Healthcare
IT
Program
Guide

Bellevue
College
Healthcare
Informatics


This
program
guide
was
created
to
support
the
Healthcare
IT
Program
Curriculum
 developed
by
the
Bellevue
College
Life
Science
Informatics
Center
and
the
IT
Center
of
 Excellence
at
Bellevue
College.

For
further
information,
please
see
 https://bellevuecollege.edu/informatics/
or
contact
 Patricia.Dombrowski@BellevueCollege.edu,
425.564.3164.
 
 2009
Bellevue
College
Life
Science
Informatics
Center
 Author:

Jennifer
D.
Jones,
edtechjen@gmail.com
 
 This
publication
is
licensed
under
a
Creative
Commons
"Attribution‐Non
Commercial‐ Share
Alike"
license.
This
license
allows
others
to
copy,
distribute,
and
display
the
 copyrighted
work,
and
derivative
works
under
certain
specified
conditions.
For
more
 information,
visit
the
Creative
Commons
web
site:
 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by‐nc‐sa/3.0/
 
 
 Healthcare
IT
Program
Guide
 2
 



 


Table
of
Contents

Purpose .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 4
 Instructor
Profile ....................................................................................................................................................................... 4
 Learner
Profile ............................................................................................................................................................................ 4
 Learning
Experience................................................................................................................................................................. 4
 Job
Shadowing/Project
Shadowing....................................................................................................................................5
 Facility
Tours................................................................................................................................................................................5
 Panel
Discussions........................................................................................................................................................................5
 Guest
Presenters..........................................................................................................................................................................5
 Simulations....................................................................................................................................................................................6
 Learning
Management
Systems
(LMS).............................................................................................................................6
 Web‐based
Tools........................................................................................................................................................................ 7
 Open
Educational
Resources
(OER)....................................................................................................................................7
 Participatory
Media ..................................................................................................................................................................8
 RSS.....................................................................................................................................................................................................8
 Blog................................................................................................................................................................................................ 10
 Real­time
Web........................................................................................................................................................................... 10
 Tagging
and
Hashtags .......................................................................................................................................................... 11
 Social
Bookmarking ............................................................................................................................................................... 12
 Synchronous
Discussion........................................................................................................................................................ 12
 Photo,
File,
and
Video
Sharing ........................................................................................................................................... 12
 Podcasting .................................................................................................................................................................................. 13
 Wiki................................................................................................................................................................................................ 13
 Embedded
Content.................................................................................................................................................................. 14
 Engaging
the
Adult
Learner ............................................................................................................................................... 15
 Library
and
Information
Resources ............................................................................................................................... 16
 Technology
and
Media
Survey .......................................................................................................................................... 16
 Resources ................................................................................................................................................................................... 16
 References ................................................................................................................................................................................... 16
 Web­based
Tools...................................................................................................................................................................... 17
 OER ................................................................................................................................................................................................ 17
 Further
Research ..................................................................................................................................................................... 17



 


Healthcare
IT
Program
Guide


3
 


Purpose


 This
document
is
a
companion
piece
to
the
Bellevue
College
18‐credit
Healthcare
 Informatics
Certificate
Curriculum,
and
was
created
to
support
program
staff
and
 instructors
implementing
Healthcare
IT
certificate
and
degree
programs.

It
includes
 information
that
may
assist
in
the
selection
of
students
and
instructors,
potential
 experiential
learning
activities,
and
learning
technologies.




Instructor
Profile


 Instructors
for
this
program
may
come
from
a
variety
of
backgrounds,
but
ideally
they
 should
have
experience
in
healthcare,
whether
it
is
primarily
clinical,
administrative
or
 technical.

Formal
teaching
experience
is
desirable,
but
may
not
be
practical.

The
Bellevue
 College
curriculum
is
designed
for
the
instructor
to
serve
as
a
facilitator
and
connector
for
 the
learners.

The
instructor’s
role
is
to
guide
student
inquiry
and
enable
learner
discovery,
 consistent
with
principles
of
adult
learning
theory.

This
may
involve
direct
instruction,
 guest
presenters
(both
face
to
face
and
online,
depending
on
the
program
model),
group
 work,
peer
mentoring,
simulations,
job
shadowing,
and
fostering
connections
with
outside
 participants.

Specific
approaches
should
be
chosen
after
consideration
of
the
nature
of
the
 cohort
admitted
to
the
program.



