is
better. I can stilf go to e4 and I attack his
b-pawn. That might be important.
42 Nd2.
SCHMID: I see that my last move was not
the best. Rb7 would have solved the
problem easily because with checks at b6
and b5 perhaps I should have won all his
pawns on the queen's wing. Now I get this
other h-pawn which is not so important at
the moment. This is very difficult because
he's well centralised, his pieces have
suddenly come to life. I shall have much
trouble to win the game, maybe it's not
even possible.
43 Rxh6+ Ke5 44 Rxb6.
Having wasted a move taking the h-pawn,
Schmid now realises that the win will not
come easily. But, never one to be ruffled,
he settled down to the task with renewed
determination. Black's king, knight and
rook are all active now and White must
play very accurately.
44 Ne4+ 45 Kf1 Nxc3.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e f 9 h
103
A good move to prevent the black pawn's
advance to this square.
39 . . . gxf4 40 Nf3.
An unpleasant move to have to meet with
little time left to reach the forty-move
control. The knight at e5 must renounce its
defence of the bishop.
40 . . . NxfS 41 Rxd7+.
1
8
i
abcdefgh
BROWNE: Made the control, thank God.
Now if I play Ke8, he plays Rh7, I move the
knight, he could even trade rooks and the
knight ending is easy. I'll have to move my
king up; maybe my good king position will
give me a chance.
41 . . . Ke6.
SCHMID: / have several moves: to go back
with my rook on the d-file, which should
win because I get the f-pawn with check
then; or to stay at the seventh rank and
attack his pawns. Either Rb7 or Rh7. I attack
his h-pawn.
42 Rh7.
BROWNE: That looks like a mistake. It's
about time he made an error. Should I play
Ng5 to threaten his rook? Maybe Nd2 is
better. I can still go to e4 and I attack his
b
-pawn
.
That might be important.
42 . . . Nd2.
SCHMID: / see that my last move was not
the best. Rb7 would have solved the
problem easily because with checks at b6
and 65 perhaps I should have won all his
pawns on the queen
'
s wing. Now I get this
other h-pawn which is not so important at
the moment. This is very difficult because
he's well centralised, his pieces have
suddenly come to life. I shall have much
trouble to win the game, maybe it's not
even possible.
43 Rxh6+ Ke5 44 Rxb6.
Having wasted a move taking the h-pawn,
Schmid now realises that the win will not
come easily. But, never one to be ruffled,
he settled down to the task with renewed
determination. Black's king, knight and
rook are all active now and White must
play very accurately.
44 . . . Ne4+ 45 Kfl Nxc3.
8
6
i
abcdefgh
103
Now 42 Nxc3 Rxc343 RbS+ Ke4
44 RxaS Rxb3 would give Black an easy
draw. He can play f3 to exchange another
pawn and leave White no winning chances
whatsoever. Schmid now plays a very fine
move, keeping knights on the board,
maintaining the f3 square and giving
Browne a real shock.
46 Ng1!
BROWNE: What a surprise. Can this really
be good? I could play NdS; Nf3+, Ke4;
Re6+, Kd3; Rd6 - doesn't look so great.
What about Kd4? Ah, but then Kf2, Ne4+;
Kf3 and then if KeS, rook check; doesn't
look so good. If Ne4, he plays Nf3 +, KdS;
RbS + kicking my king back. What shall I
do? Could give away a pawn with f3 just to
get a square, but he must have enough to
win. What can I do? This is incredible.
There must be some knight move here.
Must be something. Maybe RdB. Of course
he has Nf3+, Ke4 and then Re6+. I must
try Kd4.
46 . Kd4.
SCHMID: Well again my good friend
Walter Browne is in time trouble but he
plays very aggressively and tries to mate
me. He threatens to come with his king to
e3. However I think this move cannot save
the game because now his pawns on f4
and fS are looking a little bit weak, not
covered by the king. My king at least gets
free. I'm very happy.
47 Kf2.
BROWNE: He found a move; his only
move, but he found it. Now I have only
one chance. I have to play Ne4+; that way
he plays Kf3, KeS; RbS+, RcS; weill have
to win a pawn back. If he takes, I take with
the knight and win his b-pawn; or if he
104
plays Ne2, I take on bS, check on d2 and
take the b3-pawn. That's three pawns
against three, two passed pawns against
one. I don't like it but I have a chance for
a draw.
47 Ne4+ 48 Kf3 Ke5 49 Rb5+ Re5
50 h4.
This h-pawn is set to win the game for
White, but with both players running short
of time, accurate play is still needed.
50 . Rxb5 51 axb5 Nd2+ 52 Ke2 Nxb3
53 Kd3 Kd5 54 Ne2 Nc5+ 55 Kc3 Ne4+
56 Kb3 Kc5 57 Ka4 Nd6 58 Nc3 Ne4
8
7
- -
6
- -
5
_1-

4
-1)-


- -
3


2
- -

abc d e
9 h
59 Kxa5!
A precisely calculated and elegant solution
to White's task. By giving up his knight he
ensures that the b-pawn and h-pawn will
be more than Black can handle.
59 Nxe3 60 b6 Kc6 61 Ka6 Na4 62 h5!
62 b7? NcS+ would have lost the game.
Now, the h-pawn is too fast.
62 . Nxb6 63 h6 Ne4 64 h7 Kd5
65 h8(Q).
Now 42 Nxc3 Rxc3 43 Rb5+ Ke4
44 Rxa5 Rxb3 would give Black an easy
draw. He can play f3 to exchange another
pawn and leave White no winning chances
whatsoever. Schmid now plays a very fine
move, keeping knights on the board,
maintaining the f3 square and giving
Browne a real shock.
46 Ngl!
BROWNE: What a surprise. Can this really
be good? I could play Nd5; Nf3+, Ke4;
Re6+, Kd3; Rd6 - doesn't look so great.
What about Kd4? Ah, but then Kf2, Ne4+;
Kf3 and then if Ke5, rook check; doesn't
look so good. If Ne4, he plays Nf3+, Kd5;
Rb5+ kicking my king back. What shall I
do? Could give away a pawn with f3 just to
get a square, but he must have enough to
win. What can I do? This is incredible.
There must be some knight move here.
Must be something. Maybe Rd8. Of course
he has Nf3+, Ke4 and then Re6+. I must
try Kd4.
46 . . . Kd4.
SCHMID: Well again my good friend
Walter Browne is in time trouble but he
plays very aggressively and tries to mate
me. He threatens to come with his king to
e3. However I think this move cannot save
the game because now his pawns on f4
and f5 are looking a little bit weak, not
covered by the king. My king at least gets
free. I'm very happy.
47 Kf2.
BROWNE: He found a move; his only
move, but he found it. Now I have only
one chance. I have to play Ne4+; that way
he plays Kf3, Ke5; Rb5+, Rc5; well I have
to win a pawn back. If he takes, I take with
the knight and win his b-pawn; or if he
plays Ne2, I take on 65, check on d2 and
take the b3-pawn. That's three pawns
against three, two passed pawns against
one. I don't like it but I have a chance for
a draw.
47 . . . Ne4+ 48 Kf3 Ke5 49 Rb5+ Rc5
50 h4.
This h-pawn is set to win the game for
White, but with both players running short
of time, accurate play is still needed.
50 . . . RxbS 51 axbS Nd2+ 52 Ke2 NxbS
53 Kd3 Kd5 54 Ne2 Nc5+ 55 Kc3 Ne4+
56 Kb3 Kc5 57 Ka4 Nd6 58 Nc3 Ne4
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
59 KxaS!
A precisely calculated and elegant solution
to White's task. By giving up his knight he
ensures that the b-pawn and h-pawn will
be more than Black can handle.
59 . . . NxcS 60 b6 Kc6 61 Ka6 Na4 62 h5!
62 b7? Nc5+ would have lost the game.
Now, the h-pawn is too fast.
62 . . . Nxb6 63 h6 Nc4 64 h7 KdS
65 h8(Q).
W
a b c d e f h
a
104
The new queen signals the end for
Browne. The remaining moves were played
at lightning pace, but it was the American
who had less time on his clock.
6S Ne5 66 KbS Ke4 fjJ Qe8 Kd4
68 Qe6 fJ &9 gxf3 NxD 70 Qxf5 Ne5
71 Qe6 Nd3 72 Qd6+ Ke4 and Black lost
on lime.
The new queen signals the end for
Browne. The remaining moves were played
at lightning pace, but it was the American
who had less time on his clock.
65 . . . Ne5 66 Kb5 Ke4 67 Qe8 Kd4
68Qe6f3 69 gxf3 Nxf3 70 Qxf5 Ne5
71 Qe6 Nd3 72 Qd6+ Ke4 and Black lost
on time.
The Master Game 1981 - Series Six
The Master Game 1981 - Series Six
Order of Play
Group B:
Round One:
Round Two:
Round Three:
Miles 1-0 Larsen;
Donner Yl- Yl Miles;
Larsen 1-0 Donner;
Schmid Yl- Yl Donner
Larsen 1-0 Schmid
Miles 1-0 Schmid
M L D S Total
Miles x 1 Yl 1 2Yl
Larsen 0 x 1 1 2
Donner Yl 0 x Y2 1
Schmid 0 0 Yl x Yl
Game 35:
Tony Miles - Bent Larsen
Keres' Defence
A fine struggle which showed much of the
best of both players. Larsen played the
opening in original fashion to secure a
promising position. Pushing his K-side
pawns he developed a powerful attack
which forced play of great accuracy from
Miles. Faced with such resolute defence,
Larsen lost objectivity when his position
did not reveal a win. Refusing to settle for
a draw, he began to play badly. Miles
accepted every chance he was offered and
finally clinched a win in a hard endgame.
1 d4 e6 2 e4 Bb4+.
An unusual defence pioneered by the
Estonian grandmaster Paul Keres. Black
intends later to move his pawns to d6
and eS, so prepares to exchange this
bishop.
3 Bd2 as 4 e3 f5 5 Bd3 Nf6 6 Ne2 d6
7 Nbc3 e5 8 a3 Bxel 9 Bxc3 e4 10 Be2.
130
White plays the whole opening too
cautiously. Here 10 Bb1 was better
designed to counter Black's plan; then
Black would find great difficulties
maintaining a hold on dS with White able
to play Ba2 and Qb3 to attack that square.
10 d5 11 Nf4 e6 12 Bb3 Na6
13 exd5 exd5 14 Ba4+ Kf7.
The king is quite safe here and Black does
not mind the minor inconvenience of
being unable to castle.
15 Qd2 b6 16 Be6 Ra7 17 b4 Qd6
18 Bb5 Ne7 19 Be2 axb4 20 Bxb4 Qd7
21 0-0 Ba6 22 Bxa6 Rxa6 23 Rfel g5.
Larsen begins his K-side attack, though he
still has to take care to defend vulnerable
squares on the other wing.
24 Ne2 Ne6 25 Ne3 Raa8 26 Qe2 Rhe8
27 NbS Ne8.
Order of Play
Group B:
Round One:
Round Two:
Round Three:
Miles 1-0 Larsen;
Donner V2-V2 Miles;
Larsen 1-0 Donner;
Schmid V2-V2 Donner
Larsen 1-0 Schmid
Miles 1-0 Schmid
M L D S Total
Miles X 1 1/2 1 2V2
Larsen 0 X 1 1 2
Donner 1/2 0 X 1/2 1
Schmid 0 0 1/2 X 1/2
Game 35:
Tony Miles - Bent Larsen
Keres' Defence
A fine struggle which showed much of the
best of both players. Larsen played the
opening in original fashion to secure a
promising position. Pushing his K-side
pawns he developed a powerful attack
which forced play of great accuracy from
Miles. Faced with such resolute defence,
Larsen lost objectivity when his position
did not reveal a win. Refusing to settle for
a draw, he began to play badly. Miles
accepted every chance he was offered and
finally clinched a win in a hard endgame.
1 d4 e6 2 c4 Bb4+.
An unusual defence pioneered by the
Estonian grandmaster Paul Keres. Black
intends later to move his pawns to d6
and e5, so prepares to exchange this
bishop.
3 Bd2 a5 4 e3 f5 5 Bd3 Nf6 6 Ne2 d6
7 Nbc3 e5 8 a3 Bxc3 9 Bxc3 e4 10 Bc2.
White plays the whole opening too
cautiously. Here 10 Bb1 was better
designed to counter Black's plan; then
Black would find great difficulties
maintaining a hold on d5 with White able
to play Ba2 and Qb3 to attack that square.
10 . . . d5 11 Nf4 c6 12 Bb3 Na6
13 cxd5 cxd5 14 Ba4+ Kf7.
The king is quite safe here and Black does
not mind the minor inconvenience of
being unable to castle.
15 Qd2 b6 16 Bc6 Ra7 17 b4 Qd6
18 Bb5 Nc7 19 Be2 axb4 20 Bxb4 Qd7
21 0-0 Ba6 22 Bxa6 Rxa6 23 Rfcl g5.
Larsen begins his K-side attack, though he
still has to take care to defend vulnerable
squares on the other wing.
24 Ne2 Ne6 25 Nc3 Raa8 26 Qe2 Rhc8
27 Nb5 Ne8.
130
Black must prevent the threatened
28 Nd6+. He does not fear 28 QhS+ Kg7
when the unsupported white queen can do
no damage.
28 f3 exf3 29 gxf3 Rxe1 + 30 Rxe1 Re8
31 Rxe8 Qxe8 32 Ne3 Nf6 33 Qd3.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e 9 h
LARSEN: Now I have to calculate exactly.
f4 looks good because my knight on e6
wants to get a good square near his king.
f4, he plays e4, I play g4, nobody knows
what happens; looks very good; after e5 I
can take on f3. My knight from e6 gets to
g5, maybe to e4. It's very complicated. Kg6
is playable; e4, I can play Nf4. Maybe that
is the safe line. No, on Kg6 he comes with
the bishop to el, not logical, I'm fighting
against that bishop of course. I must play
f4.
