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Volume 128 Issue 11 Wednesday, September 10, 2014

All contents, unless stated otherwise, 2014 The University Daily Kansan
CLASSIFIEDS 7
CROSSWORD 6
CRYPTOQUIPS 6
OPINION 4
SPORTS 8
SUDOKU 6
Thunderstorms with an
80% chance of rain.
Wind NNW at 15 mph.
Today is the last day
to vote in the Student Senate
re-election.
Index Dont
Forget
Todays
Weather
Bring on the rain.
HI: 74
LO: 54
Kansan.com | The student voice since 1904
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY
KANSAN
A group of students
who call themselves the
September Siblings released
an anti-recruitment video
this morning in response to
the ongoing look at sexual
assault investigations at the
University.
Te video, titled A
Great Place to be Unsafe,
begins with clips of well-
known campus buildings,
transitions to students
reading statistics on
sexual assault and then to
statements from anonymous
sexual assault survivors in
the KU community.
Te September Siblings,
whose name is an homage to
the February Sisters, a group
that jump-started gender
equity at the University in
the 1970s, is a collective of
approximately 50 students.
Acting Student Body
President Emma Halling, a
senior from Elkhart, Ind.,
said the group is working
to create change because
they care about the KU
community.
Te students who made
the video came together
not just because they are
upset about the way things
are being handled but
because they really love this
University and they want to
see it be a safe place for all
students, Halling said.
Katherine Gwynn, a senior
from Olathe and president
of SURGE, Students United
for Reproductive and
Gender Equity, is one of the
leaders of the September
Siblings. She said the video
is a big statement but they
cant support new students
coming to the University
until changes are made.
KU needs to immediately
work with students to make
an overhaul of their sexual
assault policy, Gwynn said.
Survivors voices need to be
heard and they have not been
heard by this University, and
the only way we can continue
to make sure this doesnt
happen in the future is for
administration to work with
students to overhaul the
current policy.
Te video is one of
many student responses
to a Sept. 2 article by
the Hufngton Post
that reported how the
University and Lawrence
law enforcement handled
a sexual assault complaint.
Many students responded
with outrage and used
social media to spin the
Universitys slogan from
A Great Place to Be to
#AGreatPlaceToBeUnsafe.
University administrators
could not be reached for
comment as of 12:30 p.m.
Edited by Paige Lytle
Student video responds
to sexual assault policies
Survey: Jayhawk is most
recognized brand in state
Te University and Jayhawk
brand came out as No. 1 when
RSA Marketing conducted a
survey in July of the most well-
known Kansas-based brands.
Te 500 people surveyed
were asked what he or she
thought the most well-known
Kansas-based brand is, and
the Jayhawks came out above
brands like Sprint, Russell
Stover and Dillons.
I think its just a refection of
our fans and our alumni, said
Paul Vander Tuig, trademark
licensing director for the
University. Not only that we
have across the nation, but
particularly here in Kansas,
obviously weve got a very
recognizable brand, and
the institution is very well
represented in the state.
Vander Tuig said its his
job to make sure University
trademarks are only used
by authorized companies,
the trademarks are used
appropriately and the
University is compensated for
their use.
I would have been a little
disappointed if it werent
certainly high in the rankings
in our own state, Vander Tuig
said. He said he thinks the
results of the survey refect
what people at the University
probably already believe.
Shivani Patel, a freshman
from Overland Park, said she
is not surprised the University
came out as No. 1 in this
survey, even though another
brand is more prominent in
her hometown.
Coming from Overland
Park ... if I was asked the
question I would have to say
Sprint, Patel said. She said she
frst thinks of Sprint because
of its location in Overland
Park, but she said she is glad
the University is No. 1 in this
survey.
Vander Tuig said he believes
the recognition the University
has across the state may have
helped the University come
out on the top of this survey.
I think all those things,
you know, the retailers of
our licensed product, the
penetration that we have
not only, you know, here in
Lawrence, Kansas City, even
in Wichita, I think all lends
itself to the promotion of the
University, Vander Tuig said.
Patel said she grew up seeing
the Jayhawk trademark around
her.
Literally everywhere you go
you see a Jayhawk somewhere,
Patel said. I go outside of my
house anywhere I would see a
KU little logo on a car or Id see
a Jayhawk in a store. I mean,
its pretty big. As a child my
parents never grew up here,
they never had a college that
they supported or anything so
I always fell into KU and KU
basketball because I would see
it everywhere.
Besides placing higher than
Sprint, Dillons and Russell
Stover, the KU and Jayhawk
brand came out above
Free State Beer, Pizza Hut,
Coleman, Boulevard Beer,
Garmin, Koch Industries,
Hallmark and Beechcraf in
the survey.
Edited by Logan Schlossberg
MIRANDA DAVIS
@MirandaDavisUDK
AMBER VANDEGRIFT
@AmberVandegrift
BREAKING THE SILENCE
Student Senate Announcement
Full Student Senate will meet tonight to discuss
a resolution that suggests the University hire
a victim advocate for those going through the
hearing process, implement mandatory sexual
assault training and re-examine current policies.
MCKENNA HARFORD
@McKennaHarford
At an open forum Tuesday
night held by the September
Siblings, a new campus
organization working to change
the University sexual assault
policies, discussion ranged from
survivors stories to the lack of
education and training to the
frustration with victim-blaming.
Te recurring topic was a call for
the University to make a change
in its policies.
One of the things I heard
over and over tonight, which I
thought was really remarkable
and exciting was the call for KU
to be a leader on this issue, to
be a national leader, and I think
thats very possible, said Alesha
Doan, chair of the Department
of Women, Gender & Sexuality
Studies.
Around 275 people, including
students, faculty, advocates and
community members, attended
the meeting at the Ecumenical
Campus Ministries.
Te discussion began with the
September Siblings sharing its
demands and showing an anti-
recruitment video it will promote
until the University sexual assault
policies change.
Weve organized this event
because voices arent being heard
by KU administration, because
students are experiencing sexual
violence and they have no
control over what justice they
receive, said Hobbes Entrikin, a
junior and a September Siblings
member who helped organize
the forum. KU administration
is not allowing students to be
involved in a way that will change
policies.
One survivor shared her story
of being raped while trying to
ensure a friends safety. Another
survivor said she had been raped
by a close friend and still wasnt
completely comfortable calling it
rape because of their relationship.
Te goal of the forum was
to create a space for people to
share these stories, along with
messages of support and calls
to change policies to support
victims, Entrikin said.
Tis conversation has helped
put a face on the idea of rape
and surviving rape, which is
something people dont seem to
understand and connect with,
so providing a connection is
making a very big diference in
this, Entrikin said.
Emma Halling, a senior from
Elkhart, Ind., and acting student
body president, said changes
need to happen because they
are negatively afecting the
education and environment at
the University.
If women are being raped
at this 20 percent rate and
the University is not doing
everything in its power to a)
prevent it and b) remedy the
situations afer it happened they
are inhibiting these womens,
these survivors ability to pursue
their education here, Halling
said.
Angela Murphy, a graduate
teaching assistant and
development coordinator for
the Title IX Roundtable said in
a Sept. 8 interview that student-
led discussions are what motivate
change.
When you have students,
young people, age ranges over
a decade, gathering together
over the same issue then you are
doing something right, Murphy
said. I fully believe that thats
the one thing we are doing right
is students mobilizing to afect
positive change at the University.
Halling said students can
continue putting pressure on
the University to change by
discussing it in class and writing
to the chancellor.
Doan also said students can
continue to push for change
through social media and
spreading the word.
Creating a consent culture is
not as difcult as we pretend it is
as a society, Doan said.
Members of the organization
called for 10 demands of the
University:
- An investigation of the Ofce
of Institutional Opportunity and
Access and Student Afairs;
- Having a victim advocate
involved in the judicial process;
- An immediate budget
increase to $35,000 for the Emily
Taylor Center;
- Mandatory sexual assault
training for students;
- Increasing the minimum
punishment for sexual assault;
- Revision of sexual assault
policies;
- Te revisions to be done by a
committee of at least 51 percent
students;
- Reinvestigating sexual
assault cases of those still at the
University;
- Allowing for flers to appeal
cases;
- Eliminating the term non-
consensual sex.
We will be heard one way or
another, Entrikin said.
Edited by Casey Hutchins

This conversation has


helped put a face on the
idea of rape and surviving
rape...
HOBBES ENTRIKIN
September Siblings member
Forum provides space for community to respond to University sexual assault allegations

Survivors voices need to be


heard and they have not been
heard by this University.
KATHERINE GWYNN
Senior from Olathe
NEWS MANAGEMENT
Editor-in-chief
Emma LeGault
Managing editor
Madison Schultz
Digital editor
Hannah Barling
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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2014 PAGE 2
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THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
news
FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY
HI: 58 HI: 66 HI: 73
LO: 41 LO: 47 LO: 56
Showers. Highs in the high 50s and
lows in the low 40s.
Sunny. Highs in the high 60s and
lows in the upper 50s.
Mostly sunny. Highs in the low 70s
and lows in the high 60s.
The
Weekly
Weather
Forecast
THURSDAY
HI: 74
LO: 54
Sunny. Highs in the mid 70s and lows
in the mid 50s.
weather.com
What: Campus Movie Series:
Neighbors
When: 7:30-10 p.m.
Where: Woodruff Auditorium,
Kansas Union
About: Free movie showing.
What: Is This Real Life?
When: 5:30-7 p.m.
Where: Spencer Museum of Art
About: A KU Common Book Event.