Learner
Profile


 The
primary
intended
learners
for
this
program
are
information
technology
and
 information
systems
professionals
coming
from
industries
other
than
healthcare.
They
are
 typically
working
adults
with
higher
education
experience
and
industry
certifications.
 Some
may
have
advanced
degrees.
They
may
be
at
the
point
of
career
transition,
moving
 into
the
healthcare
field
after
working
in
other
industries.




Learning
Experience



 This
program
was
designed
to
engage
learners
and
instructors
in
an
inquiry‐based
learning
 experience.

Instructors
help
learners
discover
prior
knowledge,
develop
connections
with
 their
classmates,
and
cultivate
external
learning
relationships.
An
effective
adult
learning
 experience
provides
support
as
learners:
 
 1. Identify
and
relate
prior
knowledge.
 2. Recognize
existing
informal
and
social
learning
opportunities.
 3. Develop
new
informal
and
social
learning
connections.
 4. Participate
in
learning
experiences
that
closely
reflect
professional
practice.
 
 There
are
many
ways
to
promote
authentic
learning
in
both
face‐to‐face
and
online
 environments.

With
little
or
no
experience
in
healthcare,
these
learners
will
benefit
from
 opportunities
to
engage
in
scenarios
in
healthcare
delivery
organizations.

Hospitals,


Healthcare
IT
Program
Guide


4
 



 pharmacies,
insurance
providers,
biotech
companies
and
clinics
are
all
excellent
candidates
 for
field
trips
and
site
visits.


 
 Educational
institutions
electing
to
deliver
this
curriculum
should
therefore
make
a
 significant
effort
to
develop
relationships
with
local
and
regional
healthcare
organizations
 for
these
purposes.
It
is
well
understood
that
experience
in
healthcare
is
a
significant
factor
 in
employability,
therefore
the
more
opportunities
students
are
given
for
being
in
the
 healthcare
organization
environment,
the
better
their
chances
for
employment
are.

To
the
 extent
possible,
enabling
students
to
have
access
to
parts
of
the
information
technology
 and
information
systems
within
these
organizations
‐
specifically
the
major
tools
such
as
 the
electronic
medical
record
‐
is
also
recommended.


 
 Students
may
also
be
expected
to
complete
an
ancillary
course
in
medical
terminology
for
a
 Healthcare
Informatics
certificate
program
‐
if
so
it
is
important
for
the
Healthcare
 Informatics
instructors
to
integrate
that
course
content
into
the
learning
objectives
and
 course
assignments
in
the
Healthcare
Informatics
courses.
 
 Job
Shadowing/Project
Shadowing
 College
placement
offices
may
have
existing
relationships
with
employers
who
 support
learners
in
short‐term
shadowing
or
internship
programs.

For
project
 shadowing,
learners
can
participate
in
meetings
and
electronic
workspaces
for
the
 duration
of
a
project.

Placement
offices
also
can
help
students
learn
to
 professionally
approach
organizations
to
coordinate
their
own
shadowing
 experiences.
Advisory
board
members,
former
students
and
guest
lecturers
are
also
 excellent
sources
for
potential
experiential
learning
opportunities.
 Facility
Tours
 Hospitals,
clinics
and
other
healthcare
organizations
are
ideal
locations
for
tours.

 Because
these
learners
will
most
likely
seek
employment
through
IT
departments,
it
 is
a
good
idea
for
program
managers
to
build
relationships
with
department
 managers
willing
to
support
student
tours.

A
tour
can
introduce
learners
to
the
 daily
activities
and
scope
of
work
for
professionals
in
the
field.

Learners
can
view
IT
 processes,
nursing
stations,
administrative
systems,
data
centers
and
pharmacy
 operations.
 Panel
Discussions
 A
panel
discussion
can
be
part
of
a
facility
tour,
or
can
be
conducted
in
a
classroom
 or
online
session.
Learners
benefit
from
question
and
answer
sessions
that
include
 IT
professionals,
hiring
managers,
caregivers,
administrators,
vendors,
researchers
 and
patients.
 Guest
Presenters
 Guest
presenters
give
learners
the
opportunity
to
engage
with
active
industry
 professionals.

Story‐telling,
case
studies,
and
day‐in‐the‐life
presentations
followed
 by
question
and
answer
sessions
provide
context
to
enhance
lecture
and
text‐based
 5
 


Healthcare
IT
Program
Guide



 learning.

This
is
also
an
opportunity
for
learners
to
network
with
professionals
 working
in
their
chosen
field.
 Simulations
 Most
healthcare
delivery
organizations
use
proprietary
software
for
primary
 electronic
medical
record
systems
and
the
vendors
of
these
have
been
reluctant
to
 offer
educational
pricing
or
use
of
systems
for
learning.