33 f4.
MILES: Hello, something's happening. e4
is what I want to play, what's going to
happen? He takes it, I take with the pawn
and have a massive pawn centre. He
wouldn't play that. I can't take on f4
because he takes with the knight and my
position's a wreck. Qf5 doesn't work
because he'll take on e3. I've got to play
e4. Something nasty's going to happen to
this position very quickly.
34 e4.
LARSEN: It's interesting to take on e4.
When he takes with the pawn I must have
some threats against his king, but his
centre is very strong. I must attack
immediately.
34 g4.
MILES: I don't know what the hell's going
on. e5 is natural, but that does fix my
pawns on black squares if it doesn't win.
What's he planning on e5? He's going to
take on f3 and threaten QgB+ mating me,
or maybe play QgB first. Let's see, e5, he
takes on f3, I must recapture, QgB+, king
somewhere, Ng4, it's very messy. What
else can I play? Taking on d5, Ng5, that's
out of the question; taking on g4 can't be
right. I don't like it much but I must play
e5.
35 e5 gxf3 36 Qxf3.
LARSEN: Now I think I cannot take on d4
because he takes on f4. Well, then I can
play Qg4+ but I certainly get no winning
chances. Ng5 looks normal, it's very good
there.
36 Ng5.
MILES: This is beginning to look horrible;
his knights and queen are all flooding at
my king. Where do I put the queen? g2,
well then he's getting f3 with tempo. God,
how am I stopping that f-pawn? Nh3 + will
come, the queen could come, everything's
coming in. f1 is a useful square, it stays on
f4, it stays on the same file as his king; that
131
Black must prevent the threatened
28 Nd6+. He does not fear 28 Qh5+ Kg7
when the unsupported white queen can do
no damage.
28 f3 exf3 29 gxf3 Rxc1+ 30 Rxcl Rc8
31 RxcB QxcB 32 Nc3 Nf6 33 Qd3.
8
A
i
a b c d e f g h
LARSEN: Now I have to calculate exactly.
f4 looks good because my knight on e6
wants to get a good square near his king.
fA, he plays e4, I play g4, nobody knows
what happens; looks very good; after e5 I
can take on f3. My knight from e6 gets to
g5, maybe to e4. It
'
s very complicated. Kg6
is playable; e4, I can play Nf4. Maybe that
is the safe line. No, on Kg6 he comes with
the bishop to e7, not logical, I'm fighting
against that bishop of course. I must play
f4.
33 . . . f4.
MILES: Hello, something's happening. e4
is what I want to play, what's going to
happen? He takes it, I take with the pawn
and have a massive pawn centre. He
wouldn
'
t play that. I can't take on f4
because he takes with the knight and my
position
'
s a wreck. Qf5 doesn
'
t work
because he'll take on e3. I've got to play
e4. Something nasty
'
s going to happen to
this position very quickly.
34 e4.
LARSEN: It's interesting to take on e4.
When he takes with the pawn I must have
some threats against his king, but his
centre is very strong. I must attack
immediately.
34 . . . g4.
MILES: / don't know what the hell's going
on. e5 is natural, but that does fix my
pawns on black squares if it doesn
'
t win.
What's he planning on e5? He's going to
take on f3 and threaten Qg8+ mating me,
or maybe play Qg8 first. Let
'
s see, e5, he
takes on f3, I must recapture, Qg8+, king
somewhere, Ng4, it
'
s very messy. What
else can I play? Taking on d5, Ng5, that
'
s
out of the question; taking on g4 can
'
t be
right. I don
'
t like it much but I must play
e5.
35 e5 gxf3 36 Qxf3.
LARSEN: Now / think I cannot take on d4
because he takes on f4. Well, then I can
play Qg4+ but I certainly get no winning
chances. Ng5 looks normal, it
'
s very good
there.
36 . . . Ng5.
MILES: This is beginning to look horrible;
his knights and queen are all flooding at
my king. Where do I put the queen? g2,
well then he
'
s getting f3 with tempo. Cod,
how am I stopping that f-pawn? Nh3+ will
come, the queen could come, everything
'
s
coming in. fl is a useful square, it stays on
f4, it stays on the same file as his king; that
131
can be useful in the long run. If his knight
from f6 has to move, maybe I'll take on d5
and then perhaps I'll be able to get my
queen into activity on c4. It must be best,
though this position's getting terrible.
37 Qf1.
LARSEN: Now it's a very important
decision: should I play Qg4+ or Nh3+?
Both protect my f-pawn and bring my
pieces closer to his king. Nh3+, Kh1, Ng4,
that's interesting; I'm threatening Nf2+; he
plays Qf3, I think that's his only move;
Qf3, knight check, he goes to g2, I can
check with the queen on gB, he goes to f1,
I can check him on g1, he goes to e2 and
what have I got? This is terrible. If there is
nothing there, then d5 is hanging. It's not
so easy. I don't see it. I think Qg4 is safer.
Once more, Nh3, Kh1, Ng4, Qf3; no I
don't see it, his king escapes. He's lucky.
Well okay, Qg4+ is a good move anyway.
37 .. Qg4+.
MILES: That's what I was most frightened
of. Now I could play Qg2, but then f3 and
I think I'd lose a piece stopping the
f-pawn, so I must play Kh1, nothing else.
38 Kh1.
LARSEN: Can I sacrifice a piece? f3, take on
f6, Nh3; no I don't think it's good enough.
I'm threatening f2 but he has Nd1 for
instance, I must go to e4, that looks
natural.
38 . Nfe4.
MILES: It would be nice to take that off
but then my position is just terrible for no
compensation. I've got to go pawn
snatching. I have to take the one on d5,
it's my only hope. Maybe I can expose his
king a little. Just keep my fingers crossed.
132
39 Nxd5.
LARSEN: Another important choice: Nf3 or
Nh3. Nh3, he plays Be1, it's not so clear.
Nf3 looks good. Many threats against his
king.
39 Nf3.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e 9 h
MILES: I didn't really expect that, but it
does look quite strong now it's arrived.
How about e6+? That's the sort of move
that might disconcert him. He's only got a
few minutes left for his last move. He can't
take with the queen, because then I take
the knight on f3 and I'm completely safe.
Got to get rid of those wretched knights
somehow. e6+, takes with the king, then
at least I'm not going to have to worry
about Nd2 because I'll have some forks
with queen checks on the e-fi/e. If he
moves his king away after e6+, I play el. I
haven't seen a clear threat for him yet on
the K-side, and pawns on the seventh are
always strong. It's bound to create some
trouble.
40 e6+.
LARSEN: I guess I have to take that. It's a
can be useful in the long run. If his knight
from f6 has to move, maybe I'll take on d5
and then perhaps I
'
ll be able to get my
queen into activity on c4. It must be best,
though this position's getting terrible.
37 Qfl.
LARSEN: Now it's a very important
decision: should I play Qg4+ or Nh3 +?
Both protect my f-pawn and bring my
pieces closer to his king. Nh3+, Khl, Ng4,
that's interesting; I'm threatening Nf2+; he
plays Qf3, I think that
'
s his only move;
Qf3, knight check, he goes to gl, I can
check with the queen on g8, he goes to fl,
I can check him on gl, he goes to e2 and
what have I got? This is terrible. If there is
nothing there, then d5 is hanging. It
'
s not
so easy. I don
'
t see it. I think Qg4 is safer.
Once more, Nh3, Khl, Ng4, Qf3; no I
don't see it, his king escapes. He's lucky.
Well okay, Qg4+ is a good move anyway.
37 . . . Qg4+.
MILES: That's what I was most frightened
of. Now I could play Qg2, but then f3 and
I think I'd lose a piece stopping the
f
-pawn, so I must play Khl, nothing else.
38 Khl.
LARSEN: Can I sacrifice a piece? f3,
take on
f6, Nh3; no I don't think it's good enough.
I
'
m threatening f2 but he has Ndl for
instance, I must go to e4, that looks
natural.
38 . . . Nfe4.
MILES: It would be nice to take that off
but then my position is just terrible for no
compensation. I
'
ve got to go pawn
snatching. I have to take the one on d5,
it's my only hope. Maybe I can expose his
king a little. Just keep my fingers crossed.
39 Nxd5.
LARSEN: Another important choice: Nf3 or
Nh3. Nh3, he plays Bel, it's not so clear.
Nf3 looks good. Many threats against his
king.
39 . . . Nf3.
8
if
1
abcdefgh
MILES: / didn't really expect that, but it
does look quite strong now it's arrived.
How about e6+? That's the sort of move
that might disconcert him. He's only got a
few minutes left for his last move. He can't
take with the queen, because then I take
the knight on f3 and I'm completely safe.
Got to get rid of those wretched knights
somehow. e6+, takes with the king, then
at least I
'
m not going to have to worry
about Nd2 because I
'
ll have some forks
with queen checks on the e-file. If he
moves his king away after e6+, I play e7. I
haven't seen a clear threat for him yet on
the K-side, and pawns on the seventh are
always strong. It
'
s bound to create some
trouble.
40 e6+.
LARSEN: / guess / have to take that. It's a
132
little unpleasant, my king should be in a
safe spot, but I have to take that pawn.
40 . Kxe6.
MILES: I've got to move my knight so I can
threaten Qc4+. if the knight moves it
might as well take the b-pawn. At least that
way I won't lose a simple ending if I ever
get out.
41 Nxb6.
LARSEN: I must move my king so that his
queen has no check. I cannot play Ng3+,
he takes, Qxg3, Qc4+ and he has all his
pieces attacking before I can mate him.
41 .. Kf6.
MILES: What's wrong with Ndl+? He can't
possibly take it because then I'm
absolutely safe, so he must move his king,
but where? Anyway, what else can I play,
but it looks good.
42 Nd7+.
LARSEN: Maybe I should play Kgl, maybe
he plays Ne5. I think I can as well take the
knight. I really have a very strong position,
but it's a pity I'm a pawn down.
42 .. Qxd7 43 Qxf3 Qf5 44 Bel.
Now Black has an immediate draw with
44 ... Ng5 45 Bh4 Qb1 + 46 Kg2 Qc2+
when White has no satisfactory way to
avoid the checks. Instead, Larsen, without
any particular idea in mind, decided to
play for a win.
44 h6.
MILES: Only Larsen would playa move like
that, it's ridiculous. Well, why not push my
luck? His only plan is Ng5 to get some
play. Let's stop it with h4. I still can't be
better, but if he plays many more moves
like that I can be.
45 h4 Kg6 46 a4 Nf6 47 Bd2 Nd5
48 a5 Qbl + 49 Kh2 Qa2 50 Qd3+ Kf6
51 Kh3 Qal 52 Qa6+ Kf5 53 Qd3+ Kf6
54 Kg2 Qdl 55 Kf2 Qhl 56 a6 Qxh4+.
Now the white king escapes to the Q-side.
56 ... Qh2+ was a better chance.
57 Ke2 Qh2+ 58 Kdl Qgl + 59 Kc2 Qg2
60 Kb3 Nc7.
abc d e 9 h
MILES: Now I can't play al because he has
Qbl+. The obvious move is Bxf4, but after
Qd5+, Qc4 he has Qf3+ winning my
bishop. If this were a study the solution
would be d5. Wait, I think it is the
solution! d5, what does he play? It
interferes with his queen on the diagonal.
He can't take on a6, because I recapture
with check. I'm seriously threatening to
play d6 attacking the knight, or just going
to dl and dB. If he plays Qxd5+, I take his
queen, he plays Nxd5 and I play Ba5. Then
he can't stop my a-pawn; he plays f3, I play
al, we both queen and then I play QfB+
winning his queen. That's beautiful. This is
wonderful.
133
little unpleasant, my king should be in a
safe spot, but I have to take that pawn.
40 . . . Kxe6.
MILES: I've got to move my knight so I can
threaten Qc4+. if the knight moves it
might as well take the b-pawn. At least that
way I won
'
t lose a simple ending if I ever
get out.
41 Nxb6.
LARSEN: / must move my king so that his
queen has no check. I cannot play Ng3+,
he takes, Qxg3, Qc4+ and he has all his
pieces attacking before I can mate him.
41 . . . Kf6.
MILES: What's wrong with Nd7+? He can't
possibly take it because then I
'
m
absolutely safe, so he must move his king,
but where? Anyway, what else can I play,
but it looks good.
42 Nd7+.
LARSEN: Maybe I should play Kg7, maybe
he plays Ne5. I think I can as well take the
knight. I really have a very strong position,
but it's a pity I'm a pawn down.
42 . . . Qxd7 43 Qxf3 Qf5 44 Bel.
Now Black has an Immediate draw with
44 . . . Ng5 45 Bh4 Qb1+ 46 Kg2 Qc2 +
when White has no satisfactory way to
avoid the checks. Instead, Larsen, without
any particular idea in mind, decided to
play for a win.
44 . . . h6.
MILES: Only Larsen would play a move like
that, it's ridiculous. Well, why not push my
luck? His only plan is Ng5 to get some
play. Let
'
s stop it with h4. I still can
'
t be
better, but if he plays many more moves
like that I can be.
45 h4 Kg6 46 a4 Nf6 47 Bd2 Nd5
48 a5 Qb1+ 49 Kh2 Qa2 50 Qd3+ Kf6
51 Kh3 Qal 52 Qa6+ Kf5 53 Qd3+ Kf6
54 Kg2 Qdl 55 Kf2 Qhl 56 a6 Qxh4+.
Now the white king escapes to the Q-side.
56 . . . Qh2+ was a better chance.
57 Ke2 Qh2+ 58 Kdl Qg1+ 59 Kc2 Qg2
60 Kb3 Nc7.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
MILES: Now / can'f play al because he has
Qb7+. The obvious move is Bxf4, but after
Qd5+, Qc4 he has Qf3+ winning my
bishop. If this were a study the solution
would be d5. Wait, I think it is the
solution! d5, what does he play? It
interferes with his queen on the diagonal.
