RETAIL ANALYSIS

MERCHANDISING PLAN
&
presented to:
July 2012
© Copyright 2012 CATALYST COMMERCIAL. The information provided herein is deemed reliable and is subject to errors, omissions, change of terms and / or conditions. Prepared by Catalyst Commercial, a Texas based retail con-
sulting and market research frm that combines strategy, technology and retail analytics to deliver high-impact retailer recruitment and development strategies to local governments, private developers, retailers and economic
development organizations.
5307 Mockingbird Lane • 5th Floor • Dallas, Texas 75206 • 972.999.0081 Phone • catalystcommercial.net Edinburg Retail Analysis & Merchandising Plan • PAGE 2
Nelda Ramirez
Executive Director – Edinburg Economic Development Corporation
602 West University
Edinburg, TX 78539
Dear Ms. Ramirez,
Catalyst Commercial, Inc. (Catalyst) has been retained by the City of Edinburg’s Economic Development
Corporation to conduct an analysis of the retail trade area of Edinburg and to develop a retail strategy
that has the highest propensity for success given the assets and demand drivers within Edinburg’s trade
area. Catalyst has observed the retail trading patterns from within Edinburg and surrounding retail nodes
to delineate Edinburg’s primary retail trade area. Demographic and psychographic profles of this same
primary trade area were then analyzed to assess consumer spending propensities to determine the retail
categories which would best be received by the local market. Additionally, Edinburg’s workforce and student
populations were assessed to determine the retail demand generated by those factors. Finally, existing and
potential retail sites and corridors were analyzed to determine which retail uses they could accommodate.
The results of this Retail Merchandising and Recruitment Plan are refective of current market trends within
the trade area. Then intent of this effort has been to ensure that future development in Edinburg will be
consistent with market and economic factors and align with the internal objectives of the city’s stakeholders
and residents. The following is the result of the analysis conducted by Catalyst, as well as, the methodologies
and rationales used to generate those outputs.
We look forward to working with the City of Edinburg in its continued success.
Best Regards,
Jason Claunch
President
Catalyst Commercial, Inc.
COVER LETTER
© Copyright 2012 CATALYST COMMERCIAL. The information provided herein is deemed reliable and is subject to errors, omissions, change of terms and / or conditions. Prepared by Catalyst Commercial, a Texas based retail con-
sulting and market research frm that combines strategy, technology and retail analytics to deliver high-impact retailer recruitment and development strategies to local governments, private developers, retailers and economic
development organizations.
5307 Mockingbird Lane • 5th Floor • Dallas, Texas 75206 • 972.999.0081 Phone • catalystcommercial.net Edinburg Retail Analysis & Merchandising Plan • PAGE 3
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The City of Edinburg is the county seat of Hidalgo County, Texas and had a 2011 estimated population of 79,147. Edinburg
experienced an astonishing population growth rate of 59% between the years 2000 and 2010. The delineated Primary
Trade Area (PTA) for Edinburg had a 2011 estimated population of 269,968 and is expected to increase by over 10.5% by
the year 2016 to a population of nearly 300,000. This same PTA corresponds to a drive time of 16 minutes and a concentric
ring of 7.5 miles from downtown Edinburg. Edinburg’s existing residential retail demand is large and is growing at a rapid
rate.
Edinburg also has a signifcant commuter retail demand that is generated by US Highway 281 and the University of Texas
Pan American (UTPA). UTPA’s 2012-2013 student population is expected to be 19,555 and of this amount over 13,000 are
classifed as “commuters on a daily basis” per UTPA. UTPA’s student enrollment is expected to be over 22,000 by the year
2015. Additionally, US Highway 281 has documented daily traffc counts of over 33,000 north of the Business 281 intersection
and over 106,000 at the southern city limits. Over 73,000 vehicles on a daily basis either enter or exit US Highway 281 within
the Edinburg city limits and confrms the strength of the existing commuter demand.
The visitor retail demand of Edinburg is dominated by two groups: 1) older retired citizens of the United States and Canada
who travel to the Edinburg/Rio Grande Valley during the winter months (Winter Texans); and, 2) citizens of Mexico (Mexican
nationals) who cross into Texas on a regular basis for their retail needs (traffc counts from the three international bridges
closest to Edinburg were utilized for this report). The combined annual total retail purchases of the winter Texans and
Mexican nationals within the greater Edinburg area is over $1,600,000,000 and each of these two demographic groups
have unique and specifc retail demands and needs that must be satisfed.
Existing demand within the City of Edinburg include: 1) the high traffc volumes of US Highway 281 of between 33,000 and
106,000 vehicles per day; 2) Edinburg is the county seat of Hidalgo County and is already home to many government
institutions and their employees; 3) the 2012 daytime employment population of the city is estimated at 38,168; 4) UTPA has
a 2012 student population of over 19,500 students; 5) the Shoppes at Rio Grande shopping center corridor that presently
has over 500,000 square feet of space occupied by national retailers; and, 5) Edinburg’s existing medical industry and the
two medical use corridors within Edinburg that contain fve hospitals and over 1,000 hospital beds and accompanying
medical offce buildings. It should be noted that over 800 babies are delivered monthly within Edinburg’s hospitals and this
newborn population fgure equates roughly to the student population of a typical Texas middle school (one new middle
school population per month).
The City of Edinburg’s retail clusters are dominated along six retail corridors. Of these six corridors, the West University
corridor (UTPA), the US Highway 281/Trenton Road corridor, along with the medical and retail corridors of McColl and
Trenton Roads, offer retailers immediate opportunities to open stores to take advantage of the existing and growing
population base and demand drivers.
The City of Edinburg is the gateway into the Rio Grande Valley for travelers originating north of the Valley. Because of
Edinburg’s history and geography, the city is seen as a desirable place to live and raise a family and has been experiencing
a strong middle class growth rate. From a retail perspective, Edinburg offers a strategic geography for new store growth
and expansion as a new growth alternative to its peer competitors.
© Copyright 2012 CATALYST COMMERCIAL. The information provided herein is deemed reliable and is subject to errors, omissions, change of terms and / or conditions. Prepared by Catalyst Commercial, a Texas based retail con-
sulting and market research frm that combines strategy, technology and retail analytics to deliver high-impact retailer recruitment and development strategies to local governments, private developers, retailers and economic
development organizations.
5307 Mockingbird Lane • 5th Floor • Dallas, Texas 75206 • 972.999.0081 Phone • catalystcommercial.net Edinburg Retail Analysis & Merchandising Plan • PAGE 4
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Section I PROPERTY ANALYSIS

Section II TRADE AREA DELINEATION
· Primary Trade Area
· Drive Time Analysis
· Concentric Ring Analysis
Section III POPULATION
Section IV INCOME
Section V ETHNIC PROFILE
Section VI EDUCATION PROFILE
Section VII TRAFFIC COUNT ANALYSIS
Section VIII MARKET ANALYSIS
· Expenditures and Market Potential
Section IX TRADE AREA DEMAND MATRIX
· Lifestyle Segmentation / Psychographic Analysis
Section X RETAIL SUMMARY
Section XI DEMAND DRIVERS
Section XII COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGES
Appendix I MERCHANT MATRIX
Appendix 2 AERIAL MAP
Appendix 3 TRADE AREA DELINEATION MAP
Appendix 4 PRIMARY TRADE AREA MAP
Appendix 5 DRIVE TIME, CONCENTRIC RING
MAP
Appendix 6 POPULATION MAP

Appendix 7 INCOME MAP (MEDIAN)
Appendix 8 INCOME MAP (AVERAGE)
Appendix 9 TRAFFIC COUNT MAP
© Copyright 2012 CATALYST COMMERCIAL. The information provided herein is deemed reliable and is subject to errors, omissions, change of terms and / or conditions. Prepared by Catalyst Commercial, a Texas based retail con-
sulting and market research frm that combines strategy, technology and retail analytics to deliver high-impact retailer recruitment and development strategies to local governments, private developers, retailers and economic
development organizations.
5307 Mockingbird Lane • 5th Floor • Dallas, Texas 75206 • 972.999.0081 Phone • catalystcommercial.net Edinburg Retail Analysis & Merchandising Plan • PAGE 5
PROPERTY ANALYSIS
Map 1 Source: Catalyst
The City of Edinburg is a medium sized city with a population of approximately 79,000.
Because of Edinburg’s larger size there exist many retail developments throughout the
entire city. However, the city’s main retail clusters and corridors are: 1) East University Drive
and downtown Edinburg; 2) West University Drive and the University of Texas Pan American
retail corridor; 3) the Shoppes of Rio Grande Shopping Center located at the Trenton Road
and US Highway 281 intersection; 4) the Canton Road and US Highway 281 intersection; 5)
the Monte Christo Road and US Highway 281 intersection; 6) the McColl Road corridor; and,
7) the medical use dominated corridors of McColl Road and Trenton Road. It should also be
recognized that Edinburg has the advantage ample real estate land parcels for residential
subdivision development.
1. The US Highway 281 corridor is the dominant major thoroughfare corridor within Edinburg
and traverses the city in a north-south direction and connects Edinburg and the Rio
Grande Valley to the City of San Antonio which is located approximately 228 miles to the
north. Because Edinburg is the county seat of Hidalgo County the area surrounding the
county’s courthouse became downtown Edinburg. The downtown area and main retail
thoroughfare for downtown is East University Drive which connects the courthouse with US
Highway 281 to the east. Located at the University Drive and US Highway 281 intersection
are several national and regional fast food restaurants and pharmacies. However, as you
travel westward along University Drive this corridor is dominated by local restaurants and
businesses. There is one shopping center within this same corridor that offers some national
retailers (i.e.: Family Dollar, Fallas Paredes), but the vast majority of businesses are local. Real
estate in-fll locations and redevelopment will characterize the future development of this
corridor. Located at the US Highway 281/Canton Road intersection are two retail clusters
that appear to service Edinburg’s local population. Specifcally, located at the northeast
corner of this same intersection is a Lack’s Furniture Warehouse anchored shopping center,
while located at the southwest corner of this intersection is a Carmike Movie Theater
anchored retail cluster. The Lack’s anchored center is a more traditional shopping center
and contains many local businesses and restaurants. The Carmike Movie Theater building
is located amongst a congregation of other buildings and businesses, including a Super 8
Motel and a Rodz Bar and Grill restaurant. The overall Carmike Theater/Super 8 Motel and
Rodz restaurant development can be confusing for customer access and does not have a
good appearance, however there exists a large acreage parcel south of and adjoining the
Theater that offers good visibility to US Highway 281.
2. Located west of the Hidalgo County courthouse along West University Drive is the University
of Texas Pan American (UTPA) campus, which is the single four year university located
within the Rio Grande Valley and a dominant institution within Edinburg and the Valley.
Beginning near the UTPA campus and traveling west for approximately 2.5 miles is the West
University Drive retail corridor that terminates near the McColl Road intersection. Located
directly across from the UTPA campus is several regional and national restaurant chains
and businesses and there is a new retail shopping center under development. However,
it appears that additional retail establishments targeting the unique needs and wants of
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PROPERTY LOCATION MAP 1
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© Copyright 2012 CATALYST COMMERCIAL. The information provided herein is deemed reliable and is subject to errors, omissions, change of terms and / or conditions. Prepared by Catalyst Commercial, a Texas based retail con-
sulting and market research frm that combines strategy, technology and retail analytics to deliver high-impact retailer recruitment and development strategies to local governments, private developers, retailers and economic
development organizations.
5307 Mockingbird Lane • 5th Floor • Dallas, Texas 75206 • 972.999.0081 Phone • catalystcommercial.net Edinburg Retail Analysis & Merchandising Plan • PAGE 6
PROPERTY ANALYSIS
Map 1 Source: Catalyst
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PROPERTY LOCATION MAP 1
college students is needed as at this time there is no college centric related cluster of retail
businesses. Located further west of the UTPA campus along West University Drive are several
big box retailers with several national fast food restaurants and businesses developed
alongside the big box developments.
3. Located at the northwest quadrant of the US Highway 281/Trenton Road intersection is The
Shoppes at Rio Grande shopping center that is anchored by several national big box stores
and local restaurants. Specifcally, the tenants of this shopping center include: JC Penney’s,
Academy Sports and Outdoors, TJ Maxx, Burlington, Ross, Lane Bryant and McDonald’s.