The
active
systems
in
care
 delivery
organizations
contain
confidential
patient
data
and
it
is
difficult
to
obtain
 permission
for
students
to
access
these
systems.

There
are
alternatives
‐
for
 example
a
sample
EHR
system
CD‐ROM
can
be
purchased
with
the
textbook,
 “Electronic
Health
Records:
Understanding
and
Using
Computerized
Medical
 Records”
by
Gartee
and
is
one
resource
for
student
hands‐on
experience.

Another
 option
is
the
online
Veteran’s
Administration
online
CPRS
demo.

 
 The
Basic
Local
Alignment
Search
Tool
(BLAST)
is
a
Web‐based,
searchable
gene
 sequence
database
that
features
query
tools
that
allow
users
to
compare
sequences
 in
a
search
for
similarity
and
statistical
significance.

For
learners
interested
in
 bioinformatics,
this
is
an
excellent
resource.
NCBI
provides
numerous
supporting
 resources
and
tutorials
for
BLAST.
 http://blast.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Blast.cgi?CMD=Web&PAGE_TYPE=BlastDocs
 


Learning
Management
Systems
(LMS)

These
courses
may
be
taught
face‐to‐face,
fully
online,
or
in
a
blended
combination
of
both.
 Online
instructional
components
may
be
hosted
on
either
a
commercial
or
Open
Source
 Learning
Management
System
(LMS),
or
by
using
Web‐based
tools.

There
are
many
LMS
 options,
usually
administered
and
supported
through
an
organization’s
eLearning,
Distance
 Education,
or
Teaching
and
Learning
department.

Most
LMS’s
have
similar
features
and
 functions,
including
secure
login,
discussion
board,
file
hosting,
assignment
tools,
quiz
and
 assessment
tools,
grading
tools,
and
internal
email.
 
 This
curriculum
is
designed
for
working
adult
learners,
with
assessment
based
upon
 weekly
reflective
assignments.

The
material
allows
for
much
flexibility
in
assignments
and
 assessment.

The
courses
can
be
taught
using
an
LMS
with
the
discussion
board
tool
as
the
 primary
assignment
and
communication
area.
Make
certain
any
unused
LMS
tools
are
 disabled,
so
learners
do
not
become
frustrated
trying
to
access
them.

For
example,
if
 students
will
be
posting
directly
to
the
discussion
board
and
not
uploading
files,
disable
the
 assignment
drop
box.
 
 Challenges:

With
an
LMS‐based
course,
participation
by
guests
and
outside
 experts
may
be
limited.

In
order
to
invite
guest
presenters
and
participants,
 they
must
receive
a
course
login.

Also,
students
in
the
course
will
not
have
 access
to
the
work
of
learners
in
previous
courses,
and
usually
will
not
have
 access
to
their
own
work
once
the
course
is
complete.


 


Healthcare
IT
Program
Guide


6
 



 The
instructor
can
post
text,
audio
or
video
lecture,
and
links
to
course
documents
or
 outside
resources.
When
assignments
are
posted
to
the
discussion
board,
learners
can
 participate
and
engage
more
fully
than
they
do
when
assignments
are
only
submitted
to
the
 instructor.

Often
learners
prefer
to
use
their
own
email,
rather
than
internal
LMS
email,
 because
they
spend
more
time
checking
personal
email,
and
don’t
have
to
go
through
the
 added
layer
of
login
security
with
the
LMS.

An
online
grade
book
is
not
required,
as
long
as
 students
receive
timely
feedback
on
their
work.




Web‐based
Tools

Outside
the
LMS,
there
are
many
Web‐based
tools
that
can
provide
support
for
teaching
 and
learning
in
online
and
blended
instruction.

This
summary
focuses
on
types
of
tools,
 rather
than
specific
products
or
vendors.


 
 Challenges:

Some
institutions
have
installed
blocks
or
filters
on
some
web‐ based
tools
and
services.

Check
with
your
IT
department
to
have
the
filters
 removed
for
services
you
plan
to
use.

Let
the
students
know
which
tools
will
 be
used,
so
they
can
test
them
on
the
computers
where
they
will
be
 participating
in
the
course.

With
new
and
free
tools,
there
is
always
the
risk
 of
losing
content
if
the
service
shuts
down.

Encourage
students
to
keep
local
 copies
of
their
work,
just
in
case.


