ISSUE no. 23 [2014] / ANTAGONIST PIECE no.

366 / DEAD TECH
Dear Reader,
Dead Technologies. If you
are reading this fanzine in
the paper form then you
are taking part in a dead,
forgotten format: PRINT.
We as a culture discard
technologies as if they were
toilet paper smeared with
our feces. In this issue we
are going low tech and
bringing back a few memo-
ries of things we once loved
but only when they were
new.
- Ethan Minsker
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
EDITORS
LAYOUT
& ART DIRECTOR
COVER ART Sylvia
Ortiz
Eric
Wallin
Marissa
Bea
& Kristin
Brzoznowski
Ethan
Minsker
1
THE ANTAGONIST MOVEMENT
encourages new works of art and
challenges the art world to do
something different. We are not
based on any one style or form of
art, but believe that the piece
should provoke. To this end, the
Movement hosts the following
events.
PSYCHO MOTO ZINE - is a
branch of the Antagonist Art
Movement’s press and has been in
existence since 1988 under the
original title East Coast Exchange.
It acts as a venue for our writers,
artists and editors.
In an attempt to create new forms
of art and writing, we highlight the
obscure and unknown artists, draw
focus to subjects passed over by the
mainstream media. This is a
not-for-profit publication.
Artists/writers donate their time to
create this. The content is a
mixture of fiction and nonfiction.
We also cover news of the art
world, from street to gallery. Back
issues can be found at “Psycho
Moto Zine archives” at
Antagovision.com To learn
more about the Antagonist Move-
ment, look us up on Wikipedia.
So, if you enjoy what you have
read, please take a moment and
look up our films and books. Find
our catalog listed at the end of this
issue. There are digital copies of
each for $1.99 on Amazon. We
STATEMENT
of PURPOSE
http://www.tumblr.com/blog/
antagonistmovement
https://vimeo.com/ethanminsker
CURRENT PROJECTS - We
are currently editing our new film
Self Medicated. Some copies of
this fanzine will come with test
copies on DVD.
The Antagonist - A novel about
all of our projects for the last ten
years and more. There is a back-
story to everything we do, includ-
ing this fanzine. Want to know how
we operate? This is the book for
you. Release date - 2014?
FAHRENHEIT - Open mic the
first Sunday of every month,
features new writers. Sign-up starts
at 8pm and the readings start at
9pm at Black & White 86 East 10th
Street between 3rd and 4th Ave.
Five minutes to tell your best story.
Comics and abstract comedy
welcome. Must be 21 years of age.
PUBLIC ACCESS SHOW -
MNN channel 67, Tuesday nights at
11 p.m. “Antagovision.” This
30-minute show covers events,
artists’ studio tours and more. With
over 70 episodes, you can see what
we have been up to for the past ten
years.
To find out about film screenings
and art shows visit us at
Antagovision.com
believe the price shouldn’t hinder
you, so we do our best to have a
cheap alternative to the hard
copies. We are passionate about
each project, mixing love and
attention to detail to create a
unique work of art. Our goal is to
make something the large
entertainment companies fail to do,
which is create inspired works that
cater to like-minded individuals. All
the money we generate goes back
to creating new art projects and
supports a large community of
struggling artists.
Questions? Comments? Stories?
Suggestions? Contact us at
Antagovision.com, email us at
pmzsubmissions@gmail.com
or follow/message us at
facebook.com/pages/Psycho-
Moto-Zine
Facebook fan page! We put out
this fanzine and have no clue who
you are. We want to know you. Take
a photo of you and our fanzine and
post it to our wall. Let us know
where you are in this world.
Whatever your favorite flavor is, we
got you covered. Follow and see lots
of photos of Ethan and his little girl
doing stupid shit you don't care
about.
https://twitter.com/antagonistart
http://instagram.com/
antagonistmovement
https://vine.co/u/953510822485852160
2
3
Punker
Richard
Allen
Long before I spent all of my money feeding two hungry arms and getting high
on my own priorities, so to speak, I spent it on records. This was in the age of
analog, before computers, before the Internet and before everything was just a
click away, just a click away. It was the late ’70s, a time in which all boys¬—and
girls for that matter—should have lived through. A tribal time when there were
many camps and finding music was a gamble. The Sex Pistols had broken up,
and many worlds and styles of music would soon converge. Finding records by
punk bands was not easy. Mostly because record stores didn’t stock this “New
Wave of English aggression that had found our shores.”
Living in the developmental swamp that was Florida back then had only one
advantage: the New York pipeline. That being the steady flow of tourists that
came down in the winter. They brought their records and mix tapes and t-shirts
and other attire, and we waited for them like cultural muggers. I even heard Joy
Division (not long before Ian Curtis found a neck tie he couldn’t get out of) and
Iggy Pop’s New Values in the same sitting thanks to a kid from Queens named
Marc. The rest of the year, however, consisted of a crapshoot on which record
to choose with my limited funds. Some local record stores, at the insistence of
my friends and myself, would stock imports with the JEM label. These were
from England and, for the most part, what we were looking for. The rest were a
real hunt and a gamble. If the title of the album or the band name or photo
didn’t give it away, there were a few clues to look for. Song titles with overly
safety pinned sentiments, or
the number of songs on one
side of the album—anything
over eight or ten meant they
were fast songs and so on. I
discovered several bands like
Wire and the Buzzcocks this
way.
Eventually things began to
gel. Packs of punks found
other packs and word spread.
Marketing, of course, reared
its ugly, profitable head and
soon there was a label for you
WRITER OF
THE ISSUE
4
BetaMax
1984
Anonymous
while you were at the mall. “Punker” first came with a question mark. “Are you
a punker?” Then it just came with a fist. But for a brief shining moment you
stood alone on the cusp of something brilliant, wanting to find kids like yourself.
By the dawn of the ’80s, and the advent of music television, personally speak-
ing, I ran...I ran so far away.
I had spent that summer working for my mother painting the outside and inside
of our house. The work paid for what was cutting edge technology at the time,
a BetaMax player and camera. The BMC-100 was the first combined camera
and recorder to go on sale, in 1983. Rectangular recorder, with a camera bolted
on one end, and a handle at the bottom. Small for its age—the recorder unit is
about 15cm square, barely
wider than the standard
Betamax cassette which goes
inside. I had been making films
since I was seven years old when
my grandfather had given me
his old super 8. Watching the
first images I shot flicker across
the screen in black and white
gave me a thrill that I would
chase the rest of my life. My
parents had been divorced since
I was 7 years old. Half the week
Sister and I were shuttled
between Father’s and Mother’s
houses. It was a Saturday and
we were back at my mother’s house. My room was packed with friends as we
were about to preview something we had filmed the week before. My mother
suddenly came into the room, awkwardly stepping over the young boys. We
were all about thirteen years old. “I just have to retrieve a movie Tom and
I watched over the weekend,” she said. I hated Tom, her boyfriend. At the
VCR mother kneeled and attempted to eject the tape. What she didn’t know
was that the eject button had fallen off weeks before. If you wanted to eject at
tape you had to make contact with the tip of the butterfly knife by prodding
inside where the eject button used to be. I had left the knife next to the VCR for
that purpose. Mother fumbled and hit PLAY. On the screen flashed the image
of my mother spread eagle on her bed naked. Then Tom hopped in front of
Sylvia Ortiz
5
Dead
Technology
Ethan Minsker
author of Rich Boy Cries For Momma
and Barstool Prophets
the lens with a boner that bounced
just below his fat gut. Everything was
a sickly white pink with sparse
clusters of pubic hair. Hearing
Tom’s voice, Mother’s eyes flipped to
the screen, and she lurched forward
blocking the view with her body
from the audience. The room was
silent. Without word I took the
butterfly knife and ejected the tape,
handing it to her, my head bowed.
No eye contact. She said nothing as
she left the room. My friends never
brought it up to me. It was on such a
bad level that everyone wanted to forget it. Of course, during brutal fights with
my mother I might say, “At least I don’t make pornos with my son’s
camera then show all his friends!” But that is firepower one can only use a
few times before it loses its bite. We don’t ever talk about it today. After that
experience handling my camera was never the same. I couldn't help being
reminded that it had been abused by my own mother.
New technology has ruined a lot of fun things for me. There was a time when I
could prank call people and there was no way they could find out who I was.
That was a time when rotary phones existed. For those of you who don’t know
what those are, they were the big clunky landline phones in every home. Your
finger turned the wheel and clicks on the wire found your numbers. Then they
upgraded the phone to number pads that made a tone sound when pushed. If
wanted, you could simply punch *69 in the keypad and you would be calling
back the last number that called you. Then they came up with caller ID and