The existing portion of this center that is open consists of roughly 400,000 square feet and
is fully leased. At this time there is on-going construction activity that will bring on line an
additional 100,000 square feet which will bring the total size of this center to over 500,000
square feet. Additionally, several smaller and larger acreage pad sites are available. The
Shoppes at Rio Grande Shopping Center is the dominant soft goods shopping center within
the Edinburg PTA and offers great potential for retailers researching new store locations
outside of the congested McAllen, Texas market.
4. The US Highway 281/Monte Christo Road intersection is the frst retail intersection travelers
from San Antonio encounter when driving into Edinburg and the Rio Grande Valley. National
truck stop and fast food restaurants are located at this intersection offering limited choices
for the traveling consumer. Approximately a one-half mile to the west is the Business 281/
Monte Christo Road intersection and this intersection also consists of national fast food
restaurants and a regional grocery store. There exists ample real estate opportunities at
these two intersections for new retail development.
5. The McColl Road corridor traverses the western portion of Edinburg in a north-south
direction and is approximately 4.5 miles in length and connects West University Drive in the
north to Owassa Road in the south. The northern and central portions of this corridor have
been developed with separate big box anchored shopping centers that appear to be very
successful. The southern portion of this same corridor, along with the Trenton Road/McColl
Road intersection and corridor, has been developed with various retail uses, but medical
use associated with fve nearby hospitals are the dominant use. Doctor’s at Renaissance
Hospital – 506 beds, anchors this corridor and is located at the intersection of McColl Road
and Owassa Road. Located to the north, along Trenton Road, are: Edinburg Children’s
Hospital – 107 beds; Edinburg Regional Medical Center – 130 beds; South Texas Behavioral
Health Center – 134 beds; and, Cornerstone Regional Hospital. These fve hospitals and their
close proximity to one another are serving as a catalyst for additional medical offce and
research developments, which in turn will create a demand for new retail restaurants and
businesses. Edinburg’s healthcare industry is a dominant employment and retail catalyst for
the northern portion of Rio Grande Valley and the Edinburg PTA.
2
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© Copyright 2012 CATALYST COMMERCIAL. The information provided herein is deemed reliable and is subject to errors, omissions, change of terms and / or conditions. Prepared by Catalyst Commercial, a Texas based retail con-
sulting and market research frm that combines strategy, technology and retail analytics to deliver high-impact retailer recruitment and development strategies to local governments, private developers, retailers and economic
development organizations.
5307 Mockingbird Lane • 5th Floor • Dallas, Texas 75206 • 972.999.0081 Phone • catalystcommercial.net Edinburg Retail Analysis & Merchandising Plan • PAGE 7
PRIMARY TRADE AREA
Understanding where your target customers originate from is a crucial step in any retail
recruitment initiative. Accurate delineation of the trade area in which retailers can reasonably
expect to attract customers is the frst step in this process. Additionally, identifying the
demographic profle of the consumers which are currently shopping at a specifc location is
helpful in understanding success factors, identifying potential complementary tenants and
development marketing strategies for both a particular retail district, as well as, individual
businesses. Catalyst delineated the City of Edinburg’s Primary Trade Area (PTA) by sampling
customer data points from various in-market retail locations to determine the customer’s point
of origination in relation to the areas of study. While retailers, land developers and real estate
brokers have traditionally used radius rings and/or drive times to quickly compare prospective
sites against one another, more often than not, such arbitrary measures do not accurately
depict actual consumer trading patterns and is not suffcient for the decision making process
of advanced retailers.
For the purpose of this study, approximately 4,200 customer samples were collected between
April 30, 2012 and May 30, 2012 from seven in-market retail locations within Edinburg.
Approximately 400 samples were collected at one out of market retail location located
in McAllen, Texas during the months of January 2012 and March 2012. Sample collection
locations included: 1) Walmart – University Street; 2) Walmart – McColl Road; 3) the Hidalgo
County Courthouse; 4) the East University Street corridor; 5) the Monte Christo Road corridor;
6) the Shoppes of Rio Grande Shopping Center; 7) the medical corridor of McColl Road and
Owassa Road; and, 8) Walmart & Sam’s Club – McAllen. Traversing the middle portion of this
PTA is US Highway 281 which is also the dominant retail corridor within Edinburg’s PTA. The 5%
of the sample points located furthest from downtown Edinburg were deemed outliers and
were eliminated. Then approximately 65% of the remaining samples were utilized to delineate
the Edinburg PTA. The City of Edinburg’s city boundaries, as with many of the surrounding
communities, are diffcult to distinguish from a customer’s point of view as these city boundaries
are often a local or minor thoroughfare street. Because of these indiscernible boundaries
and the large population of Edinburg and her surrounding cities, many retail customers are
unaware when a city boundary is crossed and within what city they are purchasing their
retail goods. The distribution of the sample points when plotted on a map illustrate the large
geography associated with Edinburg’s PTA, and show many documented customers traveling
from McAllen, Pharr, Mission and throughout Edinburg itself.
The 2011 population of the Edinburg PTA was approximately 269,968 and has a projected
2016 population of 298,615 which represents a sizeable growth rate of over 10.5%. Median
household incomes for the PTA in 2011 and 2016 are estimated at $31,463 and $37,992,
respectively, which represents a growth rate of over 20%. The estimated average household
size of the PTA in 2011 and 2012 is 3.38 persons, while the median age of the PTA for these same
years is estimated at 28 years old.
In order to accurately profle retailers for this PTA, a tier system was developed by Catalyst
based upon a population density class system. Using density classifcation, the Edinburg PTA
TRADE AREA DELINEATION
PRIMARY TRADE AREA MAP 2
MARKET TYPE TABLE 1 DESCRIPTION
Tier 1 Urban
Dense urban markets with large workforce and resi-
dential populations. Prevalent pedestrian traffc.
Tier 2 Urban Peripheral
Peripheral to CBD with dense workforce and residen-
tial populations and signifcant pedestrian traffc.
Tier 3 Suburban
Mature, predominantly residential-centric market with
dispersed pockets of retail and offce.
Tier 4 Exurban
Predominantly residential, bedroom community,
growth markets. Large retail pockets, with less dense
offce populations.
Tier 5 Micropolitan Removed from metropolitan markets.
Table 1 Market Type (Source: Catalyst) Map 2 Primary Trade Area Map (Source: Catalyst)
matches the characteristics of a Tier 3 Suburban Market from a tier list of 1 through 5, with tier
1 being urban and tier 5 being rural. Over 40,000 retailer locations were profled and retailers
were segmented using population distribution among fve market types to establish a tier
classifcation for each retailer.
© Copyright 2012 CATALYST COMMERCIAL. The information provided herein is deemed reliable and is subject to errors, omissions, change of terms and / or conditions. Prepared by Catalyst Commercial, a Texas based retail con-
sulting and market research frm that combines strategy, technology and retail analytics to deliver high-impact retailer recruitment and development strategies to local governments, private developers, retailers and economic
development organizations.
5307 Mockingbird Lane • 5th Floor • Dallas, Texas 75206 • 972.999.0081 Phone • catalystcommercial.net Edinburg Retail Analysis & Merchandising Plan • PAGE 8
DRIVE TIME ANALYSIS
Drive time analysis is useful when understanding impact from one region or store to another,
but uses an algorithm to estimate drive time distance based upon road types, established
roadway speeds and roadway conditions. Drive time based trade areas are often used
to analyze trade area characteristics and are useful for comparison of proposed sites and
against both existing store locations, as well as, other prospective site locations.
Drive Time Map 3 refects the boundaries of a 16 minute drive time from downtown
Edinburg, and captures approximately 65% of the customer samples (and is also included
within the Appendix). The actual drive time analysis for Edinburg illustrates the importance
of US Highway 281 in a north-south direction and State Highway 107/University Drive in an
east-west direction. The infuence of US Highway 83 in the southern most portion of the PTA
should also be noted and this same Highway expands the PTA to the east and west due
to the ease of driving on this Highway. The chart and table below show the number of
samples that are captured by separate drive time geographies.
DRIVE TIME MAP 3
continued TRADE AREA DELINEATION
STUDY DESCRIPTION COUNT CATCHMENT
1 Minute Drive Time 28 1.4%
2 Minute Drive Time 109 5.3%
3 Minute Drive Time 215 10.5%
4 Minute Drive Time 343 16.8%
5 Minute Drive Time 432 21.2%
6 Minute Drive Time 534 26.2%
7 Minute Drive Time 617 30.2%
8 Minute Drive Time 676 33.1%
9 Minute Drive Time 755 37.0%
10 Minute Drive Time 812 39.8%
11 Minute Drive Time 910 44.6%
12 Minute Drive Time 983 48.1%
13 Minute Drive Time 1,094 53.6%
14 Minute Drive Time 1,178 57.7%
15 Minute Drive Time 1,251 61.3%
16 Minute Drive Time 1,317 64.5%
17 Minute Drive Time 1381 67.6%
18 Minute Drive Time 1438 70.4%
19 Minute Drive Time 1481 72.5%
20 Minute Drive Time 1509 73.9%
21 Minute Drive Time 1542 75.5%
22 Minute Drive Time 1565 76.7%
STUDY DESCRIPTION COUNT CATCHMENT
23 Minute Drive Time 1590 77.9%
24 Minute Drive Time 1612 79.0%
25 Minute Drive Time 1641 80.4%
Chart 2 Concentric Ring Catchment (Source: Catalyst) Table 2 Drive Time Analysis (Source: Catalyst) Map 3 16 Minute Drive Time(Source: Catalyst)
0.0%
10.0%
20.0%
30.0%
40.0%
50.0%
60.0%
70.0%
80.0%
90.0%
1 Mile
Ring
2 Mile
Ring
3 Mile
Ring
4 Mile
Ring
5 Mile
Ring
6 Mile
Ring
7 Mile
Ring
7.5 Mile
Ring
8 Mile
Ring
9 Mile
Ring
10 Mile
Ring
11 Mile
Ring
12 Mile
Ring
0.0%
10.0%
20.0%
30.0%
40.0%
50.0%
60.0%
70.0%
80.0%
90.0%
CATCHMENT CHART 1 - DRIVE TIME
© Copyright 2012 CATALYST COMMERCIAL. The information provided herein is deemed reliable and is subject to errors, omissions, change of terms and / or conditions. Prepared by Catalyst Commercial, a Texas based retail con-
sulting and market research frm that combines strategy, technology and retail analytics to deliver high-impact retailer recruitment and development strategies to local governments, private developers, retailers and economic
development organizations.
5307 Mockingbird Lane • 5th Floor • Dallas, Texas 75206 • 972.999.0081 Phone • catalystcommercial.net Edinburg Retail Analysis & Merchandising Plan • PAGE 9
CONCENTRIC RING ANALYSIS
Traditional concentric rings are another method used to quickly analyze trade area
characteristics, but are not as accurate in identifying existing constraints of the actual PTA
for Edinburg. Retailers use concentric ring studies for quick comparisons of both existing
stores and prospective new site locations. Using a concentric ring analysis, a 7.5 mile radius
from downtown Edinburg captures approximately 65% of the customer samples and
corresponds to the adjoining 7.5 Mile Radius Map.
Many retailers still rely on concentric ring data to analyze trade areas, and although this
methodology is not as accurate as customer derived delineation it can still be useful for
quick reference and comparison purposes. Demographic analysis of concentric ring trade
areas are useful, but these assume a consistently even population distribution and do not
take into account such factors as natural boundaries (lakes, rivers), demographic shifts,
manmade barriers (interstate freeways), shopping patterns, drive time impacts and other
geographic factors. The chart and table below show the number of samples that are
captured by each geography.