 
 It
is
important
to
critically
evaluate
tools
in
the
context
of
the
learning
environment
before
 application
with
students.

As
with
an
LMS,
it
is
helpful
to
keep
tools
to
the
minimum
 needed
for
successful
learning
and
engagement.

 Open
Educational
Resources
(OER)
 Open
Educational
Resources
(OER)
are
learning
materials
and
activities
made
freely
 available
online,
both
through
sponsoring
organizations,
and
individual
creators.

 The
definition
of
OER
is
constantly
evolving,
but
OER
is
an
important
international
 education
movement
toward
openness
and
sharing.
Debate
centers
on
evaluation
of
 materials,
cultural
imperialism,
copyright,
funding,
and
institutional
promotion
and
 adoption.
Many
institutions
are
now
publishing
materials
freely
online,
and
the
 Washington
State
Board
for
Community
and
Technical
Colleges
is
actively
 promoting
their
creation
and
use.

OER’s
can
take
the
form
of
Web
sites,
lesson
 plans,
curriculum,
presentations,
audio
and
video
files,
images
and
image
 collections,
handouts,
case
studies,
simulations
and
more.

They
are
usually
 designed
with
the
intent
they
will
be
shared
and
reused
by
others.
 
 In
Practice:

There
are
many
hosted
collections
of
OER’s
available
for
instructional
use.

 Some
of
these
are
listed
in
the
Resources
section
of
this
handbook.

Consider
making
 your
own
resources
available
to
others
by
posting
them
online
and
licensing
your
work
 through
Creative
Commons
at
http://www.creativecommons.org.


Healthcare
IT
Program
Guide


7
 



 
 Participatory
Media
 Participatory
Media
(social
media,
Web
2.0)
is
a
broad
term
that
encompasses
Web‐ based
tools
designed
for
user
participation.

This
can
include
text,
audio,
image
and
 video‐based
media.

Participatory
Media
tools,
such
as
blog,
wiki,
status
update,
and
 file
sharing
platforms
are
excellent
tools
for
collaboration
and
engagement.
Using
 aggregation
tools,
instructors
can
gather
class
content
in
a
single
location
for
 publication
and
feedback.

Most
of
these
tools
have
similar
features,
including
user
 profiles,
RSS,
and
friend/follower
management.

Many
offer
file
sharing
and
 commenting.
 
 In
Practice:
Survey
the
learners
to
discover
which
tools
they
are
already
using.

Allow
 them
to
collaborate
and
communicate
using
these
familiar
tools.

Actively
test
the
tools
 to
determine
which
will
work
best
with
your
learning
scenario.
 RSS
 RSS
is
a
Web
publication
format
that
supports
frequent
site
updates.

When
a
Web
 site
contains
Syndicated
content,
or
content
that
is
published
to
an
RSS
Feed,
an
icon
 (Figure
1)
appears
on
the
page
or
in
the
address
bar
in
the
browser.

Site
visitors
 can
click
the
icon
to
Subscribe
to
the
dynamic
content
in
a
Reader,
which
can
be
a
 Web‐based
tool,
or
part
of
a
Browser
or
Email
program.


When
the
site
publishes
 updates,
the
subscriber
receives
the
update
in
their
Reader,
and
does
not
have
to
 visit
the
original
site.

The
top
of
Figure
1
shows
images
of
four
sites,
with
a
Feed
 Reader
below
displaying
the
most
recent
content
from
those
sites.

Figure
1



 
 Healthcare
IT
Program
Guide
 8
 



 
 A
site’s
feed
address
is
usually
different
from
the
main
URL
address.
For
example,
 figure
2
shows
the
URL
for
PubMed.

Figure
3
shows
the
URL
for
the
PubMed
RSS
 Feed.
 


Figure
2



 


Figure
3



 RSS
is
important
because
it
allows
teachers
and
learners
to
efficiently
gather
outside
 resources,
as
well
as
content
created
within
the
course.

Course
participants
can
 publish
their
activities
using
any
tool
with
RSS.

Each
learner
can
supply
feed
 addresses,
and
the
instructor
can
easily
gather
all
the
learner‐created
content.

 When
selecting
Web‐based
tools,
RSS
should
be
a
high
priority
feature.
 
 In
Practice:

Whatever
tools
you
and
your
students
use,
if
they
feature
RSS,
the
content
 can
be
gathered
into
a
single
location
by
aggregating
the
feeds.

