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E X I S T I N G C O N D I T I O N S

3
Chapter Two
To design a street according to its probable use is a
reasonable but uncommon practice.
Harland Bartholomew
City of St. Louis Plan (1917)
15
W E S T F L O R I S S A N T A V E N U E G R E A T S T R E E T S M A S T E R P L A N
existing conditions
A HISTORICAL EXAMINATION OF WEST FLORISSANT AVENUE and its
development over time reveals important development patterns, assets and
challenges that are critical for planners and the community to understand in
considering and crafting the corridors future. Tis chapter gives an overview
of the history, development and existing conditions of West Florissant Avenue
and its bordering areas. It considers the challenges and opportunities that
are particular to West Florissant Avenue and provides a full perspective of the
corridors regional and local context. A comprehensive summary of the primary
assets, challenges, and opportunities is provided at the end of the chapter.
C H A P T E R T W O
I N T H I S C H A P T E R
h i s t o r i c a l o v e r v i e w
l a n d u s e e x i s t i n g c o n d i t i o n s
t r a n s p o r t a t i o n e x i s t i n g c o n d i t i o n s
i n f r a s t r u c t u r e a n d e n v i r o n me n t
ma r k e t c o n d i t i o n s
a s s e t s , c h a l l e n g e s , a n d o p p o r t u n i t i e s
ma r k e t s t r a t e g y
C H A P T E R T W O E X I S T I N G C O N D I T I O N S
16
W E S T F L O R I S S A N T A V E N U E G R E A T S T R E E T S M A S T E R P L A N
Automobile use began to increase in the 1920s,
facilitated by paved roads. Automobile usage
eventually led to the decline of passenger rail, which
was discontinued in the 1930s. Along with this,
buses replaced streetcars as the sole means of transit.
2.1.2 THE AUTOMOBILE AGE
After World War II, Ferguson, like many U.S.
cities, experienced a population boom that was
accompanied by strong growth of automobile
usage. Emerson Electric Company was a major
manufacturing presence at the south end of the
Project area for many decades, starting in the
1940s, providing many local jobs.
Te population of Ferguson nearly doubled
between 1950 and 1960, from 11,500 to 22,000.
It increased another 30 percent during the 1960s.
Housing growth in the area refected population
growth during this time period, with about 40
percent of Fergusons housing stock (mostly single
family) added during the 1950s, and another
19 percent during the 1960s. Dellwood, to the
east of Ferguson, was incorporated as a village in
1951, and in 1954 Dellwood was incorporated as
a Fourth Class City. Dellwood grew substantially
during the 1960s, from 4,720 to 7,137, a jump
of 66 percent. In this period housing was almost
exclusively small (approximately 1,000 square feet)
single family home dwellings.
The Wabash Railroad system, showing Ferguson station
2.1 HISTORICAL OVERVIEW
2.1.1 PRE-AUTOMOBILE ERA
In 1876 a new spur was built onto the Wabash
Railroad which connected the Ferguson area with
the city of St. Louis for the frst time, forever
changing the nature of this area and resulting in
rapid population growth. Te rail line crosses
West Florissant Avenue at the southern end of the
Project area, just north of what is now the large
Emerson Electric complex. With the development
of the rail line, passenger rail became a major
transportation mode, especially for commuting.
Ferguson was home to a depot that became a
regular train stop, Ferguson Station, at what is
now North Florissant and Carson Roads, west of
the Project area. Tis stop catalyzed further growth
and settlement in the area, primarily residential.
Ferguson became a signifcant freight and
passenger rail hub by the end of the 1800s, and
it was incorporated as a city in 1894. In 1900,
an additional connection with St. Louis came
with the development of the Kirkwood-Ferguson
streetcar line. At that time, the city limits did not
include West Florissant Avenue, which was further
east. West Florissant Avenue was built during the
latter part of the 1800s, to facilitate non-rail travel
between St. Louis and surrounding rural areas. The construction of I-270, shown here in 1970, has had a
profound and lasting effect on West Florissant Avenue
W E S T F L O R I S S A N T A V E N U E G R E A T S T R E E T S M A S T E R P L A N
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C H A P T E R T W O E X I S T I N G C O N D I T I O N S
On the other hand, although single- and multi-
family residential projects were added from the late
1960s through the 1980s, the inner-ring suburbs
along the corridor began to decline during this
period. Te population of Ferguson declined 14
percent during the 1980s and 10 percent during
the 1990s. Likewise Dellwood declined in size by
1990 to its current size of just over 5,000 people.
Together with the population decreases, the
introduction of the larger regional shopping
centers has impacted the older and smaller
In its gradual transition from mostly rural land
to residential neighborhoods and a commercial
corridor, there was perhaps no more important
event than the construction of Interstate 270 in
the mid 1960s. Commercial uses boomed, and
the Ferguson city limit expanded by the 1970s to
include portions of West Florissant Avenue, which
became a commercial corridor feeding traf c
to and from I-270. Commercial development
continued to change the character of the corridor
through the 1990s, when the last of the horse
farms at the northern end of the study area were
replaced with major retail (big box) projects.
A look at West Florissant Avenue over time reveals an area that grew rapidly after 1955, but has stayed largely unchanged since 1997
1955 1970 1997 2002 2010
commercial strips, resulting in their depreciation,
numerous vacancies, and little diversity in
the types of remaining businesses. Today as a
corporate headquarters, Emerson Electric draws its
employees less from the local area and more from
the whole metro region.
Fergusons historic downtown and main street
area around Florissant Road and Church Street,
including the old Ferguson Station, has meanwhile
undergone considerable revitalization and that area
continues to draw new retail development.
C H A P T E R T W O E X I S T I N G C O N D I T I O N S
18
W E S T F L O R I S S A N T A V E N U E G R E A T S T R E E T S M A S T E R P L A N
Dellwood Crossing is a more recently redeveloped property,
with streetscape improvements like sidewalks and plantings
Parks and recreation spaces make up one-third
of the land in the study area; Dellwood Park
is among the key green assets. Tere are also
stretches of street trees and green sidewalk bufers
that are among the corridors greatest assets;
typically, these green intervals are associated with
residential areas that are interspersed between the
commercial strip areas. A small area of the corridor
will also be getting additional green space with the
development of the Maline Creek Greenway over
the next few years.
2.2 LAND USE EXISTING
CONDITIONS
Today, West Florissant Avenue is an auto-oriented
commercial street, with unique characteristics in its
diferent segments and communities. Te corridors
urban design character is primarily a function
of the streets automobile orientation, combined
with diferences in commercial zoning regulations
among cities along West Florissant Avenue.
2.2.1 EXISTING LAND USES
Te corridors existing land uses are presented
in Table 2.1 and Map 2.1. Commercial uses,
including retail and of ce, make up 53.4 percent of
the land use in the project area, with an estimated
Floor Area Ratio (FAR) of 0.14. Retail-oriented
uses such as fast-food restaurants, beauty salons,
and service-focused stores, are the predominant
use. Typically these are set back from the street and
fronted by parking lots. Major shopping nodes are
located at the north end near I-270, in Dellwood
near Chambers Road, and at the south end near
Ferguson Avenue.
Although the areas that surround the corridor are
overwhelmingly made up of single-family (and
some multi-family) homes, strictly within the
planning area residential uses account for only 15.8
percent of the land use (almost all of it single-
family).
Strip commercial development is typical along the corridor
West Florissant is designed primarily for automobiles
Table 2.1 Existing Land Uses in the
Specied Planning Study Area
Area
(Acres)
Percent of
Project Area
Commercial 148.9 53.4%
Residential
Single-Family
Residential
41.9 15%
Multi-Family
Residential
2.2 0.8%
Parks and Recreation 30.4 10.9%
Institutional 19.3 6.9
Industrial/Utility 6.9 2.5%
Vacant/Agriculture 28.1 10.1%
Common Ground 1.4 0.5%
Total 279.1 100%
W E S T F L O R I S S A N T A V E N U E G R E A T S T R E E T S M A S T E R P L A N
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C H A P T E R T W O E X I S T I N G C O N D I T I O N S
St. Louis
Community
College
YMCA
Grifth
Elementary
Dellwood
City Hall
Lemasters
Elementary
Buzz
Westfall
Plaza
Emerson
Corporate
Headquarters
Ferguson
Community
Center
Dellwood
Recreation
Center
Planned
Transit
Center
Moline
Elementary
Koch
Elementary
*
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WEST FLORISSANT
F
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O
N
270 27 277
Existing Land Use
Map 2.1
Great Streets Initiative
West Florissant Avenue Demonstration Project
Project Sponsors:
East West Gateway I Cities of Ferguson and Dellwood I St. Louis County
500 1,000 0 2,000 250 ft N 12.19.2013
Data Source:
St. Louis County GIS
City Limit
Planning Area
Creek
Rail Line
Commercial
Multi-Family
Duplex/Townhome
Single Family
Institution
Common Ground
Park
Recreation
Industrial/Utility
Vacant/Agriculture
MAP 2 . 1 . E X I ST I NG L AND USE
C H A P T E R T W O E X I S T I N G C O N D I T I O N S
20
W E S T F L O R I S S A N T A V E N U E G R E A T S T R E E T S M A S T E R P L A N
Fergusons C-2 zoning (near I-270) has fewer
permissible uses than C-1. Although the zone
still allows retail and service establishments,
some uses that are permitted in C-1 (gasoline
stations and automotive dealers) become
conditional uses in C-2. Moreover, C-2 does
not allow uses such as veterinary services, liquor
stores, funeral services, and repair services.
Dellwood
Dellwoods zoning ordinance dates to the 1980s
and is without an accompanying map, nor is
there a guiding vision or comprehensive plan.
Dellwood has one commercial zone in the corridor
area, identifed as C-Commercial. Elsewhere in
Dellwood, there is a second commercial zone,
known as C-2 Planned District.
C District zoning is defned by uses that are
not permitted and uses that have certain
regulations; other uses are implicitly permitted.
Non-permitted uses include schools, libraries,
museums/art galleries, botanical/zoological
facilities, check cashing/pay day loan
establishments, tattoo parlors, churches, and
garages/parking uses. Regulated uses include
spas and used vehicle sales.
Te C-2 zone in Dellwood is a planned
commercial district that allows the same uses as
Fergusons C-2 zoning code.
2.2.2 COMMERCIAL ZONING AND LAND USE
DESIGNATIONS
Existing zoning designations are shown in Map
2.2. Commercial zones are of particular interest,
as these areas are important to future economic
development along the corridor and infuence
how the area is perceived and identifed. Existing
allowed land uses in these zones are summarized as
follows and in Table 2.2:
Ferguson
Fergusons zoning was updated as recently as
2011 and includes a downtown form-based
code. Fergusons guiding comprehensive plan
document is the Vision 2015 Plan Update that
dates to 1998. Ferguson has two commercial
zones in the corridor area. At the north end, near
I-270, commercial parcels are zoned C-2, Planned
Commercial. Fergusons parcels at the southern
end of the corridor are zoned C-1, General
Commercial.
Fergusons C-1 zoning (the southern end)
allows most retail and service-oriented uses,
including automotive dealers, apparel stores,
furniture stores, laundromats, professional
of ces, libraries, educational services, health
services, and government agencies. C-1
zoning also allows many conditionally-
permitted uses.
Jennings
Jennings zoning ordinance and map originated
in 1977 but has had regular updates up to the
present. Te citys comprehensive plan dates to
the year 2000. Tere are several corridor parcels
located in Jennings, at the southern end of the
corridor. Jennings has one commercial zone which
applies to these parcels: C-2, Shopping and Service
Commercial District. In general, this zone tends
to encourage smaller, free-standing commercial
development.
Tere are many uses permitted in Jennings