RADIUS RING MAP 4
Chart 2 Concentric Ring Catchment (Source: Catalyst) Table 3 Concentric Ring Analysis (Source: Catalyst) Map 4 7.5 mile ring (Source: Catalyst)
continued TRADE AREA DELINEATION
STUDY DESCRIPTION COUNT CATCHMENT
1 Mile Ring 159 7.8%
2 Mile Ring 413 20.2%
3 Mile Ring 663 32.5%
4 Mile Ring 791 38.7%
5 Mile Ring 955 46.8%
6 Mile Ring 1,126 55.2%
7 Mile Ring 1,284 62.9%
7.5 Mile Ring 1,353 66.3%
8 Mile Ring 1,408 69.0%
9 Mile Ring 1,490 73.0%
10 Mile Ring 1,549 75.9%
11 Mile Ring 1,594 78.1%
12 Mile Ring 1,657 81.2%
0.0%
10.0%
20.0%
30.0%
40.0%
50.0%
60.0%
70.0%
80.0%
90.0%
1 Mile
Ring
2 Mile
Ring
3 Mile
Ring
4 Mile
Ring
5 Mile
Ring
6 Mile
Ring
7 Mile
Ring
7.5 Mile
Ring
8 Mile
Ring
9 Mile
Ring
10 Mile
Ring
11 Mile
Ring
12 Mile
Ring
0.0%
10.0%
20.0%
30.0%
40.0%
50.0%
60.0%
70.0%
80.0%
90.0%
CATCHMENT CHART 2 - CONCENTRIC RINGS
© Copyright 2012 CATALYST COMMERCIAL. The information provided herein is deemed reliable and is subject to errors, omissions, change of terms and / or conditions. Prepared by Catalyst Commercial, a Texas based retail con-
sulting and market research frm that combines strategy, technology and retail analytics to deliver high-impact retailer recruitment and development strategies to local governments, private developers, retailers and economic
development organizations.
5307 Mockingbird Lane • 5th Floor • Dallas, Texas 75206 • 972.999.0081 Phone • catalystcommercial.net Edinburg Retail Analysis & Merchandising Plan • PAGE 10
POPULATION ANALYSIS
The City of Edinburg is the county seat of Hidalgo County and is located within the south
Texas region known as the Rio Grande Valley. The Rio Grande Valley is comprised of Hidalgo,
Cameron, Starr and Willacy Counties. The Rio Grande Valley is growing rapidly in population
and had an estimated 2010 population of 1,180,000 which represents a growth rate of over
33% when compared to the 1999 Valley wide population. It is estimated that by the year 2020
this same region will have a population of over 1,455,000 which represents a 23% growth rate
over the 2010 data. Due to the large existing population and the high growth rate there will
continue to be a need for additional retail businesses and services throughout the Rio Grande
Valley and the City of Edinburg.
The estimated 2011 population of the Edinburg Primary Trade Area (PTA) was 269,968 and
has a projected 2016 population of 298,615 which represents a signifcant growth rate of over
10.5%. Median household incomes for the PTA in 2011 and 2016 are estimated at $31,463 and
$37,992, respectively, which represents a growth rate of over 20%. The estimated average
household size of the PTA in 2011 and 2012 is 3.38 persons, while the median age of the PTA
for these same years is estimated at 28 years old. The characteristics of the PTA’s population
are summarized as: 1) young families with multiple children; 2) Hispanic or Latino dominated;
and, 3) working class. The sizeable population growth expected in the PTA, coupled with
the large median income growth, illustrates the many opportunities for new retail to locate
within Edinburg to meet the existing and growing retail needs of the population. It should also
be noted that the University of Texas Pan American had a 2011 student enrollment of over
19,000 with nearly 890 students living on campus with an undisclosed number of students living
in close proximity to the University. Some of the students living on campus and nearby the
campus in student based housing are included within this demographic information because
students have the option of flling out the United States census with either their parent’s home
or their school address.
It should also be recognized that Edinburg has the advantage ample real estate land
parcels for residential subdivision development. The City of Edinburg has in place appropriate
development standards to protect and enhance the city’s existing destination for middle
class residential subdivision development.
POPULATION DENSITY
The population of Edinburg’s PTA and the numerous communities surrounding Edinburg and
throughout the Rio Grande Valley has increased with the major transportation corridors of both
the automobile and railroad. The frst major thoroughfare through Edinburg was US Highway
281 (now Business 281) and this road connected Edinburg/ the county seat to nearby McAllen,
Texas to the south and San Antonio to the north. In more recent times US Highway 281 was
POPULATION MAP 5
TRADE AREA TABLE 4 PTA 1 MILE 3 MILES 5 MILES 7.5 MILES 16 MINUTES
2011 Population 269,968 11,677 66,860 127,143 262,273 290,856
Projected 2016 Population 298,615 12,630 73,555 139,900 288,958 318,759
Table 4 Trade Area Population (Source: ESRI) Map 5 Population (Source: ESRI)
POPULATION
constructed to better manage the higher volumes of traffc associated with Edinburg and the
overall Rio Grande Valley and nearby Mexico. Residential developments have followed and
paralleled US Highway 281 and now as Edinburg as grown you fnd higher population densities
along Edinburg’s major transportation corridors and arteries throughout Edinburg’s PTA.
The majority of Edinburg’s more densely populated neighborhoods are bounded by Schunior
Street to the north, Freddy Gonzalez Drive to the south, US Highway 281 to the east, and 7th
Avenue to the west. On the east side of US Highway 281 there are additional highly densely
populated neighborhoods situated between East University Drive to the north and Sprague
Street to the south.
© Copyright 2012 CATALYST COMMERCIAL. The information provided herein is deemed reliable and is subject to errors, omissions, change of terms and / or conditions. Prepared by Catalyst Commercial, a Texas based retail con-
sulting and market research frm that combines strategy, technology and retail analytics to deliver high-impact retailer recruitment and development strategies to local governments, private developers, retailers and economic
development organizations.
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BUILDING PERMITS
The City of Edinburg tracks the building permits for residential, commercial and industrial
projects as a total of construction project dollar valuation, the value of all construction
projects granted building permits by the City are combined to illustrate land development’s
growth or decline per year. Overall, building permits from the years 2004 through 2011 have
been reviewed and illustrates clearly the high growth period of the last decade through the
beginning of the recession in 2009 and the current growth realities of Edinburg. The years 2006
and 2007 had the highest dollar amount building permits at over $80 million and $77 million,
respectively. The lowest dollar amount of building permits issued was in 2008 and 2009 during
the recession, with total amounts of over $17 million and $28 million, respectively. In 2011 total
building permits valuation increased dramatically to over $56 million and City expects the
2012 fgures to be even higher. The relevance of this data is that it continues to support the
overall statement that Edinburg’s continued rapid growth as a residential, industry and retail
destination.
BUILDING PERMITS TABLE 5 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012
January $417,850 $637,415 $12,785,934 $33,523,300 $1,614,492 $441,245 $1,749,000 $33,175,421 $6,803,265
February $6,824,830 $4,097,586 $1,717,470 $8,057,789 $3,415,600 $1,296,000 $2,600,976 $1,533,248 $1,986,957
March $3,702,448 $4,989,755 $10,838,400 $5,950,786 $798,685 $3,871,802 $939,485 $3,018,975 $3,034,569
April $4,526,875 $4,177,800 $8,982,575 $3,112,575 $12,791,357 $2,139,518 $7,952,618 $1,500,000 $1,430,103
May $1,246,100 $1,568,005 $6,800,889 $6,679,888 $2,413,987 $1,275,988 $1,077,780 $5,115,909 $1,017,268
June $2,229,652 $16,737,515 $12,752,844 $2,537,516 $6,948,750 $2,331,275 $577,591 $1,934,098 $2,157,946
July $1,654,900 $2,688,050 $4,374,350 $439,300 $4,793,725 $516,875 $1,782,338 $352,078
August $26,292,867 $2,546,894 $3,050,906 $2,127,910 $14,309,490 $911,900 $2,315,850 $1,509,165
September $1,601,580 $9,672,580 $3,267,648 $1,680,110 $18,307,797 $1,272,800 $1,668,900 $3,677,066
October $1,963,560 $1,429,200 $5,562,760 $4,017,000 $2,737,350 $2,400,734 $499,200 $1,899,100
November $2,718,508 $578,360 $1,679,161 $6,629,287 $2,188,268 $855,000 $1,555,182 $795,305
December $2,839,956 $604,665 $8,850,106 $2,568,550 $1,852,220 $184,900 $6,110,704 $2,251,547
Total $56,019,126 $49,727,825 $80,663,043 $77,324,011 $72,171,721 $17,498,037 $28,829,624 $56,761,912 $16,430,108
Table 4 Trade Area Population (Source: ESRI) Map 5 Population (Source: ESRI)
POPULATION
© Copyright 2012 CATALYST COMMERCIAL. The information provided herein is deemed reliable and is subject to errors, omissions, change of terms and / or conditions. Prepared by Catalyst Commercial, a Texas based retail con-
sulting and market research frm that combines strategy, technology and retail analytics to deliver high-impact retailer recruitment and development strategies to local governments, private developers, retailers and economic
development organizations.
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INCOME ANALYSIS
Median household income with the Edinburg PTA in 2011 was approximately $31,463 as compared to the 2011 State of Texas median household income of $48,259. There are several
reasons for the income disparity between the Edinburg PTA and the State of Texas, one of which is because Edinburg, as with the majority of the entire Rio Grande Valley region, has
historically been an agricultural center dependent upon less costly manual labor wages and salaries. A second rationale for the lower median income is because Mexico is located just
across the Rio Grande River (approximately 13 miles to the south), and historically immigrants from Mexico have continuously moved into Edinburg and the Rio Grande Valley area and
these same immigrants have kept the labor costs low.
INCOME TABLE 6 PTA 1 MILE 3 MILES 5 MILES 7.5 MILES 16 MINUTES
Average Household Income $46,982 $33,266 $44,750 $47,594 $47,247 $45,209
Median Household Income $31,463 $22,116 $31,225 $31,291 $36,963 $29,777
Table 6 Income Summary (Source: ESRI) Map 6 Average Income (Source: ESRI) Map 7 Median Income (Source: ESRI)
AVERAGE HH INCOME MAP 6
INCOME
MEDIAN HH INCOME MAP 7
© Copyright 2012 CATALYST COMMERCIAL. The information provided herein is deemed reliable and is subject to errors, omissions, change of terms and / or conditions. Prepared by Catalyst Commercial, a Texas based retail con-
sulting and market research frm that combines strategy, technology and retail analytics to deliver high-impact retailer recruitment and development strategies to local governments, private developers, retailers and economic
development organizations.
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Hispanic (Any Race)
Non-Hispanic
ETHNIC PROFILE
ETHNIC PROFILE PIE CHART 4
ETHNICITY TABLE 7 PTA 1 MILE 3 MILES 5 MILES 7.5 MILES 16 MINUTES
White Alone 86.4% 83.9% 85.3% 87.4% 73.8% 86.5%
Black Alone 0.8% 0.5% 0.9% 0.8% 1.2% 0.7%
American Indian Alone 0.4% 0.6% 0.5% 0.4% 0.6% 0.4%
Asian Alone 1.7% 0.1% 1.9% 2.0% 1.3% 1.5%
Pacifc Islander Alone 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.1% 0.0%
Some Other Race 9.3% 12.9% 9.8% 8.1% 20.5% 9.6%
Two or More Races 1.5% 2.0% 1.6% 1.4% 2.6% 1.4%
Hispanic (Any Race) 89.4% 95.3% 89.8% 89.4% 88.2% 89.7%
Non-Hispanic 10.6% 4.7% 10.2% 10.6% 11.8% 10.3%
Chart 3 & 4 Ethnic Profle (Source: ESRI) Table 7 Ethnicity (Source: ESRI)
ETHNIC PROFILE
White Alone
Black Alone
American Indian Alone
Asian Alone
Pacific Islander Alone
Some Other Race
Two or More Races
ETHNIC PROFILE PIE CHART 3
© Copyright 2012 CATALYST COMMERCIAL. The information provided herein is deemed reliable and is subject to errors, omissions, change of terms and / or conditions. Prepared by Catalyst Commercial, a Texas based retail con-
sulting and market research frm that combines strategy, technology and retail analytics to deliver high-impact retailer recruitment and development strategies to local governments, private developers, retailers and economic
development organizations.