He can't take on a6
, because I recapture
with check. I
'
m seriously threatening to
play d6 attacking the knight, or just going
to dl and d8. If he plays Qxd5+, I take his
queen, he plays Nxd5 and I play Ba5. Then
he can't stop my a-pawn; he plays f3, I play
al, we both queen and then I play Qf8+
winning his queen. That
'
s beautiful. This is
wonderful.
f a
9
133
61 d5.
And this was the decisive move. Larsen
had to retreat to attempt to stop the
a-pawn, but the blockade was only
temporary.
61 . Nxd5 62 a7 Qg8 63 Qa6+ Nb6+
64 Kb4 Qe6 65 Kb5.
Finally the king joins in to support the
attack. Black can no longer resist. After
65 ... Na8 White wins simply with
66 Qxe6+ Kxe6 67 Kc6 f3 68 Be1 followed
by Kb7 and Kxa8. Black's king can hold
White in temporarily by following to c8,
but with the white bishop at g3, Black
quickly runs out of moves. Larsen tries to
bluff his way out.
65 . f3 66 Qxb6 resigns.
After 66 ... Qxb6+ 67 Kxb6 both sides
obtain new queens, but White has Qf8+
winning at the end.
Game 36:
Lothar Schmid - Jan Hein Donner
English Opening
Schmid's first game in defence of his
Master Game title was a fine scrap. Donner
acquired a perfectly wretched position in
the middlegame, but defended
ingeniously. A strange pawn structure
virtually cut the board in two, but the
Dutch grandmaster managed to work a
rook round the right side to aid his king.
Complications continued into the
endgame, but finally a perpetual check
brought the game to a fair end.
1 e4 d6 2 c4.
134
A very unusual move which soon leads the
game away from the Pirc Defence into
English Opening terr!tory.
2 ... c5 3 Ne2 e5.
We are now back in one of Schmid's
favourite opening lines, as we know from
game 27, but this time he is playing for
more than a draw.
4 d3 Nc6 5 Nbc3 g6 6 g3 Bg7 7 Bg2 Nge7
80-00-0 9 a3 a6 10 Rb1 Rb8 11 b4 cxb4
12 axb4 b5 13 cxb5 axb5 14 h3.
DONNER: That is a funny move. The
position is completely symmetrical and he
tries to lose a move. So far I have only
copied his moves. Shall I play h6 or is it
time for an independent move? Well, I'm
getting a little fed up with this. I think I
now play my own game.
14 ... Be6 15 Nd5.
Now Black cannot play 15 ... Nxd5
without losing a piece to 16 exd5. For that
reason 14 ... f5 was a better way to break
the symmetry.
15 ... Qd7 16 Kh2 Bxd5 17 exd5 Nd4
18 Nxd4 exd4.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e
9 h
61 d5.
And this was the decisive move. Larsen
had to retreat to attempt to stop the
a
-pawn, but the blockade was only
temporary.
61 . . . Nxd5 62 a7 Qg8 63 Qa6+ Nb6+
64 Kb4 Qe6 65 Kb5.
Finally the king joins in to support the
attack. Black can no longer resist. After
65 . . . Na8 White wins simply with
66 Qxe6+ Kxe6 67 Kc6 f3 68 Bel followed
by Kb7 and Kxa8. Black's king can hold
White in temporarily by following to c8,
but with the white bishop at g3, Black
quickly runs out of moves. Larsen tries to
bluff his way out.
65 . . . f3 66 Qxb6 resigns.
After 66 . . . Qxb6+ 67 Kxb6 both sides
obtain new queens, but White has Qf8+
winning at the end.
Game 36:
Lothar Schmid - Jan Hein Donner
English Opening
Schmid's first game in defence of his
Master Game title was a fine scrap. Donner
acquired a perfectly wretched position in
the middlegame, but defended
ingeniously. A strange pawn structure
virtually cut the board in two, but the
Dutch grandmaster managed to work a
rook round the right side to aid his king.
Complications continued into the
endgame, but finally a perpetual check
brought the game to a fair end.
1 e4 d6 2 c4.
A very unusual move which soon leads the
game away from the Pirc Defence into
English Opening territory.
2 . . . c5 3 Ne2 e5.
We are now back in one of Schmid's
favourite opening lines, as we know from
game 27, but this time he is playing for
more than a draw.
4 d3 Nc6 5 Nbc3 g6 6 g3 Bg7 7 Bg2 Nge7
8 0-0 0-0 9 a3 a6 10 Rbl Rb8 11 b4 cxb4
12 axb4 b5 13 cxbS axb5 14 h3.
DONNER: That is a funny move. The
position is completely symmetrical and he
tries to lose a move. So far I have only
copied his moves. Shall I play h6 or is it
time for an independent move? Well, I'm
getting a little fed up with this. I think I
now play my own game.
14 . . . Be6 15 Nd5.
Now Black cannot play 15 . . . NxdS
without losing a piece to 16 exd5. For that
reason 14 . . . f5 was a better way to break
the symmetry.
15 . . . Qd7 16 Kh2 Bxd5 17 exd5 Nd4
18 Nxd4 exd4.
8
i
i
6
i
a b c d e f g h
134
SCHMID: What a funny pawn formation at
the centre now. It's another type of game
than chess, it's halma perhaps. So who's
better: the white bishop on c1 or black
knight on e7? / prefer the white position
slightly. / am the first one who gets the
open file.
19 Ra1.
DONNER: /t seems that my judgment was
wrong in this position. He's obviously
better. His bishop on g2 is stronger than
my knight. / can't keep it at e7. / must go
to b6 perhaps, then / have a threat to go to
a4 and c3.
19 . .. NcB 20 Bf4 Nb6 21 Ra6 Be5
22 Bh6 RfcB.
Schmid now turns his attention to the
K-side and prepares a massive attack on
that wing.
23 f4 Bf6 24 f5 Be5 25 Qg4 Rc7 26 h4 KhB
27 Kh3.
DONNER: This is really a desperate
position. / will be crushed if / don't find
anything. Perhaps / have a little joke here. /
can play the rook to gB and I'm threatening
to take at f5. Then he has to play f6 and
that closes the position. I'm no doubt still
lost but / have small drawing chances.
27 . . . RgB 2B f6 RbB 29 Be4 Rc2.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e 9 h
SCHMID: He threatens now Rh2+ and my
queen would be lost. I'm sorry to be so
short of time, there are so many
possibilities either to exchange queens or
even to put something in between on f5.
Rf5 would be interesting, he cannot take it,
/ should mate him on g7. He could take on
f6, then / could sacrifice a queen: Rxf6,
Rh2+; Kxh2, Qxg4; Rxf7 and I'm
threatening Rxb6 and mate on fB, or even
Ra6 to a7 with another mating attack. This
would be nice for White, but he has other
better defences. Maybe he could retreat
with his queen to cB, attacking my rook on
a6. / could even then sacrifice this rook
with h5, and if he takes it then hxg6, and if
he takes with the h-pawn then Bg7 +, KgB,
Rh5 and mates him. So many lines,
however I'm not sure this is correct. / have
to play simply, otherwise my time will not
be enough. / see a line which seems to be
easy.
30 Qxd7 Nxd7 31 Bg7 + KgB 32 Ra7 RdB.
SCHMID: My problem is now that my
pawn on f6 which is so strong, is also a
little weak. His minor pieces are attacking
this pawn and bind my pieces to cover it. /
can win a pawn by Rb7, but he has counter
135
SCHMID: What a funny pawn formation at
the centre now. It's another type of game
than chess, it's halma perhaps. So who's
better: the white bishop on c7 or black
knight on e7? I prefer the white position
slightly. I am the first one who gets the
open file.
19 Ral.
DONNER: It seems that my judgment was
wrong in this position. He
'
s obviously
better. His bishop on g2 is stronger than
my knight. I can
'
t keep it at el. I must go
to b6 perhaps, then I have a threat to go to
a4 and c3.
19 . . . Nc8 20 Bf4 Nb6 21 Ra6 Be5
22 Bh6 Rfc8.
Schmid now turns his attention to the
K
-side and prepares a massive attack on
that wing.
23 f4 Bf6 24 f5 Be5 25 Qg4 Rc7 26 h4 Kh8
27 Kh3.
DONNER: This is really a desperate
position. I will be crushed if I don
'
t find
anything. Perhaps I have a little joke here. I
can play the rook to g8 and I
'
m threatening
to take at f5. Then he has to play f6 and
that closes the position. I'm no doubt still
lost but I have small drawing chances.
27 . . . RgB 28 f6 Rb8 29 Be4 Rc2.
8
1
abcdefgh
SCHMID: He threatens now Rh2+ and my
queen would be lost. I
'
m sorry to be so
short of time, there are so many
possibilities either to exchange queens or
even to put something in between on f5.
Rf5 would be interesting, he cannot take it,
I should mate him on g7. He could take on
f6, then I could sacrifice a queen: RxfS,
Rh2+; Kxh2, Qxg4; Rxf7 and I'm
threatening Rxb6 and mate on f8, or even
Ra6 to a? with another mating attack. This
would be nice for White, but he has other
better defences. Maybe he could retreat
with his queen to c8, attacking my rook on
a6. I could even then sacrifice this rook
with h5, and if he takes it then hxg6, and if
he takes with the h-pawn then Bg7+, Kg8,
Rh5 and mates him. So many lines,
however I'm not sure this is correct. I have
to play simply, otherwise my time will not
be enough. I see a line which seems to be
easy.
30 Qxd7 Nxd7 31 Bg7+ Kg8 32 Ra7 RdB.
SCHMID: My problem is now that my
pawn on f6 which is so strong, is also a
little weak. His minor pieces are attacking
this pawn and bind my pieces to cover it. I
can win a pawn by Rb7, but he has counter
135
chances; he can attack my g3 pawn by Re2
and Re3. Otherwise he seems able to free
himself by h5. I think better is to continue
my attack, h5 myself. He cannot take it or
my rook will get the f5 square.
33 h5 Re2 34 hxg6 hxg6 35 Kh4.
DONNER: I don't see any chances for me
to attack the king any more. I must give
the check. Jf he plays g4 and Kg5 I'm
completely lost.
35 Rh2+ 36 Kg4 Rh7.
A nice defence, threatening Rxg7 followed
by fS+. White cannot make progress with
37 KgS, because 37 ... RhS+ forces it back
again. Schmid decides to allow Donner his
trick.
37 Rb7 Rxg7 38 fxg7 f5+ 39 Bxi5 gxf5
40 Rxf5 Bxg7 41 Rg5 Ne5+.
Black is in a nasty pin, but this check
begins his escape from trouble.
42 Kf5 Rf8+ 43 Ke4 Nf7 44 Rf5 Re8+
45 Kf3 Ne5+.
SCHMID: Both my king and the pawn on
d3 are attacked, but just one move will be
all right. He has no check which will bring
me into trouble.
46 Ke2.
DONNER: Now I have the chances. Do I
play for a win? Yes, I'll play Bh6.
46 Bh6 47 Rf6.
This strong defence had been overlooked
by Donner. 47 ... Ng4+ is met by 48 Re6.
Now Black saves the game by constructing
a perpetual check.
47 Be3 48 Rxd6 Rf8 49 Kdl Rfl +
50 Kc2 Rcl + drawn.
136
The white king cannot go to b2 without
allowing Nxd3+, so Black's rook can check
for ever on c1, c2 and c3.
Game 37:
Jan Hein Donner - Tony Miles
Nimzo-Indian Defence
A good slugging draw. Miles, perhaps
unwisely, chose an opening variation
which has long been a favourite of
Donner's. The Dutchman had, in fact,
played the first twenty moves in an earlier
game. Miles found it hard to create active
play and sacrificed two pawns to that end.
This led to an interesting dynamic equality,
with Donner returning the material to free
his king from danger.
1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 e6 3 Nc3 Bb4 4 e3 0-0
5 Bd3 d5 6 Nf3 c5 7 0-0 Nc6 8 a3 Bxc3
9 bxc3 dxc4 10 Bxc4 Qc7.
This is one of the oldest main lines of the
Nimzo-Indian. In compensation for giving
up the bishop pair, Black frees his game
with eS and obtains some pressure down
the c-file.
11 Bd3 e5 12 Qc2 Re8 13 dxe5 Nxe5
14 Nxe5 Qxe5 15 f3 Bd7 16 a4 Rad8.
Now White tries to get his central pawns
moving, while Black would like to organise
some play against the split Q-side pawns.
17 Rel Bc6 18 e4 Nd5 19 Bd2 Nf4 20 Bfl.
chances; he can attack my g3 pawn by Re2
and Re3. Otherwise he seems able to free
himself by h5. I think better is to continue
my attack, h5 myself. He cannot take it or
my rook will get the f5 square.
33 h5 Re2 34 hxg6 hxg6 35 Kh4.
DONNER: / don't see any chances for me
to attack the king any more. I must give
the check. Jf he plays g4 and Kg5 I'm
completely lost.
35 . . . Rh2+ 36 Kg4 Rh7.
A nice defence, threatening Rxg7 followed
by f5+. White cannot make progress with
37 Kg5, because 37 . . . Rh5+ forces it back
again. Schmid decides to allow Donner his
trick.
37 Rb7 Rxg7 38 fxg7 f5+ 39 Bxf5 gxf5
40 Rxf5 Bxg7 41 Rg5 Ne5+.
Black is in a nasty pin, but this check
begins his escape from trouble.
42 Kf5 Rf8+ 43 Ke4 Nf7 44 Rf5 Re8+
45 Kf3 Ne5+.
SCHMID: Both my king and the pawn on
d3 are attacked, but just one move will be
all right. He has no check which will bring
me into trouble.
46 Ke2.
DONNER: Now / have the chances. Do I
play for a win? Yes, I
'
ll play Bh6.