One
simple
way
to
do
 this
is
to
subscribe
to
all
the
feeds
using
Google
Reader,
add
them
to
a
single
category,
 and
provide
that
category
link
to
the
learners.


Healthcare
IT
Program
Guide


9
 



 Blog
 A
blogging
platform
provides
a
location
for
teachers
and
learners
to
publish
content
 and
give
and
receive
feedback.

Each
entry
on
a
blog
is
called
a
Post.

Posts
are
time
 and
date
stamped
and
published
in
reverse
chronological
order.

Posts
can
contain
 text,
audio,
video
and
embedded
content
from
other
sites.

Each
post
features
a
 comment
area,
where
readers
can
respond
with
their
own
posts.
 
 In
practice:

There
are
hundreds
of
people
and
organizations
actively
blogging
about
 Health
IT.

Many
of
these
blogs
include
politically
charged
commentary
about
 Healthcare
Reform
and
the
impact
of
the
EHR.

Information
literacy
includes
the
 ability
to
evaluate
the
authority
of
these
types
of
resources.

Part
of
the
learning
 strategy
for
students
can
include
reading
and
evaluating
the
content
of
these
blogs.

 Learners
can
post
responses
to
the
discussion
board,
the
class
blog
or
wiki,
or
their
 own
blogs.
 Real‐time
Web

 Status
update
tools,
such
as
Twitter,
Yammer
and
laconi.ca,
are
flexible
and
 technologically
simple.

The
complexity
is
in
their
many
potential
uses.

Designed
to
 accommodate
short
status
updates
that
can
be
posted
and
accessed
from
the
Web
 and
mobile
devices,
these
services
have
been
adapted
for
many
other
uses.

People
 report
current
events
as
they
happen,
and
now
companies,
such
as
Google
and
 FaceBook
are
creating
Live
Search
tools
to
take
advantage
of
these
powerful
 streams
of
information.

Some
observers
of
these
trends
have
begun
to
use
the
 terms,
“Real‐time
Web,”
and
“Nowism.”
 
 Live
Search
is
an
important
advance
in
Web
and
mobile
technology.

For
example,
 with
previous
search
technology,
if
you
felt
an
earthquake
and
performed
a
search
 for
“earthquake”
in
your
area,
you
would
probably
retrieve
old
information,
or
links
 to
related
sites.

With
Live
Search
of
status
content,
you
will
see
real
time
updates
 from
others
experiencing
the
same
thing.

Events
become
objects
of
socialization,
as
 proven
in
the
recent
Iran
elections,
and
the
death
of
Michael
Jackson.

When
your
 students
are
discussing
a
current
event
or
article,
they
can
post
this
to
Twitter,
and
 perform
live
searches
to
connect
with
others
discussing
the
same
issue.
 
 In
Practice:

There
is
an
active
community
of
informative
and
friendly
Healthcare
IT
 professionals
using
Twitter.

Learners
can
create
an
account
and
search
for
HealthIT,
 HIT,
or
EHR
to
discover
and
follow
these
people.

A
complete
profile
with
photo
is
 important
to
attracting
followers.

Learners
can
start
by
posting
messages
that
they
 are
HealthIT
students/professionals
looking
to
connect
with
others.

There
are
many
 who
will
be
willing
to
connect
them
to
their
contacts,
including
IT
Managers,
 Employment
Agencies,
Journals,
Professional
Societies,
Educators
and
Clinicians.

Aside
 from
creating
accounts
and
participating,
you
can
simply
use
the
Twitter
search
to
 discover
the
latest
trends
and
shared
links.
 


Healthcare
IT
Program
Guide


10
 



 Tagging
and
Hashtags
 Tagging
is
a
way
to
mark
online
content
with
key
words
that
help
in
collection
and
 retrieval
of
content.

Most
participatory
media
applications
provide
a
tagging
 feature,
where
creators
and
consumers
can
add
Tags
to
items
to
help
others
better
 locate
them
in
searches.
 
 Figure
4
shows
some
results
of
a
search
for
the
tag,
“Technology,”
at
 http://www.flickr.com/creativecommons/
 


Figure
4



 Hashtags
are
short
Tags
preceded
by
a
#
symbol.

These
are
used
for
aggregating
 related
content,
hosting
organized
discussions
across
platforms,
identifying
with
 particular
groups,
and
connecting
with
others
with
similar
interests.

Hashtags
often
 emerge
organically
during
popular
media
events,
but
also
can
be
deliberately
 created
to
support
events
and
discussions.
Figure
5
shows
an
example
of
how
 Twitter
users
are
using
the
#EHR
hashtag.