5307 Mockingbird Lane • 5th Floor • Dallas, Texas 75206 • 972.999.0081 Phone • catalystcommercial.net Edinburg Retail Analysis & Merchandising Plan • PAGE 14
0.0%
10.0%
20.0%
30.0%
40.0%
50.0%
60.0%
70.0%
80.0%
90.0%
100.0%
P
T
A

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3

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5

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7
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M
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College Graduate
Some College
High School Graduate
Less than High School
EDUCATION PROFILE
The Edinburg Consolidated Independent School District (ECISD) consists of 42 school
campuses that include: twenty-nine elementary schools; six middle schools; four high
schools; and, three alternate schools. The total enrollment for the district at the end of
the 2010-2011 school year was approximately 33,066 students, which a racial make-up of
approximately 97% Hispanic, 2% White and 1% Other. Educational attainment is reported
for persons aged 25 or older, as this is the traditional age by which most people have
completed their formal education. However, a trend has developed in recent years with
people returning to school past age 25. These fgures provide a picture of the general
educational level of the population. Educational attainment is usually associated with
higher incomes, and approximately 22% of the Primary Trade Area (PTA) over age 25
population had an associate’s, bachelor’s, masters or doctorate degree vs. the State of
Texas average of 27% and a U.S. national average of approximately 30%.
THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS PAN AMERICAN
The presence and students of the University of Texas Pan American (UTPA) represent a
signifcant source of demand for retail goods and services within Edinburg and throughout
the greater Rio Grande Valley. As of the 2011-2012 academic year the University had
a full-time student enrollment of 19,034 and the 2012-2013 academic year is proposed
to have a student of 19,555 (a 2.7% increase). At this time, UTPA’s administrative offce
has estimated that their 2015 student population will be approximately 22,000. In 2011-
2012 approximately 890 students lived on campus vs. 13,000 daily commuters. Finally,
approximately 81% of UTPA’s student population lives in Hidalgo County (Edinburg is
county seat), 13% live in either Starr, Willacy and/or Cameron Counties (Hidalgo, Starr,
Willacy & Cameron Counties comprise the Rio Grande Valley), while less than 7% of the
student population lives outside of the Rio Grande Valley.
A November 2010 UTPA Economic Impact of the University of Texas-Pan American
report was conducted to quantify UTPA’s total economic impact upon Edinburg and
surrounding communities. Including construction, on-going school maintenance,
salaries and discretionary spending the total school contribution was approximately
$492,000,000. Of this amount, over $189,700,000 was attributed to student spending that
does not include tuition, books and/or room and board. Further research indicates that
this equates to discretionary spending per student of roughly $5,332 in 2010, which is
much higher than the USA national college student discretionary spending average of
$4,367. Utilizing the confrmed 2010 discretionary spending amount per student the total
amount of UTPA student discretionary retail spending for the 2012-2013 school year is
estimated to be over $202,000,000. As noted in the preceding text, college students tend
to have relatively high levels of disposable income, often supplemented by parental
assistance and fnancial aid. The student population represents a consistent source of
demand for certain retail goods and services (educational supplies, bars, restaurants,
groceries and clothing) that needs to be recognized and supplied.
EDUCATION TABLE 8 PTA 1 MILE 3 MILES 5 MILES 7.5 MILES 16 MINUTES
College Graduate 22.1% 10.6% 22.4% 21.2% 21.6% 20.7%
Some College 17.5% 17.0% 18.6% 17.1% 17.2% 17.0%
High School Graduate 20.3% 20.0% 20.0% 19.5% 20.2% 20.6%
Less than High School 40.1% 52.4% 38.9% 42.2% 41.1% 41.7%
University of Texas-Pan American: UTPA’s Economic Impact to the Rio Grande Valley. 2010 Chart 5 & 6 Education (Source: ESRI) Table 8 Education (Source: ESRI)
EDUCATION PROFILE CHART 5
EDUCATION PROFILE
0.0%
10.0%
20.0%
30.0%
40.0%
50.0%
60.0%
70.0%
80.0%
90.0%
100.0%
Edinburg PTA Texas USA
College Graduate
Some College
High School Graduate
Less than High School
EDUCATION PROFILE CHART 6
© Copyright 2012 CATALYST COMMERCIAL. The information provided herein is deemed reliable and is subject to errors, omissions, change of terms and / or conditions. Prepared by Catalyst Commercial, a Texas based retail con-
sulting and market research frm that combines strategy, technology and retail analytics to deliver high-impact retailer recruitment and development strategies to local governments, private developers, retailers and economic
development organizations.
5307 Mockingbird Lane • 5th Floor • Dallas, Texas 75206 • 972.999.0081 Phone • catalystcommercial.net Edinburg Retail Analysis & Merchandising Plan • PAGE 15
TRAFFIC COUNTS
Average daily traffc volumes are an important measurement by which most retailers
evaluate potential sites for new stores. Generally speaking, higher traffc counts are more
attractive to retailers as they are typically associated with higher retail sales potential. The
State of Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) supplied traffc count data for 2010,
as well as, City of Edinburg data from 2009, 2010 and 2011 were reviewed for Edinburg and
are also represented in the adjoining table and map.
Four traffc locations were situated along US Highway 281 and data for both north and
south bound traffc lanes were collected over a 24 hour period. The US Highway 281 data
collection locations and their respective traffc counts were: 1) US Highway 281 north of US
Highway 83 – 106,000 vehicles per day; 2) US Highway 281 at Trenton Road intersection –
99,000 vehicles per day; 3) US Highway 281 at University Drive intersection – 63,000 vehicles
per day; and, 4) US Highway 281 north of the Business 281 split – 33,000 vehicles per day. A
review of this data highlights that approximately 73,000 vehicles are exiting and entering
US Highway 281 within the City of Edinburg city limits every day, which is a very noteworthy
fgure and illustrates the importance of the existing commuter traffc within Edinburg. It
should also be noted that the recorded traffc volumes of 106,000 through 63,000 vehicles
per day are considered to be extremely high to moderately high for highway and freeway
locations throughout the State of Texas and the USA.
An additional series of traffc data collection points along University Drive were also reviewed
and summarized as: 1) East University Drive east of US Highway 281 – 18,000 vehicles per
day; 2) West University Drive just west of Business 281 intersection – 28,000 vehicles per day;
and, 3) West University Drive at the Sugar Road intersection – 33,000 vehicles per day.
This information demonstrates the higher traffc volumes along University Drive the closer
a commuter travels towards UTPA. Daily traffc counts of over 33,000 on commuter and
thoroughfare streets are considered high within the State of Texas and the USA.
Traffc counts were also collected at the McColl Road/Trenton Road intersection and the
Jackson Road/Trenton Road intersection. A review of the traffc counts from these two
intersections illustrates the apparent movement of the local neighborhood populations
to the south and east, or towards the City of McAllen and US Highway 281, respectively.
These same volumes range from approximately 8,048 to 20,416 and refect volumes that
are slightly elevated for typical neighborhood intersections.
TRAFFIC COUNTS TABLE 9
MAP LOCATION INTERSECTION
24 HOUR
COUNTS
SOURCE
1 Highway 281 n of Highway 83 106,000 TxDOT
2 Highway 281 at Trenton Road 99,000 TxDOT
3 Highway 281 at University Drive 63,000 TxDOT
4 Highway 281 n of Business 281 split 33,000 TxDOT
5 E University Drive e of Highway 281 18,000 TxDOT
6 W University Drive w of Business 281 28,000 TxDOT
7 W University Drive at Sugar Road 33,000 TxDOT
8 McColl Road n of Trenton Road 8,048 City of Edinburg
9 McColl Road s of Trenton Road 13,825 City of Edinburg
10 Trenton Road w of McColl Road 8,719 City of Edinburg
11 Trenton Road e of McColl Road 13,826 City of Edinburg
12 Jackson Road s of Trenton Road 16,096 City of Edinburg
13 Trenton Road e of Jackson Road 14,341 City of Edinburg
14 W University Drive e of Jackson Road 20,416 City of Edinburg
14 Monte Christo Rd w of Business 281 13,978 City of Edinburg
15 Business 281 s of Monte Christo Rd 13,032 City of Edinburg
Table 9 Traffc Counts (Source: Edinburg)
TRAFFIC COUNT ANALYSIS
© Copyright 2012 CATALYST COMMERCIAL. The information provided herein is deemed reliable and is subject to errors, omissions, change of terms and / or conditions. Prepared by Catalyst Commercial, a Texas based retail con-
sulting and market research frm that combines strategy, technology and retail analytics to deliver high-impact retailer recruitment and development strategies to local governments, private developers, retailers and economic
development organizations.
5307 Mockingbird Lane • 5th Floor • Dallas, Texas 75206 • 972.999.0081 Phone • catalystcommercial.net Edinburg Retail Analysis & Merchandising Plan • PAGE 16
C
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Schunior St
University Dr
Sprague Rd
Trenton Rd
Owassa Rd
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Freddy Gonzalez Dr
33,000
63,000
28,000
20,416
8,048
8,719
99,000
18,000
33,000
16,096
106,000
14,341
13,826
13,825
TRAFFIC COUNTS MAP 8
continued TRAFFIC COUNTS
Map 8 Traffc Counts (Source: Catalyst)
© Copyright 2012 CATALYST COMMERCIAL. The information provided herein is deemed reliable and is subject to errors, omissions, change of terms and / or conditions. Prepared by Catalyst Commercial, a Texas based retail con-
sulting and market research frm that combines strategy, technology and retail analytics to deliver high-impact retailer recruitment and development strategies to local governments, private developers, retailers and economic
development organizations.
5307 Mockingbird Lane • 5th Floor • Dallas, Texas 75206 • 972.999.0081 Phone • catalystcommercial.net Edinburg Retail Analysis & Merchandising Plan • PAGE 17
MARKET POTENTIAL ANALYSIS BY CATEGORY
Supply estimates are sales to consumer by establishment and exclude business to business
sales. Demand estimates refect the expected amount spent by consumers at retail outlets.
A positive (+) value represents “leakage” and a negative (-) value represents “over supply”.
Data for this section is provided by ESRI, MediaMark Research and InfoUSA.
The City of Edinburg and the corresponding Edinburg PTA have a registered over supply
of total retail trade and food and drink sales which is consistent with regional trade area
and/or high traffc volume corridors. The reason for this regional trade classifcation is due
to the presence of US Highway 281 traversing the city limits of Edinburg and the already
stated signifcant traffc volumes utilizing this same Highway. It should also be noted that
US Highway 281 is the dominant north-south major thoroughfare for the western portion
of the Rio Grande Valley and is already experiencing large regional shopping center
development.
The UTPA and downtown Edinburg corridors, along with the medical use corridors of McColl
Road and Trenton Road, also contribute to the regional retail trade area designation of
Edinburg.
Another retail strength indicator used by retailers, land developers and economists to
gauge the overall retail strength of a particular area is the Push-Pull Factors. Retail trade
‘Pull’ factors are used to measure the relative strength of a region’s ability to attract people
from outside its city limit borders. Retail trade ‘Push’ factors are the opposite of Pull. Regions
with the ability to attract more non-resident retail consumers could capture more dollars
for the region. Regions capturing non-resident dollars not only beneft from an increase of
employment opportunities, but also from an increase in the county and city sales taxes
paid by non-resident consumers.
Counties with a per capita sales greater than the per capita sales of the state would result
in a trade pull factor greater than 1.00, and trade pull factors greater than 1.00 represent
the local retail businesses are able to attract or capture more trade from non-resident
consumers. The 2011 Hidalgo County Trade Factor adjusted for per capita income was
1.63, or signifcantly higher than the State of Texas average pull factor for all Texas counties.
The 1.63 pull factor is another documented measurement illustrating the existing strength
and importance of the retail industry within Hidalgo County, which includes Edinburg.
SUMMARY
Specifc information pertaining to the State of Texas, Hidalgo County, the City of Edinburg
and the Edinburg PTA were all reviewed for this overall retail leakage/supply study and
retail push-pull factor study. Since Edinburg is classifed as a regional retail draw a strategic
focus of continued regional recruitment should be implemented for the many commercial
real estate opportunities located with Edinburg that are situated along US Highway 281,
as well as, the regional, local and medical related opportunities associated with the other
identifed retail corridors within Edinburg. The retail niche needs of the local population,
the identifed non-resident local consumers, the winter Texans and the Mexican national
customers all provide great opportunities for the City of Edinburg to capture these known
retail purchases.