C-2 zone, including retail stores (apparel,
furniture, automotive supply, general
merchandise); retail services (dine-in
restaurants, banking and lending institutions);
other services (e.g., health, recreation and
amusement); schools and vocational services;
and general and governmental of ces.
Te C-2 zoning does not allow the following
uses, or only allows them conditionally:
home improvement/garden supply stores,
used merchandise stores, check cashing
establishments, drive-through restaurants,
drinking places, and grocery stores over
30,000 square feet (under 30,000 s.f. requires
a conditional use permit).
W E S T F L O R I S S A N T A V E N U E G R E A T S T R E E T S M A S T E R P L A N
21
C H A P T E R T W O E X I S T I N G C O N D I T I O N S
Fergus usson s Fergus Fergus uson g Fergus so so so FFFeerg rggu usssss
St. L Coun SS Louis County Louis Coun St. Louis County Coun nt Co
(Un orat Unincorporated) Unincorporat (Unincorporated) orat te (U tt
St. Louis
Community
College
YMCA
Grifth
Elementary
Dellwood
City Hall
Lemasters
Elementary
Buzz
Westfall
Plaza
Emerson
Corporate
Headquarters
Ferguson
Community
Center
Dellwood
Recreation
Center
Planned
Transit
Center
Moline
Elementary
Koch
Elementary
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
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WEST FLORISSANT
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270 27 277
Zoning
Map 2.2
Great Streets Initiative
West Florissant Avenue Demonstration Project
Project Sponsors:
East West Gateway I Cities of Ferguson and Dellwood I St. Louis County
500 1,000 0 2,000 250 ft N
1.22.2014
Data Source:
St. Louis County GIS
Cities of Jennings, Ferguson,
St. Louis SSSSt. Lou L
Community C mmu
College
Ferguson Fergu guson
CCCCom mmmunity i muni Com CCCCCCC yy
CCCenter nn C tte er
****
**
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C
H H
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R
NORTH C NORTH COLLEGE OLLEGE H COLLEGE NORTH COL
STARLIGHT STARLIGHT STAARLIG GHT
Hudson Park ud
City Limit
Planning Area
Creek
Rail Line
AD Airport District
C-1 General Commercial District
C-2 Planned Commercial District
M-1 Industrial District
R-1A Single Family Residence District
R-1B Single Family Residence District
R-1C Single Family Residence District
R-1D Single Family Residence District
R-2 Two Family Residence District
R-3 Multiple Family Residence District
R-4 Planned Residence District
Ferguson Zoning Unincorporated St. Louis County Zoning
C-1 Neighborhood Shopping
C-2 Shopping
C-3 Shopping
C-4 Highway Service Commercial
C-6 Ofce and Research Service
C-7 General Extensive Commercial
C-8 Planned Commercial
M-1 Industrial
M-2 Industrial
M-3 Planned Industrial
MXD Mixed Use Development District
NU Non-Urban
PS Park and Scenic
Jennings Zoning
C-2 Shopping & Service Commercial
C-3 Regional Commercial
PS Park and Scenic
R-1 Residential
R-2 Residential
R-3 Residential
Dellwood Zoning (Provisional)
A Residential 1
B Residential 2
C Commercial
PS Park and Scenic
R-1 Residence
R-1A Residence
R-2 Residence
R-3 Residence
R-4 Residence
R-5 Residence
R-6 Residence
R-6A Residence
R-6AA Residence
R-7 Residence
R-8 Residence
MAP 2 . 2 . E X I ST I NG Z ONI NG MAP
C H A P T E R T W O E X I S T I N G C O N D I T I O N S
22
W E S T F L O R I S S A N T A V E N U E G R E A T S T R E E T S M A S T E R P L A N
Table 2.2 Existing Commercial Zones and Associated Land Uses
USES FERGUSON C-1 FERGUSON C-2 JENNINGS C-2 DELLWOOD C
Veterinary Services P NP P (no outdoor kennels) P (no kennels)
Bus Station P P NP P
U.S. Postal Of ce P NP P P
Communication Services P P P P
Home Improvement P P NP P
Garden Supply/Nursery P P NP P
Grocery/Deli/Food Store P P C P
Gasoline Station P C C P
Automotive Dealers/Leasing/Rental (New and Used) P C C P
Automotive Supply P P P P
Boat/Motorcycle/Recreation Dealers P NP C P
Apparel Stores P P P P
Furniture Stores P P P P
Site-Down/Dine-In Restaurant P P P P
General Merchandise P P P P
Liquor Store P NP C P
Banking/Lending Institutions (Depository) P P P P
Of ces; Professional Of ces (Licensed by the State) P P P P
Real Estate Agencies P P P P
Hotels/Motels P P C P
Laundry Services (Dry Cleaning, Coin-Op) P P C P
Barber/Beauty Salons P P C P
Repair Services P P C P
Funeral Service/Crematories P NP C P
Equipment Leasing/Rental P NP P P
Automotive Repair/Service P NP C P
Motion Picture Studio/Production P P P P
Table continues on next page
W E S T F L O R I S S A N T A V E N U E G R E A T S T R E E T S M A S T E R P L A N
23
C H A P T E R T W O E X I S T I N G C O N D I T I O N S
Table 2.2 (continued) Existing Commercial Zones and Associated Land Uses
USES FERGUSON C-1 FERGUSON C-2 JENNINGS C-2 DELLWOOD C
Amusement/Recreation Services P P P P
Health Services (Clinics, Laboratories, Out-Patient) P P P (no labs/diagn. imaging) P
Hospitals; Nursing Homes (Skilled, Intermediate, Home Health) P P C P
Public/Private Educational Institutions; Vocational Schools P P P NP
Libraries P P P NP
Adult Day Care P NP P P
Museums/Art Galleries P P P NP
Botanical Gardens/Zoological Centers P P NP NP
General Government P P P P
Used Vehicle Sales (Used Only) C C C P
Used Merchandise Stores/Auction Rooms C NP NP P (no pawnbrokers)
Check Cashing Agencies/Pay Day Loan Institutions C NP NP NP
Spas C NP C C
Adult Services C NP NP P
Tattoo Parlors C NP NP NP
Automotive Towing C NP C P
Automotive Repair Shops C NP C P
Churches C NP P NP
Convents/Monasteries C NP P P
Mini-Warehouses/Self-Storage C NP C P
Communication Antennae C C P P
Communication Towers C C P P
Child Care Centers C C C P
Automated Teller Machines C C P P
Eating Places (Drive-Trough Windows) C C NP P
Drinking Places C C NP P
Garages/Parking NP NP P NP
C H A P T E R T W O E X I S T I N G C O N D I T I O N S
24
W E S T F L O R I S S A N T A V E N U E G R E A T S T R E E T S M A S T E R P L A N
Although sidewalks are provided on both sides of
West Florissant Avenue along most of the corridor,
the pedestrian realm is generally uninviting and
often unsafe. Buildings are spaced too far apart
to walk, sidewalks are interrupted by frequent
driveways and parking entries, and there are few
pedestrian amenities or street trees.
Te corridors substantial inconsistencies are a
signifcant challenge to overcome in the planning
and development of this corridor-wide master
plan. With the right interventions, however, the
diversity of character along the corridor can also
become a strength, with a more unifed vision
that accentuates key characteristics in commercial,
residential, and open space areas, with appropriate
adjustments to land use regulations.
2.2.3 COMMUNITY DESIGN AND CHARACTER
Tere is little consistency of treatment or character
along the corridor. Diferences in development
types, streetscape, and sidewalk connectivity
leave a choppy impression, evident between the
diferent municipalities but also even within one
jurisdiction. Major diferences in zoning between
Ferguson and Dellwood contribute strongly to the
impression of inconsistency along the corridor;
among the most signifcant is the diferent set
of dimensional requirements for Dellwoods
Commercial (C District) zone, which has resulted
in numerous small, closely-spaced commercial
enterprises, each with its own access from West
Florissant Avenue.
Most commercial buildings are one-story, with
a few two-story structures. Combined with the
scale of West Florissant Avenue itself, this has
resulted in a public realm that is scaled more for
driving than for pedestrian interest and comfort.
Single-family homes characterize the Project areas
residential land uses
Parking lots in front characterize the commercial areas of
the avenue
W E S T F L O R I S S A N T A V E N U E G R E A T S T R E E T S M A S T E R P L A N
25
C H A P T E R T W O E X I S T I N G C O N D I T I O N S
traf c volumes at major intersections along West
Florissant Avenue within and adjacent to the
Study Area. Additionally, the maps provide ADTs
(from both CBBs November 2013 counts and
counts provided by St. Louis County) throughout
the Study Area. Diferences in the ADT values
may be a result of difering collection locations,
as well as time of year. Additionally, some of
the St. Louis County data are taken from 2007
counts. Traf c volumes in the corridor have likely
fuctuated in recently years along with changing
commercial uses.
West Florissant also carries transit, specifcally
MetroBus Route 74 (Florissant line), and though
the headways are long (30 minutes), Route 74 is
one of Metros heaviest-used lines, with over 1.1
million boardings in 2013. West Florissant is
crossed by MetroBus Route 61 (also in Metros top
ten heaviest-used routes, with 800,000 boardings)
at Chambers Road. Te heavy transit use along
the corridor results in a correspondingly heavy
pedestrian demand. Tere is a clear opportunity
to encourage transit- and pedestrian-oriented
development at this intersection of West Florissant
and Chambers Road.
While the current roadway confguration works
relatively well for those traveling by automobile,
2.3 TRANSPORTATION EXISTING
CONDITIONS
Te existing transportation uses along West
Florissant Avenue ofer some of the building
blocks for remaking the street into a true multi-
modal corridor. Today, the street functions
primarily as a Principal Arterial for automobile
traf c. Te avenue generally consists of two
through lanes in each direction and a center left-
turn lane, but there are exceptions to this. In the
southern residential portion there is no center
turn lane and the corridor has quite a diferent
character as a result. In the northernmost section,
near I-270 where traf c volume approaches
38,000 cars per day, one fnds auxiliary lanes
on each side to enable right turns, bringing the
number of total lanes up to seven. Sidewalks are
provided on both sides of West Florissant, however
they vary enormously in quality and some are
not compliant with ADA requirements. With
Average Daily Traf c (ADT) volumes varying
from approximately 25,000 to 38,000 vehicles
per day throughout the corridor, it is apparent
that this roadway is a signifcant route in north St.
Louis County, and the street has been designed
primarily for vehicles, presenting clear challenges
to other users. Maps 2.3 and 2.4 provide existing
and ofers a transit option, other modes and users
are largely shortchanged. West Florissant Avenues
auto-dominated character and design, width, and
traf c speeds, as well as the lack of any bicycle
facilities, make it hostile to and unsafe for cyclists.
Conditions for pedestrians are somewhat better,
with the presence of sidewalks, but the pedestrian
experience in many places along the corridor is
unpleasant and unsafe.
Many local agencies have identifed the need
and opportunities for improvements. One
such opportunity which ofers the chance for
potentially transformational change would be
the addition of a future Bus Rapid Transit (BRT)
route along the corridor, by Metro (see Chapter 5
for details). With new high-quality transit service
given priority along the corridor, and with rush-
hour headways of 10 minutes, the opportunity
exists to remake West Florissant Avenue into
a transit-frst street, with transit-oriented,
pedestrian-scale development clustered around
some key stations along the corridor. Te corridor
has a relatively wide right-of-way, which will make
allocating space ef ciently to serve the multi-
modal needs of all its users easier than if the street
were narrower.
C H A P T E R T W O E X I S T I N G C O N D I T I O N S
26
W E S T F L O R I S S A N T A V E N U E G R E A T S T R E E T S M A S T E R P L A N
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WEST F LOR ISSA NT AVE
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20 (20) <35>
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50th%=35mph
85th%=41mph
Posted 35 mph
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CBB
1A: Existing Traffic Volumes and Speed Data
J ob#105-13
12/11/13
= Study Limits
= AM Peak Hour Traffic Volumes (7:15 - 8:15)
Legend
= PM Peak Hour Traffic Volumes (4:30 - 5:30)
XX
= Midday Peak Hour Traffic Volumes (12:00 - 1:00) (XX)
<XX>
= Average Daily Traffic (ADT) - CBB
= Speed Data
XX
Meters
0 200 400
= Average Daily Traffic (ADT) - St. Louis County (2013) XX
= Average Daily Traffic (ADT) - St. Louis County (2007) XX
Great Streets Initiative
West Florissant Avenue Demonstration Project
Project Sponsors:
East West Gateway I Cities of Ferguson and Dellwood I St. Louis County
12.18.2013
Existing Trafc Volumes and Speed Data
Map 2.2
H
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West Florissant Ave
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O
n