then everyone knew who you were. That killed the art of the prank call for me.
No longer would I breath heavily on the line to a girl I had a crush on. Next was
the beeper, or pager as it was later called. Drug dealers made them cool and
everyone had to have one. There was a time before texts and cell phones when
the only way to find people when they were out and about was to page them.
That also meant stopping to find a phone to call back the person who paged
you. You didn’t spend your time looking at your phone and ignoring the world
around you. I sometimes paged myself just for fun. Then the cell phones came
around and I refused to get one for a very long time. Burning the lining of my
6
brain didn't appeal to me. But then long distance on a cell was cheaper. Walking
around New York City I want to bat the pedestrians out of my way as they head
straight for me, looking down at the screen. They glance up at the last moment,
avoiding me. How many of you idiots get run over reading some useless crap on
your smartphone? I go to a show and see a sea of hands raised up, videoing the
band. I am sure all those videos of the same thing are terrible. Are you really
going to watch it again? You think your friends will want to watch a show you
went to? I want to watch the band live! Do you know what that is? Instead, I get
a wall of tiny screens and faces looking at them instead of what is right there in
front of them. There is no anonymity anymore. If I punched you in the face
there would no doubt be dozens of videos pointing right back at me. Google
maps even had a photo of my mother's ass as she bent over to help get my kid
in the stroller. I know she wanted to punch the driver of the Google mapper
when she saw that. Sometimes I wish I had an EMP bomb so I could send you
all back to the Stone Age. But then again, I use technology all the time; after all,
I make films along with my books. Maybe I just don’t want you to have it.
7
Tape
Recorder
Brother
Mike Cohen
In the mid 1970s I would listen to the WKBW-AM (the Top 40 station in my
hometown of Buffalo, N.Y.) on my early 1960s clock radio which was a hand-
me-down from my parents. I had to tune the dial JUST RIGHT to get the
station perfectly.
Back in the 1970s the Top 40 stations would play rock ‘n’ roll, as well as pop
and soul hits, so I got into Kiss, Stevie Wonder, Shaun Cassidy, The Commo-
dores, and The Sweet all at the same time, from the same great AM radio
station.
In 1976 my sister gave me her Toshiba portable cassette recorder with an
external microphone. I was so excited. I could now tape my favorite songs on
the radio and not have to go to the record store and spend one dollar on the
7-inch 45. (Of course the fidelity was
horrible, but I was 11 years old and
happy to have a song for free.)
I made a list of songs “to tape”,
songs to “maybe tape”, and songs
“not to tape”. (Tape Elton John
and Kiki Dee's "Don't Go
Breakin’ My Heart"/ DO
NOT tape Hall + Oates "Sara
Smile.")
My Toshiba tape recorder was
ALWAYS set up and ready to
tape when a song I wanted to
own came on the radio. One
night in 1977 (at the age of 12),
while dining with my family, I
was misbehaving at the dinner
table and my parents sent me up
to my bedroom to think about my actions (and not have any dessert). I was on
the far side of my bed on my knees next to my clock radio and tape recorder.
My Dad (who could not see me from the neck down) came into my bedroom
and continued to yell at me for misbehaving at dinner. I pushed the red button
8
A Bangin
Mixtape
Timothy
Danger
The following is a verbal account of myself introducing a punk rock
version of an 80's song my band is about to play in my hometown.
(4.25.14 DTBG Victoria, Texas)
All right kids, it's story time...When I was seventeen years old in high school I
was in love with a girl named Tracy. She was the cutest thing I had ever seen,
with long blonde hair that flowed past her shoulders like shimmering silk. Every
day after second period I used to time my approach to the stairs of Victoria
High School so I could catch her walking down them; the light from the
windows would catch her hair reflecting a glow like a halo as she would descend
down the steps to us normal mortals.
After about six weeks I decided I was going to do something about it. That's
right kids, I was going to make a mix tape! The first song on that tape is the
song I am going to play right now...and it has never, and I mean never failed me.
I say that for two reasons. First...I'm going to play this awesome song but really
for the second reason. And that is if any of you guys here are eighteen to
twenty-one, and your mom's name is Tracy and she went to Victoria High
School...I probably banged her.
Begins to hit the A string...
and turned the little switch to play and began to tape the end of my Dad's rant:
"AND IF YOU DO IT ANY MORE YOU ARE GONNA BE TAKEN
OUT AS SOON AS YOU DO IT...AND CLEAN UP YOUR ROOM,
LEARN HOW TO START PUTTIN' YOUR STUFF AWAY...YOU'LL
GROW UP TO BE A 20-YEAR-OLD DUMB BELL AND WON'T
KNOW HOW TO DO ANYTHING!!!!!"
I continued to secretly tape my Dad yelling at me for the next 16 years on a
Helix boom box with built in condenser mics and a Panasonic hand held tape
recorder, also with a built in mic.
9
9
Forget VHS, The Video Store
Is The Dead Technology
Nicholas
Katzban
How do I feel about Kim’s Video closing
their final location? Good riddance to bad
trash. Never mind that I worked for the man,
the myth, the legend, Youngman Kim for two
thankless years without a raise, or so much as
a handshake for being the only employee-
out of everyone I started with—who went
down with the ship, straight until their final
week at 6 St. Marks Pl. in January of 2009,
dumping their museum-worthy collection of
banned, out-of-print, and awe-inspiring-by-
sheer-numbers collection of home videos on a
phony tourist trap in Sicily, and leaving as its
sole progenitor a sell-through-only music and
video store whose most tenuous link to the
days of yore is a rather paltry collection of
foreign region Blu-Rays, otherwise not
available in the US… (yet).
Remixers! Culture jammers! Open source coders, mashup artists, VJ's, DJ's,
VDJ's, programmers, contemporary artists from around the world! Understand
the common grounds that unlock endless creativity hosted in the public domain.
Like music to the ears, creative commons concepts build a foundation for
counterculture based on the copyleft GNU General Public License. It’s social
disobedience in the battlegrounds of intellectual property taken on by artists
such as Girl Talk and the Mouse Liberation Front. This is a "...probing
investigation into how culture builds upon culture in the information
age." THIS is a documentary YOU must see.
RiP: A Remix Manifesto
Director: Brett Gaylor
Documentary, 2009
86 min.
Canada
http://vimeo.com/8040182
http://ripremix.com/
Review By: Gabriel Roldos
the lens with a boner that bounced
just below his fat gut. Everything was
a sickly white pink with sparse
clusters of pubic hair. Hearing
Tom’s voice, Mother’s eyes flipped to
the screen, and she lurched forward
blocking the view with her body
from the audience. The room was
silent. Without word I took the
butterfly knife and ejected the tape,
handing it to her, my head bowed.
No eye contact. She said nothing as
she left the room. My friends never
brought it up to me. It was on such a
bad level that everyone wanted to forget it. Of course, during brutal fights with
my mother I might say, “At least I don’t make pornos with my son’s
camera then show all his friends!” But that is firepower one can only use a
few times before it loses its bite. We don’t ever talk about it today. After that
experience handling my camera was never the same. I couldn't help being
reminded that it had been abused by my own mother.
New technology has ruined a lot of fun things for me. There was a time when I
could prank call people and there was no way they could find out who I was.
That was a time when rotary phones existed. For those of you who don’t know
what those are, they were the big clunky landline phones in every home. Your
finger turned the wheel and clicks on the wire found your numbers. Then they
upgraded the phone to number pads that made a tone sound when pushed. If
wanted, you could simply punch *69 in the keypad and you would be calling
back the last number that called you. Then they came up with caller ID and
then everyone knew who you were. That killed the art of the prank call for me.
No longer would I breath heavily on the line to a girl I had a crush on. Next was
the beeper, or pager as it was later called. Drug dealers made them cool and
everyone had to have one. There was a time before texts and cell phones when
the only way to find people when they were out and about was to page them.
That also meant stopping to find a phone to call back the person who paged
you. You didn’t spend your time looking at your phone and ignoring the world
around you. I sometimes paged myself just for fun. Then the cell phones came
around and I refused to get one for a very long time. Burning the lining of my
Sylvia Ortiz
10 10
There was a time and a place—some called it
the 80s—when simply having seen Antonioni’s
The Passenger meant you were a true cineaste.
But in 1984 a brand new video distribution
company entered the still nascent world of home
video, and even more nascent media of the
laserdisc, by rereleasing Citizen Kane. Criterion
Collection’s debut was as inauspicious as their
debut title was not. Flash-forward 20 years,
laserdiscs are now smaller. We called them
Digital Video Discs (or DVDs for short) and
Criterion had amassed a catalog breaking 200
titles.