MARKET ANALYSIS
© Copyright 2012 CATALYST COMMERCIAL. The information provided herein is deemed reliable and is subject to errors, omissions, change of terms and / or conditions. Prepared by Catalyst Commercial, a Texas based retail con-
sulting and market research frm that combines strategy, technology and retail analytics to deliver high-impact retailer recruitment and development strategies to local governments, private developers, retailers and economic
development organizations.
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INDUSTRY GROUP
DEMAND
(RETAIL POTENTIAL)
SUPPLY (RETAIL SALES) RETAIL GAP
SURPLUS /
LEAKAGE FACTOR
Total Retail Trade and Food & Drink (NAICS 44-45, 722) $1,403,497,322 $2,375,102,024 -$971,604,702 -25.7
Total Retail Trade (NAICS 44-45) $1,207,025,861 $2,025,632,572 -$818,606,711 -25.3
Total Food & Drink (NAICS 722) $196,471,461 $349,469,452 -$152,997,991 -28.0
INDUSTRY GROUP
DEMAND
(RETAIL POTENTIAL)
SUPPLY (RETAIL SALES) RETAIL GAP
SURPLUS /
LEAKAGE FACTOR
Motor Vehicle & Parts Dealers (NAICS 441) $293,814,637 $545,065,161 -$251,250,524 -30.0
Automobile Dealers (NAICS 4411) $252,135,660 $500,189,645 -$248,053,985 -33.0
Other Motor Vehicle Dealers (NAICS 4412) $19,658,137 $13,907,092 $5,751,045 17.1
Auto Parts, Accessories, and Tire Stores (NAICS 4413) $22,020,840 $30,968,424 -$8,947,584 -16.9
Furniture & Home Furnishings Stores (NAICS 442) $44,242,713 $99,703,250 -$55,460,537 -38.5
Furniture Stores (NAICS 4421) $35,723,251 $82,468,942 -$46,745,691 -39.6
Home Furnishings Stores (NAICS 4422) $8,519,462 $17,234,308 -$8,714,846 -33.8
Electronics & Appliance Stores (NAICS 443/NAICS 4431) $25,630,708 $52,393,086 -$26,762,378 -34.3
Bldg Materials, Garden Equip. & Supply Stores
NAICS 444)
$42,995,829 $66,292,605 -$23,296,776 -21.3
Building Material and Supplies Dealers (NAICS 4441) $40,788,453 $64,732,206 -$23,943,753 -22.7
Lawn and Garden Equipment and Supplies Stores
(NAICS 4442)
$2,207,376 $1,560,399 $646,977 17.2
Food & Beverage Stores (NAICS 445) $267,362,721 $443,394,211 -$176,031,490 -24.8
Grocery Stores (NAICS 4451) $241,346,798 $389,365,426 -$148,018,628 -23.5
Specialty Food Stores (NAICS 4452) $20,593,397 $45,364,279 -$24,770,882 -37.6
Beer, Wine, and Liquor Stores (NAICS 4453) $5,422,526 $8,664,506 -$3,241,980 -23.0
Health & Personal Care Stores (NAICS 446/NAICS 4461) $39,249,120 $64,117,106 -$24,867,986 -24.1
Gasoline Stations (NAICS 447/NAICS 4471) $194,763,062 $355,826,785 -$161,063,723 -29.3
Clothing and Clothing Accessories Stores (NAICS 448) $53,529,026 $47,849,497 $5,679,529 5.6
Clothing Stores (NAICS 4481) $40,165,084 $32,523,554 $7,641,530 10.5
Shoe Stores (NAICS 4482) $7,120,302 $7,281,456 -$161,154 -1.1
Jewelry, Luggage, and Leather Goods Stores
(NAICS 4483)
$6,243,640 $8,044,487 -$1,800,847 -12.6
TRADE AREA DEMAND MATRIX
Table 10: The following chart is a summary of the number of uses, market demand and sales potential and leakage
factor from within the study area. (Source: ESRI)
© Copyright 2012 CATALYST COMMERCIAL. The information provided herein is deemed reliable and is subject to errors, omissions, change of terms and / or conditions. Prepared by Catalyst Commercial, a Texas based retail con-
sulting and market research frm that combines strategy, technology and retail analytics to deliver high-impact retailer recruitment and development strategies to local governments, private developers, retailers and economic
development organizations.
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continued TRADE AREA DEMAND MATRIX
INDUSTRY GROUP
DEMAND
(RETAIL POTENTIAL)
SUPPLY (RETAIL SALES) RETAIL GAP
SURPLUS /
LEAKAGE FACTOR
Sporting Goods, Hobby, Book, and Music Stores
(NAICS 451)
$15,385,630 $17,244,073 -$1,858,443 -5.7
Sporting Goods/Hobby/Musical Instrument Stores
(NAICS 4511)
$9,273,757 $12,983,008 -$3,709,251 -16.7
Book, Periodical, and Music Stores (NAICS 4512) $6,111,873 $4,261,065 $1,850,808 17.8
General Merchandise Stores (NAICS 452) $197,808,321 $293,551,679 -$95,743,358 -19.5
Department Stores Excluding Leased Depts.
(NAICS 4521)
$89,160,459 $170,708,516 -$81,548,057 -31.4
Other General Merchandise Stores (NAICS 4529) $108,647,862 $122,843,163 -$14,195,301 -6.1
Miscellaneous Store Retailers (NAICS 453) $21,275,715 $28,372,741 -$7,097,026 -14.3
Florists (NAICS 4531) $1,864,806 $2,674,033 -$809,227 -17.8
Offce Supplies, Stationery, and Gift Stores (NAICS 4532) $10,000,810 $11,428,097 -$1,427,287 -6.7
Used Merchandise Stores (NAICS 4533) $1,324,560 $1,538,704 -$214,144 -7.5
Other Miscellaneous Store Retailers (NAICS 4539) $8,085,539 $12,731,907 -$4,646,368 -22.3
Food Services & Drinking Places (NAICS 722) $196,471,461 $349,469,452 -$152,997,991 -28.0
Full-Service Restaurants (NAICS 7221) $90,614,629 $164,299,434 -$73,684,805 -28.9
Limited-Service Eating Places (NAICS 7222) $90,100,829 $159,448,505 -$69,347,676 -27.8
Special Food Services (NAICS 7223) $11,293,100 $15,484,399 -$4,191,299 -15.7
Drinking Places - Alcoholic Beverages (NAICS 7224) $4,462,903 $10,237,114 -$5,774,211 -39.3
Table 10: The following chart is a summary of the number of uses, market demand and sales potential and leakage
factor from within the study area. (Source: ESRI)
© Copyright 2012 CATALYST COMMERCIAL. The information provided herein is deemed reliable and is subject to errors, omissions, change of terms and / or conditions. Prepared by Catalyst Commercial, a Texas based retail con-
sulting and market research frm that combines strategy, technology and retail analytics to deliver high-impact retailer recruitment and development strategies to local governments, private developers, retailers and economic
development organizations.
5307 Mockingbird Lane • 5th Floor • Dallas, Texas 75206 • 972.999.0081 Phone • catalystcommercial.net Edinburg Retail Analysis & Merchandising Plan • PAGE 20
continued TRADE AREA DEMAND MATRIX
LIFESTYLE SEGMENTATION/PSYCHOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS
The 72-segment Community Tapestry system classifes U.S. neighborhoods based on their
socioeconomic and demographic compositions. The versatility of Community Tapestry
provides several methods of dividing the 72 Neighborhood segments into summary groups
for a broader view of U.S. neighborhoods. There are 15 summary groups that include
traditional geo-demographic factors, including family status, affuence, age, family status,
ethnicity, and degree of urbanization.
TOP TAPESTRY SEGMENTS (PRIMARY TRADE AREA) TABLE 11
RANK TAPESTRY SEGMENT CATEGORY % OF HOUSEHOLDS
1 Los Novios Espaniola 40%
2 Los Padres Espaniola 24%
3 Anos de Quincenera Espaniola 16%
4 Doublewides Specialties 4%
5 Los Trabajadores Espaniola 3%
6 Los Padrinos Espaniola 3%
7 Regents Creme de la Creme 3%
8 Los Solteros Espaniola 2%
9 Legacy Years Specialties 2%
10 Grand Masters Creme de la Creme 1%
LOS NOVIOS
Los Novios neighborhoods are neighborhoods with the highest percentage of married-
with-children households. So their Spanish name, which means “newlyweds” is a perfect
ft. What’s more the median-age range of residents is in the lowest category — 20s and
low-30s. Fittingly, these areas rank highest in children under six at nearly 75-percent-above-
average. But they also have a 50-percent-higher-than-average level of kids six- to 13-years-
old. While many of the residents are married, there are also above-average levels of single-
parent households: with the highest level (interestingly) in single-male-with-children at over
75-percent-aboveaverage. The highly urban Los Novios areas share several demographics
with their fellow Espaniola segments, including a high percent of residents without high-
school educations (three-times-the national-average); median household incomes too
broad to classify without misleading market researchers; and high rankings on income
from public-assistance (three-times-above-average). However, the residents also rank at
an average level of income from their predominantly blue-collar jobs. They rank extremely
high in fve occupations: farming/fshing/forestry (a whooping seven-times-the-average),
building maintenance (two-and-a-half-times-average), construction and production (both
at nearly two-times-average), and transportation (about 75-percent-above-average).
LOS PADRES
As anyone who knows anything about Hispanic culture knows, family is very important to
this demographic. In particular, parents are regarded as the kings and queens of their
castles. The aptly named Los Padres (Spanish for “parents”) neighborhoods weight in with
the second-largest percentage of children — which, of course, means there are many
parents as well. In these highly urban Espaniola neighborhoods, the percentage of married-
couple households is just below the national-norm; the level of single-female-parent homes
is 25-percent-above-average; and (interestingly) the level of single-male-parent homes is
more than 50-percent-aboveaverage. The children in the homes span all ages, but show
the highest ranking in kids under-six (nearly 50-percent-above-average). This is obviously
because of the residents’ relatively young age: The median age of Los Padres areas is
in the 30s. The median household income in these areas is too broad to classify without
misleading market researchers. But by looking at other factors, one can assume the
income levels are lower than-average. These residents have two-and-a-half-times-average
number of people with less-than-high-school educations. They also rank very high in four
blue-collar occupations: farming/fshing/forestry (two-and-a-half-times-average), building
maintenance (two-times-average), construction (over 50-percent-above-average), and
production (over 50-percent-above-average). This group also shows a 50-percent to two
times-average level of income from public-assistance.
ANOS DE QUINCENERA
Among the six predominantly Hispanic Espaniola market segments, two of them share the
highest median age range — Anos de Quincenera is one of them. That fact, combined with
the fact that these areas are home to the largest percent of married-with children families,
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PYCHOGRAPHIC AFFLUENCY CHART ( < MORE AFFLUENT - LESS AFFLUENT > ) CHART 7
Chart 7 Affuency Chart (Source: STI Popstats) Table 11 Top Tapestry Segments (Source: STI Popstats)
© Copyright 2012 CATALYST COMMERCIAL. The information provided herein is deemed reliable and is subject to errors, omissions, change of terms and / or conditions. Prepared by Catalyst Commercial, a Texas based retail con-
sulting and market research frm that combines strategy, technology and retail analytics to deliver high-impact retailer recruitment and development strategies to local governments, private developers, retailers and economic
development organizations.
5307 Mockingbird Lane • 5th Floor • Dallas, Texas 75206 • 972.999.0081 Phone • catalystcommercial.net Edinburg Retail Analysis & Merchandising Plan • PAGE 21
continued TRADE AREA DEMAND MATRIX
has given the segment its name, which is a Spanish term that means “parents with daughters
coming of marriage age.” As a result, with older children under their roofs, these residents
may very likely be at the peak of their purchasing years. While the median household
income of the areas is too broad to classify without misleading market researchers, one
indicator in particular points to the lower-end of the income scale: Residents living in these
areas are seeking public assistance at a rate of over-50-percent-above-average. Bolstering
this assumption are the facts that these areas rank as blue-collar, and show only some high-
school education, but very little higher education. In fact, the highly urban neighborhoods
ranks at a nearly two-times-average-level of resident without high-school degrees. The
largely urban Anos de Quincenera areas show an average-level-of-income from wages/
salaries, with particularly high standings in building maintenance (over-50-percent-above-
average) and transportation (over-25-percent-above-average).