Figure
5


Healthcare
IT
Program
Guide


11
 



 
 In
Practice:
Creating
a
designated
hashtag
(i.e.
#BCMedIT)
for
a
course
can
help
in
 collecting
shared
course
information
and
content.

It
also
gives
outside
participants
a
 way
to
tag
and
share
resources
with
your
students.

When
learners
use
participatory
 media
applications
to
create
content,
they
can
add
the
designated
tag.
 Social
Bookmarking
 Social
bookmarking
tools
like
delicious.com
and
diigo.com
provide
an
online
space
 for
storing
and
sharing
bookmarked
sites,
or
favorites.

There
are
social
features
to
 these
tools,
where
you
can
share
your
bookmarks
with
others,
and
search
the
sites
 other
people
have
bookmarked.

Saved
links
are
organized
with
tags,
rather
than
the
 folder
system
used
in
most
browser
bookmark
functions.
 
 In
Practice:

Learners
can
use
your
designated
tag
when
they
save
resources
in
 delicious.com.

Then
they
can
search
all
of
delicious
for
use
of
that
tag,
and
see
the
 resources
the
others
have
tagged
as
well.

Outside
participants
can
use
the
tag
when
 they
discover
resources
that
may
help
your
students.

This
works
well
with
adult
 learners
who
may
access
links
from
multiple
computers.
 Synchronous
Discussion
 There
are
many
synchronous
discussion
tools,
from
Web‐based
text
chat,
to
 sharable
white
boards,
downloadable
applications
for
video
and
voice
and
services
 that
work
with
mobile
devices.

Webinar
products
provide
a
platform
for
live
 meetings
that
can
include
audio,
video,
chat,
slides,
white
board
and
breakout
 rooms.

Many
synchronous
tools
have
the
ability
to
record
and
archive
sessions
for
 future
reference.
 
 In
Practice:

Find
out
if
your
institution
hosts
a
live
webinar
product,
such
as
 Elluminate
Live!

Learners
benefit
from
connecting
with
each
other
and
their
 instructors
and
guests
in
real
time.

Participants
need
a
headset
and
microphone
and
 can
use
a
webcam,
if
they
have
one.

Archive
the
sessions
for
those
who
are
unable
to
 attend.

Allow
time
for
informal
discussion
and
question
and
answer
sessions.

This
is
 also
a
great
way
for
students
to
get
together
for
group
projects
and
for
instructors
to
 hold
virtual
office
hours.

Products
with
desktop
sharing
and
application
sharing
allow
 participants
to
remotely
view
and
use
software
they
may
not
have
on
their
local
 machine,
such
as
an
EMR
system.
 Photo,
File,
and
Video
Sharing
 Video
publishing
sites
such
as
youtube.com,
vimeo.com
and
blip.tv
offer
videos
that
 can
be
used
within
a
course,
as
well
as
a
space
for
instructors
and
learners
to
upload
 and
publish
their
own
videos.

These
sites
feature
RSS,
and
typically
each
uploaded
 video
also
contains
a
comment
area
for
discussion.
 
 In
Practice:
Instructors
can
record
short
lectures
and
host
them
on
these
services
for
 students
to
view
and
comment.

Some
students
may
prefer
to
complete
assignments
by
 video,
rather
than
text.

Keep
in
mind
that
student
video
assignments
will
have
to
be
 12
 


Healthcare
IT
Program
Guide



 watched
in
real
time
for
assessment,
often
taking
longer
to
grade
than
written
 assignments.
 Podcasting
 A
podcast
is
an
audio
recording
published
on
a
Syndicated
site
where
listeners
can
 subscribe
to
the
Feed
in
their
preferred
reader
and
obtain
new
recordings
as
they
 are
published.

A
vodcast
includes
video.
 
 In
Practice:

If
you
record
audio
or
video
lectures
for
students,
publish
them
on
a
site
 with
RSS
so
students
can
subscribe
and
download
them
and
watch/listen
at
their
 convenience
on
their
preferred
device.

This
gives
them
much
more
flexibility
than
if
 you
simply
upload
the
file
into
an
LMS
and
post
the
link.
 Wiki
 A
Wiki
is
a
web
site
that
can
be
updated
by
multiple
authors.

The
user
interface
is
 similar
to
a
word
processor.

Most
Wiki
platforms
also
provide
discussion
boards,
as
 well
as
reverse
chronological
posting
functionality,
similar
to
a
blog.