When I started working at Mondo Kim’s Video
at 6 St. Mark’s Place in May of 2007 I was in a
tough spot, ideologically speaking. Kim’s had two
reputations, that of our massive collection of
50,000 VHS and DVDs (some of which were the only known copies in the
world) and that of our staff (who were supposed to be the brain trust of said
treasure). “Oh, go to Kim’s,” they’d say. “Walk in asking for a Kevin
Smith film, endure a little verbal abuse, and you’ll walk out with
something sure to blow your mind.” Yet, by the time I entered the picture,
this was a tough torch to take up. People came up to my dust covered early 90’s
PC running a DOS POS with the expectation I could turn them on to some-
thing they’d never heard of. I started my first day knowing I had a lot to prove,
and wasn’t quite sure how to do this. There were maybe four or five films I felt I
knew were still hard to come by, one being a then long-forgotten Jerry Schatzen-
berg film from 1971 in which pre-Godfather Al Pacino plays a floundering
heroin addict with big dreams called Panic In Needle Park. Within 8 months of
working there, all had been newly restored and released on DVD. I was stripped
of my swords, with dwindling options. I could always suggest people rent our
80’s porn VHS Hannah Does Her Sisters. Criterion hadn’t quite got around to
that one yet.
In an era when 8 dollars a month buys you unlimited streaming access to
Criterion and Janus films’ entire collection, with new titles being dumped like
the cherished objects of Charles Foster Kane being shoveled into an incinerator,
concurrent proliferation/monopolization of repress-only record labels, and rare
BBC appearances of The Television Personalities available on Youtube for any
sixteen-year-old to find in a few taps and one click, what really is the purpose of
the last remaining Kim’s Video? Is this the end of an era? I think we’re all
Adrian Alexis
11
Discovering
Pinball
Anna
Newman
Matt Walsh and I bonded over junking. He understood my story about finding
seven pairs of vintage red line Levis jeans at the dollar-a-bag Rotary rummage
sale. I could see in his eyes he got a small contact high just from hearing about
my epic score. Matt hunted even bigger game. He rescued, restored, and sold
old pinball machines.
Before arcade games and consoles, there was pinball. Pinball ruled. In
pre-WWII days, pinball raked in more profit for its operators than movies
made. Early Pinball was controversial, associated with illicit gambling. Raids
happened. Confiscated machines were smashed and burned in dramatic vice
roundups complete with police, politicians, and news photographers. Original
pinball artwork frequently featured themes of gaming, betting, racing, and
saloon girls. "To this day, pinball has a bit of a bad rep," Matt told me. I was
intrigued.
Driving around San Francisco with laundromats on my mind, I spotted what I
thought might be a pinball game. Cruising laundromats was a frequent pastime
then. I was in search of the perfect location for a short film I was making called
clawing each others’ eyes out to be the first to write the obituary of a friend
who’s been dead for decades.
In 1971, remembering the name of the band who released the 1965 one hit
wonder, “Liar, Liar” was a fairly impressive bit of rock knowledge. The next
year a guitar player from Central Jersey by the name of Lenny Kaye released a
two LP set on Elektra records he called “Nuggets.” Today, hearing The
Castaways spinning on Serato from any number of East Village bars on a
Friday night will hardly turn heads. We live in a repress culture, in which what
was once the province of a handful of social mal-adjusts who continued to live
in their parents’ basements well into their 30’s because the only jobs they could
stand to keep were dishing out rarities and new pathways to the un-inducted at
local brick & mortar video and record stores for $5.50 an hour, is now common
knowledge. When there’s an endless supply of these things, who demands them?
What is the worth of a Kim’s Video, that sells little more than the same videos
and LPs I can buy at the Barnes & Noble in Union Square? What does it mean
when discovering Michael Mann’s first film, Thief, without technology is now
outdated technology?
12
"Anna in Laundryland." (It features singing sock puppets, but that's a story
for another day.) I pulled into a parking space and entered the rundown "Wash
n Dry."
There was a pinball game. Three, in fact: Addams Family, Funhouse, and
something I didn't recognize. Addams Family was in a sorry state, but Funhouse
was playable and I quickly spent all my parking change trying to figure out how
it worked, how to get "Rudy" the doll head to talk to me. I returned later with
Matt, who gave me tips I struggled to follow, like "Don't use both flippers
together." I took photos. I dragged people from work to play during lunch. I
was hooked.
I never mastered Funhouse, but those first photos were the beginning of an
obsession with pinball art. I attended pinball shows like California Extreme and
the Pacific Pinball Expo and moved slowly from game to game, enthralled by
the detailed line art and the rich glowing colors. Hours would pass unnoticed as
I immersed myself. Little details, like colorful Bakelite plastics, awoke memories
of ancient Christmas lights my mom patiently maintained (one light goes out,
they all go out).
I got so into it I made a film called Pinball Donut Girl based on a story Matt
told me about his college days in upstate New York. Then I made a pinball
documentary about Wade Krause, a screen print artist who makes custom art
Anna Newman
13
pinball games. I traveled
across the country and went
to a tournament at the
Professional and Amateur
Pinball Association (PAPA) in
Pittsburgh, PA. I met artists
and players and collectors
and their families. People
invited me to see their
basements, garages and
specially constructed
buildings housing game after
beautiful game. Everyone in
the pinball community,
without exception, was kind
and friendly. They were
often engineers and artists,
vocal in their appreciation of
the mechanics and the art of
the games.
Back when I discovered the laundromat Funhouse, I had to seek out pinball
enthusiasts through Matt. 5 years later, pinball is making a big comeback.
Mainstream publications write routinely about the latest urban "Bar-cade,"
and just this month Forbes Lifestyle Magazine had a 3 page spread about the
pinball collection of Seagate's CEO, Steve Luczo. I don't know if my films and
photos had anything to do with the pinball reboot, but I'm glad it's happening,
and I hope more people will get involved and discover (or re-discover) pinball
like I did.
Alexis "Lex" Bhagat is a writer and curator living in Albany, NY. In
2012 he and Abby Echiverri initiated "Source of Uncertainty"—a
celebration of the Buchla 200e and a gathering for the analog synthe-
sizer community. In 2013 he was Alan Moore's right hand man on the
XFR STN exhibition at the New Museum, a public-access open-door
media preservation center. He collects audiocassettes and DVDs by
sound artists and still has a VHS player in his library.
Interviews
Ethan
Minsker
Sylvia Ortiz
14
There was a time and a place—some called it
the 80s—when simply having seen Antonioni’s
The Passenger meant you were a true cineaste.
But in 1984 a brand new video distribution
company entered the still nascent world of home
video, and even more nascent media of the
laserdisc, by rereleasing Citizen Kane. Criterion
Collection’s debut was as inauspicious as their
debut title was not. Flash-forward 20 years,
laserdiscs are now smaller. We called them
Digital Video Discs (or DVDs for short) and
Criterion had amassed a catalog breaking 200
titles.
When I started working at Mondo Kim’s Video
at 6 St. Mark’s Place in May of 2007 I was in a
tough spot, ideologically speaking. Kim’s had two
reputations, that of our massive collection of
50,000 VHS and DVDs (some of which were the only known copies in the
world) and that of our staff (who were supposed to be the brain trust of said
treasure). “Oh, go to Kim’s,” they’d say. “Walk in asking for a Kevin
Smith film, endure a little verbal abuse, and you’ll walk out with
something sure to blow your mind.” Yet, by the time I entered the picture,
this was a tough torch to take up. People came up to my dust covered early 90’s
PC running a DOS POS with the expectation I could turn them on to some-
thing they’d never heard of. I started my first day knowing I had a lot to prove,
and wasn’t quite sure how to do this. There were maybe four or five films I felt I
knew were still hard to come by, one being a then long-forgotten Jerry Schatzen-
berg film from 1971 in which pre-Godfather Al Pacino plays a floundering
heroin addict with big dreams called Panic In Needle Park. Within 8 months of
working there, all had been newly restored and released on DVD. I was stripped
of my swords, with dwindling options. I could always suggest people rent our
80’s porn VHS Hannah Does Her Sisters. Criterion hadn’t quite got around to
that one yet.
In an era when 8 dollars a month buys you unlimited streaming access to
Criterion and Janus films’ entire collection, with new titles being dumped like
the cherished objects of Charles Foster Kane being shoveled into an incinerator,
concurrent proliferation/monopolization of repress-only record labels, and rare
BBC appearances of The Television Personalities available on Youtube for any
sixteen-year-old to find in a few taps and one click, what really is the purpose of
the last remaining Kim’s Video? Is this the end of an era? I think we’re all
Q: What is the importance of maintaining and using forgotten technologies?