DOUBLEWIDES
In America there tends to be a particular stigma attached to living in mobile homes and
mobile home parks. But they are not all so called “trailer trash.” In fact, many people
chose this lifestyle as a preference for several reasons, including mobility and low-cost
housing. In fact, the median income of residents of Doublewides neighborhoods is a
very respectable high-$30,000s and $40,000s. Doublewides are areas were mobile homes
dictate the lifestyles of the residents, who share a median age in the 30s. While residents
in Doublewides do have a higher-than-average level of income from public-assistance,
many others are hardworking Americas, with a higher-than-average representation in
several manual-labor blue-collar occupations, including farming/fshing/forestry (nearly
three-times-average), construction (75-percent-above-average), repair services (over-50-
percent-above-average), transportation (50-percent-above-average), and production
(nearly 50-percent-aboveaverage). These occupations are a refection of the residents’
low educational achievements: There is an over-50-percent-average number of people
with less-than-high-school educations. However, 25-percent-above-average have high-
school degrees. Also owing to their residents’ ages, these areas have slightly more younger
children than older. They tend to have married-couple households, but also have a nearly
50-percenthigher-than-average number of single-fathers.
LOS TRABAJADORES
The Spanish-language name for this category should not be misconstrued to mean that
everyone is generating income from jobs. While an average level of Los Trabajadores
(“workers”) residents are generating income from their occupations, these neighborhoods
ranks the highest among the primarily Hispanic Espaniola areas for public-assistance
income: over four-and-a-half-times-above-average. But nonetheless these areas are
among the three segments within this category with the highest income levels: the
high-$30,000s to $40,000s. As a result, those who work are in all likelihood hard workers.
It helps that they are young: They are one of two segments with a median-age in the
20s. The dominant areas of employment for these workers are blue-collar jobs in farming/
fshing/forestry (nearly four-times-average); building maintenance (over two-and-a-half-
times-average); and transportation, construction, and food preparation (all at or above
50-percent-higher-thannational-averages). Like other Espaniola segments, Trabajadores
have a higher-thanaverage-level of people with less-than-high-school educations (nearly
three-times average). Los Trabajadores areas have the highest percent of children of all
the segments, especially kids under six (over 50-percent-above-average). They are also
predominately single-parent homes, with about two-and-a-half-above-average levels of
both singlemale-parents and single-female-parents.
LOS PADRINOS
Among the predominantly Hispanic Espaniola segments, Los Padrinos is one of two segments
with a median age in the 40s. These neighborhoods also show higher percentages of
single-parent households than other segments. As a result, these areas have been names
Los Padrinos, which means “godparents,” a very common honorarium bestowed on older
singles in the Hispanic culture. The number of single-parent homes ranks high for both males
(75-percent-above-average) and females (over 75-percent-above-average). However,
these neighborhoods rank at an overall average-level of children in all age groups,
indicating that the homes are not bursting at the seams with kids. Los Padrinos areas also rate
the highest percentage of residents over-65-years-old in this category. Owing, no doubt, to
the older median age, these areas show above-average levels of widows/widowers and
divorcees. Los Padrinos is one of three segments within the Espaniola category with the
highest median-income levels: the high-$30,000s and $40,000s. While some of this income
is generated by jobs, they also rank high in public-assistance: about two-and-a-half-
above-average. Those who are employed are primarily blue-collar workers: presumably
a refection of a two-times the-national-average number of people with less-than-high-
school educations. The residents’ dominant job categories include building maintenance
(two-times-average), food preparation (50-pecent-above-average), and personal care
and transportation (both 25-percent-above-average).
REGENTS
Regents are highly urban Crème de la Creme neighborhoods with the vast majority of their
residents in their 40s, fewer-than-average children under 17 years old, and a higher-than-
average number of 65-plus-year-olds. Though they have fewer children, the residents in
these areas have a higher-than-national-average quota of married couples. Also higher-
than-average are the number of college-educated residents, people employed in white-
collar management and professional positions, and income from retirement investments/
social security. The combination of income avenues, put these neighborhoods solidly in
the $70,000s to $80,000s median annual income range — making their “middle-age” years
extremely fnancially secure and materially comfortable.
LOS SOLTEROS
Among the six primarily Hispanic Espaniola neighborhood segments, the Los Solteros are
© Copyright 2012 CATALYST COMMERCIAL. The information provided herein is deemed reliable and is subject to errors, omissions, change of terms and / or conditions. Prepared by Catalyst Commercial, a Texas based retail con-
sulting and market research frm that combines strategy, technology and retail analytics to deliver high-impact retailer recruitment and development strategies to local governments, private developers, retailers and economic
development organizations.
5307 Mockingbird Lane • 5th Floor • Dallas, Texas 75206 • 972.999.0081 Phone • catalystcommercial.net Edinburg Retail Analysis & Merchandising Plan • PAGE 22
continued TRADE AREA DEMAND MATRIX
among three with the highest income-levels: the high-$30,000s to $40,000s. However, that
doesn’t mean they aren’t struggling, because other factors speak to people working hard
to make ends meet. For one things, these highly urban areas are home to predominately
single-households, in particular single-parent families: hence their name — Los Solteros mean
“singles” in Spanish. They rank at two-times-the-national-average for single-male-parent
and singlefemale-parent households. A 50-percent-higher-than-average number of these
residents have never been married. There are above-average numbers of children of all
ages in the households, with the highest percent in the younger group (under six-years-old)
and fewer in the oldest grouping (13 to 17 years old). Another fact pointing to their fnancial
struggle is the high level of income from public-assistance: more than three-timesaverage
With a two-and-a-half-times-average level of residents with less-than-highschool educations,
residents of Los Solteros areas are employed in predominantly bluecollar manual-labor jobs,
with higher-than-average rankings in all of these occupations: building maintenance, food
preparation, construction, production, transportation, healthcare support, and farming/
fshing/forestry.
LEGACY YEARS
There are two images of that come to mind when you say “senior citizen” in the United
States. One is of a very well off retired person living out their golden years in comfort. A
second image is of an older person who is struggling to make ends meet and suffering
the indignities of a combination of old-age and low-income. Legacy Years are areas
representing households that are fully retired with residents on very tight budgets. The
median age in these neighborhoods is the 50s and low-60s, but they also have a nearly
three-times-the-national-average number of people over 65-years-old. The median
income of these households is the low-$30,000s or less. While many residents are drawing
on social security and retirement income, they also have a 75-percent-above-average
ranking in public-assistance. This group of senior citizens also ranks above-average on
several occupational categories, which is either a refection of the employment of the
younger members of the neighborhood or the need for some seniors to continue working.
They show above-average levels of employment in both blue- and white-collar jobs in
these areas: healthcare support, building maintenance, farming/fshing/forestry, protective
services, and food preparation. An above-average percent have high-school degrees,
but a higher percent have less-than-high-school educations. These areas have an average
level of married-couples and few children, but above-average levels of single-households
(over 50-percent-above-average), widows (well over two-times–average), and widowers
(over two-and-a-half-times-average).
GRAND MASTERS
Grand Masters are highly urban neighborhoods that enjoy the stature of their Crème de
la Crème brethren in most measured areas, including education, occupation, and family
composition. Grand Masters are home to 40-something white-collar professionals who are
married-with-children, college-educated, and employed overridingly in management
and professional positions. Residents in these areas enjoy incomes of between $70,000 and
$80,000 on average. While residents in Grand Masters earn an average level of income
from their management and professional positions, they also have a higher-than-average
population earning income from self-employment enterprises and interest/dividend
income. They have a slightly higher-than-average percentage of families with children;
with a modestly higher-than-average number of teens aged 13 to 17. Also, Grand Masters
have slightly over two-times-the-national-average in college-educated residents, and
nearly twice-the-average number of people in white-collar management positions.
© Copyright 2012 CATALYST COMMERCIAL. The information provided herein is deemed reliable and is subject to errors, omissions, change of terms and / or conditions. Prepared by Catalyst Commercial, a Texas based retail con-
sulting and market research frm that combines strategy, technology and retail analytics to deliver high-impact retailer recruitment and development strategies to local governments, private developers, retailers and economic
development organizations.
5307 Mockingbird Lane • 5th Floor • Dallas, Texas 75206 • 972.999.0081 Phone • catalystcommercial.net Edinburg Retail Analysis & Merchandising Plan • PAGE 23
RETAIL SUMMARY
EXISTING RETAIL USES AND CATEGORIES
In an effort to better understand the retail potential of Edinburg, Catalyst completed a
comprehensive market wide study of the existing retailers within Edinburg. Data is compiled in the
Catalyst Merchant Matrix (see Appendix 1), and included the use by category and location. Further
analysis of the Catalyst Merchant Matrix allows for deeper insight into the distribution of uses of the
retail market within the PTA. The results paint the picture of the retail categories which exist and are
oversaturated, under supplied or void of representation. This data is useful in developing a clearer
understanding of what types of retail are existing in the market, as well as, what types of retail are
missing in the market for one reason or another. From the data compiled, Catalyst can begin to
formulate a game plan as to which retail categories should be considered further. Categories which
already have optimal market penetration and those which appear to be oversaturated should
be evaluated further to determine if these uses should be eliminated from consideration. Void or
underrepresented categories are evaluated based upon factors such as alignment with the vision
of the City, co-tenancy, demand/leakage analysis and demographic and psychographic profles
within the study area.
A review of the accompanying Category Table 11 confrms the large number of restaurants open
for business within Edinburg, and how these same restaurants are all contributing to the existing and
growing infuence of Edinburg as a retail hub destination. As the University Drive and Shoppes of
Rio Grande retail corridors further develop they will assist in cementing Edinburg as a leading retail
destination within the entire Rio Grande Valley.
CATEGORY TABLE 12 COUNT
Apparel Retail - 448110 14
Automotive Retailer - 4413 8
Automotive Service - 447190 9
Bank - 522110 11
Beer/Wine (no liquor) - 445310 1
Check Cashing/Pawn/Thrift - 522390 12
Child Care/Education - 624410 1
Convenience Store - 445120 27
Dollar/Variety Stores - 452990 7
Florist - 453110 4
General Merchandise Stores - 452910 2
Grocery - 445110 7
Hair Cutter/Salon - 812112 16
Hardware/Home Improvement - 444130 - 444110 2
Health & Beauty Care Locations - 453998 3
Health Clubs/Gyms - 713940 2
Hobbies/Craft/Art Supplies - 453998 - 451120 1
Home Furnishings - 442210 - 442291 5
Table 12 Retail Uses (Source: Catalyst)
Hotel - 721110 11
Liquor stores - 445310 4
Medical - Other - 621111 5
Medical - Supplies & Equipment - 446199 3
Movie Theater - 512131 1
Nail Salon - 812113 8
Offce Products/Stationary - 322231 1
Other 11
Paint & Wallcoverings store - 444120 1
Pet Store - 453910 1
Pharmacy - 446110 8
Rental Centers - 532310 3
Restaurant - American - 722110 12
Restaurant - Asian - 722110 5
Restaurant - Bakery - 722110 1
Restaurant - Bar/Nightclub - 722410 2
Restaurant - Burgers - 722110 3
Restaurant - Coffee - 722211 1
Restaurant - Ice Cream/Yogurt - 722211 3
Restaurant - Italian - 722110 1
Restaurant - Limited Service & Fast food - Burger - 722211 19
Restaurant - Limited Service & Fast food - Chicken - 722211 5
Restaurant - Limited Service & Fast food - Other - 722211 1
Restaurant - Limited Service & Fast food - Pizza - 722211 6
Restaurant - Mexican - 722110 23
Restaurant - Pizza - 722110 - 722211 2
Restaurant - Sandwich/Deli - 722110 - 722111 9
Restaurant - Seafood - 722110 2
Restaurant - Sushi - 722110 2
Restaurant - Wings - 722110 2
Self Storage - 531130 1
Shoe Store - 448210 4
Spa - 812199 1
Sporting Goods Store - 451110 1
Tax and Investment Services - 541213 - 523930 2
Wireless Store - 443112 10
GRAND TOTAL
© Copyright 2012 CATALYST COMMERCIAL. The information provided herein is deemed reliable and is subject to errors, omissions, change of terms and / or conditions. Prepared by Catalyst Commercial, a Texas based retail con-
sulting and market research frm that combines strategy, technology and retail analytics to deliver high-impact retailer recruitment and development strategies to local governments, private developers, retailers and economic
development organizations.