What: Study Abroad Fair
When: 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Where: Fourth Level, Kansas Union
About: Students can learn about
worldwide study abroad opportuni-
ties.
Calendar
Wednesday, Sept. 10 Thursday, Sept. 11 Friday, Sept. 12 Saturday, Sept.13
What: Monarch Watch Open House
When: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Where: Foley Hall
About: An open house to celebrate
the monarch butteries arriving
from the North.
JAMES HOYT/KANSAN
The former Pulse coffee shop in Kansas Memorial Union will reopen Monday with a new name, Roasterie Cof-
feehouse. Since the coffee shops closing, other coffee stands on campus have seen an inux of customers.
Memorial Union coffee
shop to reopen Monday
Underage drinking is
one of the most common
illegal activities among
college students. While
many students engage in
this activity, few know the
costs of what could happen
to them if they are caught.
Captain James Anguiano
of the KU Public Safety
Office said 23 students were
charged with possession of
alcohol while underage last
year.
In the past three years,
105 people have been cited
for minor in possession,
Anguiano said. So far in
2014, 12 people have been
given citations.
According to the Lawrence
City Attorneys website,
minors can be charged with
underage possession in
many situations including
being in a vehicle that
contains opened or
unopened containers,
even if the minor has not
consumed alcohol.
Private residences are not
excluded. If an officer is
responding to a complaint
at a residence and the
officer observes individuals
breaking the law, he or she
may have the right to enter
the home.
The fines associated with
the charge can be quite
hefty. According to the
City Attorneys website,
first-time offenders may
have to pay anywhere from
$300 to $500. Along with
the fines, jail time of up
to 30 days and up to 40
hours of community service
may also be given. Fines
and penalties can be even
worse if found using a fake
ID. These fines can range
from $300 to $2,500, along
with up to a year in jail and
100 hours of community
service.
Lexanna Sims, a
sophomore from Topeka,
said the fines associated
with MIPs deter her from
underage drinking. Sims
also said while she believes
campus police are doing
a good job making sure
underage drinking is
limited, there is no way to
catch everyone who drinks.
It just feels so common
at the dorms, Sims said.
And there arent a lot of
police there, so unless you
are going crazy with it they
probably wont catch you.
Completing diversion
programs is one way of
keeping a citation off your
record. According to the
City Attorneys website, a
diversion is a set agreement
with certain conditions and
supervision that must be
met in order for the MIP
not to show up on records.
I totally think that there
should be a way to get it off
your record, said Meghan
Keller, a sophomore from
Topeka. You shouldnt have
to have a mistake you made
in college haunt you later
on.
Edited by Jacob Clemen
ANDY NELSON
@UDK_Nelson
MIPs may lead to nes, other penalties
MIP CHARGES
Yearly breakdown
of charges
2014:
12
2013:
23
2012:
70
(Tis was in combina-
tion of a task force that
included the Alcohol
Beverage Control, Law-
rence PD and Douglas
County Sherifs ofce.)
Coffee drinkers on the
north side of campus can
finally get their caffeine
fix without having to walk
too far. The popular coffee
shop at the Memorial Union
is scheduled to reopen
Monday with a new look
and a new name: Roasterie
Coffeehouse.
Those visiting Roasterie
Coffeehouse on Monday
will see an update in decor,
but will still get the same
locally roasted, direct-trade
coffee.
The University has been
in partnership with the
Roasterie for almost 20
years now, said Alecia
Stultz, assistant director
of KU Dining Services.
She said the Union has
decided to capitalize on
that partnership, and bring
their name to the front of
operations.
The coffee shop was
formerly known as Pulse,
but was closed in late July to
reinvent its look.
Projects starting late in
the summer typically suffer
setbacks, Stultz said. We
had to wait on the cabinetry
and some counter materials.
Ever since the delay in
renovation, there has been
an influx of coffee drinkers
trying to find their morning
fuel elsewhere. All coffee
shops are operating at peak
capacity to combat the
momentary hiatus at the
Union, Stultz said.
Even smaller stands, which
usually dont have long lines,
have been affected.
April Huston has been
working at Jay Break in
Strong Hall since before
the renovation and has
seen a change in demand
since Pulse closed. Shes
overheard people talking
and has noticed more
people coming in for coffee.
Students like Jerome
Goscha, a senior from Salina
whos double majoring in
English and history, arent
happy about the temporary
closure.
I was disappointed to
walk in the Union this year
expecting a hot cup of Joe
and a muffin, then see it
closed, Goscha said. It is
such a staple and central hub
for that side of campus.
Edited by Kelsie Jennings

It just feels so common at


the dorms.
LEXANNA SIMS
Sophomore from Topeka

I was disappointed to walk


in the Union this year expect-
ing a hot cup of Joe and a
mufn, then see it closed.
JEROME GOSCHA
Senior from Salina
JOHN PAUL REYNOLDS
@JohnPaul_UDK
Elderly KC couple
dies after beating
An elderly couple severely
beaten in their Kansas City
home, allegedly by a man also
accused of fatally shooting
three of their neighbors, died
Tuesday afer being taken
of life support, relatives and
hospital ofcials said.
Ann Taylor, 86, and
her husband, George
Taylor, 80, were attacked
in their basement Sept. 2.
Prosecutors allege Brandon
Howell beat the couple,
then fatally shot three other
people outside nearby homes
before feeing in the Taylors
SUV. Howell, a convicted
felon, was arrested hours
later when police found
him walking with a loaded
shotgun in his pants.
Ann Taylor was taken of
life support Monday night
but lived until Tuesday, while
her husband was removed
from life support Tuesday
morning and died soon afer,
according to HCA Midwest
Health in Kansas City.
George and Ann died
peacefully and we are blessed
that they lef this Earth
together, family members
said in a statement. Tey
were married more than 40
years, and loved each other
dearly.
Howell, 34, faces a dozen
felony charges including
three counts of frst-degree
murder for the deaths of
the Taylors neighbors:
Alice Hurst, 88; her son,
Darrel Hurst, 63; and Susan
Choucroun, 69.
It wasnt immediately clear
when or if new charges would
be fled related to the Taylors
deaths, but be assured
that at the appropriate
time, todays sad news of
the Taylors passing will be
refected in the states case
against the defendant, said
Mike Mansur, spokesman
for the Jackson County
prosecutors ofce.
Kansas City police
responded to a 911 call from
Ann Taylor the afernoon
of Sept. 2. Ofcers found
Choucrouns body in the
driveway of the home next
door to the Taylors house. A
few houses away, the Hursts
bodies were found in the
front yard of their home, in
a tidy cul-de-sac lined with
duplexes.
Kansas court records
show Howell pleaded guilty
in 2000 to a 1999 home
invasion in Johnson County,
Kansas, in which one victim
was cut on the hand and a
cat was decapitated. He was
sentenced to 12 years but
paroled in 2011.
Howell also was acquitted
in 2009 in the killings of
two Kansas teenagers who
were last seen in 1998. One
victims body was later found
buried outside a Kansas City
home being renovated by
Howells father; the other
body has never been found.
ASSOCIATED PRESS
@KANSANNEWS
YOUR GO TO
FOR THE LATEST
KU NEWS
Three of KUs rst four
chancellors were ministers.
Weve had seventeen
chancellors in our
148-year history.
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2014 PAGE 3 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
Senate candidate sues
Secretary of State
U.S. Senate candidate Chad Tay-
lor led a lawsuit against Kansas
Secretary of State Kris Kobach with
the Kansas Supreme Court on Tues-
day to be removed from the Nov. 4
ballot.
Last week, Kobach announced
Taylor would remain on the ballot
because of KSA 25-306b(b), a Kan-
sas law stating that candidates
who wish to withdraw must state
they would be incapable of fulll-
ing the requirements of the job.
Kobach refused to remove Taylor
from the ballot because he said he
believes Taylors letter didnt fulll
this requirement.
Taylors petition, however, says
his withdrawal was timely, lawful
and unequivocal.
Kelly Arnold, chairman of the
Kansas Republican Party, said the
Democratic Party will have to re-
place Taylor on the ballot within 10
days if he is allowed to withdraw.
Stay tuned to Kansan.com for
more details.
Allison Kite
A group of moderate former
Republican state legislators
Tuesday endorsed the Demo-
cratic nominee in the sprawl-
ing and heavily GOP 1st Con-
gressional District of Kansas
over conservative incumbent
Tim Huelskamp.
Democrat Jim Sherow, a
63-year-old Kansas State
University history professor
and former Manhattan may-
or, had a Statehouse news
conference to tout his back-
ing from Traditional Repub-
licans for Common Sense.
Sherow served six years on
the nonpartisan Manhattan
City Commission and said he
worked with local Republi-
cans then.
People in this district want
practical results, Sherow said.
Huelskamp spokeman Mark
Kelly dimissed the news con-
ference as political theater
and said the congressman was
busy Tuesday in Washington,
working on issues such as re-
sisting new federal water reg-
ulations.
Congressman Huelskamp
believes the people of the
1st District will re-elect him
based on his record of work-
ing for them and standing
with their values, Kelly said
in a statement.
Te moderate GOP group
said it opposes Huelskamp
partly because he was stripped
of Kansas nearly automatic
seat on the Agriculture Com-
mittee in December 2012 fol-
lowing conficts with Speaker
John Boehner.
Huelskamp, a tea party fa-
vorite, has said hes willing to
buck party leaders to repre-
sent his largely rural district,
which covers more than 60
counties, mostly in western
and central Kansas. He is
seeking his third, two-year
term.
He remains favored to win
re-election Nov. 4 because
53 percent of the districts
409,000 registered voters are
Republicans, and only 19 per-
cent are Democrats.
Te moderate GOP group
was formed in 2012 by ex-leg-
islators upset with the Kansas
GOPs shif to the right. It also
endorsed independent candi-
date Greg Orman in the U.S.
Senate race, and many of its
members are backing Dem-
ocrat Paul Davis in the gov-
ernors race over incumbent
Sam Brownback.
But its chairman, former
state Rep. Jim Yonally, of
Overland Park, said the group
expects to endorse Republi-
can Attorney General Derek
Schmidts re-election.
Dissident Republican group
backs Democrat in Kansas
ASSOCIATED PRESS
JAMES HOYT/KANSAN
Sophomore Austin Canady and graduate student Michael Walker table for Grow KU in front of Watson Library on
Tuesday. Student Senate re-elections were held Tuesday and continue today in the wake of the disqualication of
the Jayhawkers coalition last spring.
TABLING: ROUND TWO
RockChalkLiving.com
BECAUSE THIS ISNT WHAT YOU HAD IN MIND WHEN
YOU SAID...
HARDWORKER ON YOUR RESUME
STUDENTS PREMIERE HOUSING SITE
@RockChalkLiving /RockChalkLiving

People in this district want


practical results.
JIM SHEROW
Kansas State University
history professor, former
Manhattan mayor
JAMES HOYT/KANSAN
Crimson & True vice presidential candidate Sarah Anees speaks to a prospective voter while tabling Monday. The
two coalitions were given two days to campaign before the polls for the re-election opened Tuesday.
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2014 PAGE 4
The Walking Dead is so much
better than Breaking Bad.
Editors Note: Thats debatable...
I made the mistake of ordering a
textbook through Amazon.
An exams coming up and
Im still waiting for it...
I wish we had the old Big 12 with
Texas A&M, Nebraska and yes,
even Mizzou... KSU just
isnt a rivalry.