A: We have forgotten the technology that built Stonehenge or Pumapunku,
which is why they are mysterious. We run the risk (I hope that we will!) of
forgetting how to build a nuclear reactor, which is why Obama and Cameron
want to build new ones while the experienced engineers are still alive.
We have NOT forgotten about old media. We still have the machines. We still
have the parts. We still have the manuals. We still have the tapes. Old media are
not forgotten; they are simply "unsupported." Sony, RCA, Philips and Pana-
sonic just don't make the parts anymore. And many warehoused parts were
destroyed in the 2004 and 2011 Asian tsunamis. The playback machines are
doomed.
Yet, so much remains on old media! The
situation is truly urgent and artists need to know
that whatever isn't converted in the next few
years will be lost, probably irreversibly. I trust
that artists know, or have friends and supporters
who know, about important tapes that are out
there in their studios and closets. I believe in creating opportunities for those
important tapes to be saved, and seen, to find a new audience, and to take their
place in art history.
Q: Where can we find out more?

A: Everything transferred at the XFR STN went up onto The Internet Archive.
It's there as its own collection.
https://archive.org/details/xfrstn
And some of the technicians who worked on XFR STN have started their own
group called the XFR Collective.
http://cargocollective.com/xfrcollective/About-XFR-Collective-1
They are working now with a small group of artists and arts organizations to
preserve their tape collections. I am on their advisory board, and my mission is
to find partners for future instances of public access "transfer stations." I'd love
to hear from any readers who might have tips about possible partners. Folks can
find me on twitter, @nadalex.
15
Boris Castro & Ale Dumbsky are the publishers and Editors-in-Chief of
the free German-based newspaper READ which has a circulation of
15K. Though based out of Hamburg, it can be picked up in various cities
in Germany and Austria, mostly in Hamburg and Berlin, where they
have about 600 outlets. The paper is mainly in German, but articles
from English authors will be kept in the original language. Full
disclaimer here, I also sometimes write for them. You can find reviews
in past PMZ issues. There is no online version of this paper. Where
most print is moving to digital form, Boris stated to me (off the record)
that READ will not be available on the web. Today we hope to get him
on the record. (Clearly I have no clue what off the record means, since I
printed that. Sorry…)
Q: Why not go online?
A: Originally we started as an independent film
festival, where we screened movies and encour-
aged people to watch as an audience, instead of
home alone online. We enjoyed working on the
program, featuring hundreds of films from all
across the world. In 2010 we decided that we need
to cover more topics and more often than just
once a year. We were Inspired by a story on the
New York Times, which was trying to win back
print readers by buying out the Queens Chronicle,
which had been rejecting Rupert Murdoch’s offer
for years. We wanted to fill an analog niche over here for READers who are sick
of copy-pasted articles. We try to stay as exclusive as possible and when people
ask where they can get it, we simply tell them to search in the streets.
It’s about rituals, where you are waiting days for the latest release of your
favorite comic book or fanzine. And it is not coming at you, easily accessible by
a click.
Q: Do you think printed news is a dying technology?
A: Printed news is a dead technology, but we cover stories, not news. You can
even READ old issues and I am sure you will find many stories that are new to
you.
Q: How can we get our hands on a copy?
16
A: If you are outside of Germany or Austria, you can send us an envelope with
either 10 Euros or 15 dollars and we will post 6 issues to your home wherever
you are on this planet. You can also email us at wtf@read-magazine.com for
wire instructions, but an envelope is cheaper and you will not make your bank
richer.
Mailing address:
READ
Gruener Jager 3
20359 Hamburg
Germany
Jake is an artist I met a few years ago in Victoria, Texas. He works in
long exposure film—painting with light. Yes. Film. And without Photo-
shop. His work has been featured in publications around the world. He
is currently working on a coffee table book about ghosts of South Texas,
but I will let Jake tell you more about that.