5307 Mockingbird Lane • 5th Floor • Dallas, Texas 75206 • 972.999.0081 Phone • catalystcommercial.net Edinburg Retail Analysis & Merchandising Plan • PAGE 24
DEMAND DRIVERS
LOCAL RETAIL DEMAND DRIVERS / NON-TRADITIONAL CONSUMERS
Typically, there are four demand drivers that infuence the retail spending patterns for
communities, and these are: 1) residential demand; 2) commuter demand; 3) visitor
demand; and, 4) frmographic demand. These demand drivers are further described in the
following paragraphs.
The demand for retail is generally positively correlated with population density; however,
factors such as income, quality or existing retail sales and retail competition, retail co-
tenants, transportation convenience and demand generators all contribute to retail
success. Residential demand is derived from existing residential population within Edinburg
and the growth of this population. The 2011 estimated population of the City of Edinburg
is 79,147 which represent a very impressive growth rate of nearly 1.4% from the City’s 2010
population. However, during the previous decade (2000 – 2010) the population of Edinburg
experienced an explosive growth of over 59%. The Edinburg PTA’s 2011 population of 269,968
is projected to grow by over 10.5% by the year 2016. The existing projected population and
residential growth of the City of Edinburg and the Edinburg PTA confrms the signifcant
strength of residential retail demand.
A second retail demand driver is commuter demand and data collected illustrates the high
traffc volumes of US Highway 281 of between 33,000 and 106,000 vehicles per day, and
these same traffc counts confrm the presence of an important transportation corridor. A
review of roadway traffc count data for this Plan indicate that over 73,000 vehicles are
either entering or exiting US Highway 281 within the city limits of Edinburg. Commuter retail
demand within Edinburg is considered to be very high.
A third retail demand driver is visitor demand and the visitor demand within Edinburg and
the Edinburg PTA is very important and large and is based upon the “Winter Texans” and
“Mexican Nationals” as retail purchasers. The Rio Grande Valley of Texas is a popular winter
destination for retirees from throughout the northern United States and central Canada
due to the Valley’s tropical and mild winter weather. Approximately 144,000 “winter Texans”
live in south Texas for approximately four months per year and it has been estimated by
the State of Texas that each of these households (two people per household or 72,000
households) spend over $10,700 during their stay in the Valley, or over $770,000,000. Winter
Texans spend money in most retail categories (groceries, automobile supplies, restaurants)
but have unique retail needs that need to be recognized by local businesses. Based
upon the location of existing retail establishments a conservative estimate of the winter
Texans retail spending capture rate within Edinburg is between 7% - 10% at this time, or
approximately $77,000,000.
The visitor demand of Edinburg and the Edinburg PTA is also very heavily infuenced by
the Mexican nationals who cross the nearby international border on a regular basis for
shopping and social purposes. Local and national studies have proven that the retail
purchasing power of the Mexican nationals is second only to the local population in
overall retail purchasing importance. There are nine international bridges situated within
the greater Rio Grande Valley connecting the United States to Mexico, and the bridges
located in the cities of McAllen, Pharr and Progresso greatly infuence the vehicular traffc
within the greater Edinburg area due to their geographic locations. In 2010, approximately
9,291,000 passenger vehicles crossed the McAllen/Pharr/Progresso bridges and of this
fgure over 4,540,000 vehicles crossed north into the United States. These same bridges had
2010 pedestrian and commercial truck volumes of approximately 4,166,000 and 978,000,
respectively. The large volume of Mexican citizens traveling through the greater Edinburg/
McAllen/Pharr areas greatly contribute to the overall retail success of both large and small
businesses within these same cities.
It has been estimated that each passenger vehicle spends an average of $182 per trip into
the United States, which creates an estimated $826,280,000 in annual retail spending in
the greater Edinburg/McAllen/Pharr area based upon the north bound passenger vehicles
crossing at the three aforementioned international bridges. Additionally, it has been
estimated that over 30% of the total retail sales in the nearby City of McAllen is conducted
by Mexican nationals and Edinburg is fortunate in that available commercial real estate
within McAllen is scarce and these same shoppers can easily travel the short distance north
to Edinburg to continue their shopping needs. Local businesses understand the importance
of the Mexican national customer but to some of the regional and/or national retailers
the greater Rio Grande Valley and border areas are a retail mystery due to the diffculty
of obtaining accurate demographic and retail sales information. Based upon location,
existing retail product offerings and the convenience of Edinburg a conservative estimate
of the Mexican national’s retail spending capture rate within Edinburg is between 5% - 9%
at this time, or approximately $77,000,000.
Firmographic demand is another important retail sales demand driver and within the
City of Edinburg and the Edinburg PTA several frmographic demand drivers have been
recognized, and are: 1) Edinburg is the county seat of Hidalgo County and is already home
to many government institutions and their employees; 2) UTPA and the over 19,500 students
and the staff required to manage this University; 3) Edinburg’s existing medical industry and
the two medical use corridors within Edinburg that contain fve hospitals and over 1,000
hospital beds and accompanying medical offce buildings.
A list of the top 10 individual employers within Edinburg is provided below and highlights the
diversity of employment generators within the city. As the county seat, Edinburg is fortunate
to have several large city, county, school and federal government institutions and employers
located within the city. Additionally, healthcare and education are two nationwide growth
industries that are also represented on the top 10 employers list, and the employment fgure
for the three institutions listed does not include three additional hospitals located within
the Edinburg medical corridor. The government, medical, education and other industry
employers listed below all contribute to the frmographic demand of Edinburg.
© Copyright 2012 CATALYST COMMERCIAL. The information provided herein is deemed reliable and is subject to errors, omissions, change of terms and / or conditions. Prepared by Catalyst Commercial, a Texas based retail con-
sulting and market research frm that combines strategy, technology and retail analytics to deliver high-impact retailer recruitment and development strategies to local governments, private developers, retailers and economic
development organizations.
5307 Mockingbird Lane • 5th Floor • Dallas, Texas 75206 • 972.999.0081 Phone • catalystcommercial.net Edinburg Retail Analysis & Merchandising Plan • PAGE 25
DEMAND DRIVERS
Top ten employers:
1. Edinburg Consolidated ISD Education 3,600
2. Edinburg Regional Medical Center Health Care 3,000
3. University of Texas–Pan American Education 2,850
4. Hidalgo County Government 2,211
5. Doctor’s Hospital at Renaissance Health Care 2,000
6. U.S. Customs & Border Patrol Government 1,609
7. City of Edinburg Government 505
8. Walmart (University Dr./Sugar) Retail 480
9. Walmart (Trenton & McColl) Retail 370
10. Teleperformance Call Center 355
The fve frmographic demand drivers identifed and discussed are very important separately
and combined together provide the catalyst needed to attract additional retail stores and
developments.
TOP EMPLOYERS MAP 9
Map 9 Top Employers (Source: Catalyst)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7 8
9
10
© Copyright 2012 CATALYST COMMERCIAL. The information provided herein is deemed reliable and is subject to errors, omissions, change of terms and / or conditions. Prepared by Catalyst Commercial, a Texas based retail con-
sulting and market research frm that combines strategy, technology and retail analytics to deliver high-impact retailer recruitment and development strategies to local governments, private developers, retailers and economic
development organizations.
5307 Mockingbird Lane • 5th Floor • Dallas, Texas 75206 • 972.999.0081 Phone • catalystcommercial.net Edinburg Retail Analysis & Merchandising Plan • PAGE 26
COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGES
COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGES
The following paragraphs summarize the positive attributes associated with the City of
Edinburg regarding its attraction for new retail businesses and stores.
The documented rapid population and overall growth rates of the City of Edinburg highlights
the existing need of new and additional retail opportunities. Edinburg is a destination for
new middle class residents moving into the greater Rio Grande Valley area, and these
same residents require a variety of retail products and businesses.
For several decades the nearby City of McAllen has been the dominant retail destination
for the local population, and the visiting winter Texans and Mexican national consumers.
Presently, the Highway 83 corridor, located within McAllen, has been extensively developed
over the past several decades and has created a shortage of properties suitable for retail
development. Because of this lack of real estate opportunities within McAllen, the nearby
City of Pharr and the City of Edinburg are both positioned well to accommodate those
retailers who wish to open a second store or a frst store within the immediate vicinity of
McAllen. However, the City of Pharr is also limited by their lack of available vacant real
estate so the City of Edinburg has become the natural market for these new opportunities.
The US Highway 281 corridor is the dominant major thoroughfare corridor within Edinburg
and traverses the city in a north-south direction connecting Edinburg and the Rio Grande
Valley to the City of San Antonio. Edinburg is the county seat of Hidalgo County and
located nearby downtown Edinburg and the county courthouse complex is the UTPA
campus. The close proximity of UTPA, the courthouse, downtown Edinburg and US Highway
281 provides a daytime employment population base of nearly 40,000 that offers many
retail opportunities.
Edinburg’s medical industry is a dominating presence within the western Rio Grande
Valley, and is strategically located along Trenton Road and McColl Road which share an
intersection. Presently, fve major hospitals are located within the Edinburg medical corridors
and are surrounded and connected by the associated medical offce support buildings.
However, it should be noted that there is a lack of retail shopping and restaurants within
these same medical corridors and their large daytime employment population which has
created immediate retail opportunities within this niche market.
The West University retail corridor connects US Highway 281 to the east with downtown
Edinburg and the county courthouse complex and the dominant UTPA campus and
associated retail. UTPA is the only four year university within the Rio Grande Valley and
expanding at a rapid pace to accommodate the educational needs of the greater Valley
and South Texas. Presently, there are few retail establishments targeting the retail needs
of the over 19,500 students expected to be enrolled for the 2012-2013 school year. There
appears to be immediate retail needs for this niche market.
The US Highway 281 corridor is the dominant major thoroughfare corridor within Edinburg
and traverses the city in a north-south direction and connects Edinburg and the Rio Grande
Valley to the City of San Antonio which is located approximately 228 miles to the north.
Edinburg is the county seat of Hidalgo County and located nearby downtown Edinburg
and the county courthouse is the UTPA campus and the associated retail for these same
areas of Edinburg. The close proximity of UTPA, the courthouse, downtown Edinburg and
US Highway 281 provides a daytime population base that offers many retail opportunities.
The dominant existing retail corridor or cluster within Edinburg is located at the northwest
corner of the Trenton Road/US Highway 281 intersection which is developed with The
Shoppes at Rio Grande shopping center. This shopping center will be over 500,000 square
feet when completed in the Fall of 2012 and is currently anchored by JC Penny’s, Academy
Sports and Outdoors, TJ Maxx, Burlington, McDonald’s restaurant and a local free standing
restaurant. There are many other existing stores open and there are many pad and parcels
of land available for development. Visibility from US Highway 281 is excellent and access
from Trenton Road and the US Highway 281 feeder road is good. This shopping center is
well positioned to take advantage of new retail businesses looking to enter Edinburg, the
Rio Grande Valley and/or stores that want to expand from their existing McAllen, Texas
locations due to success but are unable to locate appropriate real estate within McAllen.
Edinburg’s medical industry is large and is a dominating presence within the western Rio
Grande Valley, and is strategically located along Trenton Road and McColl Road which
share an intersection. Presently, fve major hospitals are located within the Edinburg
medical corridors and are surrounded and connected by the associated medical offce
support buildings. However, it should be noted that there is a lack of retail shopping and
restaurants within these same medical corridors. The frmographic strength of these medical
facilities, their large employee daytime population and the medical end user needs offers
immediate retail opportunities for this niche market.
MERCHANT MATRIX
presented to:
July 2012
© Copyright 2012 CATALYST COMMERCIAL. The information provided herein is deemed reliable and is subject to errors, omissions, change of terms and / or conditions. Prepared by Catalyst Commercial, a Texas based retail con-
sulting and market research frm that combines strategy, technology and retail analytics to deliver high-impact retailer recruitment and development strategies to local governments, private developers, retailers and economic
development organizations.