46 . . . Bh6 47 Rf6.
This strong defence had been overlooked
by Donner. 47 . . . Ng4+ is met by 48 Re6.
Now Black saves the game by constructing
a perpetual check.
47 . . . Be3 48 Rxd6 Rf8 49 Kdl Rf1 +
50 Kc2 Rc1+ drawn.
The white king cannot go to b2 without
allowing Nxd3+, so Black
'
s rook can check
for ever on d, c2 and c3.
Game 37:
Jan Hein Donner - Tony Miles
Nimzo-lndian Defence
A good slugging draw. Miles, perhaps
unwisely, chose an opening variation
which has long been a favourite of
Donner's. The Dutchman had, in fact,
played the first twenty moves in an earlier
game. Miles found it hard to create active
play and sacrificed two pawns to that end.
This led to an interesting dynamic equality,
with Donner returning the material to free
his king from danger.
1 d4 Nf6 2 c4 e6 3 Nc3 Bb4 4 e3 0-0
5 Bd3 d5 6 Nf3 c5 7 0-0 Nc6 8 a3 Bxc3
9 bxc3 dxc4 10 Bxc4 Qc7.
This is one of the oldest main lines of the
Nimzo-lndian. In compensation for giving
up the bishop pair, Black frees his game
with e5 and obtains some pressure down
the c-file.
11 Bd3 e5 12 Qc2 Re8 13 dxe5 Nxe5
14 Nxe5 Qxe5 15 f3 Bd7 16 a4 Rad8.
Now White tries to get his central pawns
moving, while Black would like to organise
some play against the split Q-side pawns.
17 Rel Bc6 18 e4 Nd5 19 Bd2 Nf4 20 Bfl.
136
8

7
i _ifl
6
_.t __ .
5
r
~
m ~
II
f ~
-
4
~ -
- ~ -
?L.,"
3
0 n ~
- ~ -
2
- ~
- ~
a b c d e
9
h
MILES: I've been wanting to play the
Nimzo-Indian for some time but everyone
avoids it these days, they always play
Queen's Indians instead. At least I've got a
main-line position. The trouble is he's
been playing so quickly. I have a feeling
it's the sort of position he's very used to.
Now the problem is he wants to advance
on the K-side with g3 and f4, very slowly
probably. At the moment both moves
come with gain of tempo because they hit
my knight and queen, so what about
regrouping this knight? I put it on e6, that's
a nice central square; it controls f4, d4 and
defends the pawn on c5.
20 .. Ne6.
DONNER: That is a remarkable move. I
have had this position several times
already. The Dutch player Sosonko played
c4, which is a pawn sacrifice. It seems he
isn't afraid of this position, I have the two
bishops but it's true his knight is very
active. He's going to attack me on the
K-side. Who's coming first there? I must
play g3 and f4, but first let me put my
bishop on e3.
21 Be3 .
MILES: He's going to play g3 so I'd like to
undermine it to get some play. h5 and h4
is a natural idea; the only other thing
would be to try and double on the d-fi/e,
but that looks too slow. I think I should
play like Larsen.
21 hS.
DONNER: That is a very good move.
Perhaps I should have played g3
immediately. Perhaps I have lost a tempo
already with Be3. Well, I must advance with
my K-side pawns.
22 g3.
MILES: Well, I didn't scare him. If I play
h5, I must play h4.
22 ... h4.
DONNER: Can I take it? Looks silly, but it's
always these silly moves you have to look
at. No, if I take, he plays Qf6; I can't do
that so I must protect the pawn.
23 Bf2 NgS 24 Bg2 Qe6.
Continuing his policy of active K-side play,
Miles gives up his c-pawn. A brave
decision, but the alternative was to allow
the white pawns to start rolling with f4.
25 BxcS Nh3+ 26 Bxh3 Qxh3 27 Qg2
Qxg2+ 28 Kxg2 Rd2+ 29 Kh3.
Despite the queen exchange, Black's
initiative continues, but he is still a pawn
behind.
137
s
8
a
i
abcdefgh
MILES: I've been wanting to play the
Nimzo-lndian for some time but everyone
avoids it these days, they always play
Queen's Indians instead. At least I've got a
main-line position. The trouble is he
'
s
been playing so quickly. I have a feeling
it's the sort of position he's very used to.
Now the problem is he wants to advance
on the K-side with g3 and f4, very slowly
probably. At the moment both moves
come with gain of tempo because they hit
my knight and queen, so what about
regrouping this knight? I put it on eS, that
'
s
a nice central square; it controls f4, d4 and
defends the pawn on c5.
20 . . . Ne6.
DONNER: That is a remarkable move. I
have had this position several times
already. The Dutch player Sosonko played
c4, which is a pawn sacrifice. It seems he
isn't afraid of this position. I have the two
bishops but it's true his knight is very
active. He
'
s going to attack me on the
K-side
.
Who's coming first there? I must
play g3 and f4, but first let me put my
bishop on e3.
21 Be3.
MILES: He's going to play g3 so I'd like to
undermine it to get some play. h5 and h4
is a natural idea; the only other thing
would be to try and double on the d-file,
but that looks too slow. I think I should
play like Larsen.
21 . . . h5.
DONNER: That is a very good move.
Perhaps I should have played g3
immediately. Perhaps I have lost a tempo
already with Be3. Well, I must advance with
my K-side pawns.
22 g3.
MILES: Well, I didn't scare him. If I play
h5, I must play h4.
22 . . . h4.
DONNER: Can I take it? Looks silly,
but it's
always these silly moves you have to look
at. No, if I take, he plays Qf6; I can't do
that so I must protect the pawn.
23 Bf2 Ng5 24 Bg2 Qe6.
Continuing his policy of active K-side play,
Miles gives up his c-pawn. A brave
decision, but the alternative was to allow
the white pawns to start rolling with f4.
25 Bxc5 Nh3+ 26 Bxh3 Qxh3 27 Qg2
Qxg2+ 28 Kxg2 Rd2+ 29 Kh3.
Despite the queen exchange. Black's
initiative continues, but he is still a pawn
behind.
137
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e 9 h
MILES: I had a clear line of play if he went
back, but now he comes forward. Can he
really do this? I must take on g3; can he
take with the pawn? I have lines like Re5;
Be3, Rh5 +; Kg4, I can even play something
like Bd7+ then, after Kxh5, I have Rh2+;
Kg5, f6+; Kg6, Be8+; Kf5, Bd7+; then if he
goes to f4, I have g5 mate, but he could
come to g6 and I only have a draw. /t's all
very interesting though. Anyway I must
take on g3.
29 . hxg3.
DONNER: Now I'm definitely better. How
shall I take back? If I take with the king, he
plays Rd3 and the pawn on f3 is pinned.
There are dangerous moments when he
checks me with the other rook after Re6 or
Re5. Okay, let him chase my king, it
becomes better and better probably.
30 hxg3.
MILES: There must be something for me
here. The only trouble is the black squares,
I haven't anything to control them with.
Re5 looks the most dangerous, hits his
bishop. If he goes to e3, I can check on
h5; I get many threats. Maybe e3 is the
138
wrong square, he wants to escape with his
king there. Maybe he can even take the
second pawn on a7. But I think I must play
Re5 to keep my initiative.
30 ReS.
DONNER: I can't believe that this is really
an attack. I take at a7. Is it dangerous? Is
there Rh5+? No, my king is very well
placed as a matter of fact.
31 Bxa7 RhS+ 32 Kg4 Rh6 33 Bd4.
MILES: That's a good solid move. Now one
of my ideas was to play Rg2 to try and get
the g-pawn back, but it's not so wonderful.
I still have chances of trying to create a
mating net, maybe later by Rd3 to cut off
his flight square, but I must have
something to control the black squares. His
Bd4 isn't active; I have another free move.
33 ... f6.
DONNER: Now it's becoming dangerous
really. Kf4, Rd3, g4, Rh3, that is very
unpleasant. I must do something
immediately because he's threatening to
mate me now. His bishop is very strong. I
must change a pair of rooks.
34 Rad1.
MILES: That's annoying, I can never cut off
his flight square with Rd3 now. I could bail
out and get his a-pawn back, but I think I
can get more than this out of it. I ought to
settle something on the K-side. How's Rg2?
Threatens Rg6+; should get the pawn back.
34 . Rg2.
DONNER: I'm two pawns up, but I'm
afraid I'm going to lose both of them. Well,
I see a small chance.
35 Kf4.
8
m
a a
1
abcdefgh
MILES: / had a. clear line of play if he went
back, but now he comes forward. Can he
really do this? I must take on g3; can he
take with the pawn? I have lines like Re5;
Be3, Rh5+; Kg4, I can even play something
like Bd7+ then, after Kxh5, I have Rh2+;
Kg5, f6+; Kg6, Be8+; Kf5, Bd7+; then if he
goes to f4, I have g5 mate, but he could
come to g6 and I only have a draw. It
'
s all
very interesting though. Anyway I must
take on g3.
29 . . . hxg3.
DONNER: Now I'm definitely better. How
shall I take back? If I take with the king, he
plays Rd3 and the pawn on f3 is pinned.
There are dangerous moments when he
checks me with the other rook after Re6 or
Re5. Okay, let him chase my king, it
becomes better and better probably.
30 hxg3.
MILES: There must be something for me
here. The only trouble is the black squares,
I haven't anything to control them with.
Re5 looks the most dangerous, hits his
bishop. If he goes to e3, I can check on
h5; I get many threats. Maybe e3 is the
wrong square, he wants to escape with his
king there. Maybe he can even take the
second pawn on a7. But I think I must play
Re5 to keep my initiative.
30 . . . Re5.
DONNER: / can't believe that this is really
an attack. I take at a7. Is it dangerous? Is
there Rh5 +? No, my king is very well
placed as a matter of fact.
31 Bxa7 Rh5+ 32 Kg4 Rh6 33 Bd4.
MILES: That's a good solid move. Now one
of my ideas was to play Rg2 to try and get
the g-pawn back, but it's not so wonderful.
I still have chances of trying to create a
mating net, maybe later by Rd3 to cut off
his flight square, but I must have
something to control the black squares. His
Bd4 isn't active; I have another free move.
33 . . . f6.
DONNER: Now it's becoming dangerous
really. Kf4, Rd3, g4, Rh3, that is very
unpleasant. I must do something
immediately because he's threatening to
mate me now. His bishop is very strong. I
must change a pair of rooks.
34 Radl.
MILES: That's annoying, I can never cut off
his flight square with Rd3 now. I could bail
out and get his a-pawn back, but I think I
can get more than this out of it. I ought to
settle something on the K-side. How
'
s Rg2?
Threatens Rg6+; should get the pawn back.
34 . . . Rg2.
DONNER: I'm two pawns up,
but I'm
afraid I
'
m going to lose both of them. Well,
I see a small chance.
35 Kf4.
138
MILES: I can take on a4 with tempo any
time but I've got to win one of those
K-side pawns to be really safe. I think it
must be g5 +, getting the pawn
immediately. I think he's given up trying to
win; he's letting me out with a draw.
35 gS+ 36 Ke3 Rxg3 37 Rg1 Rxg1
38 Rxg1 Bxa4.
DONNER: It's hopelessly drawn, but you
can play. I can never lose.
39 eS.
This wins a pawn for Donner, but indeed
the resulting ending is hopelessly drawn.
White's king can never join in and Black
establishes a permanent blockade.
39 fxeS 40 RxgS+ Kf7 41 BxeS Rh3
42 Kf2 Bc6 43 f4 Ke6 44 Ke2 Be4
45 Bd4 BfS Draw agreed.
After 46 Rg7 Rh7 White has nothing to do.
Game 38:
Bent Larsen Lothar Schmid
Queen's Gambit Declined
A tense struggle developed from the
opening with the kings castled on opposite
sides of the board. Schmid handled his
position with great subtlety and appeared
to have a good game. Then he blundered,
overlooking a tactical possibility which let
Larsen's pieces in
1 c4 e6 2 Nc3 dS 3 d4 Nf6 4 cxdS exdS
5 BgS Be7 6 e3 c6 7 Bd3 h6.
Donner was to play the theoretically
recommended 7 ... Ne4 in game 39
against Larsen. Schmid's move gives the
bishop the chance to change diagonals and
avoid exchange.
8 Bf4 Nbd7 9 Nf3 Nf8 10 h3 Ng6
11 Bh2 Bd6 12 Bxd6 Qxd6 13 Bxg6 fxg6.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e f 9 h
LARSEN: I want to play Ne5. I could also
play Qb3 so that his bishop has to stay
home for a moment. Ne5 is nice because it
forces him to play g5. He cannot play Bf5
because of g4. Ne5 looks natural, but I
hate making natural moves.
14 NeS.
SCHMID: That attacks my pawn. Bf5 would
be a mistake because of g4. The only move
is g5, but I think it is sufficient.
14 gS.
LARSEN: I could still castle K-side and later
maybe f4. No, I think I have to castle
Q-side. The queen can go to c2 or d3; that
stops his bishop from going to f5. If I go to
c2, then afterwards my rook on d1
indirectly threatens his queen. Also I like it
because he gets the f-file and I like to
protect f2.
139
MILES: / can take on a4 with tempo any
time but I've got to win one of those
K
-side pawns to be really sa
fe. I think it
must be g5+, getting the pawn
immediately. I think he's given up trying to
win; he
'
s letting me out with a draw.
35 . . . g5+ 36 Ke3 Rxg3 37 Rgl Rxgl
38 Rxgl Bxa4.
DONNER: It's hopelessly drawn, but you
can play. I can never lose.
39 e5.
This wins a pawn for Donner, but indeed
the resulting ending is hopelessly drawn.
White's king can never join in and Black
establishes a permanent blockade.
39 . . . fxe5 40 Rxg5+ Kf7 41 Bxe5 Rh3
42 Kf2 Bc6 43 f4 Ke6 44 Ke2 Be4
45 Bd4 Bf5 Draw agreed.
After 46 Rg7 Rh7 White has nothing to do.