R
a
m
p
E
B

2
7
0

O
f
f

R
a
m
p
P
e
r
s
h
a
ll
R
o
a
d
1
7
5

(
1
0
5
)

<
1
8
5
>
4
7
0

(
1
9
5
)

<
2
8
5
>
2
3
0

(
1
8
0
)

<
2
2
5
>
115 (190) <330>
370 (560) <920>
85 (130) <150>
SAN
1
0
0

(
9
5
)

<
1
5
0
>
1
9
0

(
1
9
5
)

<
5
2
0
>
9
0

(
1
3
5
)

<
2
5
5
>
M
B
E
R
S
R
D
VE
120 (135) <160>
650 (520) <590>
115 (105) <175>
50th%=34mph
85th%=39mph
Posted35mph
50th%=35mph
85th%=41mph
Posted 35 mph
4
0

(
4
5
)

<
3
0
>
5

(
2
0
)

<
2
5
>
5
0

(
8
0
)

<
1
0
5
>
ST F
45 (45) <50>
790 (765) <835>
20 (20) <35>
4
0

(
3
0
)

<
3
5
>
2
0

(
1
0
)

<
1
5
>
5
5

(
4
0
)

<
4
0
>
A
R
G
A
IL
C
T
30 (25) <55>
595 (715) <1,170>
50 (50) <55>
38,100
31,580
2
1
,
1
9
0
1
7
,
3
5
0
26,900
3
,
5
0
0
26,400
2
3
,
9
0
0
1
7
,
6
0
0
MAP 2 . 3 . E X I ST I NG T RAF F I C V OL UME S AND SPE E D ( NORT H CORRI DOR)
Data Sources:
CBB feld study; St. Louis County
Maps 2.3-2.4 provide existing traffic volumes at major intersections
using counts done in November 2013 and previous counts provided
by St. Louis County. Differences in the ADT values may be a result of
differing collection locations, as well as time of year.
W E S T F L O R I S S A N T A V E N U E G R E A T S T R E E T S M A S T E R P L A N
27
C H A P T E R T W O E X I S T I N G C O N D I T I O N S
P
R
I V
A
T
E
R
D
P
R
IV
A
T
E
R
D
P
RIVATE RD
S
H
A
R
O
N
D
A
L
E
CIR
INAGUA DR
B
A
R
B
A
B U Z Z W E S T F A L L
D
R
N
O
R
F
O
L
K
S
O
U
T
H
E
R
N
R
R
N
O
R
F
O
L
K
S
O
U
T
H
E
R
N
R
R
N
O
R
F
O
L
K
S
O
U
T
H
E
R
N
R
R
S DELLWOODAVE
N
O
R
T
H
L
A
N
D
S
H
O
P
P
IN
G
C
TR
A
C
C
E
S
S
R
D
NEWTON DR
FLORIDALE
C
T
N O R W O O D H I L
L
S
C
O
U
N
T
R
Y
C
L
U
B
D
R
M
C
L A
W
A
Y
S
ID
E
D
R
ELMDALE DR
A L L E
Y
D R
L U
C
A S
A
N
D
H
U
N
T
R
D
L
U
C
A
S
A
N
D
H
U
N
T
R
D
L
U
BL AN TO N P L
AVE
S SCHLUETER AVE
EN LN
L
A
M
M
E
R
T
L
N
CLARION DR
M E
A
D
O
W
L
A
R
K
A
V
E
EUNICE RD
F
E
R
G
U
S
O
N
A
V
E
F
E
R
G
U
S
O
N
A
V
E
W
IN
D
CADDIEFIEL D
RD
CADDIEFIELD RD
CADDIEFIELD RD
C
A
D
D
I E
F
I E L D R D
C
O
P P
E R C R E E K C T
STONEFIELD RD
C A N F I E L D
C
T
P
LE
A
S
E
W
A
Y
D
R
S T A
T L E R
A
V E
L E V
E R
E T T E
A V E
T E R
C
A
L
V
IN
A
V
E
C
H
A
N
D
L
E
R
A
V
E
C
A
S
T
R
O
D
R
WEE KS AV E
TIL FOR D AV E
E
U
N
IC
E
A
V
E
G
A T E S
W
O
R
T H
A
V E
J
E
N
W
O
O
D
A
V
E
LAGON DA AV E
O
S
B
O
R
N
D
R
PA YN E A VE
W
O
O
D
S
T
O
C
K
R
D
W
O
O
D
S
T
O
C
K
R
D
G
L
E
N
D
DEV ER DR
GIL LE TTE A VE
GILLETTE AVE
S
O
L
W
A
Y
A
V
E
G
L
A
D
E
A
V
E
S
A
V
E
D
R
C
A
N
F
I E
L
D
D
R
S
U
N
B U
R
Y
A V E
C
U
R
R
Y
A V E
H
A
L
P
IN
D
R
RANDDR
A
B
A
C
O
C
T
N O R L A K
E
S
D
R
DENNIS DR
KIRK DR
LORNA LN
S DELLWOOD DR
VENICE DR
MILLBURN DR
E
D
G
E
H
IL
L
D
R
V
IC
K
IE
P
L
VICKIE PL
C
L
E
A
R
F
IE
L
D
D
R
H
IG
H
M
O
N
T
D
R
H
I G
H
M
O
N
T
D
R
PERCH DR
N
O
R
T
H
W
I N
D
S
E
S
T
A
T
E
S
D
R
MEADOWCREST DR
N
E
M
N
I C
H
A
V
E
R
E
N
S
H
A
W
D
R
FENWICK DR
F
A
R
G
O
D
R
ASTDELL DR
S
H
T
S
C
T
MEDFORDDR
D
E
L
L
W
O
O
D
C
T
DUP RE E A VE
B
L
A
N
D
I N
G
D
R
WARD DR
DASHWOOD D
R
F
O
R
E
S
T
W
O
O
D
D
R
FORESTWOOD DR
GAGE DR
L
A
N
G
D
R
WESTDELL DR
B
A
Y
V
IE
W
C
T
ELLISON DR
W
E
S
T
F
L
O
R
IS
S
A
N
T
A
V
E
WEST FLO
R
IS
SA
N
T
A
VE
WEST FLORISSANT AVE
WEST FLORISSANT AVE
WEST FLORISSANT AVE
N
E
S
B
I T
D
R
ROYCE DR
F
I R
D
R
FLORWOOD CT
K
A
P
P
E
L
D
R
K
A
P
P
E
L
D
R
70 (50) <65>
9
0
(
9
5
)
<
2
6
0
>
2 (15) <20>
585 (775) <1,265>
85 (95) <180>
1
(
5
)
<
5
>
4
0
(
6
0
)
<
1
2
0
>
1,030 (775) <905>
4 (15) <10>
5
6
0
<
5
7
5
>
6 5 < 7 0 >
6
0
<
7
0
>
7
2
5
<
4
8
5
>
7
0
<
1
5
0
>
4
0
<
1
2
5
>
2
5
5
<
5
6
5
>
1
1
5
<
1
1
0
>
4 1 5 < 6 8 0 >
4 6 0 < 6 6 0 >
3
3
5
<
3
9
5
>
5
5
<
9
5
>
0
(
1
5
)
<
2
0
>
0
(
3
)
<
1
0
>
0
(
1
0
)
<
1
5
>
25,400
5
,
9
0
0
3
1
, 7
0
0
1
5
,8
0
0
31,650
3
3
,3
8
0
1
9
,2
8
0
50th% = 31 mph
85th% = 35 mph
Posted 35 mph
50th% = 30 mph
85th% = 37 mph
Posted 35 mph
5
0
th
%
=
2
9
m
p
h
8
5
th
%
=
3
4
m
p
h
P
o
ste
d
3
5
m
p
h
5
0
th
%
=
3
2
m
p
h
8
5
th
%
=
3
6
m
p
h
P
o
ste
d
3
5
m
p
h
CBB
xhibit 1B: Existing Traffic Volumes and Speed Data
J ob#105-13
12/11/13
Meters
0 200 400
= Study Limits
= AM Peak Hour Traffic Volumes (7:15 - 8:15)
Legend
XX
= Midday Peak Hour Traffic Volumes (12:00 - 1:00) (XX)
= PM Peak Hour Traffic Volumes (4:30 - 5:30) <XX>
= Average Daily Traffic (ADT) - CBB
= Speed Data
XX
= Average Daily Traffic (ADT) - St. Louis County (2013) XX
= Average Daily Traffic (ADT) - St. Louis County (2007) XX
Existing Trafc Volumes and Speed Data
Map 2.3
Great Streets Initiative
West Florissant Avenue Demonstration Project
Project Sponsors:
East West Gateway I Cities of Ferguson and Dellwood I St. Louis County
12.18.2013
3
1
,5
8
0
3
1
,5
8
0
36,650
5
,
9
0
0
2
6
,4
0
0
3
1
, 7
0
0
25,400
D
L
E
R
A
V
E
T
F
L
O
R
IS
S
A
N
T =
o
s
te
d
3
5