Q: Tell us about your work. Why
do you choose to not alter the
images digitally?
A: I am a Light Painter and Light
Painting can be easily viewed as
digital manipulation because of the
complexity and vibrancy of the
actual photo. When I’m Light
Painting it’s done in complete
darkness and each photo takes from
2 to 30 minutes to create. I have to
do a lot of scouting for locations,
calculating what light pollution will
be present and adapting my light
painting tools and camera settings
to compensate for all of those
variables. I may only take a few
minutes to create the photo but
prep time is much longer. I do not
alter my photos because of the
preparations that are made for each photo. I want to use the camera and proper
preparation to achieve the levels, contrast, cropping and other properties that
are usually corrected so that the image is as raw and organic as possible, so there
is no confusion of manipulation in my photos.
Jake Ramirez
17
Q: I know you have had a lot of
people who question your work’s
authenticity, could you tell us some
short anecdotes?
A: When I first started Light
Painting I decided to sell some
prints at a local Austin art market.
I noticed a lot of people would
glance at my photos and walk by, a
few people would stop and ask
what they were looking at and
when I would explain they weren’t
photoshopped or digitally manipu-
lated I would get questioned
because the photos appear to be
digitally manipulated to most
people. I decided to start shooting 35mm film to be able to show people
negatives of the photo they were buying to prove it was authentic.
Q: Plug your new book project here and let us know where we can find out
more. Use this as an advertisement. Why in the hell should we buy it? (Please
note reader, I have already pre-ordered one.)
A: The book is in the final stages of its production and it’s called Beneath Texas.
It is a collaborative art project that will be a re-telling of Texas’s myths and
ghost stories that have been handed down through word of mouth for genera-
tions. I am taking the photos and it will be written by Timothy Danger. Our
crowd-funding page has ended but you can keep up to date by following the
Facebook page. I am currently in Marfa, Texas—which is famous for the Marfa
Lights—where I will be searching for the Lights to take some photos to finish up
the book. If you want to pre-order the book, send us a message on FB and we
will get you a copy before it’s done.
Q: Do you think film is a dead technology? Defend your position!
A: Film is alive and will never die!! Camera technology has become very good
over the last few years but all of the new cameras are trying to emulate the
dynamic range that film has to offer so we can never say film is dead when the
digital world is still trying to fight its way to the quality of image film produces.
Q: Where can we find out more about you and your work?
Jake Ramirez
18
A: I have a new website, www.sumerianlights.com where you can find out more
about my work and I will have a full on store coming soon to buy prints,
pre-order books, and possibly t-shirts and other goodies. You can also follow me
on Instagram @sumerianlights.
I was first introduced to the guys of 30 Minutes of Madness through
their fanzine Hoofsip back in the ’90s. We traded VHS tapes of the
projects we were working on back then. They were still in high school
and I was at art school. Their work blew my mind. 20 years later, it
still does.
Interview with Jerry White Jr., director and producer of 30 Minutes of
Madness.
Q: Tell us about 30 minutes of
Madness.
A: Public-access TV came into being in
the late ’70s or early ’80s as an agree-
ment between cities and incoming cable
television. My understanding is that it
was a tradeoff—yes, you can set up
shop here, but you gotta give us
something in return. That something
was channels dedicated to local
programming: municipal, education and public-access television. The latter was
a free forum for people in the community to have access to TV equipment and
training so they could have their own shows, about pretty much anything.
30MOM was the show I started with my friend Joe Hornacek after getting
certified for PATV in 1992. It's a kind of half-hour comedy/variety mixtape of
skits and random weirdness—interesting/funny/bizarre vids we made ourselves
with friends and other Metro Detroiters as the target audience. As the show and
our skills progressed we made our own music for it as well and continually
expanded the cast and crew.
Q: What type of camera did you film on back then?

A: We shot on a variety of formats. Primarily VHS—I had a Quasar
camcorder, either the VM-735 or something that looked just like it. At the
studio the format was 3/4" U-matic and the cameras were made by Sony and
were state of the art, but from the 80s. Later on we shot a lot of Hi-8 with a pro
19
camera checked out from the studio, no idea what the model was, and finally on
SVHS with a Panasonic AG-455 (which I still have).
Q: Can you share any funny stories about doing the show and people watching
in your hometown?
A: Here are a few things that come
to mind. We shot a skit once in
downtown Rochester where my
friend Phil Holt got buck-naked
and played a primitive chanting on
a fallen tree—anyone passing by
caught more than an eyeful. We got
into trouble once filming at the
studio when my friend (also Phil)
brought a squirrel inside he'd
caught in the parking lot. We didn't
even shoot anything with it—the coordinator had access to the camera feed and
kicked us out for the day. We didn't hurt it and he let it go…is that funny?
Another time Joe was out picking some people up to shoot and set the (very
expensive) Hi-8 camera on the top of his car, then drove off forgetting it was up
there. It fell off and busted the lens, which Joe had to pay about $400 to fix and
he was banned from the studio for about a month. I think my favorite reaction
to people watching the show was when I'd get a call from the head of program-
ming asking me to tone down the language and subject matter because the
station was receiving a lot of complaints. Thing is, 1st amendment and all, he
couldn't straight up forbid the stuff we were doing since it wasn't illegal—he just
put the show on later and later time slots. I was just happy to know that people
other than us were watching. There was one time I was at a bowling alley in
Rochester (long ago since turned into a Barnes & Noble) and a woman came up
to me and asked "Are you Jerry White Jr. from 30 Minutes of Madness?" She'd
watched the show and wasn't connected to anyone in our group so that was my
first taste of minor local celebrity. I tried not to let it go to my head.

Q: Tell us about the new film
coming out.
A: In 2012, to celebrate the
20-year anniversary of the show,
I went back to Michigan and got
the old gang back together to
film a new episode. A
20
documentary crew followed us making 20 Years of Madness, a film directed by
Jeremy Royce that tells the story of the reunion and shows the struggles we
faced getting back together as well as delving into the stories of the main
characters and the different paths our lives have taken. The film uses a lot of
our analog footage from the ’90s to really underline the ways in which we've
changed while also showing how we're still the same in some fundamental ways.
It's ultimately a story about friendship and dreams and the importance of a
creative community as a uniting force that transcends the hardships of a
fractured group of dreamers.

Q: Where can we find out more about the film and 30 Minutes of Madness?
A: Links! The show website is www.30mom.com. The doc website is
www.20yearsofmadness.com. We've also got the requisite Facebook pages
and what not, but I'll let the folks Google to find those.
Interview with Jessen Jurado, head coordinator at I/O Chip Music NYC.
I/O is a monthly chip music and visual show in Brooklyn, free to play
and free or low cost to attend, with the aim of providing exposure for
new and established chip musicians, visualists, and mixed media
artists. The Antagonist Movement used to host a live music venue on
Monday nights at Niagara Bar, in NYC. Some of our busiest nights were
8-Bit events where musicians played original music using modified
Game Boys. Alongside the techno sound of beeps and bloops was video
pixel art projected onto the walls. Visiting artists from around the
world would show up and lead a packed bar in a sweaty dance party.
Q: What is 8-bit music? How is it made, and why?
A: It’s called chip music, (or
chiptune, 8-bit music) because the
sounds are made by a computer
chip. A musician composes by
programming a set of
instructions—similar to sheet
music—for the chip to play in real
time, almost like a music box or
player piano. As for why, some
musicians grew up listening to chip, or are young enough so it sounds new and
interesting to them. Others enjoy the challenge of creating highly complex
works using simple tools and showcasing their work live at a venue before an
audience.
Marjorie Becker
21
Q: Tell us why 8-Bit is centered on Game
Boys and other old gaming systems.
A: Chip musicians actually use a large variety
of classic computers and game systems to get
the chip sounds they want. Like vintage beat
machines and keyboards, these devices are still
used for making music, easily available, and
have decades of information about their
capabilities available online. Game Boys are
especially popular with chip musicians because
there is great software support for them and
the hardware is tough and portable. Even with
the availability of today’s handheld devices
and dozens of mobile apps, for less than $100
the Game Boy is still a solid dedicated solution
for composing music on the go.
Q: Tell us about how far this underground scene has spread. I know it is big in
other cities too.
A: Since the early 2000s chip music has been gaining worldwide renown, due in
part to the popularity of monthly live shows and the (now-defunct) Blip Festivals
in New York, Europe and Tokyo. I could oversimplify and say the music
originated in Japan, enjoyed steady popularity in Europe and spread throughout
the US via the East Coast, but that would undermine how much the current
wave of chip music grew up alongside the rise of the Internet. It is modern
music created using vintage tools informed by the decades of music, and
distributed instantly throughout a global network: you can’t tie its influences to
any particular place or time.
Q: Where do you see 8-Bit going in the future? Will other old gaming systems
be hacked to make music?
A: Chip music has plenty of influence on mainstream pop, hip-hop, and dance
music today, even if it isn’t always strictly made on video game systems. The
sounds are ubiquitous enough that most people will hear it and recognize it as
“Nintendo” or “retro” even if they don’t know what it is or how it’s made.
There are plenty of bands and producers today incorporating the sounds of
chip into their songs. Chip music, as a matter of course, is a bit more pure.
Marjorie Becker
22
Q: Where can we learn more about 8-Bit?
A: For a good introduction to chip music I recommend going to a live show.
http://www.iochipmusic.com/about
https://www.facebook.com/iochipmusic/info
In a time before CD cassette tapes ruled, I remember making mix tapes
for my friends of my favorite punk rock bands and mailing them all
over the country, or handing them off to my pals. I would spend hours
copying the names and songs on to a handmade cover with artwork.
This was a time before the Internet and discovering new bands meant
you had to seek them out. It let me act as the distributor and taste-
maker that helped form my friends’ choices. I recently came across
Angel Nikola's Facebook page and noticed that she listed Stink Rat
cassettes & records in her About section. It was through her I found out
that there is still a thriving underground that trades and collects
cassette tapes. I asked her to recommend someone for an interview
who is a tape distributor and artist, and we found Jude Noel.