Game 38:
Bent Larsen - Lothar Schmid
Queen's Gambit Declined
A tense struggle developed from the
opening with the kings castled on opposite
sides of the board. Schmid handled his
position with great subtlety and appeared
to have a good game. Then he blundered,
overlooking a tactical possibility which let
Larsen's pieces in decisively.
1 c4 e6 2 Nc3 d5 3 d4 Nf6 4 cxd5 exdS
5 BgS Be7 6 e3 c6 7 Bd3 h6.
Donner was to play the theoretically
recommended 7 . . . Ne4 in game 39
against Larsen. Schmid
'
s move gives the
bishop the chance to change diagonals and
avoid exchange.
8 Bf4 Nbd7 9 Nf3 Nf8 10 h3 Ng6
11 Bh2 Bd6 12 Bxd6 Qxd6 13 Bxg6 fxg6.
8
1
a
a b c d e f g h
LARSEN: / want fo play Ne5. I could also
play Qb3 so that his bishop has to stay
home for a moment. Ne5 is nice because it
forces him to play g5. He cannot play Bf5
because of g4. Ne5 looks natural, but I
hate making natural moves.
14 Ne5.
SCHMID: That attacks my pawn. Bf5 would
be a mistake because of g4. The only move
is g5, but I think it is sufficient.
14 . . . g5.
LARSEN: / could still castle K-side and later
maybe f4. No, I think I have to castle
Q
-side
.
The queen can go to c2 or d3; that
stops his bishop from going to f5. If I go to
c2, then afterwards my rook on dl
indirectly threatens his queen. Also I like it
because he gets the f-file and I like to
protect f2.
139
lS Qc2 0-0 16 0-0-0.
SCHMID: I have to develop first my bishop
and then ask his knight what he wants to
do there on e5, by retreating my own
knight to d7. Then the decision for him will
not be so easy.
16 ... Be6 17 g4 Nd7 18 f4.
Taking advantage of a tactical idea in order
to defend his knight.
18 ... gxf4 19 Ng6 Rf6 20 Nxf4 Re8.
LARSEN: Oh that is annoying, he wins
some kind of tempo because when he
plays Bf7 later he's attacking the pawn. This
is difficult, I don't like it too much. I can
play Rg1, he plays Bf7, and in some cases
he plays g5 afterwards. I can protect e3,
but still in some cases I play Rg1 and g5,
my rook takes on g5 and then the other
rook is unprotected on e1 so he can take
on f4. That was a strong move he made. I
have to protect e3 at once, Qd2; I don't
like to go away from that diagonal but
maybe it's good to get away from a white
square where it can be attacked by the
bishop.
21 Qd2.
SCHMID: Now he threatens to push his
pawns against my king, but I shall have a
lot of counterplay at the queen's wing
because his queen is a little bit exposed on
d2. I play Nb6 and I shall have a threat to
go to c4.
21 ... Nb6.
LARSEN: I cannot allow Nc4, so I have no
choice. After b3 his knight is a little
except for sacrifices. My king is
a Itttle open, but there is nothing else.
22 b3 as.
140
LARSEN: I have to start attacking. Rg1, but
which rook? That's a problem because if I
play Rdg1 then h3 is protected; sometimes
it could be important, there's also a flight
square for my king. There's probably
something wrong with it. I must make the
natural move.
23 Rhg1.
SCHMID: He wants to attack with g5 and
so on. However my position looks rather
solid, all the pieces are well placed. Let's
be consistent.
23 . .. a4.
LARSEN: Normally one shouldn't take
notice of such moves as long as they
contain no direct threats, but maybe I can
take with the knight, knight takes knight,
pawn takes. He probably plays Ra8; even if
gets mated I then get an endgame
With some weak pawns. I don't like that. I
think I have to play g5.
24 gS hxgS 2S RxgS axb3 26 axb3 BfS.
Both attacks are gathering momentum
now. White is ready to add to his g-file
pressure, while Black keeps the move
Qa3+ in reserve.
27 NhS Rf7.
15Qc2 0-0 16 0-0-0.
SCHMID: / have to develop first my bishop
and then ask his knight what he wants to
do there on e5, by retreating my own
knight to d7. Then the decision for him will
not be so easy.
16 . . . Be6 17 g4 Nd7 18 f4.
Taking advantage of a tactical idea in order
to defend his knight.
18 . . . gxf4 19 Ng6 Rf6 20 Nxf4 Re8.
LARSEN: Oh that is annoying, he wins
some kind of tempo because when he
plays Bf7 later he
'
s attacking the pawn. This
is difficult, I don't like it too much. I can
play Rg1, he plays Bf7, and in some cases
he plays g5 afterwards. I can protect e3,
but still in some cases I play Rg1 and g5,
my rook takes on g5 and then the other
rook is unprotected on e1 so he can take
on f4. That was a strong move he made. I
have to protect e3 at once, Qd2; I don't
like to go away from that diagonal but
maybe it
'
s good to get away from a white
square where it can be attacked by the
bishop.
21 Qd2.
SCHMID: Now he threatens to push his
pawns against my king, but I shall have a
lot of counterplay at the queen's wing
because his queen is a little bit exposed on
d2. I play Nb6 and I shall have a threat to
go to c4.
21 . . . Nb6.
LARSEN: / cannot allow Nc4, so I have no
choice. After b3 his knight is a little
misplaced except for sacrifices. My king is
a little open, but there is nothing else.
22 b3 a5.
LARSEN: / have to start attacking. Rg1,
but
which rook? That
'
s a problem because if I
play Rdg1 then h3 is protected; sometimes
it could be important, there's also a flight
square for my king. There
'
s probably
something wrong with it. I must make the
natural move.
23 Rhgl.
SCHMID: He wants to attack with g5 and
so on. However my position looks rather
solid, all the pieces are well placed. Let's
be consistent.
23 . . . a4.
LARSEN: Normally one shouldn't take
notice of such moves as long as they
contain no direct threats, but maybe I can
take with the knight, knight takes knight,
pawn takes. He probably plays Ra8; even if
nobody gets mated I then get an endgame
with some weak pawns. I don
'
t like that. I
think I have to play g5.
24 g5 hxg5 25 Rxg5 axb3 26 axb3 Bf5.
Both attacks are gathering momentum
now. White is ready to add to his g-file
pressure, while Black keeps the move
Qa3+ in reserve.
27 Nh5 Rf7.
140
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e f 9 h
LARSEN: He didn't play Qa3+; he could
have forced the exchange of queens, but
of course he likes to keep that threat. Now
Nxg7 is no good; he checks with the
queen, exchanges queens, he takes my
knight, I take his bishop and then he takes
the pawn on e3 and I get a difficult ending;
three weak pawns, not nice. Rdg1 I don't
think creates many threats. I think I must
play Rf1; it's nice to attack that bishop and
indirectly attack the rook which is
defending everything. I think I am okay
now.
28 Rf1.
SCHMID: He did not get into my trap to
take the g-pawn. Now this is dangerous.
He threatens to take my bishop and I
should do something against it. The solid
way is perhaps Qa3+, this forces the
queen exchange, then I c;over my bishop.
Or I can retreat immediately Bg6 and if he
takes my rook, king takes; his knight could
go back to f4 and the whole position is
about even. But why not play g6? If he
plays Ng3, then Qa3 +, Qb2, exchange
queens, then Bd3. This would be very
good for Black.
28 ... g6.
LARSEN: What's happening? He should
have checked me and exchanged queens.
What's happening now? I take on f5 and
that gives me the square c2 for my king. I
don't see what he can do. Yes, this is
fantastic. Three moves ago I thought I was
in trouble. Rxf5, he takes, I take and check
with the queen. Wonderful.
29 RhfS.
SCHMID: Oh my goodness, I made a
blunder. I see it now. This move g6 was
terribly bad; I should have checked on a3.
Now suddenly he threatens to mate me
and wins the queen after all. I could resign
immediately. Well, he did it cleverly;
myself, I was a fool to play that way. Okay
I have to take and playa few more moves
only.
29 .. RxfS 30 Rxi5 Qa3+ 31 Kc2 gxf5
32 Qg2+.
This killing check is the point of Larsen's
little combination. The queen penetrates to
g7. The end is easy and quick.
32 ... Kf7 33 Qg7 + Ke6 34 QeS+.
Now 34 ... Kf7 35 Qf6+ KgB 36 Qg7 is
mate, while 34 ... Kd7 loses the rook ~ f t r
35 Nf6+.
Black resigned.
Game 39:
Bent Larsen - Jan Hein Donner
Queen's Gambit DeClined
Larsen has a very subtle appreciation of
small endgame advantages, but this time
141
1
8
a
f a
g
LARSEN: He didn't play Qa3+; he could
have forced the exchange of queens, but
of course he likes to keep that threat. Now
Nxg7 is no good; he checks with the
queen, exchanges queens, he takes my
knight, I take his bishop and then he takes
the pawn on e3 and I get a difficult ending;
three weak pawns, not nice. Rdgl I don't
think creates many threats. I think I must
play Rfl; it
'
s nice to attack that bishop and
indirectly attack the rook which is
defending everything. I think I am okay
now.
28 Rfl.
SCHMID: He did not get into my trap to
take the g-pawn. Now this is dangerous.
He threatens to take my bishop and I
should do something against it. The solid
way is perhaps Qa3+, this forces the
queen exchange, then I cover my bishop.
Or I can retreat immediately Bg6 and if he
takes my rook, king takes; his knight could
go back to f4 and the whole position is
about even. But why not play g6? If he
plays Ng3, then Qa3+, Qb2, exchange
queens, then Bd3. This would be very
good for Black.
28... g6.
LARSEN: What's happening? He should
have checked me and exchanged queens.
What's happening now? I take on f5 and
that gives me the square c2 for my king. I
don't see what he can do. Yes, this is
fantastic. Three moves ago I thought I was
in trouble. Rxf5, he takes, I take and check
with the queen. Wonderful.
29 R1xf5.
SCHMID: Oh my goodness, I made a
blunder. I see it now. This move g6 was
terribly bad; I should have checked on a3.
Now suddenly he threatens to mate me
and wins the queen after all. I could resign
immediately. Well, he did it cleverly;
myself, I was a fool to play that way. Okay
I have to take and play a few more moves
only.
29 . . . Rxf5 30 Rxf5 Qa3+ 31 Kc2 gxf5
32Qg2+.
This killing check is the point of Larsen's
little combination. The queen penetrates to
g7. The end is easy and quick.
32 . . . Kf7 33 Qg7+ Ke6 34 Qe5+.
Now 34 . . . Kf7 35 Qf6+ Kg8 36 Qg7 is
mate, while 34 . . . Kd7 loses the rook after
35 Nf6+.
Black resigned.
Game 39:
Bent Larsen - Jan Hein Donner
Queen's Gambit Declined
Larsen has a very subtle appreciation of
small endgame advantages, but this time
141
he went straight from the opening into an
ending where he appeared to have nothing
at all. Donner looked bored for a long
time, and even seemed not a little irritated
that Larsen was continuing with his
winning attempts. The Dane, however, had
an idea in mind, which he delayed until
Donner was short of time. The Dutchman
defended wrongly, and Larsen scored a
surprising victory.
1 c4 e6 2 Nc3 d5 3 d4 Nf6 4 cxd5 exd5
5 Bg5 c6 6 e3 Be7 7 Bd3 Ne4
B Bxe7 Qxe7 9 Qc2 Bf5.
Note that White was threatening Nxd5 as
well as capturing on e4.
10 Nge2 Nd7 11 Ng3 Nxg3 12 hxg3 Bxd3
13 Qxd3 g6.
Donner's sensible plan of exchanging
pieces has left him with near equality.
White's main plan lies in the advance of
his Q-side pawns to provoke weaknesses.
14 b4 a6 15 a4.
White can continue to leave the b-pawn
unprotected. Qxb4 is always met by Rb1,
regaining the b7-pawn.
15 Nf6 16 Rb1 Ne4 17 Nxe4 dxe4
1B Qc3 0-0 19 0-0 RfdB 20 Qc5 Qxc5
21 bxc5 Rd7 22 g4.
A good move, discouraging Black from
playing h5 and f5; both white g-pawns are
now working, but his advantage is very
small.
22 ReB 23 Rb3 Kg7 24 Kh2 g5
25 Kg3 Kg6 26 f3 exf3 27 gxf3 h5
2B gxh5+ Kxh5 29 Rfb1 Ree7 30 f4 f5
31 Rh1 + Kg6 32 fxg5 Kxg5.
And this is where Larsen began his war of
attrition. For the next forty moves nothing
142
significant happened, except for the
exchange of one pair of rooks. Larsen tried
several feints, hoping to confuse Donner,
or at least give him to think
about. Only at move 75 did his plan begin
to become clear.
33 Kf3 Rh7 34 Rbb1 Rde7 35 Rbg1 + Kf6
36 as Rd7 37 Ke2 Rde7 38 Kd3 Rd7
39 Rf1 Ke6 40 Rhg1 Rdg7 41 Rxg7 Rxg7
42 Rh1 Rf7 43 Rh6+ Rf6 44 Rh4 Rf7
45 Rh6+ Rf6 46 Rh2 Rf7 47 Kc4 Kf6
48 Rh1 Re7 49 Kd3 Kg5 50 Rg1 + Kf6
51 RgB Rh7 52 RbB Rd7 53 Ke2 Rh7
54 Kf3 Rh3+ 55 Kf4 Rh4+ 56 Kg3 Rh7
57 RfB+ Kg5 58 Kg2 Re7 59 Kf3 Kg6
60 RdB Kf6 61 Rd6+ Kg5 62 RdB Kf6
63 RhB Kg6 64 Rh1 Kg5 65 Rf1 Kf6
66 Ke2 Kg5 67 Kd3 Kg4 68 Rf2 Kg5
69 Rg2+ Kf6 70 Rh2 Kg5 71 Rg2+ Kf6
72 Re2 Kg5 73 Re1 Kf6 74 Rb1 Rd7
75 Kc4.
abc d e 9
h
DONNER: For the last forty moves he has
done absolutely nothing. He has played his
rook to all possible squares and his king to
c4, d3, e2, f3 and even at one moment f4.