To all of our new Jayhawks: Youve
made it through two weeks.
You can do this.

Have you tried to sneak a hot dog
into a classroom? I did.
I put in my pocket.

On the stalls of womens bath-
rooms are signs about how to
avoid being raped. Are there signs
explaining consent on the mens?

Im so much less socially awkward
when Im highly caffeinated.

Maybe drinking and doing home-
work was a bad idea.

Woke up today 20 minutes before
class started and still made it on
time with 5 minutes to spare.

It doesnt matter if the guy
couldnt tell if the girl was drunk
or not. Rape is rape. Its a crime!

Coffee makes big lecture classes
all better sometimes.

What kind of twisted person de-
signs a building and does not put
the mens and womens restrooms
next to each other.

To Ivory: Im so so sorry the univer-
sity failed you, but know that
we do care about you and
about what happened.

I dont know if the guy next to me
has a phone in his pocket or a
vibrator. Turn it down dude!

Sexual assault would be a lot less
frequent if we had some decent
alcohol education alcohol
helps facilitate almost all
sexual assaults at KU.

You know what this campus
needs? Batman.

There isnt a building
on campus I dont like

If you choose to ride the bus,
choose to shower as well.

Shoutout to Dr. Ilardi for
being the most engaging
professor Ive ever had!

People raining re and brimstone
on Wescoe Beach. Oh joy.

I need a caffeine x, but
I hate coffee. Is there
hot chocolate anywhere?

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grade and hometown. Find our full letter to the
editor policy online at kansan.com/letters.
What do you wish
you had better
self-control over?
FFA OF THE DAY

Me walking on campus- you better stop for me!


Me driving- you better not expect me to stop!
O
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
opinion
Follow us on Twitter @KansanOpinion.
Tweet us your opinions, and we just
might publish them.
Emma LeGault, editor-in-chief
elegault@kansan.com
Madison Schultz, managing editor
mschultz@kansan.com
Hannah Barling, digital editor
hbarling@kansan.com
Cecilia Cho, opinion editor
ccho@kansan.com
Christina Carreira, advertising director
ccarreria@kansan.com
Tom Wittler, print sales manager
twittler@kansan.com
Scott Weidner, digital media manager
sweidneri@kansan.com
Jon Schlitt, sales and marketing adviser
jschlitt@kansan.com
THE EDITORIAL BOARD
Members of the Kansan Editorial Board
are Emma LeGault, Madison Schultz,
Cecilia Cho, Hannah Barling and Christina
Carreria.
A
friend I know
recently received
his Medical
College Admission Test
(MCAT) score. He scored
a 37, placing him in the
98th percentile, where
Harvard Medical Schools
previous fall class averaged
36.36. While his score is
impressive, I want to note
that his amount of self-
control led him to succeed.
Its easy to assume natural
ability, genes and talent
land people places, however,
psychology studies show
self-control is like a muscle
and can be strengthened
and exercised over time.
This makes people wonder
if high test scores and self-
control can be related.
More self-control led my
friend to a phenomenal
MCAT score, and it can
lead others where they
want to go. From the dining
table to finishing reps at
the gym, having more self-
control allows us to achieve
more.
While in college, self-
control is vital as we are
constantly being tested. You
can eat healthier, stay in
and study instead of going
out or use social media
less. All of your goals will
become easier to attain if
you practice self-control.
Learn to regulate your
decisions so you dont
regret them later. You can
push yourself further each
time.
How can we achieve
more self-control?
Australian scientists Megan
Oaten and Ken Cheng
of Macquarie University
in Sydney assigned
volunteers to a two-
month physical exercise
program. Participants who
completed the exercise
program did better on a
lab measure of self-control
than participants who did
not complete the physical
exercise program.
Regularly exercising their
willpower with physical
exercise, it seemed, led
to stronger willpower in
nearly all areas of their
lives, according to the
study. Oaten and Cheng
also suggest that because
willpower and self-control
can be depleted, its best
to focus on one goal at a
time. Trying to achieve
multiple goals at once will
lead to faster depletion and
incompletion of all goals.
So, whats your goal for
this school year? Pick one,
and start working on your
self-control. Now is the
time to develop this muscle.
Anrenee Reasor is a senior
from Thayer studying
economics and East Asian
Languages and Cultures
College years important for developing self-control

@KUSteamWhistle
@KansanOpinion
WOOOOOOOing every 50-65
minutes on the dot
E
very year we get
older, learn new
things, and gain
experience. The older you
get, the more responsibility
you have to take on.
However, just because
we grow up doesnt mean
you have to grow up.
Not acting so serious can
be a great way to relieve
stress in todays fast-
paced society. Looking at
life differently may cause
you to be happier. Dr.
Kathleen Fuller, a cognitive
behavioral psychotherapist,
has studied the behaviors of
children and adults for 40
years. According to Fuller,
playing can relieve stress
and it is a form of self-
expression that many adults
have lost.
When you were a kid, you
had little to worry about;
your homework consisted
of coloring, basic addition
and learning to write in
cursive. School was more
fun and classes were easier
when we were younger. As
we progress through school,
classes become more
difficult and stressful, but
you can still have fun while
studying. Making games
out of the study material is
a great way to remember
everything efficiently.
Making flashcards to use
so you can challenge your
friends can make studying
easier and competitive. If
you miss coloring, highlight
key sections in your books
to help remember specific
passages that are important
to know.
Being a kid can go beyond
the classroom. In your
everyday life, acting more
carefree can drastically
increase your mood. As a
kid, the world was the best
playground you had; no
matter where you were, you
could make up games and
have the best time, whether
alone or with friends. Dont
lose your imagination as
you grow up.
Sometimes being a
grown-up is, well, boring.
Yes, you should pay your
bills, make your deadlines,
and clean your apartment,
but make sure to leave
time to be a little silly and
have fun, says Gabrielle
Bernstein, author of Add
More -Ing to Your Life: A
Hip Guide to Happiness.
Even jumping on your bike
for an afternoon ride with
friends will make you feel
more carefree.
Go swing on a playground
and imagine you are flying.
Create a game with your
friends or bake a cake.
There are many things you
can do to keep your inner
child alive.
Society frowns on adults
acting younger than their
age. It is fun to live a little
more carefree and childish
than to always think you
are forgetting something or
to be on the move. Acting a
little more carefree doesnt
mean youre less intelligent;
it means that youre
enjoying the time you have.
Were back in school and
every day we grow older.
Worrying less can be the
best way to keep sane. You
are only as old as you want
to be, so go have fun with
the time you have.
Tyler Yunk is sophomore
from Belvidere, Ill.,
studying journalism
Carefree living relieves pressure of growing up
By Anrenee Reasor
@anreneer
By Tyler Yunk
@tyleryunk
KANSAN CARTOON
INTERESTED IN SUBMITTING
YOUR OWN CARTOON?
EMAIL EDITOR@KANSAN.COM
How Agents Handle
Leaked Celebrity Photos
by Jacob Hood
@kelseydoeslife
@KansanOpinion if I see a
dog in public, I cant NOT pet
it. Im slightly ashamed to say
Ive chased down a jogger or
ve.
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2014
A
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
arts & features
HOROSCOPES
Because the stars
know things we dont.
PAGE 5
Aries (March 21-April 19)
Today is an 8
Work out a compromise. Youre
very attractive, intellectually.
Being busy looks good on you.
Partner up with a gracious per-
son. Chores take priority. Keep
communications owing. Talk
about joy and abundance.
Taurus (April 20-May 20)
Today is a 7
Learn even more about love.
Smart investments now can
increase your security. Your own
wit and effort makes the differ-
ence. Stick with what worked
before. Follow the money trail.
Stock up on essentials.
Travel for pleasure.
Gemini (May 21-June 20)
Today is a 7
Talk about what you love and
a possibility grows closer to
realization. Share the value you
see. Conditions seem unstable.
Work smart and prot. Stay out
of somebody elses argument.
Cancer (June 21-July 22)
Today is a 6
Career efforts could stall. Per-
suade your audience, and your
message travels. Work on family
projects. Increase productivity by
cutting frills. Its not a good
time to gamble. A change in
schedule is required.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)
Today is a 7
Reach out and connect with
people. Write down your latest
fantasies. Dont be afraid of
a mess... clean as you go.
Collaborate. Navigate around
unexpected difculties.
You can do it, especially
by working together.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Today is a 7
You can afford a communi-
cations upgrade. Develop a
comprehensive plan to increase
efciency. Something you try
doesnt work. Share your expe-
rience. Get an expert opinion.
Confer with family.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Today is a 7
Invent new possibilities in a
partnership, and schedule who
does what. Write down your
creation and share it. Prioritize
practical efforts today, as
fantasies can evaporate.
Networking brings results.
Beautify your workspace.
Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Today is a 7
The rst reaction could seem
negative... dont get stopped.
Clarify any miscommunications.
Balance family and social
activities carefully. Costs may
be higher than expected. Stash
valuables in a safe place. Count
blessings and give thanks.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Today is a 6
Get playful for unexpected
discoveries. Take the student
role. Listen to an older persons
concerns carefully. Be willing to
compromise. New status brings
new rewards. Romance and
passion occupy your thoughts.
Later you get your chance.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
Today is a 6
Keep it vague about nances.
Its not a great time to talk
about money. Be patient with
someone whos not. Save more
than you spend, and investigate
protable directions. Good news
comes from far away.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Today is a 6
Its a good time to travel or
launch projects. Indulge in a
favorite luxury. Answer questions
directly. The best things
in life are still free.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20)
Today is an 8
Remain skeptical of something
that sounds too good. Sign up
once youve reviewed from all
angles. Watch for a weak link.
Prot and luck comes
through networking with
your communities.
MINSEON KIM
@minseonkim94
As Argentine tango music
flled the art gallery on the
second foor of Signs of Life,
students and locals gathered
to dance with their partners
during a weekly practice. Afer
struggling to learn the dance
at frst, l Imrn, a graduate
student from Lawrence, is now
president of the KU Tango
Club.
It was difcult, Imrn said.
You have to put in a lot of work
and efort to learn this, but once
you start having fun, then its
hard to walk away from it.
Some students participate in
tango as a way to get their minds
of school and work. Christian
Encarnacion, a junior from
Parsons, started tango when
his friend asked him to go to a
free dance lesson together. He
said it was nice to do something
completely unrelated to his
daily routine.
Pete Walker, a PhD student,
said many of the tango
instructors have previously
studied in Argentina. He said
a lot of the people involved in
the tango community have a
sincere passion for dance and
love to share their passion with
others.
Tey are teachers in that they
like to share the art of the dance
and they are students in that they
like to learn, and they learn a lot
by teaching others and dancing
with people of all levels, Walker
said. So its a really complex
yet complete relationship that
there is something to learn and
something to teach.
Most students involved in
the tango club had no prior
experience with tango and
didnt expect to ever become
involved. Rachel Frish, a junior
from Dallas, said she hadnt
considered taking up tango
until she sat in on a class that
her friend was in.
I got into it really gradually,
Frish said. I think it was the
frst night I stopped bringing
homework that I was like, Oh,
I actually really like this.
Te Lawrence tango
community is welcoming to
frst time learners. Walker
reminisces about when he frst
started learning tango.
It was awkward and
uncomfortable at frst, he said.
I thought it was a lot of fun,
but I wasnt quite sure if I was
capable of doing it. Its a walk
but its one of those hardest
walks Ive ever had to do.
Even though learning a new
dance can be tough, it provides
students an opportunity to
experience and immerse
themselves in a new culture.
Encarnacion said he knows
he was tripping over a lot of
peoples feet at frst, but dancing
tango is a nice way to experience
a new culture.
Students involved with the
Lawrence tango community
said they have met many
new people by dancing tango
together.
We are a very friendly
community and some of the
best friends I have ever made
were through tango, Imrn
said. Its a really great way
of making good friends and
building relationships with
people.
Edited by Ashley Peralta
Taking up the art of tango
Club provides comfortable environment for both new, experienced dancers
BMX Guy draws inspiration from pro
BEN LIPOWITZ/KANSAN
Participants practice dancing the tango at the Signs of Life bookstore
and coffee shop at 722 Massachusetts St.