Interview by Angel Nikola and Ethan Minsker
Q: How did you get into this?
Jude Noel: I’ve always been a fan of obscure music, especially that which has a
fuzzy, home-recorded texture. The best place to find this sort of music, in my
opinion, is Bandcamp, a website which allows any member to stream and sell
their music, and it’s all free! One day, while browsing the site’s “experimental”
tag, I came across this great single by a solo project called Abuela. It was an
entrancing effort, minimal and mumbly folk, accented by the singer’s gravelly
falsetto. Looking around on that particular Bandcamp page led me to find out
that the single was released on cassette. That came as a major surprise to me, as
the last cassette I could remember being in contact with was a Simon and
Garfunkle tape I listened to on the way to elementary school. Tapes were
already old news by the time I was born! But I couldn’t help but love this tape. It
was housed in a beautifully collaged cover, and was a nice shade of navy blue. I
soon realized that the Abuela tape was just one release on the Swan City
Sounds cassette label and that SWS was just one label in a community of
cassette distributors. It was a sort of circle of friends that I wanted to be a part
of. From that day on, I began to review cassettes for my music blog, Half-Gifts,
and started collecting tapes of my own.
23
Q: What is the benefit of cassettes?
Jude Noel: Tapes have the high level of collectability and customization,
which I crave. They remind me of the baseball cards I stockpiled when I was
younger. They each were the same size and shape and had a similar concept,
but the manufacturers they came from, (Fleer, Topps, etc), each had a slightly
different vibe. Plus, some cards were
more coveted than others due to
their rarity. There are definitely
some legendary tapes out there that
I’d like to have. And, of course, they
were just plain fun to read and to
look at. For me, it’s not so much the
nostalgia of the format itself. I’m
too young to have experienced tapes
in their heyday. It’s the nostalgia of
collecting things and obsessing over
them that gets me.

Q: Do you believe cassette tapes
have ever been a dead technology?
Jude Noel: Hmm, I’m not really
sure. I feel like they’re inferior in
sound quality to CDs and vinyl, but
I actually prefer that fuzzy warble over an overly-slick sound myself. But from
my limited knowledge, tape culture kind of hit a dry period around the late ’90s
and early 2000s. But then again, so did just about all culture.
Q: Where can we find out more?
Jude Noel: I’ll shamelessly plug my blog here: half-gifts.blogspot.com. I review
a lot of tapes there. Also, I’d check out other blogs like Cassette Gods, Weed
Temple and Tape Famous. Make sure to visit the subreddit /r/cassetteculture
as well!
Think Tank Interview
Q: Give us a statement of purpose for
Think Tank? . Any bands you want to
name drop do it here.
A: The Tank was built to provide a
creative environment for artists to experi-
ment with ideas using various vintage
instruments, amps, recording devices,
effects, and consoles. I have partnered with
members of Sonic Youth, Don Fleming,
and local artists from Hoboken, NYC, and
Brooklyn to accumulate an eclectic
collection of gear.

Q: Could you tell me about Think Tank
and about some of your best/oddest
recording equipment, especially the stuff no one uses anymore?

A: Think Tank Studio was built in 1996 as a total DIY project—by the artists,
for artists. The studio features a Neve 5116 analog console, Studer A800 – 16
track 2” tape machine and an Ampeg ATR-102 ½ “ – 2 track. We also have a
classic EMT 140 stereo tube plate reverb. These control room gems are
complemented by an extensive microphone collection as well as a collection of
2 dozen vintage Fender, Ampeg, and Vox amps. We also have 2 Pro Tools rigs
for digital multi-tracking and mixing.
Q: How does this affect the
quality of recorded sound?
A: All of the vintage gear gives
an array of options allowing
artists to go from totally gritty,
overdriven analog tube distortion
to pristine digital 24bit/192kbps
resolution and everything in
between. Recording is widely
enhanced by having options for
manipulating sound
Q: Tell us about the events you do there.
24
A: We have a running SOUNDcheck series where artists such as Mike Doughty,
Jesse Malin, Jim Boggia, and Ari Hest perform live for a small audience (25-30
people) which we record multi-track and video for use by the artist and access
through our website.

Q: Website or where people can find out more:
A: Check out http://www.thinktankstudio.org for a complete gear list, plus a
listing of artists who have recorded and performed in the Tank. Feel free to
contact us for sessions and/or general inquiries. Rock On! –Matty and the Tank
team.
Interview with Hit and Run Cinema
From Berlin, Germany
Interviewer’s Note: Because of the nature of their work, we are leaving
out names. I will say there are hints of who they might be laced into our
films, but I wouldn’t tell you which films so it’s more of an egg hunt.
We have worked with some of their members for years.
Q: Not sure I have the name
right, but can you give us the
statement of purpose of the
Outlaw Cinema?
A: The Outlaw Cinema or as
we usually call it, “Hit and Run
Cinema,” has the concept to
show films at special locations.
These locations are often
abandoned buildings, but
sometimes we use also aban-
doned underground passages. It is like a pop-up cinema at a location nobody is
expecting a cinema. Normally we have a location and the film is chosen in order
to interact and to establish a connection with the location.
Q: Where are some of the strange locations you have shown in and what
happens when the cops show up?
A: We have shown movies in different locations like old hospitals, supermarkets,
factories, garden plots, abandoned clubs, schools, liquor factories, and so on. It’s
very uncommon that cops show up during the screening. We sometimes have a
situation where they were looking for us but they couldn’t find us because we set
25
up the cinema in a part of the building that was away from the street, and the
police stood outside, waiting for somebody to leave the building. In this case, we
tell people not to go outside for the next e.g. half an hour after the film and
normally the police aren’t waiting any longer. However, it happens sometimes
that the police find the Hit and Run Cinema. Normally we have to quit the film
and everybody has to leave the building.
Q: What type of films do you show?
A: We show films which refer to the building the Hit and Run cinema takes
place in. When we had the cinema in the old liquor factory we showed Special
Treat, a Yugoslavian movie from the early ’80s about a specialist who is treating
alcoholics in a hospital. In general, we show the original version with English
subtitles. We are trying to find films which are unknown by a broad audience.
Q: Can people submit work to be screened by you?
A: No, normally not.
Q: Tell us about some of the film equipment you bought? Why use 16mm and
Super 8 and not video?
A: I’ve used Super 8 since I was 13. At the same time I started to gain some
experience with photography and so it was consequential to use also Super 8.
Furthermore, at this time Kodak was still producing the Kodachrome film,
which offered fantastic colors, much better than the standard video equipment
like VHS-C. Some years later the Internet and Ebay started getting more
important and I was able to buy a lot of Super 8 equipment and films for little
money. For a time we shot a lot on Super 8, films with goats and films without
goats. But Super 8 is very small and difficult to handle. A few years ago I found
out that 16mm is available
for nearly the same price
and at first I started to
collect some movies on
16mm. Sometimes it
happens that the perfora-
tion or some parts of the
film are damaged and I
was looking for a small
16mm editing table. I
found one 400 miles away
from Berlin. Rolf was
26
27
selling an editing table he had used to produce German television, until the year
2000, but he no longer needed it. He liked the idea that somebody was still
interested in 16mm and he offered me all the 16mm equipment he had. A few
other things like the Nagra or some features for the camera I found at the
Internet. But I’m surprised how many people are still maintaining all this old
analog equipment.
Q: Where can we see more? Website? Contact for the group?
A: We have no contact or website for the Hit and Run Cinema, we only have a
newsletter. Normally you can be part of the newsletter if you sign in during one
of the screenings. At the moment we have around 15,000 email addresses in the
newsletter. We don't advertise because it is all illegal.
Blak Mama (2009) 95 min-DVD
Directors: Miguel Alvear, Patricio Andrade
Quito, Ecuador
http://www.ochoymedio.net/productora-8/
http://www.behance.net/gallery/BLAK-MAMA-(2009)/8732213