Some
offer
file
 hosting.

Wikis
have
a
variety
of
participation
and
security
levels
and
provide
tools
 for
tracking
edit
history.

Figure
6
shows
the
welcome
screen
for
setting
up
a
 WetPaint
Wiki.

Most
Wiki
platforms
provide
the
tools
needed
to
run
a
course
 online,
without
requiring
a
commercial
LMS.

Some
of
the
sites
run
ads
that
can
be
 removed
for
a
small
fee,
or
by
contacting
the
host
to
let
them
know
you
are
using
it
 for
educational
purposes.


Figure
6



 In
Practice:

Set
up
a
wiki
as
the
home
base
for
the
course.

Experiment
with
security
 levels
to
determine
whether
it
will
be
open
to
the
public,
or
only
to
your
students.

Have
 students
join
the
wiki
and
post
their
introductions
to
the
discussion
board.

Post
the
 latest
course
news
on
the
front
page.

You
can
also
add
pages
for
group
projects.
 
 Healthcare
IT
Program
Guide
 13
 



 Embedded
Content
 Embedding
is
a
way
to
gather
content
from
multiple
sites
onto
a
single
site.

Many
 Participatory
Media
services
provide
embed
code
that
can
be
cut
from
individual
 postings
and
inserted
onto
the
new
site,
where
the
content
then
displays
in
a
 modified
format.
These
pieces
of
other
sites
are
often
called
Widgets
or
Gadgets.
 Figures
7‐9
show
steps
to
embed
a
YouTube
video
in
a
WetPaint
wiki.


Figure
7


Figure
8


Figure
9


Healthcare
IT
Program
Guide


14
 



 In
Practice:

Search
for
content
on
sites
like
youtube.com
and
embed
the
video
on
your
 course
wiki,
or
within
the
LMS,
if
that
function
is
enabled.

You
can
also
embed
 instructor
and
student
videos,
and
things
like
widgets
created
from
delicious.com
or
 your
Google
Reader.



Engaging
the
Adult
Learner

Many
adult
learners
have
been
conditioned
to
believe
learning
happens
primarily
in
 structured
formal
learning
environments.

They
are
often
unaware
of
the
learning
they
 experience
in
their
daily
informal
interactions
with
others.
Jay
Cross
(2007)
speaks
of
the
 importance
of
informal
learning
in
the
work
place:
 
 The
old
way
of
learning
used
workshops,
training
programs,
role
plays,
lectures,
 readings,
tests,
practice
assignments,
group
discussion,
homework,
self­study,
 computer­mediated
lessons,
job
rotation,
assessments,
and
on­the­job
training.
The
 emergent
way
of
learning
is
more
likely
to
involve
community,
storytelling,
simulation,
 dynamic
learning
portals,
social
network
analysis,
expertise
location,
presence
 awareness,
workflow
integration,
search
technology,
help
desks,
spontaneity,
personal
 knowledge
management,
mobile
learning,
and
co­creation.
 
 Program
staff
and
instructors
can
help
students
recognize
their
current
learning
and
 engage
in
the
new
experience
before
the
course
begins.

Many
online
instructors
find
that
 learners
who
enroll
late
or
begin
to
engage
in
the
course
later
than
the
first
week
of
class,
 end
the
course
with
lower
grades
than
peers
who
engage
before
the
course
starts,
or
on
the
 first
day
of
instruction.
 
 When
instructors
use
Web‐based
tools
in
online
learning,
learners
may
have
access
to
the
 work
of
previous
program
students.

Program
staff
can
provide
links
to
these
resources
as
 soon
as
students
enroll.

Program
staff
or
instructors
can
also
provide
welcome
materials,
 which
include
the
instructor’s
contact
information,
teaching
and
learning
philosophies,
 resources
and
expectations.

This
is
also
a
good
time
to
survey
students
on
their
technology
 experience
and
existing
knowledge
of
the
course
content.
 
 Each
learner
brings
prior
knowledge
and
experience
that
will
contribute
to
the
richness
of
 the
course.
Initial
activities
of
low
complexity
and
close
interval,
with
immediate
feedback
 and
socialization,
can
serve
as
a
catalyst
for
self‐directed
and
social
learning.

Following
are
 some
suggested
online
course
activities:
 
 • Create
a
“personal
introduction”
assignment,
due
within
the
first
few
days
of
class.

 Introductions
can
include
preferred
name
and
contact
information,
photograph
and
 a
short
introductory
paragraph,
or
answer
to
a
question.