You have to put in a lot


of work and effort to learn
this, but once you start
having fun, then its hard
to walk away from it.
L IMRN
President of KU Tango Club
Te name BMX Guy might
ring a bell to some students.
Tats because you have
probably seen Zunwu Zhou,
a senior from Wuhan, China,
around campus and in front of
Wescoe Hall, practicing tricks
on his BMX bike. On Tuesday,
Zhou was back in front of
Wescoe, but this time joined by
another BMX rider, who is an
inspiration to Zhou.
Terry Adams, a Red Bull
professional fatland BMX
rider, visited the campus.
Adams has won numerous
awards over the course of his
life including: Ride BMX
Magazines Number One Ride
Award two times, and an X
Games gold medal in 2005.
Last year, the University Daily
Kansan ran an article about
Zhou. Now, the two BMX
masters sat down, together, in
front of Wescoe and discussed
their biking experiences in a
joint interview.
University Daily Kansan:
How did both of you get
started with BMX?
Terry Adams: I got started
just because I saw people
doing it on TV and in
magazines, and it pretty much
just looked impossible, so
I was intrigued, and how it
looked, and just being a kid,
I wanted to see how it felt to
move the bike around like
that, and just see how it felt
to be at a high level of a BMX
rider, so thats what kind of
kept me involved in it.
Zunwu Zhou: I guess it was
around seven or eight years
ago when the BMX fatland
was still part of the X Games,
and I liked to watch TV shows
with it, and thought it was
really cool, so I just kind of
just got started. Especially at
that time, I was back in China,
and no one else in the city was
doing it, so I just really wanted
to do something diferent that
no one else could do. I also
watched diferent videos at
that time, and I watched a
lot of videos of Terry riding,
so Terry has been a pretty
infuential rider in my life.
UDK: How long have the
two of you been riding?
Adams: About 20 years.
Zhou: I think around seven
or eight years.
UDK: What were your
inspirations for atland
BMX riding?
Adams: For me it was just
the fact that it was diferent
than the other aspects of
BMX, which are kind of easy
to fgure out, where its guys
jumping down steps, or guys
racing BMX, but BMX fatland
is more complex, and it was
kind of so complicated, I just
wanted to fgure it out, you
know? Te frst time I saw
it on TV, it almost felt like I
was looking at something I
couldnt describe, so I wanted
to get in there and try to fgure
it all out.
Zhou: For me, when I
learned my frst spinning
tricks, I just got addicted to it,
and spinning my bike.
UDK: So, how did you two
rst meet?
Adams: Right here, right?
Zhou: Yeah, right here, I
think it was three years ago,
Terry was here doing the same
Red Bull campus tour. We met
here, and had a riding session
together.
Adams: Yeah, so we met
here, but then we kind of met
up at diferent locations, and I
got to see this guys progress.
UDK: What were a
couple of those locations
you met up at?
Adams: It was Joplin, Mo.;
Austin, Texas; and Newport
Beach in California.
UDK: What kind of work
goes into BMX for you?
Adams: Yeah, its diferent
than other types of BMX
because its not that dangerous,
so really the work that goes
into it is like trying the same
motion over and over for a
lot of repetitions. Sometimes
guys are working on tricks
for three months, and theyre
just trying the same motion.
Our injuries might come from
like a sore muscle because our
hand might be fipped around
a certain way, or were doing
the same motion over and over
again.
Zhou: Like Terry said, we
have to do the same motion
or trick and practice it over
and over again in order to gain
muscle memory.
UDK: What is your
favorite experience
with BMX?
Adams: It would be what
BMX has given me, you know,
the opportunity to meet guys
like this [Adams motions
to Zhou], and to just travel
the world and view diferent
cultures through BMX. BMX
has just given me a chance to
see that anything is possible.
Zhou: I really enjoy going
out to contests, the goal
isnt necessarily to get the
prize there, the main reason
or motivation to go out to
diferent contests is so I can
meet diferent riders from all
around the country, or even
from all around the world.

UDK: Zhou said you were
one of his inspirations
for BMX; have you had
any riders who were an
inspiration for you?
Adams: Pretty much when
I was growing up, I admired
every rider that was in the
magazines, or in a VHS tape or
a DVD, so back then it was any
rider that was a pro. My goals
were to be as good as those
guys, so thats kind of where
my focus point was as a kid.
UDK: Have you had
a moment or a time
when you really scared
yourself doing BMX?
Adams: I guess a couple
times when I was younger I
was a little bit more careless.
Now, Im not as careless as I
was before. You know, there
were times when I was younger
where I would be hauling ass
and not really paying attention,
and those were the times where
I would break bones and be out
for a couple months. My main
goal now is to be safe.
Zhou: Probably the times
where a certain part on my bike
breaks, thats probably the most
scary part because Ive broken
my handlebar or the frame just
cracks and that is pretty scary.
Adams: Yeah, cause you
could come and it could jar you
in the neck.
UDK: Where do you
see your bike taking you
in the future?
Adams: Hopefully I can
keep doing the same as
Ive been doing, you know
which is traveling the world,
and doing what I love. This
was a childhood dream of
mine and now Ive gotten
the opportunity to live
that dream through my
sponsors and through all the
companies that support me.
So right now its not taking
those opportunities for
granted.
Zhou: For me, I dont think
Ill be able to become a
professional rider, but I want
to keep on riding the rest of
my life or till Im old enough.
After I graduate and get a job,
Ill still be going to different
contests or different gyms, so
Im just going to keep riding.
Adams: But I have to
disagree, I think that you
could be a pro rider if you
wanted to jump up from the
class, because I think your
skill level is high.
Zhou: Yeah, I think I can do
that, but not like professional
riding like you, riding is your
career.
Adams: Yeah, your skill
level is high though, I think
if you wanted to you could.
Zhou: I could compete
in the pro class, but I dont
think Im good enough that I
could have Red Bull or other
companies sponsor me and
send me around the world.
Adams: I still disagree, I
think that youre better than
what you think.
Zhou: [Laughs] All
right, thanks, I guess Ill
see where it takes me.
UDK: So what is riding
about to you?
Adams: Te fatland is a very
artistic side of BMX, so its a
way for riders to kind of express
themselves, its very diferent
from the other disciplines
because its almost dancing on
the bike, so all it really takes is
your mind and your body, and
coming up with something
creative in your head.
Zhou: For me its defnitely
part of my life, and Ill say I
cant live without it.
UDK: Is there any advice
you would give to anyone
starting BMX?
Adams: My advice is fnd a
community or help build one
to help fatland grow.
Zhou: I would just go online
and watch a good video and go
riding directly aferward, and
put on some music, thats my
advice for when I dont have a
lot of motivation.
UDK: Is there any info
youd like to share that I
havent already asked?
Adams: If you want to
follow me, my Instagram and
Twitter are @terryadamsbmx
and they can also fnd me on
Facebook by just typing in
Terry Adams BMX.
Zhou: You can just tell them
Ill be riding [at Wescoe] a lot!
Adams: I mean you can see
the marks on the ground over
here, this guys been riding in
the same location for years,
you know?