Now he has come back again just trying to
he went straight from the opening into an
ending where he appeared to have nothing
at all. Donner looked bored for a long
time, and even seemed not a little irritated
that Larsen was continuing with his
winning attempts. The Dane, however, had
an idea in mind, which he delayed until
Donner was short of time. The Dutchman
defended wrongly, and Larsen scored a
surprising victory.
1 c4 e6 2 Nc3 d5 3 d4 Nf6 4 cxd5 exd5
5 Bg5 c6 6 e3 Be7 7 Bd3 Ne4
8 Bxe7 Qxe7 9 Qc2 Bf5.
Note that White was threatening Nxd5 as
well as capturing on e4.
10 Nge2 Nd7 11 Ng3 Nxg3 12 hxg3 Bxd3
13 Qxd3 g6.
Donner's sensible plan of exchanging
pieces has left him with near equality.
White's main plan lies in the advance of
his Q-side pawns to provoke weaknesses.
14b4a6 15 a4.
White can continue to leave the b-pawn
unprotected. Qxb4 is always met by Rbl,
regaining the b7-pawn.
15 . . . Nf6 16 Rbl Ne4 17 Nxe4 dxe4
18 Qc3 0-0 19 0-0 RfdB 20 Qc5 Qxc5
21 bxc5 Rd7 22 g4.
A good move, discouraging Black from
playing h5 and f5; both white g-pawns are
now working, but his advantage is very
small.
22 . . . Re8 23 Rb3 Kg7 24 Kh2 g5
25 Kg3 Kg6 26 f3 exf3 27 gxf3 h5
28 gxh5+ Kxh5 29 Rfbl Ree7 30 f4 f5
31 Rh1+ Kg6 32 fxg5 Kxg5.
And this is where Larsen began his war of
attrition. For the next forty moves nothing
significant happened, except for the
exchange of one pair of rooks. Larsen tried
several feints, hoping to confuse Donner,
or at least give him something to think
about. Only at move 75 did his plan begin
to become clear.
33 Kf3 Rh7 34 Rbbl Rde7 35 Rbg1+ KfB
36 a5 Rd7 37 Ke2 Rde7 38 Kd3 Rd7
39 Rfl Ke6 40 Rhgl Rdg7 41 Rxg7 Rxg7
42 Rhl Rf7 43 Rh6+ Rf6 44 Rh4 Rf7
45 Rh6+ Rf6 46 Rh2 Rf7 47 Kc4 Kf6
48 Rhl Re7 49 Kd3 Kg5 50 Rg1+ Kf6
51 Rg8 Rh7 52 RbB Rd7 53 Ke2 Rh7
54 Kf3 Rh3+ 55 Kf4 Rh4+ 56 Kg3 Rh7
57 Rf8+ Kg5 58 Kg2 Re7 59 Kf3 Kg6
60 RdB Kf6 61 Rd6+ Kg5 62 RdB Kf6
63 RhB Kg6 64 Rhl Kg5 65 Rfl Kf6
66 Ke2 Kg5 67 Kd3 Kg4 68 Rf2 Kg5
69 Rg2+ KfB 70 Rh2 Kg5 71 Rg2+ Kf6
72 Re2 Kg5 73 Rel Kf6 74 Rbl Rd7
75 Kc4.
8
1
a b c d e f g h
DONNER: For the last forty moves he has
done absolutely nothing. He has played his
rook to all possible squares and his king to
c4, d3, e2, f3 and even at one moment f4.
Now he has come back again just trying to
142
find the best position for his pieces. I think
he has reached it now. The threat is dS. If I
take that with the pawn he plays Kd4 and
he has an excellent position because of the
check at b6. I must fight against dS by
playing the rook to e7.
75 Re7.
LARSEN: I must protect e3 with my rook.
It's funny how in these long games you
suddenly think of something that
happened a long time ago. If my pawn had
not gone from a4 to as, I could now have
the threat to play the king to b4, as and b6.
Well, I think he would then play his pawn
to as. No regrets, my pawn is one step
closer to queening, that's why it went to as
so long ago.
76 Rb3.
DONNER: I'm in a kind of zugzwang now;
when I go away with the rook along the
seventh rank, he plays dS; and the king
can't go to e6. I must play KgS.
76 . KgS.
LARSEN: Well I guess it's now or never. I
was hoping he would be more in time
pressure, but he still has 20 minutes. I
don't think I can improve my position. It
would be too much to go back with Kd3,
and dS is really very interesting. I must do
it, it's the only chance.
77 dS.
DONNER: At last the game is reaching its
climax. Now I must be very accurate. The
idea is to check and then take the pawn. I
see no other move.
77 Re4+ 78 Kd3 adS.
LARSEN: I don't know if this is a win, but
at least I can say I got this far.
79 Rxb7 Rc4 80 Rc7.
DONNER: Now I wish my king was at f6.
Then it is a dead draw. But I can play f4
and exchange an important pawn. It's very
dangerous because he plays Rc8, I take on
e3 and he plays c6. That looks very
dangerous. I must go back.
80 Kf6.
In fact this was the moment when Donner
panicked. After 80 ... f4 81 Rc8 fxe3
82 c6 Black has still time to return:
82 ... Kf6 83 c7 Ke7 and the king is close
enough to stop the pawn.
LARSEN: Now c6 is nothing. If I play Rc6+
and take the pawn on a6 then I have
gained a tempo, but in the meantime he
has improved his king position. But I think
it's the only move.
81 ReS + KeS 82 Rxa6 Rxc5 83 Ra8.
DONNER: Aye, aye! That is very painful;
that is horrible. Now he's threatening a6
and a7. I should have changed that last
pawn there at e3; I regret now that I played
Kf6 instead of f4. Am I losing? There's only
one way, I must go with the king to the
pawn.
83 Kd6 84 a6 Kc7.
LARSEN: What's happening? I thought he
would play RaS. No, It's the same of
course, exactly the same. What is now a7,
Kb7? I get some winning chances maybe.
No, there's only one move; that's Rf8. The
rook has to go away, so why not threaten
the pawn?
85 Rf8.
DONNER: This position is desperate,
because the pawn ending is lost. My two
pawns lose against his one because his
143
find the best position for his pieces. I think
he has reached it now. The threat is d5. If I
take that with the pawn he plays Kd4 and
he has an excellent position because of the
check at b6. I must fight against d5 by
playing the rook to el.
75 . . . Re7.
LARSEN: / must protect e3 with my rook.
It's funny how in these long games you
suddenly think of something that
happened a long time ago. If my pawn had
not gone from a4 to a5, I could now have
the threat to play the king to b4, a5 and b6.
Well, I think he would then play his pawn
to a5. No regrets, my pawn is one step
closer to queening, that
'
s why it went to a5
so long ago.
76 Rb3.
DONNER: I'm in a kind of zugzwang now;
when I go away with the rook along the
seventh rank, he plays d5; and the king
can
'
t go to e6. I must play Kg5.
76... Kg5.
LARSEN: Well I guess it's now or never. I
was hoping he would be more in time
pressure, but he still has 20 minutes. I
don't think I can improve my position. It
would be too much to go back with Kd3,
and d5 is really very interesting. I must do
it, it's the only chance.
77 d5.
DONNER: At last the game is reaching its
climax. Now I must be very accurate. The
idea is to check and then take the pawn. I
see no other move.
T! ... Re4+ 78 Kd3 cxd5.
LARSEN: / don't know if this is a win, but
at least I can say I got this far.
79 Rxb7 Rc4 80 Rc7.
DONNER: Now / wish my king was at f6.
Then it is a dead draw. But I can play f4
and exchange an important pawn. It
'
s very
dangerous because he plays Red, I take on
e3 and he plays c6. That looks very
dangerous. I must go back.
80 . . . Kf6.
In fact this was the moment when Donner
panicked. After 80 . . . f4 81 Rc8 fxe3
82 c6 Black has still time to return:
82 . . . Kf6 83 c7 Ke7 and the king is close
enough to stop the pawn.
LARSEN: Now c6 is nothing. If I play Rc6+
and take the pawn on a6 then I have
gained a tempo, but in the meantime he
has improved his king position. But I think
it's the only move.
81 Rc6+ Ke5 82 Rxa6 Rxc5 83 Ra8.
DONNER: Aye, aye! That is very painful;
that is horrible. Now he's threatening a6
and a7. I should have changed that last
pawn there at e3; I regret now that I played
Kf6 instead of f4. Am I losing? There's only
one way, I must go with the king to the
pawn.
83 . . . Kd6 84 a6 Kc7.
LARSEN: What's happening? I thought he
would play Ra5. No, It
'
s the same of
course, exactly the same. What is now al,
Kb7? I get some winning chances maybe.
No, there's only one move; that's Rf8. The
rook has to go away, so why not threaten
the pawn?
85 Rf8.
DONNER: This position is desperate,
because the pawn ending is lost. My two
pawns lose against his one because his
143
king is nearer. Well, I must do a move.
85 Ra5.
LARSEN: What's happening? I thought he
would play Kb6, but it was probably a win
anyway. I would have won both f5 and d5
and his king would have been cut off. But
now it's easy. a7, he takes, I check him,
then his king is on a7 after the exchange of
rooks, I play Kd4, he plays King b
something, I take on d5, then go to e5 and
I take on f5. Then I win with my last pawn.
No trouble.
86 a7 Kb7 87 a8(Q)+.
DONNER: Yes, I am horribly swindled
here. He wins the pawn ending with a
whole pawn down. This is hopeless.
Black resigned.
After 87 ... Rxa8 88 Rxa8 Kxa8 89 Kd4 the
white king takes both black pawns.
Game 40:
Tony Miles - Lothar Schmid
Neo-Gruiifeld Defence
This game was played at the same time as
Larsen-Donner. While that game looked so
drawish, there remained chances for
Schmid to force a play-off for the group: if
he beat Miles, then all players would end
level on 1% points. This accounts for
Schmid's play around move 30. He
suddenly lashed out and opened the game,
when passive defence was called for. This
brave winning try, however, was
thoroughly punished by Miles's attack.
1 g3 d5 2 Nf3 g6 3 c4 Nf6 4 Bg2 Bg7
5 d4 0-0 6 0-0 dxc4.
The main alternative is to hold firm in the
144
centre with 6 ... c6. With the move
played, Schmid gives up his Rawn
occupation of the centre in return for
piece activity.
7 Na3 Nc6 8 Nxc4 Be6 9 b3 Bd5
10 Bb2 as 11 Rc1 Qc8.
Black must keep dS and e4 under controi
to prevent the white centre pawns
expanding. This queen move prepares a
later Rd8 and Qe6, maintaining Black's
hold. Miles reacts immediately by chasing
the powerful bishop.
12 Ne3 Be4 13 Ne5.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e f 9 h
SCHMID: Now immediately complications.
Nxe5, dxe5, RdB would be fine, but he
could play better; Nxe5, Bxe4. No, I think
it's not in my style. I'll exchange bishops.
13 Bxg2 14 Kxg2 Nb4.
MILES: He ran away. Well, a3, where's he
going next? If he goes to a6, I have Ne5-c4
with the double threat of Nb6 and Nxa5;
that looks as if it wins a pawn. So he has to
go to d5; I take it and play e4; I've got a
wonderful space advantage. He can never
king is nearer. Well, I must do a move.
85 . . . Rd5.
LARSEN: What's happening? I thought he
would play Kb6, but it was probably a win
anyway. I would have won both f5 and d5
and his king would have been cut off. But
now it
'
s easy, a7, he takes, I check him,
then his king is on a7 after the exchange of
rooks, I play Kd4, he plays King b
something, I take on d5, then go to e5 and
I take on f5. Then I win with my last pawn.
No trouble.
86a7Kb7 87 a8(Q) + .
DONNER: Ves, / am horribly swindled
here. He wins the pawn ending with a
whole pawn down. This is hopeless.
Black resigned.
After 87 . . . Rxa8 88 Rxa8 Kxa8 89 Kd4 the
white king takes both black pawns.
Game 40:
Tony Miles - Lothar Schmid
Neo-Gruhfeld Defence
This game was played at the same time as
Larsen-Donner. While that game looked so
drawish, there remained chances for
Schmid to force a play-off for the group: if
he beat Miles, then all players would end
level on IVi points. This accounts for
Schmid's play around move 30. He
suddenly lashed out and opened the game,
when passive defence was called for. This
brave winning try, however, was
thoroughly punished by Miles's attack.
1 g3 d5 2 Nf3 g6 3 c4 Nf6 4 Bg2 Bg7
5d4 0-0 6 0-0 dxc4.
The main alternative is to hold firm in the
centre with 6 . . . c6. With the move
played, Schmid gives up his pawn
occupation of the centre in return for
piece activity.
7 Na3 Nc6 8 Nxc4 Be6 9 b3 Bd5
10 Bb2a5 11 Rcl QcB.
Black must keep d5 and e4 under control
to prevent the white centre pawns
expanding. This queen move prepares a
later Rd8 and Qe6, maintaining Black's
hold. Miles reacts immediately by chasing
the powerful bishop.
12 Ne3 Be4 13 Ne5.
8
3
1
1
a b c d e f g h
SCHMID: Now immediately complications.
Nxe5, dxe5, Rd8 would be fine, but he
could play better; Nxe5, Bxe4. No, I think
it's not in my style. I'll exchange bishops.
13 . . . Bxg2 14 Kxg2 Nb4.