Visual poetry. If you are an artist traveling to Ecuador this is a film I
suggest you watch. Ecuador has a rich and varied history that is
intertwined with the Incas, The Spanish, a dictator, and the Catholic
Church. The storyline follows three crossed lovers on a journey of
discovery and self-awakening that leaps through time and space. Blak
Mama illustrates the emotional subtext of a culture and its people.
Recommended.
Reviews
Ethan
Minsker
Movies
A Million Little Pieces
By James Frey
April 15, 2003 (John Murray)
ISBN 0-385-50775-5
“It tells the story of a 23-year-old alcoholic and drug abuser and how he copes with
rehabilitation in a twelve steps-oriented treatment center. While initially promoted as a
memoir, it was later discovered that many of the events described in the book never
happened. “ (Wikipedia)
Books
28
This was a book left by my roommates after they moved out. I was told to
read it, but after it was discovered that Frey had lied about most of it and
pissed off Oprah Winfrey I thought twice about investing the time. 10
years later I picked it up off the shelf and decided to try it out. What
popped out first was his style of writing. FAST. As if his flow of
consciousness didn’t have time to format into a conventional style. It was
hard to get used to for the first 30 pages or so, but once I did I appreci-
ated it. That alone makes it worth reading. However, it is clear that a lot
of the story is made up. This is especially true when it comes to the
gangster/criminal element that seems as if he took it right from a bad TV
show. I don’t use drugs but those parts and the self-hatred—the Fury, as
he calls it—seem right on. The big problem is the main character’s name
is James Frey so whenever I read a corny part (like any part where he
delves into the subject of Love) I couldn’t help but turn the book over and
look at his photo and shake my head. It is one thing to crank out a book,
and another to purposefully not limit the corniness and crap that just pulls
you out of the story. But nonetheless I did enjoy the book and wasn’t
bored, for the most part (except when he repeated himself a little too
much). I would still recommend this book as a fine example of style and
how personal style can make the difference.
Razorcake (Non-profit punk rock) $4
8 ½ X 11” black and white newsprint
112 pages
razorcake.org

Like Maximum Rock And Roll but younger, faster, and I might add,
cooler. I have been sending my books, fanzines, and films for review to
Razorcake and even though sometimes they may sting a little I trust them
to be fair and honest. And that is valuable feedback if you want to
improve your art. The focus is on punk rock music and politics,
interviews, cartoons and everything you want for a good read. Recom-
mended.
Fanzines
Le Sparragusanada-$3
7” X 7” Full color printed
Pages 50
Quito, Ecuador
lesparragusanada.ec

Cartoons from Mexico, Argentina, and Ecuador. All in Spanish. I have no
clue what they are saying but that doesn’t really matter. The artwork is
fantastic. This should be huge! From the images I can tell it covers sex and
29
violence, comedy, teen angst, and interviews. I was a fan of Heavy Metal
Magazine as a teenager and even though this is not so much centered on
Sci-Fi, I still see connections. Maybe that is just me.
Strapped-mini zine
Color printed on glossy paper
Digest size
12 pages
For copies contact Dori Cameron at STRAPPEDzine@gmail.com
Art, poems, short stories, rants. My two favorite things about Strapped?
1.) The artwork. 2.) Life Lessons with Jay and McCool. These are
probably the guys I would hang out with. Making fun of mustaches and
E-Cigs? Hell yes.
Basura
Yellow cover with black and white guts
Digest size
22 pages
I met Elijah Arrington (http://no-future82.tumblr.com or @no_future82 on
Instagram) in Victoria, Texas during an artist salon we held there during
the VXTIFF. He stands at about 6’7” and towers over me with a Mohawk
and dresses way more punk than I ever did. He handed me a copy and I
must say, I love this zine. Filled with artwork that reminds me of the old
Pushead art on flyers and record covers. I could see the artwork ending up
on shirts and tattoos. So very punk rock. I love it!
All vinyl, never downloaded, never streamed, never from CD. Our record player has one mono speaker
with no thrills—the way you should be listening to records. We love dead technologies, if that isn't clear
yet.

How do we find records? When we travel we find the local record shop and ask the clerk to select the best
of what is local, generally punk and rock.

This issue we cover: Austin, Texas; Providence, RI; and France.
Album: 7” Damnit Pomegranate/Can’t Complain
Band: A Giant Dog
$5.40
Where I picked this up: Austin, TX
Website or contact: www.tictactotally.com
Stars: ****
Fast rock reminds me of the best party punk bands of the 80’s. Oingo
Boingo comes to mind though I am sure the band would hate that
connection.
Music
30
Album: 7” Les Silences/Terre Damnee
Band: La Fraction
Where I picked this up: France
Website or contact: lafraction.org
Stars: ****

For the true music lover La Fraction is good for your diet. I eat you! In the
style of 70’s punk. I have no clue what they are saying since it is in French
but whatever it is she isn’t joking. The singer belts it out with pure
emotion. Good if you are in an angry mood.
Album: 7” Look Back and Laugh
clear blue vinyl, great packaging
Band: Dropdead
Where I picked this up: Providence, RI
Website or contact: www.armageddonshop.com
Stars: ***

My daughter of three years old said, “Icky.” My wife said, “Turn it off it
hurts my brain!” But I doubt either grasps the complexity of hardcore.
My daughter might learn, my wife never will. I enjoyed this. My vote is
the only one that counts.
Album: 7” Love On You/Dragstrip
Band: Homer Henderson: One Man Band
Where I picked this up: Austin, TX
Website or contact: P.O. Box 141199-672 Dallas, TX 75214
https://myspace.com/homerhenderson
Stars: ***** (My favorite of this batch of reviews)

Rockabilly with echo on the vocals, honky-tonk blues—perfect for a road
trip. This record was recorded live at the Party Lab 6.23.94 Well done
good sir.
Album: 7” Sweat Lodge
Band: Sweat Lodge
$6
Where I picked this up: Austin, TX
Website or contact: americaniconrecords.bigcartel.com
Stars: ****
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Even at 33 rpm it still sounds fast. Vocals like Vice Squad (old 80’s English
punk from UK fronted by a woman) fused with Led Zeppelin meets Judas
Priest all in a switch blade fight.
Album: 7” Black Triangle
Band: The Best
$5
Where I picked this up: Austin, TX
Website or contact: twistworthy.com
Stars: ****