5307 Mockingbird Lane • 5th Floor • Dallas, Texas 75206 • 972.999.0081 Phone • catalystcommercial.net Edinburg Retail Analysis & Merchandising Plan • PAGE 28
MERCHANT MATRIX
CATEGORY COUNT
Apparel Retail - 448110
Gavel Clothing 1
Bealls 1
Melrose Family Fashions 1
Fallas Paredes Clothing Store 1
Fashion Bug 1
Duratex Apparel 1
Cato Fashions 1
One Stop Fashion Clothing 1
Burlington Coat Factory 1
TJ Maxx 1
Ross Dress For Less 1
JC Penney 1
Melrose Fashions 1
Foxy Flo's Women's Apparel 1
Automotive Retailer - 4413
O'Reilly Auto Parts 4
Auto Zone Auto Parts 3
Advance Auto Parts 1
Automotive Service - 447190
Bridgestone Tire Center 1
Pueblo Tire Shop 1
Midas Mufer / Spee Dee Oil Change 1
Texas Tires 1
Discount Tire 1
Medina Tires 1
Oil Can Harry's Oil Change 1
Cantu Tire Shop 1
10 Minute Lube 1
Bank - 522110
Elsa State Bank 1
Bank Of America 1
Edinburg Teachers Credit Union 1
Chase Bank 2
IBC Bank 1
Compass Bank 2
Wells Fargo Bank 1
Border Capital Bank 1
First National Bank 1
Beer/Wine (No Liquor) - 445310
Minor's Drive Through Beverage 1
Check Cashing/Pawn/Thrift - 522390
Cash America Pawn 1
Checks Cashed Loans 1
Lone Stare Title Loans 1
Money Order 1
First Cash Pawn 1
Cash Advance 1
Auto Loans 1
Sun Loans 1
Pawn Shop 1
Cash Store 1
EZ Pawn 1
Money Loans 1
Child Care/Education - 624410
The Children's Place 1
Convenience Store - 445120
Valero C Store 3
Shell C Store 1
Valero / Stripes C Store 2
Exxon C Store 5
Shamrock C Store 2
Strips C Store 1
Aziz C Store 2
Barbie's Drive Through C Store 1
Stripes C Store 4
Chevron C Store 1
Flying J Truck Stop 1
Stadium Drive Through C Store 1
Chill Out C Store 1
Mundo C Store 1
© Copyright 2012 CATALYST COMMERCIAL. The information provided herein is deemed reliable and is subject to errors, omissions, change of terms and / or conditions. Prepared by Catalyst Commercial, a Texas based retail con-
sulting and market research frm that combines strategy, technology and retail analytics to deliver high-impact retailer recruitment and development strategies to local governments, private developers, retailers and economic
development organizations.
5307 Mockingbird Lane • 5th Floor • Dallas, Texas 75206 • 972.999.0081 Phone • catalystcommercial.net Edinburg Retail Analysis & Merchandising Plan • PAGE 29
Drive Through Grocery Store 1
Dollar/Variety Stores - 452990
Family Dollar 3
Dollar Tree 2
Dollar General 2
Florist - 453110
Divine Florist 1
Nidia's Florist 1
Rosie's Flower Shop 1
General Merchandise Stores - 452910
Walmart 2
Grocery - 445110
King Of Meats Grocery 1
Aguilar's Meat Market 1
La Michoacana Meat Market 1
Hielera Meat Market 1
Jr's Grocery 1
HEB Grocery 2
Hair Cutter/Salon - 812112
Hair Salon 2
Tips And Clips Hair Salon 1
Just A Cut Hair Salon 2
D'marquez Beauty Salon 1
Unique Look Beauty Salon 1
Yvonne's Hair Salon 1
Hair Cut Salon 1
Goddess Beauty Salon 1
Lush Boutique 1
Cacique Botique 1
Main Street Hair Company 1
Barber Shop 1
Caprice Hair Salon 1
Quick Cuts Hair Salon 1
Hardware/Home Improvement - 444130 - 444110
Lowe's Improvement 1
McCoys Building Materials 1
Health & Beauty Care Locations - 453998
Sally Beauty Supply 1
GNC 2
Health Clubs/Gyms - 713940
Freedom Fitness 1
Max Fitness 1
Hobbies/Craft/Art Supplies - 453998 - 451120
Anna's Linens 1
Home Furnishings - 442210 - 442291
Famsa Furniture / Electronics / Appliances / Matresses 1
El Potnero Furniture 1
Lacks Furniture Showcase 1
Tuesday Morning 1
Lane Bryant 1
Hotel - 721110
University Inn Motel 1
Super 8 Hotel 2
Comfort Motel 1
Best Western Hotel 1
Rex Motel 1
Motel 6 Hotel 1
Echo Hotel 1
Frontier Motel 1
Executive Inn Motel 1
Amigo Motel 1
Liquor Stores - 445310
Wine And Liquor Store 1
Us Liquor Store 1
Boracho Liquor Store 1
Bourbon Liquor Store 1
Medical - Other - 621111
Family Clinic 1
Cooper Medical Offce 1
Adult Day Care 1
Dynamic Children Therapy 1
Children's Hospital 1
Medical - Supplies & Equipment - 446199
Monte Christo Medical Supplies 1
continued MERCHANT MATRIX
© Copyright 2012 CATALYST COMMERCIAL. The information provided herein is deemed reliable and is subject to errors, omissions, change of terms and / or conditions. Prepared by Catalyst Commercial, a Texas based retail con-
sulting and market research frm that combines strategy, technology and retail analytics to deliver high-impact retailer recruitment and development strategies to local governments, private developers, retailers and economic
development organizations.
5307 Mockingbird Lane • 5th Floor • Dallas, Texas 75206 • 972.999.0081 Phone • catalystcommercial.net Edinburg Retail Analysis & Merchandising Plan • PAGE 30
continued MERCHANT MATRIX
Medical Equipment 1
Cantu's Medical Equipment 1
Movie Theater - 512131
Carmike Movie Theaters 1
Nail Salon - 812113
Spring Nails 1
Nails 2
One Stop Nails 1
Viziarsi Nail Salon 1
Nail Salon 1
Bonita Nails 1
Foxy Nails 1
Offce Products/Stationary - 322231
Staples 1
Other
Car Wash 4
Irene's Novelty Shop 1
Monster Carwash 1
Laundry Depot 1
Sun Palace Dance Hall 1
La Rose Gifts 1
Ez Clean Car Wash 1
Spin Laundromat 1
Paint & Wallcoverings Store - 444120
Sherwin Williams Paint Shop 1
Pet Store - 453910
Petco 1
Pharmacy - 446110
Walgreen's Pharmacy 2
Med Care Pharmacy 1
Family Pharmacy 1
Santa Maria Pharmacy 1
Jr's Pharmacy 1
Richard's Pharmacy 1
Cvs Pharmacy 1
Rental Centers - 532310
Amigo Rent To Own 1
Rent A Center 1
Rent To Own Center 1
Restaurant - American - 722110
Luby's Restuarant 1
Mega Chicken Restaurant 1
Ihop Restaurant 1
Denny's Restaurant 2
Capital Bar And Grill 1
Woodreaux's Restaurant 1
Rodz Restaurant 1
The Moonlight Cafe Restaurant 1
Stars Drive In Restaurant 1
Applebee's Restaurant 1
Mesquite Grill Restaurant 1
Restaurant - Asian - 722110
Golden China Restaurant 1
Quick Wok Chinese Restaurant 1
Oriental Cafe Restaurant 1
Wok Chinese Restaurant 1
Khan's Mongolian Grill Restuarnt 1
Restaurant - Bakery - 722110
La Renera Bakery 1
Restaurant - Bar/Nightclub - 722410
Danny's Bar 1
The Drunken Clam Bar 1
Restaurant - Burgers - 722110
Starlite Hamburger Restaurant 1
Hamburger King 1
Monster Hamburgers 1
Restaurant - Coffee - 722211
Koffee Bar 1
Restaurant - Ice Cream/Yogurt - 722211
Yogurt Restaurant 1
Frozen Yogurt 2
Restaurant - Italian - 722110
Luigie's Italian Restuarant 1
Restaurant - Limited Service & Fast Food - Burger - 722211
Whataburger Restaurant 3
Burger King Restaurant 4
© Copyright 2012 CATALYST COMMERCIAL. The information provided herein is deemed reliable and is subject to errors, omissions, change of terms and / or conditions. Prepared by Catalyst Commercial, a Texas based retail con-
sulting and market research frm that combines strategy, technology and retail analytics to deliver high-impact retailer recruitment and development strategies to local governments, private developers, retailers and economic
development organizations.
5307 Mockingbird Lane • 5th Floor • Dallas, Texas 75206 • 972.999.0081 Phone • catalystcommercial.net Edinburg Retail Analysis & Merchandising Plan • PAGE 31
Dairy Queen Restaurant 2
Sonic Restuarant 1
Wendy's Restaurant 2
Jack N Box Restaurant 2
McDonald's Restaurant 5
Restaurant - Limited Service & Fast Food - Chicken - 722211
Church's Chicken Restaurant 4
KFC Restaurant 1
Restaurant - Limited Service & Fast Food - Other - 722211
Taco Bell / Long John Silvers Restaurant 1
Restaurant - Limited Service & Fast Food - Pizza - 722211
Pizza Hut Restaurant 2
Dominos Pizza 1
Papa Johns Pizza 1
Pizza Patron 1
Little Caesar's Pizza Restaurant 1
Restaurant - Mexican - 722110
Valle Verde Mexican Restaurant 1
Mexican Restaurant 3
El Zarape Mexican Restuarant 2
Tacos Reynosa 1
La Olla Mexican Restaurant 1
Taco Restaurant 2
El Pato Taco Restaurant 1
Ella's Mexican Restuarant 1
El Caporal Mexican Restaurant 1
La Paloma Mexican Restaurant 1
Bertha Tortilleria 1
Pump Jack Mexican Restaurant 1
Mexican Restaruant 1
Aleta's Mexican Restaurant 1
Taco Ole Restaurant 1
Ceteros Mexican Restaurant 1
Los Compadres Mexican Restaurant 1
Jc's Mexican Restaurant 1
El Taquito Mexican Restaurant 1
Restaurant - Pizza - 722110 - 722211
Armandos Pizza 1
Peter Piper Pizza Restaurant 1
Restaurant - Sandwich/Deli - 722110 - 722111
Subway Restaurant 5
Schlotzsky's Restuarant 1
Deli 1
Babs Deli 1
Quiznos Sub Restaurant 1
Restaurant - Seafood - 722110
La Pasca Seafood Restaurant 1
Tino's Seafood Restaurant 1
Restaurant - Sushi - 722110
Maki Sushi Bar 1
Kato Sushi Restaurant 1
Restaurant - Wings - 722110
Wing Stop Restaurant 1
Buffalo Wings And Rings Restaurant 1
Self Storage - 531130
Self Storage 1
Shoe Store - 448210
Payless Shoes 2
Texas Boot Supply 1
Shoe Department 1
Spa - 812199
Avalon Spa 1
Sporting Goods Store - 451110
Academy 1
Tax And Investment Services - 541213 - 523930
Tax Service 1
Jackson Hewitt Tax 1
Wireless Store - 443112
Cricket 6
Verizon Wireless 1
AT&T 1
T Mobile 2
GRAND TOTAL 307
continued MERCHANT MATRIX
AERIAL MAP
presented to:
July 2012
TRADE AREA MAP
presented to:
July 2012
DRIVE TIME &
CONCENTRIC RING MAP
presented to:
July 2012
POPULATION MAP
presented to:
July 2012
MEDIAN INCOME MAP
presented to:
July 2012
AVERAGE INCOME MAP
presented to:
July 2012
TRAFFIC COUNT MAP
presented to:
July 2012
C
l
o
s
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e
r

B
l
v
d
Schunior St
University Dr
Sprague Rd
Trenton Rd
Owassa Rd
S
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a
r

R
d
J
a
c
k
s
o
n

R
d
M
c
C
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l

R
d
Canton Rd
V
e
t
e
r
a
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s

B
l
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C
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B
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Freddy Gonzalez Dr
33,000
63,000
28,000
20,416
8,048
8,719
99,000
18,000
33,000
16,096
106,000
14,341
13,826
13,825
RETAIL ANALYSIS
MERCHANDISING PLAN
&
presented to:
July 2012

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