MILES: He ran away. Well, a3, where's he
going next? If he goes to a6, I have Ne5-c4
with the double threat of Nb6 and Nxa5;
that looks as if it wins a pawn. So he has to
go to d5; I take it and play e4; I
'
ve got a
wonderful space advantage. He can never
144
take the knight on eS; he goes to b6 and
his knight's stupid. This looks very nice.
15 a3 Nbd5 16 NxdS Nxd5 17 e4.
SCHMID: There are two moves: b6 or f6
with the knight. I like it better that the
knight will defend the king's wing and at
the same time attack his pawn on e4. Then
we have this typical position where he has
one more line of space, four against three.
This is certainly an advantage for him, but
Black's position is very solid. I do not have
any weaknesses and I think this game
should not be too bad.
17 ... Nf6.
For the next dozen moves, Miles slowly
built up his position, but Schmid refused
to give ground. Black must always keep a
firm hold on d5 to prevent White breaking
through on that square, but Schmid
patiently defended with pawns on e6 and
c6.
18 Qe2 e6 19 Rfd1 Qd8 20 a4 e6
21 Ba3 Re8 22 Qf3 Qe7 23 Ne4 Red8.
White can win material here with
24 Bd6 Rxd6 25 Nxd6 Qxd6 26 e5 Qd5
27 exf6 Qxf3+ 28 Kxf3 Bxf6. Miles rejected
this line, since the final position offers
White no evident winning plan. Better to
keep the tension and wait.
24 Be5 Ra6 25 h3 Ne8 26 Qe3 b6
27 Ba3 Qb7 28 Kh2 Raa8.
MILES: I have to find a plan in this
position. I stand clearly better, but what
should I do? The thematic break is dS, but
it's not so easy to get enough pieces
defending that square. At the moment I
even have problems protecting my pawn
on d4. The correct plan has got to be
overprotecting the d-pawn. I must double
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e 9 h
rooks on the d-file. That looks clearly right.
29 Rd3.
SCHMID: I should try and attack on the
K-side, hS and perhaps later h4 and Kh7;
and the bishop might come occasionally to
h6. It is no special plan, but it is a plan.
Why not try; he is a little bit short of time.
29 h5.
MILES: He wants to play Kh7, Bh6; if
h4, I just play g4, it's a weakness. He's
welcome to play all of those. It just looks
weakening. I don't want to spend any time
on this. Just double rooks.
30 Red1.
SCHMID: I'm not very happy with my own
plan. It is so difficult to play well in such a
cramped position. Perhaps I should play
Rac8. Otherwise I have the possibility bS,
and the rook covers the pawn on as. All
these moves are not very nice. In fact, it's
better to continue with my plan.
30 Kh7.
MILES: I want to put some more pieces on
dS. Qf3 looks the next one, then maybe I'll
145
take the knight on e5; he goes to 66 and
his knight's stupid. This looks very nice.
15 a3 Nbd5 16 Nxd5 Nxd5 17 e4.
SCHMID: There are two moves: 66 or f6
with the knight. I like it better that the
knight will defend the king's wing and at
the same time attack his pawn on e4. Then
we have this typical position where he has
one more line of space, four against three.
This is certainly an advantage for him, but
Black's position is very solid. I do not have
any weaknesses and I think this game
should not be too bad.
17 . . . Nf6.
For the next dozen moves, Miles slowly
built up his position, but Schmid refused
to give ground. Black must always keep a
firm hold on d5 to prevent White breaking
through on that square, but Schmid
patiently defended with pawns on e6 and
c6.
18 Qe2 e6 19 Rfdl Qd8 20 a4 c6
21 Ba3 ReB 22 Qf3 Qc7 23 Nc4 Red8.
White can win material here with
24 Bd6 Rxd6 25 Nxd6 Qxd6 26 e5 Qd5
27 exf6 Qxf3+ 28 KxfB Bxf6. Miles rejected
this line, since the final position offers
White no evident winning plan. Better to
keep the tension and wait.
24 Bc5 Ra6 25 h3 NeS 26 Qe3 b6
27 Ba3 Qb7 28 Kh2 Raa8.
MILES: / have to find a plan in this
position. I stand clearly better, but what
should I do? The thematic break is d5, but
it's not so easy to get enough pieces
defending that square. At the moment I
even have problems protecting my pawn
on d4. The correct plan has got to be
overprotecting the d-pawn. I must double
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
rooks on the d-file. That looks clearly right.
29 Rd3.
SCHMID: / should try and attack on the
K-side
, h5 and perhaps later h4 and Kh7;
and the bishop might come occasionally to
h6. It is no special plan, but it is a plan.
Why not try; he is a little bit short of time.
29 . . . h5.
MILES: He wants fo play Kh7, Bh6; if
h4, I just play g4, it's a weakness. He's
welcome to play all of those. It just looks
weakening. I don
'
t want to spend any time
on this. Just double rooks.
30 Rcdl.
SCHMID: I'm not very happy with my own
plan. It is so difficult to play well in such a
cramped position. Perhaps I should play
Rac8. Otherwise I have the possibility 65,
and the rook covers the pawn on a5. All
these moves are not very nice. In fact, it's
better to continue with my plan.
30 . . . Kh7.
MILES: / want to put some more pieces on
c/5. Qf3 looks the next one, then maybe I
'
ll
-
A
1
m
7;
7,
v.
1
A
f
9
145
bring my bishop from c1 to g5. That might
be inconvenient. Also Qf3 gives e3 for the
knight. I'm going to get d5 and smash him.
31 Qf3.
SCHMID: Now he gives me the chance to
get that square d5 myself, if I risk f5. I shall
have a chance to get all these white
squares, d5, e4 and still a little pressure on
d4. The risk is that he will come to the
open e-file with his rooks. It's difficult to
seeojf I will have a good defence.
31 . f5.
MILES: He's going berserk. I can take it,
he's got to take with the e-pawn, and what
about the e-file? Playa rook to the e-file,
any rook. I've got penetration squares on
e6 and e7. How can he defend the
weaknesses on c6, b6, g6 and the seventh
rank?
32 exf5 exf5 33 Re3.
SCHMID: That's it. I do have now all these
white squares, d5 and e4, and pressure
against d4, but he has squares which are
even weaker than this. The question is
whether I have enough possibilities to
defend. I'm afraid I'm wrong here. Perhaps
I should try to get all my pieces on the
eighth rank to defend.
33 ... Rac8 34 Rde1 Qb8.
MILES: Okay let's start analysing some
lines. Do I go to e6 or e7? Re6 attacks c6,
it's nice. Re7 is always nice, then I put the
other one on e6. Maybe that should decide
for me. Let's see; Re7, if he plays Rc7, I can
just take it and win a pawn immediately if
there's nothing better. So Nf6 looks
146
natural, then the other rook to e6,
threatening his knight, Nd5 must be best,
but then I can just play Rxg7+, Kxg7; Ne5
threatening Rxg6+; his only defence is Nf6,
then Be7 is slaughter. I haven't got much
time, but Re7 has got to be a massacre.
35 Re7 Rc7.
Schmid surrenders a pawn, in the hope of
lessening the force of Miles's attack, but
even after the rook exchange, enough
white pieces remain near the black king.
36 Rxc7 Nxc7 37 Qxc6 Nd5 38 Re6 f4.
A desperate try to create some attacking
chances, but to no avail. White can play
39 Rxg6, but Miles finds something even
stronger.
39 Ne5 fxg3+ 40 fxg3 h4 41 Rxg6 Qc7.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e 9 h
And now the coup de grace.
42 Rh6+! Bxh6 43 Qg6+ Kh8
44 Qxh6+ Kg8 45 Qg5+ resigns.
After 45 ... Kh7 46 Qg6+ Kh8 47 Nf7+
the queen is lost, while 45 .... Kh8 allows
46 Qxd8+ Qxd8 47 Nf7+ winning a piece.
bring my bishop from c7 fo g5. That might
be inconvenient. Also Qf3 gives e3 for the
knight. I'm going to get d5 and smash him.
31 Qf3.
SCHMID: Now he gives me the chance to
get that square d5 myself, if I risk f5. I shall
have a chance to get all these white
squares, d5, e4 and still a little pressure on
d4. The risk is that he will come to the
open e-file with his rooks. It
'
s difficult to
see if I will have a good defence.
31 . . . f5.
MILES: He's going berserk. I can take it,
he's got to take with the e-pawn, and what
about the e-file? Play a rook to the e-file,
any rook. I
'
ve got penetration squares on
e6 and e7. How can he defend the
weaknesses on c6, b6, g6 and the seventh
rank?
32exf5exf5 33 Re3.
SCHMID: That's it. I do have now all these
white squares, d5 and e4, and pressure
against d4, but he has squares which are
even weaker than this. The question is
whether I have enough possibilities to
defend. I'm afraid I'm wrong here. Perhaps
I should try to get all my pieces on the
eighth rank to defend.
33 . . . Rac8 34 Rdel Qb8.
MILES: Okay let's start analysing some
lines. Do I go to e6 or e7? Re6 attacks c6,
it's nice. Re7 is always nice, then I put the
other one on e6. Maybe that should decide
for me. Let's see; Re7, if he plays Rc7, I can
just take it and win a pawn immediately if
there's nothing better. So Nf6 looks
natural, then the other rook to e6
,
threatening his knight, Nd5 must be best,
but then I can just play Rxg7+, Kxg7; Ne5
threatening Rxg6+; his only defence is Nf6,
then Be7 is slaughter. I haven't got much
time, but Re7 has got to be a massacre.
35 Re7 Rc7.
Schmid surrenders a pawn, in the hope of
lessening the force of Miles's attack,
but
even after the rook exchange, enough
white pieces remain near the black king.
36 Rxc7 Nxc7 37 Qxc6 Nd5 38 Re6 f4.
A desperate try to create some attacking
chances, but to no avail. White can play
39 Rxg6, but Miles finds something even
stronger.
39 Ne5 fxg3+ 40 fxg3 h4 41 Rxg6 Qc7.
8
1
1 1
1
abcdefgh
And now the coup de grace.
42 Rh6+! Bxh6 43 Qg6+ Kh8
44 Qxh6+ KgB 45 Qg5+ resigns.
After 45 . . . Kh7 46 Qg6+ Kh8 47 Nf7+
the queen is lost, while 45.. . . Kh8 allows
46 Qxd8+ Qxd8 47 Nf7+ winning a piece.
146
The Final
Game 41:
Nigel Short - Tony Miles
Sicilian Defence
Nigel's path to the final had been an
astounding success, but he would be the
first to admit that luck had travelled with
him. After all, Gligoric and Byrne had both
made uncharacteristic blunders, while Hort
had been within the narrowest margin of
victory. There is, however, no detraction
from the qualify of Nigel's play in this final
game. He outplays his powerful opponent
in a highly mature, positional style; a
wonderful performance by one who had
not yet reached his sixteenth birthday.
1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 Bb5+ Bd7.
Varying from the 3 ... Nd7 which Byrne
had played (game 32).
4 Bxd7 + Nxd7 5 0-0 Ngf6 6 Qe2 e6
1. c3 Be7 8 d4 0-0 9 Rd1 Rc8.
White has established an advantage in
space, thanks to his advanced centre
pawns, but Black has no weaknesses. With
his next move, Short tries to increase his
command of the board and drive Black
further back.
10 e5 Ne8 11 Nbd2 cxd4 12 cxd4 Qc7
13 Nf1 Qc4.
White hoped to use his extra space to
develop attacking chances against the king.
By exchanging queens, Black removes this
danger.
14 Qxc4 Rxc4 15 Ne3 Rc7 16 Bd2 d5
17 Rac1 Nb8 18 h4 Rxc1 19 Rxc1 Nc6.
White retains more territory, but his
central pawns are blocked on the same
coloured squares as his bishop. This
results in certain weaknesses on the white
squares which Black can hope eventually
to exploit by getting his knights to c4 or
d3. Meanwhile, White puts his faith in a
general K-side pawn advance.
20 h5 h6 21 Kf1 Nc7 22 Ke2 Rc8
23 Kd3 Kf8.
8
7
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a b c d e
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147
The Final
Game 41:
Nigel Short - Tony Miles
Sicilian Defence
Nigel's path to the final had been an
astounding success, but he would be the
first to admit that luck had travelled with
him. After all, Gligoric and Byrne had both
made uncharacteristic blunders, while Hort
had been within the narrowest margin of
victory. There is, however, no detraction
from the quality of Nigel's play in this final
game. He outplays his powerful opponent
in a highly mature, positional style; a
wonderful performance by one who had
not yet reached his sixteenth birthday.
1 e4 c5 2 Nf3 d6 3 Bb5+ Bd7.
Varying from the 3 . . . Nd7 which Byrne
had played (game 32).
4 Bxd7+ Nxd7 5 0-0 Ngf6 6 Qe2 e6
7 c3 Be7 8 d4 0-0 9 Rdl Rc8.
White has established an advantage in
space, thanks to his advanced centre
pawns, but Black has no weaknesses. With
his next move. Short tries to increase his
command of the board and drive Black
further back.
10 e5 Ne8 11 Nbd2 cxd4 12 cxd4 Qc7
13 Nfl Qc4.
White hoped to use his extra space to
develop attacking chances against the king.
By exchanging queens. Black removes this
danger.
14 Qxc4 Rxc4 15 Ne3 Rc7 16 Bd2 d5
17 Racl Nb8 18 h4 Rxcl 19 Rxcl NcS.
White retains more territory, but his
central pawns are blocked on the same
coloured squares as his bishop. This
results in certain weaknesses on the white
squares which Black can hope eventually
to exploit by getting his knights to c4 or
d3. Meanwhile, White puts his faith in a
general K-side pawn advance.
20 h5 h6 21 Kfl Nc7 22 Ke2 Rc8
23 Kd3 Kf8.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
1
3
f e
a
147
SHORT: I've got a nice bind on the K-side;
I'd like to gain a bit more space by playing
f4 and g4, preparing f5 or g5. Obviously the
thing to do is get my knight on f3 out of
the way. I'll play it to g1 and it can come to
e2; that should hold the centre while I get
started on the K-side.