5
0
th
%
=
3
2
m
p
h
8
5
th
%
=
3
6
m
p
h
P
o
s
te
d
3
5
m
p
h
T
F
L
O
R
IS
S
A
N
T
0
5
0
th
%
=
2
9
m
p
h
8
5
th
%
=
3
4
m
p
h
P
o
s
te
d
3
5
m
p
h
%
=
3
2
m
=
3
5
6
0
<
5
7
5
>
6
3
3
5
<
3
9
5
>
5
5
<
9
5
>
L
U
C
A
6
0
<
7
0
>
7
2
5
<
4
8
5
>
7
0
<
1
5
0
>
5
6
5
<
7
0
>
4
1
5
<
6
8
0
>
4
6
0
<
6
6
0
>
L
U
0
4
0
<
1
2
5
>
2
5
5
<
5
6
5
>
1
1
5
<
1
1
0
>
W
0

(
1
5
)

<
2
0
>
0

(
3
)

<
1
0
>
0

(
1
0
)

<
1
5
>
RISSANT AVE
2 (15) <20>
585 (775) <1,265>
85 (95) <180>
W
70 (50) <65>
1,030 (775) <905>
4 (15) <10>
FLORISS
9
0

(
9
5
)

<
2
6
0
>
1

(
5
)

<
5
>
4
0

(
6
0
)