Edited by Ashley Peralta
JAMES HOYT/KANSAN
Zunwu Zhou, known by many as the BMX Guy, talks with professional BMX atland rider Terry Adams on
Tuesday. The pair met three years ago on campus during a Red Bull campus tour.
RYAN MILLER
@Ryanmiller_UDK
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 6
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Wichita-based Hog Wild Pit BBQ
opens restaurant in Lawrence
KWANG HYUN
@Khyun_UDK
Jeremy Saunders, general
manager of the newly opened
restaurant Hog Wild Pit BBQ,
has a long-running history
with Lawrence. Even though
he is from Eureka and didnt
attend the University of Kan-
sas, he has always been a fan
of the Jayhawks and KU bas-
ketball.
Ive been coming to basket-
ball games for the last 12 years
and had connections with
people here, Saunders said.
He said the restaurants
Wichita-style barbecue is per-
fect for small towns like Law-
rence.
Hog Wild Pit BBQ is a
Wichita-based barbecue
chain opening restaurants in
cities like Hutchinson, Salina
and El Dorado afer its suc-
cess at each of its fve Wichita
locations. Te Lawrence loca-
tion, which is located on 23rd
Street near Naismith Drive,
became the ninth store of the
franchise.
We really have a good cov-
erage in the Wichita area and
its surrounding areas there,
Saunders said. We are just
basically moving away from
there as we grow. Lawrence
seems like a good ft for us. Its
a great location. Its great for
the campus.
Te Lawrence location re-
placed an old Blockbuster
store that went out of busi-
ness in 2013. Te restaurant
opened its doors in August
and is owned by T.D. OCon-
nell.
Bill Self has visited the
restaurant and has eaten its
famous barbecue, Saunders
said. He lef his signature on
a menu which is now framed
on the restaurant's wall.
Its my frst time here, but
the restaurant looks well
designed and their food is
delicious, customer Chris-
sy Allen said. Since its on
23rd street, it is pretty conve-
nient for us to grab barbecue
anytime.
Edited by Jacob Clemen
JOHN GRIFFIN/KANSAN
Patrons eat dinner at Hog Wild Pit BBQ, a new barbecue restaurant in
Lawrence on 23rd Street near Naismith Drive.
Young Frankenstein has new life
at 40th-anniversary celebration
Director Mel Brooks spent a
lot of money on white hand-
kerchiefs while making his
1974 tour de farce, "Young
Frankenstein."
"I gave everybody in the
crew a white handkerchief,"
said the 88-year-old comedy
legend during a recent phone
interview. "I said, 'When you
feel like laughing, put this in
your mouth.' Every once in
a while, I'd turn around and
see a sea of white handker-
chiefs, and I said, 'I got a hit.'"
"Young Frankenstein" was
more than a hit. It is a comic
masterpiece.
Shot in glorious black-and-
white, the comedy managed
to be both a spoof and a lov-
ing homage to the Universal
horror flms 1931's "Fran-
kenstein" and 1935's "Te
Bride of Frankenstein," both
directed by James Whale, and
1939's "Son of Frankenstein,"
directed by Rowland V. Lee
that starred Boris Karlof
as the monster.
Brooks co-wrote the Os-
car-nominated script with
the flm's star, Gene Wilder,
who had starred in Brooks'
1967 classic "Te Producers"
and 1974's "Blazing Saddles."
Wilder played the arrogant
Dr. Frederick Frankenstein,
who had so distanced him-
self from his family that he
insisted his last name be pro-
nounced "Frankensteen." But
when the good doctor visits
the old family castle in Eu-
rope, it isn't long before he
creates his own monster (Pe-
ter Boyle).
Rounding out the cast of
crazies were Madeline Kahn
as Frederick's tightly wound
fancee, Elizabeth; Marty
Feldman as "Eye-Gore; Clo-
ris Leachman as the terrify-
ing Frau Blucher; Teri Garr as
the saucy Inga; Kenneth Mars
as the one-armed Inspector
Kemp; and Gene Hackman as
the blind hermit.
Brooks, who has won Em-
mys, a Grammy, an Oscar
and Tonys, put his hand and
footprints in the famed TCL
Chinese Teatre forecourt
Monday morning as part of
the flm's 40th-anniversary
celebration.
On Tuesday, Twentieth
Century Fox Home Enter-
tainment released a new Blu-
ray version of the flm.
It was Wilder who came
up with the idea for "Young
Frankenstein." One day
during production on "Blaz-
ing Saddles," Brooks saw
Wilder sitting in a corner
with a legal pad "scribbling
something in his cowboy out-
ft," said Brooks.
"I said, 'What are you do-
ing?' He said, 'I have an idea
for a movie. It's about the
grandson of Victor Franken-
stein, and he wants nothing
to do with the family, but
sooner or later he will get
sucked into the family insan-
ity.' "
Afer flming ended that day
on "Blazing Saddles," the two
worked until 2 a.m. on ideas
for "Young Frankenstein."
"We were very excited
about were we could go, the
possibilities, what was au
courant we could make fun
of," he said. "We both knew
we had to salute (novelist)
Mary Shelley as well as James
Whale. We had respect for
the book and the movie."
Te flm was originally set
to be made at Columbia. But
the studio executives nixed
the idea of him shooting it
in black-and-white like the
original flms. "I said then
the deal is broken," noted
Brooks.
"Young Frankenstein"
quickly found a new home
at Fox afer the flm's pro-
ducer Michael Gruskof gave
the script to his friend Alan
Ladd Jr., who had just taken
over the reins of the studio.
Dale Hennesy designed the
sets that honored art director
Charles D. Hall's original de-
signs for "Frankenstein" and
"Bride of Frankenstein." Ger-
ald Hirschfeld supplied the
atmospheric black-and-white
cinematography.
For added authentici-
ty, Brooks found Kenneth
Strickfaden, who had created
the seminal electrical equip-
ment for the original horror
flms, so he could use it in
"Young Frankenstein."
"He had a garage in Santa
Monica," noted Brooks. "I
went to his garage, and there
it was. He said, 'OK, let me
turn it on.' He hit the switch,
and it all went buzzzzzz."
"I had a real problem,"
Brooks said. "I didn't want
it to be just funny or silly. I
wanted Mary Shelley's basic
feelings captured and the ...
haunting beautiful quality
that James Whale got with
Boris Karlof. My movies are
not about jokes. Tey are
about behavior, and behavior
can be very funny."
Brooks and Wilder had a
disagreement over one of
the movie's many iconic
moments Frederick and
the monster decked out in
top hat and tails performing
"Puttin' on the Ritz."
Wilder, related Brooks,
"wanted to do 'Puttin' on the
Ritz' to show the prowess of
the talent of the monster. I
said no, no, no, we can't do
that. It will make it silly."
But Brooks gave in because
Wilder "never stopped an-
noying me," he said, laugh-
ing. "We shot it, put it in the
picture, and we loved it."
When he screened the
rough cut of "Young Franken-
stein" to a small audience on
the Fox lot, he warned them
that at nearly 2 hours long,
the movie "would be a total
failure," but said if they came
back in a month, it would be
"a brilliant, funny, remark-
able success."
During that month in the
editing bay, "I did my home-
work," said Brooks, who real-
ized that there was too much
comedy in the flm. He cut
the weaker comic moments
and "spaced out when I want-
ed the audience to breathe out
and relax. I got the rhythm of
the movie right."
"'Young Frankenstein,'" he
said, is "by far the best movie
I ever made. Not the funniest
'Blazing Saddles' was the
funniest, and hot on its heels
would be 'Te Producers.' But
as a writer-director, it is by far
my fnest."
MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2014 THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN PAGE 7
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CONVINCING ARGUMENT AT KANSAN.COM
By Christian Hardy
@HardyNFL
NICK HARWELL MONTELL COZART
THE DAILY DEBATE
Which Kansas football player impressed you the most in the season opener?
By Kirsten Peterson
@KeepUpWithKP
Te Kansas Jayhawks
grasped their fourth-straight
season opener win Satur-
day night with spectacular
performances from senior
wide receiver Nick Harwell
and sophomore quarterback
Montell Cozart.
Harwell and Cozarts in-
credible chemistry surprised
us all. Cozart found Harwell
in the end zone to mark his
frst career touchdown pass,
followed by a 10-yard pass
moments later to pull a 24-0
lead against the Redhawks.
Te Jayhawks won the game,
34-28.
Cozart set new career-high
passing numbers in yards,
attempts and completions
going 12-for-24 with three
touchdowns.
Harwell had a great per-
formance Saturday night
debuting crimson and blue
for the frst time, but he is no
stranger to success. Harwell
set the Miami (Ohio) Uni-
versity school record with
receiving 219 yards in a game
as a freshman. All our expec-
tations were already sky-high
for this transfer.
On the other hand, Cozart
impressed us all with his
confdence and leadership
starting on the feld as a
sophomore. With Cozarts
redshirt ripped of in the
middle of the season last
year, he ended up starting
three of the seven games he
played in.
Plus, we all cant forget
Cozarts frst-career start vs.
West Virginia last year, which
helped the Jayhawks end
their 27-game conference
losing streak, snatching their
frst Big 12 game victory in
two years.
Cozart told the Kansas City
Star in February of last year
that a big reason he chose
Kansas was reuniting with
former Bishop Miege High
School coach Tim Grunhard,
the former ofensive line
coach. However, Grunhard
stepped down at the end of
the season and was replaced
by John Reagan, formerly the
ofensive line coach at Rice
University.
I have more confdence
in this ofense, because I
ran it in high school and I
was more familiar with the
spread, Cozart said (via
cjonline.com). When coach
Reagan came in, that gave
me a little more confdence.
With coach Weis ofense, it
would have been the same,
but this ofense is a lot more
fun. It gives me a lot more
freedom. I can go through
up to three progressions,
then if no one is open I can
scramble.
Not since Todd Reesing led
the Jayhawks to a victory in
the 2008 Insight Bowl have
Jayhawk fans had such high
expectations for a quarter-
back, but Cozart is commit-
ted to meeting those expec-
tations with his confdence
and the athletic ability that is
destined to change history.
Edited by Logan
Schlossberg
When senior wide receiver