There is genus in the name of this band. “Who is playing tonight?”
Answer. “The Best.” How could you go wrong with a name like that? Also
you better not suck. They don’t. Quite good in fact. I like. Dirty down
rock and roll.
Album: 7” Very Negative
Great packaging, black insert, black label with no text, the record
has a nice weight to it
Band: F/I
$5
Where I picked this up: Providence, RI
Website or contact: atomicactionrecords.bigcartel.com
Stars: ***

Comes with a download. Trash metal. I can imagine a mini mosh pit like
a spinning hurricane. This will not be the average cup of tea for the easy
listener. This is for those with a strong constitution. Makes me wish I had
long hair, hell makes me wish I had any hair at all. I just wish I had hair.
Citizens for The Arts, Inc. is a
501(c)(3) New York State
licensed, federally tax-exempt
charitable organization.
Donations are tax deductible to
the extent allowable by law.
Citizens for the Arts is inspired
by the foundations created by
The Antagonist Art Movement.
Citizens For
The Arts
citizensforthearts.com
facebook.com/pages/Citizens-For-The-Arts
ISSUE ARTISTS
Sylvia Ortiz
http://thebeautifully
grotesque.blogspot.com
Jake Ramirez
Instagram@sumerianlights
Adrian Alexis
adrianalexis.com
Marjorie Becker
www.chiptography.com
All interview photographs are
courtesy of the interviewee.
Unless otherwise posted.
NEXT ISSUE
He Said, She Said
Misunderstandings, overheard conversations. I was at work when a woman said
to me, “How’s it hanging?” Most guys will tell you that when you are asked,
“How’s it hanging?” that it refers to your dick. The correct response is to the
left or right or low. But since I was at work I said, “It is hanging appropri-
ately.” She didn’t think anything of it and as we made it to an intersection of
the hallway she cut to the left and I walked on straight to one of the offices to
ask what a few friends would have thought it meant. The consensus was all the
men thought it was about the dick and all the women thought it meant “How
are things?” But I still don’t see how they translate that from “it hanging.” It
is a dick. A DICK! So your task has been set. As I look at my watch and mark
the date and time I lift my arm in the air with a starters pistol. BANG! Start
writing. That means you! Write or send us your artwork on this theme! Deadline
October 1st 2014. Guidelines: 500 words or less (less is better); Art 300 DPI .tif
or .jpg.
Send submissions to our Facebook page or pmzsubmissions@gmail.com.
Le Sparragusanada-$3
7” X 7” Full color printed
Pages 50
Quito, Ecuador
lesparragusanada.ec

Cartoons from Mexico, Argentina, and Ecuador. All in Spanish. I have no
clue what they are saying but that doesn’t really matter. The artwork is
fantastic. This should be huge! From the images I can tell it covers sex and
32
Located in New York City’s East Village, and a community staple since 2000, the
Antagonists consist of a network of artists, musicians, and writers that come
together to celebrate one another’s talents and provoke each other’s creative
potential. Since its inception the group has grown exponentially. As such, CFA
has adapted these foundations, adding initiatives to foster domestic and interna-
tional cultural exchange. The primary focus is to provide projects that enable
learning opportunities, job opportunities, teaching and leadership skills, and
growth and support in other artistic ventures in each member’s respective
community.

Please make a donation and help.
•ANTAGONIST FILM CATALOG•
The Dolls Of Lisbon - A movie about
struggling artists making work on the other side of
the world. A DIY eyeball-busting bonanza.
Available on Amazon, iTunes and on DVD. Also
available at St. Marks Book Shop on 9th St & 3rd
Ave. Money goes to making new overseas art
projects.
This is Berlin, Not New York - See what
trouble the Antagonists can get into when you
make art in abandoned buildings in Berlin.
Available on DVD and Amazon instant download.
Anything Boys Can Do - Female musicians are
all too often regarded as novelty acts, regularly
shrugged off as militant feminist or cutely enter-
taining. Overwhelmed by the numbers of male
bands, female bands of the scene are lumped
together in one category, "girl group", regardless of
their vastly different styles. Available on DVD and
Amazon instant download.
The Soft Hustle - The story of a Lower East
Side lowlife who makes a bet for $1,000, which he
promptly loses. After getting kicked out of the
apartment by his girlfriend, he finds himself having
sex with cheap barflies, robbing East Village stores,
and pathetically pretending he is gay just to have a
place to sleep. Available on Amazon instant
download.
Album: 7” Damnit Pomegranate/Can’t Complain
Band: A Giant Dog
$5.40
Where I picked this up: Austin, TX
Website or contact: www.tictactotally.com
Stars: ****
Fast rock reminds me of the best party punk bands of the 80’s. Oingo
Boingo comes to mind though I am sure the band would hate that
connection.
33
Rich Boy Cries For Momma - A first-hand
account of Washington, D.C.’s punk rock scene
in the ‘80s and ‘90s as told by a dyslexic punk.
Available anywhere e-books and paperbacks are
sold. Also available at St. Marks Book Shop on
9th St & 3rd Ave. and Generation Records at
210 Thompson St. between w. 3rd and Bleecker
St. Money goes to publishing new books.
Barstool Prophets - A book about the dirty
secrets every bartender in the Lower East Side
knows. Before you date a bartender, read this
book. Available anywhere e-books and paper-
backs are sold. Also available at St. Marks Book
Shop on 9th St & 3rd Ave. Money goes to
publishing new books.
•ANTAGONIST BOOK CATALOG•
•ANTAGONIST MERCHANDISE•
Where can you get an
Antagonist shirt, button
or a buncha other stuff ?
Head on over to
antagovision.com and visit
our Store
34
Sylvia Ortiz
Award winning artist Sylvia O. and The Beautifully
Grotesque, a life long thesis, where she pushes and
pulls the boundaries of what is considered “Ethe-
real” and “Abhorrent”. Constantly dissecting the
definitions, boundaries, standards, and expectations
of these two anomalies. In an attempt to lure and
seduce the viewer into delving deeper into their own
identity and perception of what separates the
beautiful from the grotesque by using the human
form as an “object” as opposed to the “subject”.
Her ultimate goal is to convince the viewer that there is no line between the
beautiful or the grotesque, but instead they exists as one entity.
In 2010 Sylvia O. had to put her career aside to battle Breast Cancer; which is
ironic because of her signature floating “Boobles™”. An iconic symbol of
femininity, strength, sustenance and vitality in her work. Often using vibrant
colors that allure but also marring them with dark splotches of black and fine
line work. In hopes to enlighten and pave a road of consciousness for women to
follow as she prepares for her artistic comeback.
Her works have been published in pop culture magazines such as Juxtapoz, the
Schiffer book called The New Brow: 50 contemporary artist which was released
in 2012; Her work has traveled around the world and has exhibited in
renowned shows like NYC’s Red Dot Fair, Kris Kuksi’s “Beauty… isn’t
pretty” juried exhibition, DC’s Art Whino G40, Fountain Fair, Art basel and
many others.
Sylvia is in her 4th year (4th recurrence) of aggressive cancer. This is no joke.
She needs your help. That means we need your help. Please give if you can and
pass this on. Please! Sylvia has been a part of the Antagonist Movement from
the start. She has created designs for our clothing, illustrated for our zine,
curated shows and been an organizer for events. Not only is she a great artist,
but also a close friend and a little sister. We need her here with us.
http://www.youcaring.com/medical-fundraiser/fight-like-a-girl-/199879
ARTIST OF
THE ISSUE
A Note From the Editor