<
1
2
0
>
GAGE
50th% = 30 mph
85th% = 37 mph
Posted 35 mph
VENICE DR 50th% = 31 mph
85th% = 35 mph
Posted 35 mph
MAP 2 . 4 . E X I ST I NG T RAF F I C V OL UME S AND SPE E D ( SOUT H CORRI DOR)
Data Sources:
CBB feld study; St. Louis County
C H A P T E R T W O E X I S T I N G C O N D I T I O N S
28
W E S T F L O R I S S A N T A V E N U E G R E A T S T R E E T S M A S T E R P L A N
2.3.1 KEY FINDINGS: AUTOMOBILES
Te two existing through lanes in each direction
along West Florissant Avenue provide suf cient
capacity for current and future vehicle traf c
volumes. In some areas for much of the day, one
travel lane in each direction would be suf cient.
Te roadway has a large paved foot-print, and the
space required for automobile traf c can likely be
accommodated in a smaller paved footprint that
retains the same number of lanes.
About 5.8% of the households in surrounding
neighborhoods have no vehicle available, as
compared to 2.6% for the state of Missouri and
2.4% for St. Louis County.
Tere are two traf c hot spots along the
corridor: 1) Near the I-270 interchange; and 2)
at the intersection with Chambers Road. Te
Chambers Road hot spot was confrmed by
project stakeholders, who reported that this
intersection can become congested at various times
of the day (e.g., during the lunch rush and evening
commute).
Excessive speed does not appear to be a major
problem in the corridor. Te posted speed limit on
West Florissant Avenue is 35 mph. Te majority
The space allocated to West Florissant Avenues vehicle
traffic could be reduced
The intersection of West Florissant Avenue and Chambers
Road is a hot spot.
of observed speeds (85th percentile) were less than
42 mph.
Overall, the types of vehicle crashes along the
corridor are typical for arterial corridor (mostly
rear end and angle). However pedestrian crashes,
at 21 crashes over 4 years, were fairly high. Te
crash data indicates that most occurred on good
weather days and during the daylight. Maps 2.5
and 2.6 illustrates the number of crashes as related
to location along the corridor. Te largest percent
of crashes were reported at Chambers Road with
about 24% of total, the second most occurred
at Pershall Avenue with about 19% of total, the
third most at Ferguson Avenue (8.5%) and less
6% of the total at each of the other intersections.
Moreover, one-third of the pedestrian crashes in
the Study Area occurred at the Chambers Road
intersection.
Tere were 736 reported crashes in the four years
from 2008 to 2011. Of the total crashes reported,
0 fatal crashes, 228 injury crashes (31%) and
508 property damage only (69%) crashes were
reported.
W E S T F L O R I S S A N T A V E N U E G R E A T S T R E E T S M A S T E R P L A N
29
C H A P T E R T W O E X I S T I N G C O N D I T I O N S
Existing street conditions are not bicycle-friendly and lack
bicycle facilities
After analyzing the crash data over four years, it
is evident that angle and rear end crashes are the
most prominent type of crash, which is typical for
a signalized corridor.
Te pedestrian crashes were at 3% for the corridor
with all but one pedestrian crash resulting in
injuries. Of 21 pedestrian crashes over 4 years,
one third of these occurred at the intersection
of Chambers Road. It is apparent that this
intersection has a higher safety risk. Te physical
features of the intersection include a general lack
of access management and numerous transit
stops. Any potential changes to the system should
consider impacts to the non-motorized mode.
2.3.2 KEY FINDINGS: PARKING
Approximately 30% of the project area is
paved parking, a large and visible presence, and
much of it underutilized. Tis issue needs to
be addressed in zoning changes and in shared
parking agreements that make more ef cient use
of parking areas and reduce parking redundancy.
Near I-270, parking is provided in large lots,
typically with access provided to West Florissant
Avenue at a traf c signal. Parking and parking
lot access is adequate in this section. Closer to
Chambers Road the lot sizes generally decrease.
Some businesses have cross access and shared
parking. Many of these larger parking areas have
unsignalized access to West Florissant Avenue,
making left turn access dif cult during peak traf c
periods. Many of the smaller lots have parking
that backs directly onto West Florissant Avenue,
which can be hazardous for both business patrons
and through traf c. Cross access can be improved
in some instances, while the small lot sizes
preclude cross access in other cases. Improved
access management would help to facilitate safer
and more ef cient access in this section of the
corridor, and additional cross access should be
pursued where feasible. Te southern section of
the corridor has predominantly mid-sized lots
with extensive parking to the front and in many
cases the rear of the businesses. Cross access is
provided between many, but not all businesses.
Most driveways are provided at midblock locations
making left-turn access dif cult during peak traf c
periods. Additional cross access and creation
of a backage road system, in addition to other
access management measures, would provide a
tremendous beneft to provide for safer and more
ef cient access in this section of the corridor.
2.3.3 KEY FINDINGS: BICYCLES AND
PEDESTRIANS
Pedestrian use and bicycle travel are considered
to be equal in importance to vehicular and public
transit use in the planning and design of a Great
There are numerous access points directly from West
Florissant Avenue to parking areas
C H A P T E R T W O E X I S T I N G C O N D I T I O N S
30
W E S T F L O R I S S A N T A V E N U E G R E A T S T R E E T S M A S T E R P L A N
MAP 2 . 5 . V E HI CL E CRASHE S ( NORT H CORRI DOR)
24.1%
1.7% 0.4%
0.4% 5.0% 1.8%
4.9%
2.9%
4.7%
19.2%
VICKIE PL
R
A
M
P
F
L
O
R
I
S
S
A
N
T
A
V
E
S
O
M
E
R
S
E
T
G
R
E
E
N
C
T
S DELLWOOD AVE
WEDGE DR
V
E
R
S
H
I R
E
C
T
WAYSIDE
D
R
H
A
R
NEYWOLDDR
F
E
S
T
I
V
A L D R
F E S T I V A L D R
F
E
S
T
I
V
A
L
D
R
CHA MBE RS H ILL D R
DENNIS DR
S FLORIDALE AVE
AT WA TER A VE
N
D
E
LLWOOD AVE
S SCHLUETER AVE
Y
A
R
W
O
OD
C
T
D
A
R
G
A
IL
C
T
LORNA LN
S O
M
E R S E T
T E R R A C E C T
S
O
M
E
R
S
E
T
T
E
R
R
A
C
E
D
R
E
R
A
M
P
I
2
7
0
E
I
2
7
0
H
W
Y
E
I
2
7
0
H
W
Y
T
H
A
T
C
H
E
R
A
V
E
A R G E N T A V E
E
A
S
T
D
E
LL DR
WESTDEL L DR
C
H
A
M
B
E
R
S
R
D
C
H
A
M
B
E
R
S
R
D
WEST FL OR ISS ANT AVE
WEST FLO RISS ANT AVE
WEST FLORISSANT A VE
K
R
O
E
G
E
R
D
R
D
E
L
LR
ID
G
E
C
T
M
A
L
D
O
N
L
N
TAMWO RTH D R
DELLR IDGE LN
J E T T D R
N
S
C
H
LU
E
TE
R
A
V
E
N FLO RI DA LE AVE
H
E
Y
D
T
A
V
E
S
T
E
I
N
R
D
ROU SSIL LON CT
REBA
DR
L
AKEMOO R D R
B
A
B
C
O
C
K
D
R
NOR TH C OL LEG E D R
C A M
D
E
N
P
A
R
K
D
R
W
I
L
LIAM
S
F
I
E
L
D
D
R
QUAKE
R
DR
QUAKER DR
B
E
E
C
H
E
R
D
R
C
H
A
R
DONNIERE DR
K
E
E
L
E
N
D
R
K
L
O
S
T
E
R
M
A
N
D
R
H
U
D
S
O
N
R
D
HUD SON RD
C
HAPL ETON DR
HUDSON
H
IL
L
S
D
R
ELKHART DR
PRI V
A
T
E
RD
P R I V A T E R
D
P
R
IV
A
T
E
R
D
P
R
I
V
A
T
E
R
D
PRIVATE RD
P
R
I
V
A
T
E
R
D
ALLIANCE DR
ALL IANCE DR
C
H
A
M
P
L
I
N
D
R
C
H
E
S
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CBB
J ob#105-13
12/11/13
Legend
= Study Limits
= % of Total Crashes on West Florissant
Meters
0 200 400
Great Streets Initiative
West Florissant Avenue Demonstration Project
Project Sponsors:
East West Gateway I Cities of Ferguson and Dellwood I St. Louis County
Crash Data
Map 2.4
Maps 2.5 and 2.6 illustrate the number of crashes
as related to location along the corridor. The largest
percentage of crashes was reported at Chambers Road,
with about 24% of total; the second-most occurred at
Pershall Avenue, with about 19% of total.
Data Source:
St. Louis County
W E S T F L O R I S S A N T A V E N U E G R E A T S T R E E T S M A S T E R P L A N
31
C H A P T E R T W O E X I S T I N G C O N D I T I O N S
MAP 2 . 6 . V E HI CL E CRASHE S ( SOUT H CORRI DOR)
2.27
5.77
1.47
3.37
8.57
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0.37
2.7
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B: Crash Data
J ob#105-13
12/11/13
Legend
= Study Limits
= % of Total Crashes on West Florissant
Meters
0 200 400
Great Streets Initiative
West Florissant Avenue Demonstration Project
Project Sponsors:
East West Gateway I Cities of Ferguson and Dellwood I St. Louis County
12.18.2013
Crash Data
Map 3.7B
Data Source:
St. Louis County
C H A P T E R T W O E X I S T I N G C O N D I T I O N S
32
W E S T F L O R I S S A N T A V E N U E G R E A T S T R E E T S M A S T E R P L A N
updated to include countdown heads, and some
of the push buttons do not function. Lighting is
poor throughout the corridor, and the presence
of driveways, curb-cuts and unclear access points
for vehicles, especially around commercial areas,
signifcantly decreases the safety of all users, most
critically pedestrians on sidewalks. Pedestrian
crossing facilities are limited to occasional
signalized intersections, which results in dangerous
attempts by people to get across the street on
their own. Strong pedestrian connections to
adjacent neighborhoods are also lacking. Twenty-
one pedestrians have been hit by vehicles just in
the past 4 years, indicating signifcant risk, and
nearly one-third of these crashes occurred at the
intersection with the highest need for pedestrian
safety, at Chambers Road. Te environment for
pedestrians could be greatly improved by better
connecting sidewalks, adding green bufers and
shade, improving ADA compliance, creating
more midblock crossing opportunities, enhancing
some intersections, consolidating and removing
driveways and vehicle access points, updating
signalized pedestrian crossings, and lighting all
parts of the corridor. Overall, given the number of
people walking along the corridor, the pedestrian
Street that best serves the population around the
West Florissant Avenue Corridor. Worldwide,
the interaction of all modes has been observed to
be essential to healthy communities. Today, few
bicyclists are observed riding along the corridor,
which is predictable since no real bicycle facilities
are currently provided along West Florissant
Avenue. Tose that are observed are primarily
seen riding on the sidewalks. Te Draft Ferguson
Bicycle & Pedestrian Plan and Bike STL Plan
provide various options to upgrade bicycle
facilities along the corridor, to be considered in
the range of context-friendly enhancements that
serve all users. It is likely that bicycle ridership
would be signifcantly higher in the corridor if
safe bicycle facilities were provided, given the
high volume of pedestrians along the corridor and
low automobile ownership in the surrounding
residential neighborhoods.
Pedestrian conditions are only marginally better.
Sidewalks are provided on both sides of West
Florissant Avenue, and pedestrian crosswalks
and push buttons are provided at all signalized
intersections. However, the quality of the
sidewalks and pedestrian crossings could be greatly
improved. Specifcally, many of the sidewalks are
disjointed and some are not compliant with ADA
requirements, pedestrian signals have not been
Due to an auto-centric street design, pedestrians often make
unsafe street crossings in the middle of the block
Transit is a major presence on West Florissant Avenue
W E S T F L O R I S S A N T A V E N U E G R E A T S T R E E T S M A S T E R P L A N
33
C H A P T E R T W O E X I S T I N G C O N D I T I O N S
residents. Transit access is especially high around
the Chambers Road intersection, underscoring the
importance of this node as a central community
area. Destinations like St. Louis Community
College also draw regional transit riders and have
actually seen a decline in the use of automobiles
among their students.
Tree bus routes currently serve the Project area:
Route 74 (Florissant), Route 61 (Chambers
Road), and Route 64 (Lucas and Hunt). Many
transit customers transfer buses (especially near
the Chambers Road intersection), which results in
a high number of mid-block crossings. Although
pedestrian crosswalks are provided at all signalized
intersections, the walking distance between
these signalized intersections is high, and feld
observations revealed that many pedestrians are
not using them. Most intersections with smaller
roads along West Florissant have neither controls,
such as signals or stop signs, nor pedestrian
crossing facilities, such as crosswalks.
Transit mode share could be substantially
improved in the corridor through a variety of
strategies. Bus stops are already being improved
with shelters and benches and some are being
relocated to more convenient locations. Improved