Nick Harwell was selected by
the team to be a captain this
summer, he had never suited
up for a Jayhawks football
game. But afer one game, its
clear why he was selected for
the leadership role.
Harwell took his role as the
ofenses chief and ran with
it Saturday in the Jayhawks
34-28 win against Southeast
Missouri State. Quarterback
Montell Cozart was looking
for Harwell early and ofen.
On the Jayhawks third drive,
the transfer wide receiver and
the sophomore quarterback
connected on a well-executed
corner route from six yards
out to put Kansas on top 17-0.
Harwells second touchdown
of the frst quarter came on an
out-route inside the 10-yard
line, where he was clearly
Cozarts frst option, as he
stared him down all the way
through the route.
Cozart kept looking Har-
wells way, too. Harwell got in
space multiple times in the
second half, including once on
a post near the goal line and
another on a deep fade route,
but the two couldnt quite
connect on either play. Tats
likely a facet of the Jayhawks
ofense that will grow as the
season progresses.
At the end of the day,
Harwell notched four recep-
tions for 46 yards and two
touchdowns on eight targets.
Harwells performance was so
raved about that he overshad-
owed a nice day for his senior
counterpart, Tony Pierson,
who came up with four recep-
tions for 95 yards, including a
67-yard receiving touchdown.
Maybe most impressive
was Harwell recovering the
Redhawks onside kick afer
they had scored to make it a
one-possession game. Te ball
rattled around the Jayhawks
special teams crew, shaking
Memorial Stadium, but Har-
well eventually jumped on it,
letting Cozart and the ofense
run out the remainder of the
clock efortlessly.
Te fact that Harwell
seamlessly transitioned into
Kansas new ofense in his frst
game lining up out wide, in
the slot and taking a reverse
for a few yards shows just
how important hes going to
be to the entire ofensive staf,
including Cozart under center.
Last week, Harwell said
he was shooting for the
Biletnikof Award, which is
attributed to the nations out-
standing college football wide
receiver every season. Harwell
was placed on the awards
watch list this summer.
With his performance Satur-
day, Harwell made a resound-
ing efort toward that award,
and possibly many more
accolades beyond that.
Edited by Jacob Clemen
WANT SPORTS
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Te No. 24 Kansas womens
volleyball team (6-1) won in
four sets, 25-23, 17-25, 26-
24, 25-19, in a tougher-than-
anticipated matchup with
the UMKC Kangaroos (4-3)
on Tuesday night at Horejsi
Family Athletics Center. It
wasnt always pretty, but the
Jayhawks still managed to
secure a win heading into this
weekends Villanova Classic.
Tese mid-week matches
are sometimes a Catch-22, but
everybody plays them so you
just have to be ready, Kansas
coach Ray Bechard said.
Obviously there were times
that it looked like Kansas City
was a little more engaged than
we were.
Kansas seemed a bit sluggish
and unsure of itself early, as
it fell behind afer a string of
mental errors and general
poor play. Down 17-11 in the
frst set, the Jayhawks rallied
back behind strong play from
their outside hitters and an
array of assists from freshman
setter Ainise Havili, who
fnished with 42 assists and 12
digs for a double-double. Te
two squads exchanged leads
late in the set before senior
outside hitter Sara McClinton
came up with two crucial kills
to seal it for Kansas.
We really had to pull
together as a team, we had
to fx our errors and stay
aggressive, McClinton said.
Te Jayhawks quickly
dropped the second set afer
recording a dismal .000 kill
percentage, fnishing with
nine kills and nine kill errors.
But they overcame their
lackluster second set, taking
the momentum back for good
with another late rally to steal
the third set from UMKC.
[Te third set] was crucial,
that game kind of could have
changed how the entire match
went, McClinton said. We
were lucky that it went our
way, but we had to grind out
those last couple points and
that made a huge diference.
Junior hitter Emma
Hagedorn was an impact
player for UMKC all night
long, recording 12 kills, as well
as teaming up with sophomore
Taylor Buhrow for a combined
13 blocks. Te Jayhawks front
row struggled to get it over the
Kangaroos front early on, but
managed to gradually wear it
down as the match progressed.
I think were all kind of
disappointed how we started
of, Havili said. But we
fought hard and I think that
shows how resilient we are. A
win is a win, so well take it.
McClinton and fellow
senior outside hitter Chelsea
Albers were too strong for
the Kangaroos at the net, as
McClinton fnished with 18
kills and Albers ended with 11.
Freshman Madison Rigdon
chipped in to an already-
stacked outside hitter position
with 15 kills of her own
several of those coming at key
moments.
With the win, the Jayhawks
improve to 32-1 all time
against UMKC, including
23-0 against the Kangaroos in
Lawrence. Kansas now kicks
of the Villanova Classic by
taking on host Villanova at
the Jake Nevin Field House,
Friday at 11 a.m. Te Jayhawks
then face Yale and American
before closing out the
tournament against defending
national champion Penn State
on Saturday afernoon.
Edited by Kelsey Phillips
Volume 128 Issue 11 kansan.com Wednesday, September 10, 2014
By Ben Felderstein
@Ben_Felderstein
COMMENTARY
Coach Bill Self
eyes top recruit
for 2015 season
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
sports
S
Kansas is on its way to an-
other impressive incoming
freshman class this season
thanks to Bill Self s
strong recruiting skills
with Cliff Alexander
leading the way as Kansas
second top-three prospect
in the last two years. Self
hopes to continue recruit-
ing top prospects for the
2015 season.
No. 6 overall prospect
Stephen Zimmerman, a top
Kansas target, is a 7-foot
center who was named the
MVP of the Nike Global
Challenge in August. He av-
eraged 17.5 points and 11.5
rebounds per game during
the tournament.
Zimmerman is scheduled
to come to Lawrence on
Oct. 10, one of his five
officially scheduled college
visits.
The big thing I will be
looking for on my visits
is how I feel when I get to
campus and see if I can see
myself living there next
year, Zimmerman said.
Just wanting to get the nat-
ural feel for where is right
for me. A lot of players say
it just feels right at a certain
school. Ill most likely get to
see practice and see around
campus to see how I might
fit.
Zimmerman is one of four
top recruits that will be vis-
iting Kansas and Kentucky
within a week of each other.
Jaylen Brown, Carlton
Bragg and Brandon Ingram
are also scheduled to visit.
The four will travel to both
schools together as a group.
It just happens to be the
midnight madness stuff at
both schools, and that is
usually the best time for
recruits to visit and when
coaches want players to
see all the fun they have
and when they want us to
come, Zimmerman said.
Draftexpress.com de-
scribes Zimmerman as
a mobile big-man with
above-average passing skills
and good ball-handling.
Former Jayhawk Joel Embi-
id also was described with
the same characteristics as a
prospect.
Big men that can move,
pass and score are ideal for
a Bill Self high-low offense.
Zimmerman is also a talent-
ed shooter, which makes
him valuable at power
forward because of his
ability to stretch the floor
and knock down perimeter
shots.
With only one of the top
10 recruits signed for the
2015 class so far, there are
still many visits and dis-
cussions to be had. In the
last three years, Kansas has
signed 15 recruits and they
are looking to carry that
success over to 2015.
Edited by Ashley Peralta
ANNA WENNER/KANSAN
Minami Levonowich, a senior from Hilton Head, S.C., lines up her shot at the Marilynn Smith Sunower Invitational on Tuesday. Kansas nished second with a team total of 900 (+36).
SAKDEE TAKES TITLE
Kansas finishes second in tournament
after difficult second day
MICHAEL OBRIAN/KANSAN
Senior Sara McClinton attempts to put the ball over the net before UMKC can block it during Tuesdays
volleyball match at Horejsi Family Athletic Center. McClinton had a team-high 18 kills in Kansas victory.
Kansas volleyball gets tough test
from UMKC before Villanova Classic
Kansas sophomore golfer
Pornvipa Sakdee won
the individual title at the
Marilynn Smith Sunflower
Invitational on Tuesday,
with an even-par score of
216. Sakdee is the second
straight Kansas golfer to win
the Sunflower Invitational,
after Meghan Potee won the
event last year.
Sakdee began the day one
stroke behind Kansas States
Chandler Gallagher, who
finished the tournament at
third overall. Sakdee shot
a 1-over score of 73 in the
final round, which was good
enough for the victory.
I feel so happy, Sakdee
said. I am glad I won.
After finishing Mondays
round in first place, the
Kansas Blue team had a
difficult day Tuesday, and
finished second in the
tournament with a team
total of 900 (+36). The
Kansas State Wildcats won
the tournament with a final
score of 894 (+30).
Today was a tough day
and obviously we are a
little disappointed, coach
Erin ONeil said. We were
leading going in and gave
some shots away, but we
learned a lot. I think its
good to do it on the front
end and figure out what we
need to learn and adjust.
We have a talented young
group, so I just think we
need to learn how to handle
that pressure going forward.
It was a good experience for
us.
Kansas junior Yupaporn
Kawinpakorn had the best
individual round of the
tournament on Monday, but
finished tied for fifth with
an overall score of 222 (+6).
Senior Gabby DiMarco tied
for 19th with a score of
228 (+12). Freshman Kallie
Gonzales tied for 35th at
238 (+22) and freshman
Pitsinee Winyarat finished
47th at 243 (+27).
The Kansas Crimson team
placed ninth and ended
with a total of 949 (+85).
Senior Michelle Woods led
the Crimson team with a
score of 222 (+6) and tied
for fifth. Junior Mackenzie
Thayer tied for 26th at 232
(+16) and senior Minami
Levonowich tied for 44th
at 241 (+25). Freshman
MacKenzie Sexe finished
57th at 255 (+39) and junior
Carly Humes placed 60th at
259 (+43).
Kansas will play next at
the Minnesota Invitational
in Minneapolis Sept. 15-16.
Edited by Jordan Fox