24 Ng1.
MILES: That's a good move. I wonder if I
should ever have allowed him to get his
pawn to h5. That bind on the K-side is
going to be a nuisance. It's terribly difficult
to create play on the Q-side. Bringing my
king to the centre doesn't seem quite right
yet, because I might need it on the K-side
when he starts advancing there. That
knight on c7; is it going to a6 or a8? a8 to
b6 then a4 or c4, that's a good circuit to be
on. Na8 contains the accidental threat of
Nb4+, but unfortunately Ne2 stops it.
24 Na8 25 Ne2 Nb6 26 f4.
MILES: I can't really advance anywhere on
the K-side, it's too weakening. I should
simplify somehow, exchange rooks on the
c-file may well be best. But I don't know,
I'm not going to get more than a draw if 1.
do that. He's a good blitz player, I don't
really want a play-off. I should bring my
king to d7 so I can then bring the rook
over to defend if I need it. Also it defends
e6 which is probably attacked soon.
26 Ke8.
Miles was soon to regret his decision not
to play for a draw at this stage. His
position rapidly deteriorates as the white
K-side pawns advance.
Xl g4 Kd7.
SHORT: I want to threaten either f5 or g5.
g5 will nearly always create a passed pawn
148
or some terrible weakness in his K-side. My
rook on c1 isn't doing much so I'll just play
Rg1 threatening g5.
28 Rg1.
MILES: g5 is a serious threat here. I haven't
really any play on the Q-side. The only try
is Na4; of course he won't play b3 because
he gets mated after Nb4+ and Nb2, but he
just plays Nd1. I don't get very far. Well, it
kicks his knight backwards and stops it
supporting f5. But then I've got to stop g5,
that's the big threat here. I think I'll have
to play Rh8 to stop it. It's getting
uncomfortable.
28 Na4 29 Nd1 Rh8.
SHORT: Now's my chance. I can't play g5,
but I can play f5 with the idea of just
playing Nf4, threatening to exchange on e6
and go Ng6; then I've got a tremendous
position.
30 fS Nb6 31 Nf4 Rf8 32 Ne3 Re8
33 fxe6 + fxe6 34 Ng6.
The knight has reached its desirable
residence and now White threatens Rf1
and Rf7.
34 Ke8 35 Rf1 Nd7 36 Ng2.
This knight follows its path; the
threat is 37 N2f4, reducing Black to total
passivity.
36 BgS 37 N2f4 Bxf4 38 Rxf4.
SHORT: I've got a nice bind on the K-side;
I'd lik
e to gain a bit more space by playing
f4 and g4, preparing f5 or g5. Obviously the
thing to do is get my knight on f3 out of
the way. I'll play it to gl and it can come to
e2; that should hold the centre while I get
started on the K-side.
24 Ngl.
MILES: That's a good move. I wonder if I
should ever have allowed him to get his
pawn to h5. That bind on the K-side is
going to be a nuisance. It's terribly difficult
to create play on the Q-side. Bringing my
king to the centre doesn't seem quite right
yet, because I might need it on the K-side
when he starts advancing there. That
knight on c7; is it going to a6 or a8? ad to
b6 then a4 or c4, that's a good circuit to be
on. Na8 contains the accidental threat of
Nb4+, but unfortunately Ne2 stops it.
24 . . . Na8 25 Ne2 Nb6 26 f4.
MILES: / can't really advance anywhere on
the K-side, it's too weakening. I should
simplify somehow, exchange rooks on the
c
-file may well be best
. But I don't know,
I
'
m not going to get more than a draw if I
do that. He's a good blitz player, I don't
really want a play-off. I should bring my
king to d7 so I can then bring the rook
over to defend if I need it. Also it defends
e6 which is probably attacked soon.
26 . . . Ke8.
Miles was soon to regret his decision not
to play for a draw at this stage. His
position rapidly deteriorates as the white
K
-side pawns advance
.
27 g4 Kd7.
SHORT: / wanf fo threaten either f5 or g5.
g5 will nearly always create a passed pawn
or some terrible weakness in his K-side. My
rook on d isn
'
t doing much so I'll just play
Rgl threatening g5.
28 Rgl.
MILES: g5 is a serious threat here. I haven't
really any play on the Q-side. The only try
is Na4; of course he won't play b3 because
he gets mated after Nb4+ and Nb2,
but he
just plays Ndl. I don't get very far. Well, it
kicks his knight backwards and stops it
supporting f5. But then I
'
ve got to stop g5,
that's the big threat here. I think I'll have
to play Rh8 to stop it. It's getting
uncomfortable.
28 . . . Na4 29 Ndl RhB.
SHORT: /Vow's my chance. I can't play g5,
but I can play f5 with the idea of just
playing Nf4, threatening to exchange on e6
and go Ng6; then I
'
ve got a tremendous
position.
30 f5 Nb6 31 Nf4 Rf8 32 Ne3 Rc8
33 fxe6+ fxe6 34 Ng6.
The knight has reached its desirable
residence and now White threatens Rfl
and Rf7.
34 . . . Ke8 35 Rfl Nd7 36 Ng2.
This knight follows its brother's path; the
threat is 37 N2f4, reducing Black to total
passivity.
36 . . . Bg5 37 N2f4 Bxf4 38 Rxf4.
148
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e f 9 h
MILES: I'd like to play NdB, but-I don't like
the idea of his bishop coming in to b4.
Maybe I can playaS first. This sometimes
gives me the threat of Nb4+. as looks a
good idea to keep his bishop out of the
game.
38 as.
SHORT: I've got a very nice idea here: NhB
with the idea of playing Nfl and Nd6. He
can't stop this with NdB because of BxaS.
39 Nh8.
MILES: I can't play NdB because the
a-pawn's hanging. That was stupid, I
should have played b6 before as. He's
threatening Nfl and Rfl - no, not Rfl
because I have NxeS +, that's okay - what
can I play? I've got to play b6 to free the
rest of my pieces.
39 b6 40 Nf7 Ke7.
SHORT: I'd like to play Bel, then Nb4+
and if I move my king back to e2, Rc2 + is
unpleasant because Kdl, Rcl + and a fork
on d3. Well, my only other try is gS. Then
if he plays hxgS, I move my rook back
somewhere, threatening BxgS+, then if he
moves his king to eB, Nd6 is mate. Well, gS
threatens g6 or gxh6. This looks really
good.
41 gS.
MILES: If I get a position where he plays
g6, the endings are awful; he's always
threatening to sacrifice something on the
K-side. Let's analyse hxgS, rook runs back
on the f-file, Nb4+; Ke2, Rc2; KdI maybe
that's not so terrible. It would depend on
where's his rook. If he plays RfI, I have
Rxb2. I'm still kicking because I'm winning
his Q-side. If he puts his rook on f2,
though, that's a problem. hxgS, Rf2, Nb4+,
Ke2, Rc2, KdI, end. It's horrible. What can
I do? If he plays g6 I'm as good as dead,
and if I lose the h-pawn I'm as good as
dead. I've got to hope he doesn't put his
rook on f2.
41 hxgS.
Nigel chose the wrong square, and Tony
Miles breathed again.
42 Rfn Nb4+ 43 Ke2 Rc2 44 Kd1 Rxb2.
Of course with the rook on f2 instead of
f1, this move would be impossible owing
to the reply 45 Bxg5+ winning the rook.
45 BxgS+ Kf8 46 Nd8+.
MILES: KeB, Nxe6 doesn't look too good,
but after KgB I'm threatening RbI + picking
up his a-pawn. His e-pawn can't be that
strong. I'm almost getting happy with my
position.
46 Kg8.
SHORT: Rfllooks a good move. If he plays
NbB, I've got Rbl, just hitting his knight,
and I can take his e-pawn; then his g-pawn
will fall as well. If he plays NfB, then h6
wins a piece. What defence has he got?
149
1
8
</s/'f/.
4
V.
m
a b c d e f g h
MILES: \'d like to play Nd8, but I don't like
the idea of his bishop coming in to b4.
Maybe I can play a5 first. This sometimes
gives me the threat of Nb4+. a5 looks a
good idea to keep his bishop out of the
game.
38 . . . a5.
SHORT: I've got a very nice idea here: Nh8
with the idea of playing Nf7 and Nd6. He
can
'
t stop this with Nd8 because of Bxa5.
39 Nh8.
MILES: / can't play Nd8 because the
a
-pawn
'
s hanging. That was stupid, I
should have played b6 before a5. He
'
s
threatening Nf7 and Rf7 - no, not Rf7
because I have Nxe5+, that's okay - what
can I play? I
'
ve got to play b6 to free the
rest of my pieces.
39 . . . b6 40 Nf7 Ke7.
SHORT: I'd like to play Bel, then Nb4 +
and if I move my king back to e2, Rc2+ is
unpleasant because Kdl, Rcl + and a fork
on d3. Well, my only other try is g5. Then
if he plays hxg5, I move my rook back
somewhere, threatening Bxg5+, then if he
moves his king to e8, Nd6 is mate. Well, g5
threatens g6 or gxh6. This looks really
good.
41 g5.
MILES: If I get a position where he plays
g6, the endings are awful; he
'
s always
threatening to sacrifice something on the
K-side
.
Let's analyse hxg5, rook runs back
on the f-file, Nb4+; Ke2, Rcl; Kdl maybe
that's not so terrible. It would depend on
where
'
s his rook. If he plays Rfl, I have
Rxb2. I'm still kicking because I'm winning
his Q-side. If he puts his rook on f2,
though, that's a problem. hxg5, Rf2, Nb4+,
Ke2, Rc2, Kdl, end. It's horrible. What can
I do? If he plays g6 I'm as good as dead,
and if I lose the h-pawn I
'
m as good as
dead. I've got to hope he doesn't put his
rook on f2.
41 . . . hxg5.
Nigel chose the wrong square, and Tony
Miles breathed again.
42 Rfl? Nb4+ 43 Ke2 Rc2 44 Kdl Rxb2.
Of course with the rook on f2 instead of
fl, this move would be impossible owing
to the reply 45 Bxg5+ winning the rook.
45 Bxg5+ KfB 46 Nd8+.
MILES: Ke8, Nxe6 doesn't look too good,
but after Kg8 I'm threatening Rb1+ picking
up his a-pawn. His e-pawn can
'
t be that
strong. I
'
m almost getting happy with my
position.
46 . . . KgB.
SHORT: Rf7 looks a good move. If he plays
Nb8, I've got Rb7, just hitting his knight,
and I can take his e-pawn; then his g-pawn
will fall as well. If he plays Nf8, then h6
wins a piece. What defence has he got?
149
Maybe he can play Rg2 after Rf7, then
Rxd7, Rxg5, Nxe6 and maybe I'm winning.
47 Rf7.
MILES: Is he panicking, or is he really
doing something? I don't believe him. NfB
defending the e-pawn even threatens Nc6.
He might be losing control. Play quickly.
47 NfS.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
abc d e 9 h
SHORT: Why doesn't h6 win? It threatens
just mate in two with Rxg7 + and Nfl mate.
He has no defence to that. Maybe he can
take on h6, then Bxh6; I'm threatening his
knight and I'm also threatening Rg7+.
Surely he must lose a piece.
48 h6.
MILES: That was stupid. Why didn't I play
Rg2, the position was quite okay then. I've
got no defence now. He's threatening mate
in two with Rxg7 +. If I take on h6, he just
recaptures. How can I do things like that?
I've got to lose a piece. It's completely
hopeless, but I could play for a few moves.
Who knows, I swindled him once before.
48 gxh6.
150
But there was to be no swindle. Miles had
to surrender his knight in order to stop the
mate, and thereafter Short gave him no
chance.
49 Bxh6 Rg2 50 RxfS+ Kh7 51 Bd2 Nd3
52 Nxe6 Nb2+ 53 Kc1 Nc4 54 Bc3 Rg1 +
55 Kc2 Rg2+ 56 Kb3 b5 57 Nf4 Rf2
58 e6 b4 59 e7 Nd6 60 Nxd5 Re2
61 eS(Q).
A final little trick to put an end to
resistance. White has Nf6+ to add to the
protection of e8.
61 a4+ 62 Qxa4 resigns.
Maybe he can play Rg2 after Rf7,
then
Rxd7, Rxg5, Nxe6 and maybe I'm winning
.
47 Rf7.
MILES: Is he panicking, or is he really
doing something? I don't believe him. Nf8
defending the e-pawn even threatens Nc6.
He might be losing control. Play quickly.
47 . . . Nf8.
8
1
1
abcdefgh
But there was to be no swindle. Miles had
to surrender his knight in order to stop the
mate, and thereafter Short gave him no
chance.
49 Bxh6 Rg2 50 Rxf8+ Kh7 51 Bd2 Nd3
52 Nxe6 Nb2+ 53 Kcl Nc4 54 Bc3 Rg1 +
55Kc2Rg2+ 56Kb3b5 57 Nf4 Rf2
58 e6 b4 59 e7 Nd6 60 Nxd5 Re2
61 e8(Q).
A final little trick to put an end to
resistance. White has Nf6+ to add to the
protection of e8.
61 . . . a4+ 62 Qxa4 resigns.
SHORT: Why doesn't h6 win? It threatens
just mate in two with Rxg7+ and Nf7 mate.
He has no defence to that. Maybe he can
take on hS, then Bxh6; I'm threatening his
knight and I'm also threatening Rg7+.
Surely he must lose a piece.
48 h6.
MILES: That was stupid. Why didn't I play
Rg2, the position was quite okay then. I've
got no defence now. He
'
s threatening mate
in two with Rxg7+. If I take on hS, he just
recaptures. How can I do things like that?
I
'
ve got to lose a piece. It
'
s completely
hopeless, but I could play for a few moves.
Who knows, I swindled him once before.
48 . . . gxhS.
150