facilities need to be considered with a level of care
equal to that given to automobile facilities.
2.3.4 KEY FINDINGS: TRANSIT
Te Project area has a much greater public
transportation mode split as compared to Missouri
and St. Louis County averages, which is explained
in part by area demographics (mode split is the
percentage of travelers using a specifc mode, such
as transit or walking or driving). 8.5% of the
Project areas residents use transit as compared to
1.5% for the state of Missouri and 2.4% for St.
Louis County. 13.5% of people in the Study Area
are not using a car to get to work (according to the
US Census, this compares with a fgure of 8.1%
nationally for workers who live outside a principal
city but in the metro area). Transit mode share
could likely be improved in the Study Area. For
example, the layout of the local roadway system
does not connect neighborhoods well with the
transit stops on West Florissant Avenue. Maps
2.7 and 2.8 illustrate the diferences between
the one-quarter mile/one-half mile straight-line
and walking distances to bus stops. Strategically
located bicycle and pedestrian paths may shorten
walking distances to transit stops for some local
and strategically-located bicycle and pedestrian
routes and paths could shorten access distances
and time, thus enhancing transit accessibility
for some local residents. Te general pedestrian
environment should also be improved (with
sidewalks, shade, and pedestrian amenities).
Te corridor also needs to incorporate public
transportation facilities and services that meet the
special needs of the elderly, low-income families,
disabled, and those without access to private
automobiles.
Metro has also selected the corridor as one of two
routes to implement Bus Rapid Transit (BRT),
which is a faster bus service with a signature
design that will complement local bus service.
Te installation of a BRT route alone will be an
enormous improvement not only to transit service
but also to the whole image of the corridor. Metro
is also designing a new North County Transit
Center that will be located of Pershall Road to the
east of West Florissant Avenue, at the north end of
the project area. Tis facility, scheduled to open
in spring of 2015, will serve the eastern North St.
Louis County region (the Hanley Road transit
center serves western North St. Louis County),
providing transfer opportunities for 9-10 routes.
C H A P T E R T W O E X I S T I N G C O N D I T I O N S
34
W E S T F L O R I S S A N T A V E N U E G R E A T S T R E E T S M A S T E R P L A N
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BON OAK DR
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bit 5A: Bus Stop Locations with .25 Mile and .5 Mile Walking Distances
J ob#105-13
12/11/13
Legend
= Within .25 Mile Walk of a Bus Stop
= Within .5 Mile Walk of a Bus Stop
= Bus Stop
= Study Limits
= .25 Mile Radius of a Bus Stop
= .5 Mile Radius of a Bus Stop
Meters
0 250 500
Great Streets Initiative
West Florissant Avenue Demonstration Project
Project Sponsors:
East West Gateway I Cities of Ferguson and Dellwood I St. Louis County
12.18.2013
Bus Stop Locations with .25mi and .5mi
Walking Distances
Map 3.5A
MAP 2 . 7 . T RANSI T ACCE S S ( NORT H CORRI DOR)
The layout of the local roadway system does not connect
neighborhoods well with the transit stops on West Florissant Avenue.
Maps 2.7 and 2.8 illustrate the differences between the one-quarter
mile/one-half mile straight-line and walking distances.
Proposed BRT Stop
(northbound)
Proposed BRT stop
(southbound)
Proposed BRT
Terminus
Data Source:
Field survey
W E S T F L O R I S S A N T A V E N U E G R E A T S T R E E T S M A S T E R P L A N
35
C H A P T E R T W O E X I S T I N G C O N D I T I O N S
S
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INAGUA DR
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Legend
= Within .25 Mile Walk of a Bus Stop
= Within .5 Mile Walk of a Bus Stop
= Bus Stop
= Study Limits
= .25 Mile Radius of a Bus Stop
= .5 Mile Radius of a Bus Stop
bit 5B: Bus Stop Locations with .25 Mile and .5 Mile Walking Distances
Meters
0 250 500
Great Streets Initiative
West Florissant Avenue Demonstration Project
Project Sponsors:
East West Gateway I Cities of Ferguson and Dellwood I St. Louis County
12.18.2013
Bus Stop Locations with .25mi and .5mi
Walking Distances
Map 3.5B
MAP 2 . 8 . T RANSI T ACCE S S ( SOUT H CORRI DOR)
Data Source:
Field survey
C H A P T E R T W O E X I S T I N G C O N D I T I O N S
36
W E S T F L O R I S S A N T A V E N U E G R E A T S T R E E T S M A S T E R P L A N
Street lighting is owned and maintained by
Ameren. Most of the street lighting on the west
side of West Florissant Avenue is provided by
suspension from power poles. Te street lighting
on the east side of the corridor is a combination of
suspension from power poles and individual poles,
and largely benefts vehicles. Pedestrian-scale
street lighting is recommended along the corridor
to improve lighting and pedestrian use.
2.4.1 STORM WATER INFRASTRUCTURE
Much of the corridor is impervious surface:
approximately 85% of the right-of-way and 55%
of the project area is impervious; just over half of
this impervious area consists of paved parking.
Reducing this impervious area to the greatest
extent possible will beneft water quality, improve
storm water management, and reduce the heat
island efect.
Te Project area lacks vegetation and landscape;
just 13% of the Project area has tree canopy
coverage (Map 2.10). As an point of comparison,
in 2010, Forest ReLeaf of Missouri (FRM),
with funding from Missouri Department of
2.4 INFRASTRUCTURE AND
ENVIRONMENT
West Florissant Avenue has typical infrastructure
for utilities, such as storm drains and sanitary
sewer facilities, power lines and communication
transmission facilities, street lights, and
conveyance of potable water and natural gas
(Map 2.9).
For electrical power, Ameren Missouri, the
areas power provider, has a substation located
at the northeast side of the intersection of West
Florissant Avenue and Chambers Road. Most
overhead power is on the west side of West
Florissant Avenue, generally inside the existing
right of way. Power pole locations vary, but
they are generally placed between the edge of
pavement and sidewalk or are located on the
west side of the sidewalk. Tere also is a stretch
of overhead power and power poles located on
the east side of West Florissant Avenue, from
Northwinds Estates Drive to Kappel Drive.
Communication is suspended from power poles,
which are mostly located on the west side of West
Florissant Avenue. In addition, underground
communications lines exist within the Project
corridor.
Conservation, and in partnership with the City
of St. Louis, Metropolitan Sewer District, and St.
Louis County performed an Urban Tree Canopy
(UTC) Assessment. In the area studied, UTC was
recorded at 26%, which is considered far too low
by national standards. American Forests provides
a benchmark of 40% canopy coverage which
many cities use as a target.
Te lack of water-permeable space compromises
storm water management eforts, and has
resulted in disconnected habitat corridors, a
visually uninviting corridor, and a less healthy
environment.
Existing storm water infrastructure includes inlet
structures and conveyance pipes and channels,
forming two drainage areas in the West Florissant
Avenue Corridor. All storm water for this project
study area ultimately outlets into Maline Creek.
Given the plans to develop Maline Creek as a
green corridor, there is a need to clean as much
of West Florissants stormwater runof as possible
before it reaches Maline Creek, through advanced
stormwater management interventions in the
right-of-way.
W E S T F L O R I S S A N T A V E N U E G R E A T S T R E E T S M A S T E R P L A N
37
C H A P T E R T W O E X I S T I N G C O N D I T I O N S
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270 27 277
Utilities Infrastructure
Map 4.1
Great Streets Initiative
West Florissant Avenue Demonstration Project
Project Sponsors:
East West Gateway I Cities of Ferguson and Dellwood I St. Louis County
500 1,000 0 2,000 250 ft N 12.18.2013
Data Source:
St. Louis County GIS
Power Poles
Light Poles
Power Lines
Charter
Hydrants
Lacelede Gas Line
Watermain
Storm Water Channel
Storm
Storm Sewer Structure
Sanitary
Sanitary Sewer Structure
!
!
City Limit
Planning Area
Park
Creek
Rail Line
E
O
!(
MAP 2 . 9 . E X I ST I NG UT I L I T Y I NF RAST RUCT URE ( SE E E NL ARGE D MAP I N APPE NDI X )
Map 2.7
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W E S T F L O R I S S A N T A V E N U E G R E A T S T R E E T S M A S T E R P L A N
study area. Te use of trees and vegetated areas,
especially in parking lots and pedestrian zones will
reduce peak summer temperatures by 2-9 degrees,
lowering surface and air temperatures.
2.4.4 ENERGY CONSUMPTION
Te existing street lighting is far less ef cient
than newer technologies of today, inficting
unnecessarily high yearly costs. Utilizing todays
technology has the potential of reducing energy
consumption for road lighting by as much as 50%.
2.4.5 NATURAL AREAS
Tere are 160 acres of open space or park land use
within one mile of the West Florissant Corridor
study area. Dellwood Park is directly adjacent to
the corridor and within the study area, providing
14.2 acres of open space accessible to residents
and local businesses. Tese spaces ofer a variety
of recreational and ecological services for the area
and could be strengthened with more systematic
connections to one another. Te existing Maline
Creek and hydrological systems provide natural
corridors that are vital to the health of the study
area. Te two wildlife corridors that intersect the
corridor are the Maline Creek on the southern
end and one of its tributaries to the north. Tese
natural areas provide wildlife habitat and passages
for safe migration of indigenous species.
Parks within the Project area have good tree coverage, but
the street itself is lacking in green vegetation and landscape
The Project area has a high proportion of impervious sur-
face coverage, especially in commercial areas
Storm water quality requirements will need to be
evaluated with individual improvements in the
future. Some water quality solutions that would
be appropriate for an urban site such as West
Florissant Avenue include bio-retention, rainwater
harvesting, sand flters, permeable pavement, and
proprietary solutions.
2.4.2 AIR QUALITY AND SOUND POLLUTION
Air quality in the study area is mostly afected
by idling motor vehicles. Metros plans for the
addition of Bus Rapid Transit in this corridor
and the introduction of a multi-use path are clear
alternatives to car trips and may ultimately help
make incremental improvements to the air quality
of the corridor. In addition, any reduction in
motor vehicle traf c will also result in a reduction
in sound pollution. Bus traf c also afects air and
sound pollution, but at this point it is unknown
whether there will be an overall increase or
reduction in the number of buses on the corridor
as a result of the introduction of BRT.
2.4.3 HEAT ISLAND EFFECT
In an urban environment, heat gain can be as
much as 20% higher due to the suns exposure to
surfaces such as pavement and roofs. Pavement
reduction and the use of concrete will reduce the
current levels of urban heat island efect in the
W E S T F L O R I S S A N T A V E N U E G R E A T S T R E E T S M A S T E R P L A N
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C H A P T E R T W O E X I S T I N G C O N D I T I O N S
Existing Green Infrastructure
MAP 2 . 1 0 . E X I ST I NG GRE E N I NF RAST RUCT URE
Map 2.8
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Although the NMA is not growing in terms of
population, it is shifting demographically, creating
opportunities for the development of afordable
senior housing.
Homes in Ferguson and Dellwood have
experienced some of the weakest property
appreciation in the entire St. Louis region.
Home values in the NMA tend to range between
$60,000 and $70,000well below the $175,000
needed to construct quality single family housing.
Demographic analysis reveals a sizable minority
of households in the NMA that are capable of
afording new, market rate housingbe it rental
or for-sale. Evidence indicates this population is
migrating farther north into St. Louis County,
as well as to St. Charles County, in order to fnd
appropriately priced and quality housing.
Nevertheless, analysis does show there will be
future demand for apartment housing on the order