We have a talented young


group, so I just think we need
to learn how to handle that
pressure going forward. It
was a good experience.
ERIN ONEIL
Womens golf coach
MADELINE MALONEY
@madmaloneyUDK
KYLE PAPPAS
@KylePap
Albers, McClinton in running for CLASS Award
Both of the Kansas womens
volleyball teams seniors,
outside hitters Chelsea
Albers and Sara McClinton,
were named Tuesday as
candidates for the 2014
Senior CLASS Award in
collegiate volleyball. Te
CLASS (Celebrating Loyalty
and Achievement for
Staying in School) award is
given annually to an NCAA
Division I senior with
notable achievements in four
areas: community, classroom,
character and competition.
Tese two have always
represented this program
in a positive way, coach
Ray Bechard said. Tey are
the example of the balance
required of a successful
student-athlete in that they
are both good students, good
athletes and good people. We
are proud of them, both on
and of the court.
Albers is a two-time
Academic All-Big 12 First
Team selection whos
majoring in exercise science.
She has embraced her role
as veteran on a squad with
seven freshmen and has
shown strong leadership
early in the season.
McClinton, also a two-time
Academic All-Big 12 First
Team selection, is majoring
in human biology and plans
to attend physician assistant
school afer her volleyball
career. In addition to her
demanding class schedule,
she has paid her way to play
on a USA Developmental
Team the past two summers
and donated her hair to the
Locks of Love charity.
On the court Albers and
McClinton have become
one of the most dominant
twosomes in Kansas
volleyball history. Both are
coming of 2013 campaigns
that saw them named All-
Big 12 First Team and
All-American Honorable
mention while leading the
Jayhawks to their frst ever
Sweet 16 appearance. Te
duo has showed no signs
of slowing down in 2014
as McClinton has already
notched her 1,000th career
kill and Albers was named
MVP of the Pioneer Classic
in Denver this past weekend.
Te current list of 30
nominees for the award will
be cut down to 10 fnalists
midway through the season,
with the winner being
announced during the 2014
NCAA Division I Womens
Volleyball Championship
in December. Kansas senior
middle blocker Caroline
Jarmoc was tabbed a top-10
CLASS fnalist last season.
Edited by Casey Hutchins
KYLE PAPPAS
@KylePap