of 400 to 500 units over 20 years, focused on
senior and mixed income housing.
2.5 MARKET CONDITIONS
North County, in general, can be characterized as
having incomes and property values that have not
kept up with infation and regional growth rates.
Tis pattern has been particularly acute south
of I-270, where the study area is located. North
Countyespecially in and around the study
areais characterized by the lowest apartment
rents and highest vacancy rates in the St. Louis
region, making the use of subsidies like tax credits
necessary in order to build quality replacement
housing.
Single family rental housing is common and
becoming more common. Since 1990, the
homeownership rate in the Neighborhood Market
Area (NMA) has declined from 68 to 58 percent.
Two very large apartment properties at the
southern end of the corridor Park Ridge
and Northwinds have some of the heaviest
concentrations of very low income residents
(defned as earning no more than 30 percent of
Area Median Income) in the entire region, and are
not performing well in terms of overall occupancy.
1%
1%
36%
54%
Dellwood
Ferguson
St. LouisCounty
StLMetro
Percent Home Value Increase 1998-2013
Source: Zillow Home Value Index
Comparison of home value changes in the Project area
(green) and region
Market Areas for the Project vicinity
W E S T F L O R I S S A N T A V E N U E G R E A T S T R E E T S M A S T E R P L A N
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C H A P T E R T W O E X I S T I N G C O N D I T I O N S
Projected demographic changes in the Neighborhood
Market Area
3%
-1%
-4%
5%
-5%
6%
32%
8%
Pre-school (0-4)
K- 12(5-17)
College Age (18-24)
EarlyWorkforce (25-34)
FamilyYears(35-49)
EmptyNesters(50-64)
Seniors(65-74)
Elderly(75+)
Projected Population Growth
Neighborhood Market Area: 2010-2017
Source: Esri, 2013
Single family home dominate the market, leaving an open
niche for development of mixed income and senior living
apartments
2.5.1 RETAIL
Te corridor has over 1.2 million square feet of
retail (Map 2.11). Retail supply is well defned
in the corridor, with two community/power retail
centers at either end that serve a broader region,
a neighborhood center in the middle that serves
the neighborhood market area, and a number of
small/boutique/independent retailers in between
that serve client bases from a very small and
specifc surrounding geography. Together, these
centers provide most of the communitys retail
needs. Tere are few opportunities for additional
retail. Paring back land devoted to retail is needed
along the corridor to boost overall occupancy
rates and correct a market condition of oversupply
that leads to low rents and, as a result, insuf cient
funds for landlords to maintain their properties.
Of ce opportunities in the corridor are limited,
with the possible exception of medical of ce space,
and growth opportunities related to the St. Louis
Community College and Emerson Electric.
Tese fndings point to the need for market and
economic strategies that guide public investments
in place, enhance transit and active transportation
routes, and improve functionality in ways that
stimulate private investment, consumer attraction
and population growth. Targeting nodes and
areas of opportunity, capitalizing on specifc
market opportunities such as senior housing, and
retaining higher income households in the market
area while providing a better quality of life for
all residents are all critical pieces of a successful
market and economic strategy for the area.
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MAP 2 . 1 1 . CHARACT E RI ST I CS OF T HE KE Y RE TAI L ARE AS
A: Rec B: Dellwood C: South
Center Plaza Chambers
Existing SF: 580,000 110,000 158,000 81,000 99,000 300,000
Occupancy Rate: 96% 27% 98% 100% 90% 96%
Avg. Year Built: 1993 1970 1988 1974 1975 2005
Avg. Lease/Sq. Ft.: $18 $10 $16 $10 (est.) $10 $23
Segment 1:
North Gateway
Segment 3:
Dellwood
Town Center
Segment 5:
South Gateway
Buzz
Westfall
A B C
Retail supply is well defined in the corridor, with two community/power retail centers at either end that serve a broader region, a neighborhood center in the middle that serves the
neighborhood market area, and a number of small/boutique/independent retailers in between that serve client bases from a very small and specific surrounding geography.
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C H A P T E R T W O E X I S T I N G C O N D I T I O N S
3. Tere are several active neighborhood groups
in Dellwood and Ferguson (such as the
Nesbit Newton Neighborhood Association
and Dellwood Business Association) who are
involved in making their communities better
places to live and work.
4. Major community institutions like St. Louis
Community College and Emerson Electric
generate activity and interest in the area.
With vested interests in the corridor, their
assistance in improving the corridor is both
greatly needed and important to their long-
term investments in the corridor.
5. Major retail areas at the I-270 Interchange
and Buzz Westfall Center provide many
services to the area and generate taxes and
income, some of which is captured by the
local economy.
6. Afordable Housing: Te low cost of housing
in the area provides households of modest
economic means an afordable place to live.
2.6 ASSETS, CHALLENGES AND
OPPORTUNITIES
Key assets, challenges and opportunities stand out
that can be leveraged for positive change through
this project. Tese issues and opportunities refect
both our analysis and what we heard local people
say in various meetings, interviews and surveys.
2.6.1 ASSETS
1. Attractive green spaces like Dellwood Park
and Recreation Center and Forestwood
Park ofer tangible benefts to residents and
support the environmental systems of the area.
Maline Creek and Hudson Creek (west of the
corridor) are assets that have potential to do
much more for the community in terms of
public heath, recreational opportunities and
alternative transportation routes, and can play
a larger role in providing wildlife habitat and
corridors. Tese areas can play a crucial role
as focal points for improvements in a way that
improves values for the whole community.
2. West Florissant Avenue is easy to navigate in
cars (community members often remarked
that it is easy to get around by car) and
provides the backbone for a critical transit
lifeline that is among the most heavily-used
routes in the metro area.
Dellwood Park and Recreation Center is a community node
Community institutions like the Emerson Family YMCA are
strong
Neighborhood groups and residents are engaged in their
community
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corridor have deteriorated physically. If
property values for single family housing
continue to fall behind the market they
too, may sufer from disinvestment and
deterioration.
5. Conditions at both Northwinds and Park
Ridge need to be re-evaluated and improved
to encourage broader socio-economic diversity
and better integration into the community in
a manner that is economically sustainable and
socially equitable. Best practice approaches
in property management, mixing of incomes,
and cooperative housing need to be explored.
6. While low rents and home sales have their
advantages, poor rent growth and home
appreciation are stifing investment in
maintenance and new development in the
market, particularly for housing.
7. Loss of the areas wealthiest residents (in this
case, largely middle-income households) to
outlying areas has reduced the number of
people able to invest in the maintenance of
their properties, as well as those most able to
pay property taxes that underwrite programs
aimed at helping the areas neediest citizens.
2.6.2 CHALLENGES
1. Te corridor is extremely unpleasant and
unsafe for walking and biking. Shopping
and doing business on foot or by bike are not
considered by most residents. Pedestrian and
bicycle facilities need signifcant improvements
to be able to ofer viable active transportation
choices to residents.
2. Te area has no sense of identity - a refrain
that summarized what many feel encompasses
the set of problems that have led to the decline
of the street and neighborhoods and have
driven away quality businesses and residents.
Te abundance of paved areas, vacant lots,
parking lots, unattractive power lines and
utility poles all add to the unsightliness and
visual disorder of the corridor.
3. Tere are few community gathering places
where people can interact and socialize.
Whether sit-down restaurants, farmers
markets, or public plazas, some gathering
places are needed to help generate a feeling of
community.
4. Older generation retail centers and some
multifamily housing in and around the
West Florissant Avenue has been left to deteriorate and
decline
The street lacks character and a strong identity
It is unsafe and unwelcoming for bicycling and walking
along West Florrissant Avenue
W E S T F L O R I S S A N T A V E N U E G R E A T S T R E E T S M A S T E R P L A N
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C H A P T E R T W O E X I S T I N G C O N D I T I O N S
with additional civic buildings and a mix of
other uses. A new Dellwood City Hall could
be part of this civic mix.
5. Given the expected growth in the healthcare
industry, demand for service providers is likely
to increase: and a new medical facility could be
an important part of a development strategy.
6. As part of a public/private partnership, funds
could be devoted to development of higher
quality space for those existing retailers able to
pay somewhat higher rates.
7. Senior housing is a niche market for which
demand and development opportunities are
likely to increase.
8. Best practice property interventions could be
undertaken for Park Ridge and Northwinds,
including cooperative housing and mixed-
income housing.
9. Maline Creek and potentially Hudson Creek,
west of the avenue, can be improved for public
health, recreation, open space and habitat,
enhancing east-west connections on foot, and
adding to the attraction of West Florissant.
10. Leveraging limited public money at the right
locations could stimulate private investment in
a mix of uses in select areas.
2.6.3 OPPORTUNITIES
1. West Florissant Avenues existing through
lanes provide suf cient capacity for current
and future vehicle traf c volumes in some
areas more than suf cient. Yet the roadway
has a larger than necessary paved foot-print.
Te roadway (space required for automobile
traf c) can be accommodated using narrower
lanes, opening up opportunities for transit,
pedestrians and cyclists; trees and greenery;
and medians in the center turn lane.
2. Te designs proposed in Chapter 5 result in
an increase in green space of up to 70%, with
34% less area devoted to impervious surface.
Te transformation of the corridor through
such improvements will dramatically improve
water quality, reduce fooding and piped
stormwater, reduce the heat island efect,
improve walkability, and raise property values.
3. Transit stations that are enhanced as part of a
broader Bus Rapid Transit system will improve
the lives of people and their access to jobs.
BRT could also improve property values and
drive development opportunities, particularly
within a quarter-mile radius.
4. Te area in and around Dellwood Park and
Dellwood Recreation Center presents an
opportunity for a true civic center, perhaps
Excess and poorly used of right-of-way can be reallocated
A new BRT line could be a transformative addition to the area
New greenways along Maline and Hudson Creeks could
also bring dramatic improvements to area residents
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opportunities that are present, targets investment
in key nodes where development can be most
catalytic, locates or co-locates complementary uses,
identifes traf c-driving anchors (both civic and
private sector-driven), invests in placemaking and
transit opportunities to maximize private real estate
and public tax revenues, and leverages a signifcant
amount of local, state, and federal incentives in
order to realize catalyst projects.
2.7.1 A POLICY FRAMEWORK FOR THE
CORRIDOR
A holistic policy framework is needed for the
corridorone that not only improves the physical
realm, but begins to address some of the root causes
of economic deterioration, including access to jobs,
education, stable and quality afordable housing,
and the need for more grassroots community
engagement. In other words, a market strategy is
needed that makes targeted investments in people,
places, and buildings in a manner that leads to real
estate, economic, and community development.
2.7 MARKET STRATEGY
A market strategy ensures that the right types of
products will be delivered to the right market,
thereby reducing risk to developers and the
public sector while increasing the likelihood of
a lasting, sustainable development. Without a
sound market strategy, market analysis provides
little more than a programan amount of
supply that could be delivered to a market to
satisfy unmet demand. But not all housing,
of ce, and retail developments consist solely of
commodity products. By leveraging investments
in place and the public realm, sound urban
design and architecture, anchors to drive traf c,
and coordination of complementary uses, a
development, district, or community can be
created that is greater than the sum of its parts.
Te constraints and threat analysis points to
the need for a market strategy that leverages
the corridors assets, makes use of market
Community
Development
Infill
Housing
Neighborhood
Retail
Civic
Anchors
Heal th &
Wel lness
Opportunities
for Change!
The future of West Florissant Avenue will benefit from an
integrated policy framework
W E S T F L O R I S S A N T A V E N U E G R E A T S T R E E T S M A S T E R P L A N
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C H A P T E R T W O E X I S T I N G C O N D I T I O N S
Street environment and retail: Te quality
of the street environment can boost retail
traf c. Often, this can be accomplished by
enhancing the streetside zone with sidewalks,
street trees, and opportunities for outdoor
dining. Traf c-calming measures and bufers
should be employed. If traf c analysis allows,
selected locations for on-street parking might
be identifed at nodes where walkability and
storefront retail is desirable.
Main street model: In the St. Louis area,
many of the most rapidly-revitalizing
communities, such as University City and
Maplewood, are leveraging their historic main
streets as assets that increase retail traf c and
demand for housing (and thus retail sales and
home values). Creating an inviting sense of
enclosure with multistory buildings, narrow
street lanes, and street furniture are value-
creating eforts. Where architecture and
building enclosure are not possible, mature
street trees can be a practical placemaking tool
that has benefts for economic development.
2.7.2 PLACE AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
An important intervention in the physical realm
that can lead to enhanced performance of private
enterprise involves making portions of West
Florissant Avenue (where feasible, in terms of
traf c considerations) into a more walkable,
livable, human-scaled street with a strong sense of
place.
Over the past decade, a measurable positive
market response has been well-documented
in areas with great character and placemaking
principles (i.e., main streets, town centers,
walkable neighborhoods, historic districts,
transit-oriented development) in the form of
value appreciation for property owners, greater
retail traf c, greater desirability as a location for
employers and employees, and greater real estate
revenues (which make quality development more
economically viable).
Successful St. Louis neighborhoods like Maplewood have a
strong, pedestrian-friendly street environment
The main street model helps create core town centers and
real community places
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Town centers: Te 15-year retail trend of
developers successfully leveraging placemaking
principles to increase traf c and revenues, by
building open-air town centers in the U.S.,
is noteworthy here because it validates many
urban design principles. Tese include:
* Accessible, but hidden, parking behind
buildings
* Storefront retail
* Inviting streetside zones
* Public plazas and village greens
* Attractive trees and landscaping
TOD: Transit-oriented development, or
TOD, has been demonstrated to create real
estate value premiums for nearby property.
Generally, the greatest beneft is experienced
within 800 feet of a TOD station, with lesser,
but positive benefts extending at least another
500 to 800 feet. Tis is often dependent on
the design of the surrounding community;
pedestrian-oriented development is most
capable of maximizing the positive benefts
of TOD. Te places chosen for potential
Streetscape improvements can foster a sense of place and
promote a vibrant community
Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) stationsa form
of TODshould therefore be located in
areas supportive of dense, pedestrian oriented
catalyst projects and future development.
Parks: In many communities, parks can be
enormous value-creating assets that improve
property values. Tis has been amply
demonstrated across the country where
well-maintained and programmed public
spaces attract high quality development or
raise values of existing adjacent properties.
Low-scale residential townhouses could
be developed along Dellwood Park, and
opportunities for plazas and activity areas
in targeted nodes should be sought, in
conjunction with private and civic building
development.
Greenways: Linear parks also can create real
estate value. With eforts underway by Great
Rivers Greenway to add greenways that
bisect two parts of the corridor, real estate
development strategies should be sought to
maximize views of, and access to, these green
amenities.
Property premiums for parks in
new developments range from 2 to
50 percent, depending largely on
urban design, park development,
and access and visibility.
Source: John L. Cromptons research, M. Wetli
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2.7.3 BUILDINGS AND REAL ESTATE
DEVELOPMENT
Tough little new development is likely to
occur in the corridor without public-private
partnerships, eforts should be made to
leverage other sources of money to augment
private investment to the full extent possible.
Development should be focused in targeted areas
(Segments 3 and 5) to create critical mass and
improve surrounding property values.
Senior and Mixed-Income Housing: market
analysis shows that there will be demand for
roughly 200 to 250 quality rental units over
a span of 10 years. Projecting further out,
this could translate into 400 to 500 units over
20 years, provided there is sustained political
support and a persistent implementation
entity. Rental housing is the land use for
which the most state and federal incentives are
available for development. Tis is generally
due to the low-income housing tax credit
program. If this and other investments are
successfully made, it has the potential to serve,
at minimum, three policy goals:
Desirable senior housing development recently completed
in the St. Louis market
Mixed-use building with retail below and housing above
showing local City of St. Louis example appropriate for its
scale and development cost
* Stimulate the private market into adding
additional housingperhaps within
10 to 15 years and following sustained
investment in people, places, and
buildings.
* Provide quality afordable housing to
replace some percentage of deteriorated
housing in the area.
* Improve property values for surrounding
neighborhoods by enhancing the
marketability and image of its most
prominent thoroughfare.
Replacement Retail: Outside of the three
strong retail concentrations, new retail
development along this corridor is the most
economically challenged development type,
due to very low rents and returns, relative to
development costs. Tis is true even when
taking into account tax credit incentives. Still,
a combination of local and federal incentives
might be suf ciently leveraged to create some
higher quality developmentperhaps with
two separate projects (one in each targeted
node)with each footprints of 30,000 square
feetthat accommodate a mix of existing and
new businesses in a manner that helps replace
some deteriorated structures.
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Anchors: A combination of civic and retail
anchors should be explored in the two
targeted nodes to help increase traf c for
shopkeepers. Some possibilities to pursue are:
* Library branch/library storefront
* A new city hall
* A pharmacy with resources to buy a
corner location at Chambers Rd.
* A small hardware store
* A public square or plazadesigned and/
or programmed to encourage frequent use
Retail Tenanting: In addition to potential
anchors, such as a hardware store and
pharmacy, other potential retailers to pursue
include: an ice cream parlor, pizza parlor,
donut shop, cofee shop, and ftness center.
Analysis indicates there is a shortage of these
vendors in the market area, so assembling
them as tenants in a new retail development
is more likely than pulling together a group
of tenants in retail categories that are already
well-supplied in the area. To the degree some
of these more leisure-oriented businesses (such
as a cofee shop or ice cream parlor) can be
incorporated into a concept with usable public
space, success is more likely, because leisure
Another pharmacy, together with health care services near-
by, could anchor the idea of a Health and Wellness district
uses beneft from being near inviting places
that encourage greater frequency of use.
Independent and distinctive retailers: while
independent retailers and restaurateurs often
cannot pay the higher rents that chains
provide (and thus support the construction
of new buildings and facilities), incorporating
them into a mix of vendors can increase
the attractiveness of an area. Independent
restaurateurs, such as barbecue operators, help
highlight local, authentic St. Louis cuisine in
a manner that is authentic well-appreciated,
and capable of drawing in outside money.
Crown Candy is an excellent example of an
authentic, local business that can serve as a
neighborhood anchor.
Medical Of ce: An opportunity exists for a
healthcare facility. Currently, there is a lack
of many such facilities in the vicinity of the
corridor, and the new Afordable Health Care
for America Act (AHCAA) is providing health
insurance to those who previously lacked it.
As a result, communities such as Dellwood
and Ferguson will likely represent a growth
opportunity for health care providers in the
future. Tough incentives may be required,
such development is likely to be largely
privately-fnanceable.
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C H A P T E R T W O E X I S T I N G C O N D I T I O N S
2.7.4 PEOPLE & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
A third and often-overlooked element of a
corridor revitalization strategy is investments in
people. Given certain socio-economic metrics
present in the neighborhood, such as income
and educational attainment, a sound community
development strategy is highly warranted in the
area. Organizations such as Beyond Housing,
Rise, and the Carondelet Community Betterment
Federation represent many local examples of
eforts to develop property and community
services simultaneously. While such investments
cannot be necessarily tied to the corridor alone
(after all, most people live in the adjacent
neighborhoods), certain civic-oriented facilities
and institutions could be introduced within the
corridor that provide services to the surrounding
neighborhoods. Tese could include:
Early Childhood Center: Given some of the
success stories of such centers, a location in
the corridor for such an institution is highly
justifed. Funds from public, private, and/or
institutional sources should be sought for the
development and operations of the facility.
Community Garden: Community gardens
can be an excellent tool for stabilizing
neighborhoods, particularly when they
are formed by the community members
themselves. A study by Gateway Greening
showed greater stabilization of property
values around many community gardens.
In Dellwood, there is already interest from
residents in establishing a garden, which
we recommend should be co-located with
a cluster of civic uses, such as a new library,
childhood center, or City Hall. Te need for
civic spaces like this is evident in results from
the workshops, survey, and observations of
socializing along West Florissant.
Library: Both a civic anchor that can drive
traf c and an investment in people, libraries
help further education and learningtwo
pillars to economic growth and access to
employment.
Community gathering places like libraries and community
gardens help build stronger communities
West Florissants Emerson Family YMCA is an important
community gathering place