We really had to pull


together as a team, we had
to x our errors and stay
aggressive.
SARA MCCLINTON
Senior outside hitter
j ay h a wk s a b r o a d
Vol. 5
S T U D Y A B R O A D
F A I R T O D AY
10:30AM-3:30PM 4TH FLOOR, UNION
JAYHAWKS ABROAD 2
upcoming info sessionS
STUDY
ABROAD
I NFO
CENTER
105 LIPPINCOTT HALL
1410 JAYHAWK BLVD
WALK-IN ADVISING 9-5,
M-F
YOU HAVE QUESTIONS.
WE HAVE ANSWERS.
READY TO
GET STARTED?
SEPTember 10
Study Abroad in
Eastern Europe
Kansas Union, Divine Nine Room
12:00 - 1:00pm
Study Abroad in
the Middle East
& North Africa
Kansas Union, Alcove G
2:00 - 3:00pm
Intern Abroad:
London & Sydney
Kansas Union, Alderson Auditorium
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the African Continent
Kansas Union, Alcove E
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Lippincott Hall, 203
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Kansas Union, Parlors Room
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September 11
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Summerfeld Hall, 501
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Intern Abroad:
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Kansas Union, International Room
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Kansas Union, Alcove F
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September 11 ( cont. )
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Kansas Union, Parlors Room
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Fraser Hall, 108
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September 15
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Wescoe Hall, 4033
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in Panama
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September 17
Study Abroad
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Study Abroad in
Costa Rica
Lippincott Hall, 203
4:00 - 5:00pm
September 23
Study Abroad
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12:00pm
September 26
Study Abroad
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September 29
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2:00pm
JAYHAWKS ABROAD 3
The best thing about traveling around Central
America were the people. They were cool vaga-
bonds, vacationing middle-agers, and full on weir-
dos. I met them everywhereriding in the ferry,
hiking to a waterfall, searching for the proper bus
station, or simply staying in a hostel.
My favorite hostels feel like islands (them being
located on an actual island is inessential but obvi-
ously a clear plus). They have little to no internet
connection, no television, and sometimes not even
private rooms. In addition to offering little to no
privacy, these hostels also steal away every other
form of outside entertainment, leaving everyone
with no choice but to grab a book, play cards, or
swap stories with the 6-20 other people they fnd
themselves surrounded by.
At any one gathering it is common to have three
languages (at least) weave in and out of each other
like a complicated lopsided braid, each member
trying to be conscious of the language that the
other members speak best. The two dominating
languages are Spanish and English as almost ev-
eryone present is profcient in at least one of these.
However, no ones second language is perfect and
this leaves many native-English speakers occasion-
ally translating for the native-Spanish speakers and
vice versa. Additionally, the Europeans (usually,
though not always, Dutch, German, or French) will
exchange quick words and phrases to each other
in their native tongues that (much to my dismay)
no one can understand but them. I like to imagine
that these gatherings are like United Nations
meetings. That is, if every United Nations delegate
was an early 20 to late 30 something year-old with
limited income, sparse education, and a propensity
to gravitate towards dangerous activities (such as
deep |ungle hiking, surfng, cliff diving, waterfall
repelling, and riding local buses at night). Actually,
United Nations should look into some kind of
international bonding activity like this because after
spending many-a-night surrounded by people from
France, England, Canada, Germany, Sweden, the
Netherlands, Colombia, Spain, Brazil, Argentina,
Bulgaria, and Venezuela, I actually have greater
respect for their countries and I dont think there
was a single argument among us. Wait, no there
was one argument (it was about smoking and we
entered into it by accident).
In his or her own way every traveler is different.
Some people work on boats. Some people work
temp jobs. Some people are waiters and waitress-
es. Some people dont work at all anymore. Some
people are students. Some people are about to
be students. And other people just seem to have
money for no reason.
movi ng forward
By Betsy Tampke
They are from everywhere and have been every-
where. They are from uptight wealthy families and
poor dilapidated ones. They got straight As and
went to good universities to make their parents
proud and they started drinking at age 12, dated
20-somethings in their teenage years, have over
fve tattoos, and never graduated high school. They
worked as a librarian for 5 years before they decid-
ed to quit their job and travel. Theyve never worked
a day in their life. They have been to Argentina and
hiked through Patagonia. They saw Machu Picchu.
They answer questions about Russia and Thailand
and tell stories about how when they were in China
they were waiting in line for two hours to get train
tickets only to have the clerk see that they were
white and shut the gate on them.
They are more adventurous than meor perhaps
more idiotic than me, but in the world of travelers
sometimes that line feels blurred. They paid Captain
Shay $5 to ride between cows and pigs in the bot-
tom of his boat to avoid a $30 ferry. They showed
up to Costa Rica without any clear sort of plan. They
took a Chicken Bus. They climbed down into that
bat cave the hostel owner took a group of us to,
while I stood by the mouth and watched with my
mothers voice pleading dont do anything reckless
playing over and over again in my head.
They are proud of their adventure-hoodwear-
ing the places they have been and near death
experiences they have survived like patches on a
boy-scout uniformand they are unashamed of the
amount of time they have spent un-rooted.
They travel in pairsas couples or friends. They
travel in groups of three or four. They travel
completely alone. They travel to work. They travel
to study. They travel to fnd themselves, and they
travel to lose themselves.
They leave behind wives, husbands, fancs, girl-
friends, boyfriends, siblings, and children. Some of
them have been traveling for so long that they dont
leave anyone behind anymore when they go. When
we asked a late ffty-something year-old-|oan-
about if she ever had a husband or children she
shook her head and laughed.
I forgot, she said and shrugged her shoulders.
Yes, everyone is different. Just as every country is
different and every bus is different and every time
I try to turn on a hostel kitchen stove its different.
But in another way every one Ive met and me are
all exactly the same.
Were all running away. Running away, hiding,
escaping, avoiding, evading, whatever you want
(continued on page 6)
voices from abroad
San Jose, costa Rica
stirling, scotland
buenos aires, argentina
london, england
sienna, italy
brno, czech republic
The best part about studying abroad is being
able to experience something completely
unique, even within your area of study outside of
language. While in Costa Rica, I was able to take
a ma|or-level Biology course in which we studied
in the country's rain forest--something that is
defnitely not possible to do in Kansas.
andy larkin
Biology & Spanish
Coing abroad enabled me to experience a true
cultural shift entirely different from my own. It
enabled me to gain independence and conf-
dence in my own abilities. I now feel comfortable
in situations that before I went abroad would
have stressed me out beyond belief. Instead of
focusing inwardly on my own individual life and
goals, I now have an expanded awareness of the
world around me, and it's allowed me to focus
more-so on how I can have a positive impact
on other people.
jessica rea
Architecture
My experience in Costa Rica made me feel more
prepared to take on whatever will come my way
post-graduation. I realized |ust how adaptable I
can be. I feel more ready to take on unexpected
challenges in a work environment. I learned that
there is not a right or wrong when it comes to
cultures, they are merely different. Once you
learn to accept this idea it becomes a lot easier to
immerse yourself into a whole new world.
jackie langdon
|ournalism, Strategic Communications
Taking classes abroad is what makes studying
abroad so unique. Rather than |ust visiting a
country, I was truly living in it. I took my classes
in Spanish so they were more dimcult than they
might have been in English. It was also dimcult
at times to balance having fun in a new place
while keeping on top of my class work. All in all
though, taking classes abroad gave me a unique
experience that I could truly only get abroad.
logan masenthin
Clobal and International Studies
Scotland is a beautiful country with very friendly
people and tons of sights to see, and for those
that want to travel, London, Dublin and Western
Europe are |ust a short (and cheap) fight away.
The number of outdoor opportunities was sur-
prising to me. Between visits to Stirling Castle,
hiking in the Highlands or even |ust |ogging
around the city, there are lots of opportunities
to get outside, stay active and see some
gorgeous scenery. alex jaumann
|ournalism & Film
JAYHAWKS ABROAD 4
Wollongong, australia
dushanbe, tajikistan
delhi, india
My advice to someone about to go abroad is to
go into this adventure with an open mind! Be
fexible and take advantage of every opportunity
you are given because when are you ever
going to be able to do this again7 One night in
the dorms, some of my Hungarian friends taught
me how to make Coulash, a traditional
Hungarian dish. I will always remember this
moment because it wasnt just a monument or a
tourist attraction, it was a unique and immersive
European experience.
Emily Farnan
Marketing
The most rewarding part for me was being able
to experience how life at another university was.
It was amazing to engage in class discussions
on Foreign Policy and other issues affecting the
world in a culture and classroom so different
from the one I was used to.
Garrett Wolfe
Clobal and International Studies
Studying abroad in college is one of the best
opportunities you will get to explore the world.
Not only can you learn more about cultures
found outside of the United States but you can
also discover something new about yourself. One
of my favorite things to do in London was visiting
the museums, where I was able to connect with
strangers through our mutual appreciation
for art and history.
julia doan
Craphic Design
I was studying Persian language during my sum-
mer abroad, so my class schedule consisted of
grammar, conversation, and literature courses.
It was an intensive immersion program, so I was
in classes for about four hours a day and I was
also able to practice my language on the bus on
the way to school, with my host family, and at the
bazaar outside of class. While this may sound
like a lot, it really didn't feel overwhelming -
eventually it began to feel normal and I really got
used to speaking in Persian in my everyday life.
Ben ale-ebrahim
Anthropology
I found it very easy to ft studying abroad into my
ma|or (Mechanical Engineering). This was due
to early planning and following in the footsteps
of upperclassmen who took the same classes
abroad. Engineering is a global feld and having
experience abroad is a beneft on a resume.
Study abroad also allows for personal growth
and en|oyment.
If you are going abroad, never lose your sense of
wonder. There will be times when all you want to
do is sit inside and watch a movie, but |ust think,
you could do that back at home. If your friends
are bored and don't know what to do next, plan
something. You and your friends will be thankful
for the opportunity to see more of the country
you traveled miles to be in and a chance to cre-
ate more memories that will truly last forever.
Brittni birkeland
|ournalism, Strategic Communications
jake Wernal
Mechanical Engineering
JAYHAWKS ABROAD 5
JAYHAWKS ABROAD 6
to call itat the core its all the same. We leave
behind different things, for different amounts of
time, and linger in different places but we all have
that same fearful-hungry look behind our eyes if
you stare at us for long enough. A fear of being
still. A fear of staying stuck.
I stayed up late one night in a hostel talking to
a Swedish girl, Glovanna, who used to work in a
French circus and just recently quit her job teach-
ing English in an international school in Costa Rica.
I have this feeling, she said to me. I wish I didnt.
Its like a burning.
Burning she said. And I understood, but what a
way to describe it-as if a fame has ignited within
her and threatens to scorch her from the inside
out if she doesnt keep on moving. We were all
burning like that. We need to keep on running,
self-producing wind to blow the fame low enough
for long enough so we can protect ourselves from
ever really being singed.
Its very she continued. I dont know the word I
feel en espaol es inquieto.
Unquiet? I offered.
I dont know.
Well of course we are unquiet. If we werent we
would be stationary. We would be able to peaceful-
ly and indefnitely stay in our carefully construct-
ed nests of friends, family, and familiarity. We
wouldnt need to see and do more. We wouldnt
need to fll ourselves up with |umps from water-
falls and potential run-ins with wild boars. We
saturate our minds so thoroughly we arent left to
think about anything else.
New. More. Different. Dangerous. What does
Lonely Planet say? Lets go. Im down. Where are
you guys from?
I think that maybe I am scared to get a job, she
said. That now I wont like any form of work.
And she said this with so much sincerity, embar-
rassment, and fear that I wanted to cry for her.
She was grasping at herself in the dark, unable
to understand anything she was touching. The
source of her burning was cold, shrouded, and
unknowableshe was running on fear.
I used to feel like that, I said.
I understood her feeling, but burning like that
felt so distant to me now, more vague than the
memory of a dream. My burning wasn't a fre, dark
and deadly, my burning had long been traded for
a steady simmering coal. After being abroad for
six months my burning had receded and could
be contained, comfortably deep within my belly
even as I sat stationary. My coal still scorched a
little, gently goading me to continue to go and
do and see things, but it didnt feel so urgent
anymore. I didnt need to run away for fear of not
surviving. In fact, even though I was still traveling
I didnt even really feel like I was running at all
anymore. It was like reaching the sixth mile on a
ten-mile run, when my body accepts that I might
just keep running forever and seems to move
without my agency.
In fact, with my little coal I feel like I could stop
whenever I wanted to. Lay down roots. Grow nice
and tall and deep. With branches intertwining so
completely they were indistinguishable from the
other trees around me. No really. I could. I can
just maybe not forever.
And many people burnt like me: the middle aged
honey-mooners, some students in my program,
the French/Spanish couple, the Spaniard in Costa
Rican medical school.
And others burnt like Glovanna: the American
marine-turned-builder-turned-actor-turned-dive-
master-turned-sailor-turned-wild-life-expert in
Panama, the former German pro-skater who lost
everything in a massive injury, the New Yorker who
hasnt lived anywhere for more than a year in the
last decade, the Canadian who sold his house and
took a permanent leave of absence from his work.
The burning in people ranges from wild fre to
candle. It burns for days, weeks, months, years,
and life times. Its fueled by fear, love,
desire, and ambition. And it manifests
itself in traveling.
Traveling-more specifcally studying abroad
through KUhas quenched and sparked and
transformed my burning. Its been the best and
most challenging experience of my life. But
unlike so many other things I have been a part of,
traveling hasnt left me with nostalgialooking
back with my neck craned and eyes hungry for a
lost image. Instead it leaves me springing forward,
excited to jump into a bright new world. After
traveling Im no longer scared of getting a job
or growing up, andto speak against a popular
clich for my age group-I'm defnitely not scared
of graduating.
More often than not, the most memorable people
I met were middle-aged travelers. Not only be-
cause they were often quirky and shameless, but
specifcally because they were middle aged. They
gave me the gift of showing me that I didnt need
to be afraid of the futurethat graduation isnt a
death sentence and the journey never really has to
end. Even if you can only steal weeks at a time out
of your life, adventures can continue forever. Burn-
ing isnt just for the young and reckless. Running
can be a lifetime sport.
(continued from page 3)
Want more? Visit our blog at
www.jayhawksabroad.dept.ku to
read other posts written by our
KU students studying abroad.
54 reasons
WHY YOU SHOULD
STUDY ABROAD
BROUGHT TO YOU BY STUDENTS
WHO HAVE STUDIED ABROAD
1. Broaden your horizons
2. Become more independent
3. Learn to adjust in
new environments
4. Eat authentic food
5. Develop personal relationships
with locals and other travelers
6. Acquire new fashion tastes
7. Make new friends
8. Immerse in another culture
9. Meet various types of people
10. Appreciate other cultures, peo-
ple, food, language, etc.
11. Appreciatie things back home
in the United States
12. Appreciate public transportation
13. Appreciate professor contact
hours
14. Appreciate what you have
15. Become a better traveler
16. Acquire a lust for traveling
17. Learn to identify
pickpocket techniques
18. Experience new forms of
entertainment (music, movies,
art)
19. Gain a new perspective
20. Become aware of global issues
21. Become globally competent
22. Learn to read maps and
follow directions
23. Learn to be brave
24. Become a better planner
25. Becoming more cultured
26. Gain interest in/see new sports
27. Learn to not to panic when lost
28. Become more condent
29. Become more patient
30. Explore the unknown
31. Meet indigenous people
32. Embark on new adventures
33. Experience beautiful nature
34. See wildlife in person
35. Learn to be healthier
36. Become more open-minded
37. Discover yourself
38. Encounter cultural differences
39. Shop abroad
40. Improve time management skills
41. Experience unique cultural
events (festivals, holidays, etc.)
42. Become more mature
43. Learn to live with less
44. Learn how to budget
45. Learn/improve language
prociency
46. Become more educated to
reach future goals
47. Connect curriculum to global
issues
48. Be willing to learn more
49. Experience historicaI sites rst-
hand
50. Expand worldview
51. Expand portfolio/resume
52. Network internationally
53. Increase condence for
future interviews
54. Improve decision-making skills
JAYHAWKS ABROAD 7
This winter break, students can get out of the
cold and study Marine Biology in Bonaire.
Students will have the opportunity to scuba dive
in one of the most bio-diverse coral reefs in the
world and receive academic credit. KU professor
and excursion leader, Dr. James Thorp, said he
considers this opportunity a must on any persons
bucket list.
It is a phenomenal experience. Students who
have gone on these trips in the past come back
terribly excited about what they have seen and
their general experience, said Thorp.
The island of Bonaire is a special municipality of
the Netherlands and is located off the northern
coast of South America in the Caribbean Sea. It
is a semi-desert island which is noted for its rich
coral and real communities and is highly favored
by scuba divers.
Study Abroad Program Coordinator Mari Keyser
said this program is one of the only KU programs
studying a less commonly
taught language abroad
scuba dive in bonaire
offered in the Caribbean and is a good opportu-
nity for students to learn more about aquatic life.
Students will have the opportunity to dive twice a
day on marine feld trips. In addition, students will
attend short lectures and other land excursions to
get credit for BIOL 418/701.
Students obtain more knowledge from diving on
a coral reef than they ever could in a classroom
setting on campus, said Thorp.
This study abroad opportunity is available to
students of all majors who have a 2.5 GPA. Par-
ticipants need to be good swimmers and scuba
certifed before the trip begins in |anuary. Appli-
cations for the program are due October 1 and
can be completed online at https://ku.studioabroad.
com/index.cfm?FuseAction=Programs.ViewProgram&Pro-
gram_ID=10127.
By Jackie Langdon
By Ben Ale-Ebrahim
This summer I spent two months abroad studying
Persian language in Dushanbe, Tajikistan with the
American Councils for International Education.
As a KU student, I was able to take advantage
of several on-campus opportunities available
for anyone interested in Less Commonly Taught
Languages, which include Persian, Arabic, Swahili,
Chinese, and Russian, among many others. One
of the best resources for learning these languag-
es are KUs various area studies centers, including
the Center for Global and International Studies,
the Center for Russian, East European, and
Eurasian Studies and the Kansas African Studies
Center. If you havent considered learning a
language like Uyghur or Amharic before, and you
are interested in a non-traditional study abroad
experience, contact one of these centers and
take advantage of the great language learning
opportunities on campus before you even leave
Lawrence. If you are currently enrolled in one
of these language classes, think about studying
abroad this is a great way to put your language
skills to use and get that all-important immersion
experience. Even though I was only in Tajikistan
for two months, I was able to learn two semes-
ters worth of Persian simply because I was using
the language all day, every day, not just in my
classroom. Finally, there are several scholarship
opportunities available to study these languages
including FLAS, Boren, and CLS that KU students
have been awarded in the past that help fund
these life-changing experiences. If you want to
learn more about studying abroad in a less-
commonly taught language, stop by the Study
Abroad Info Center and we can fnd the right
program for you.
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