Many
instructors
request
 that
students
describe
their
learning
expectations
for
the
course
as
well
as
any
 relevant
professional
experience.


 • Contact
each
student
individually
to
ensure
they
understand
how
to
access
the
 course.
 • Provide
an
early
object
for
learner
socialization.

This
can
be
a
short
video,
position
 paper,
or
current
event
article.

Provide
a
shared
space,
such
as
a
discussion
board,
 
 Healthcare
IT
Program
Guide
 15
 



 wiki
or
blog
for
students
to
connect
to
discuss
their
thoughts
on
the
piece.


Give
 your
own
response
to
the
material
as
an
example
of
what
you
would
like
to
see
from
 the
learners.
 Check
the
course
site
daily
the
first
several
weeks
of
class,
commenting
frequently
 and
encouraging
interaction.
 Help
learners
discover
how
their
current
and
past
experience
relates
to
the
course
 material.

Let
them
know
how
their
contributions
will
help
other
learners.
Digital
 storytelling
is
an
excellent
way
to
help
learners
bring
forth
and
share
their
existing
 knowledge
with
others.

This
can
be
done
through
audio
or
video
based
tools,
or
text
 narratives.


• •

Library
and
Information
Resources

The
campus
library
is
often
an
underused
resource
for
adult
learners.

Libraries
are
 custodians
of
digital
and
print
resources
that
can
add
depth
to
instruction.

Many
campus
 libraries
feature
24‐hour
virtual
librarians,
access
to
paid
subscription
journals,
online
 tours
and
tutorials,
and
special
reserves
and
collections.

Libraries
are
also
a
good
source
 for
information
and
training
on
media
and
information
literacy.

Ensure
students
have
the
 information
they
need
to
access
these
resources.


Technology
and
Media
Survey


Evaluating
the
technology
and
media
habits
of
instructors
and
learners
can
help
determine
 potential
tools
to
use
for
teaching
and
learning.

This
can
be
done
with
a
paper
or
web‐ based
survey.

Google
Documents
include
a
simple
form
creator
that
collects
responses
into
 a
spreadsheet,
which
can
then
be
exported
into
Excel,
or
another
analysis
tool.

Surveying
 the
students
during
registration,
or
at
the
beginning
of
the
course
will
help
the
instructor
 understand
and
plan
for
any
potential
challenges
with
student
technology
adoption.


Resources

References

Cormier, D. (2008). Rhizomatic education: Community as curriculum. Innovate 4, (5). Retrieved August 30, 2009 from http://www.innovateonline.info. Couros, A. V. (2006). Examining the open movement: Possibilities and implications for education. PhD. Dissertation, The University of Regina (Canada), Canada. Retrieved August 30, 2009 from http://www.scribd.com/doc/3363/Dissertation-Couros-FINAL-06-WebVersion. Cross, J. (2007). Emergence. Informal Learning: Rediscovering the Natural Pathways that Inspire Innovation and Performance. Pfeiffer. Siemens, G. (2005) Connectivism: A learning theory for the digital age. International Journal of Instructional Technology and Distance Learning. 2,(1). Retrieved August 30, 2009 from http://itdl.org/Journal/Jan_05/article01.htm. Siemens, G. (2003). Learning Ecology, Communities and Networks: Extending the Classroom. Retrieved August 30, 2009 from http://www.elearnspace.org/Articles/learning_communities.htm.

Healthcare
IT
Program
Guide


16
 



 Web‐based
Tools
 Wiki:
http://wikispaces.com,
http://pbworks.com,
http://wetpaint.com,
 http://mediawiki.org
 Blog:
http://wordpress.com,
http://edublogs.org,
http://blogspot.com,
 http://wordpress.org
 Slide
hosting:
http://slideshare.net
 Video
hosting:
http://youtube.com,
http://blip.tv,
http://vimeo.com
 Microblog/Status
tools:
http://twitter.com,
http://laconi.ca,
http://yammer.com,
 http://edmodo.com
 Social
Networking:
http://facebook.com,
http://ning.com
 Chat:
http://skype.com
 Social
Bookmarking:
http://delicious.com,
http://diigo.com
 Photo
sharing:
http://Flickr.com
 Real‐time
Web
Search:
http://surchur.com/,
http://www.wowd.com/,
 http://www.oneriot.com/,
http://www.whatthetrend.com/

 OER
 http://www.oercommons.org/
 http://ocw.mit.edu/
 http://ce.byu.edu/is/site/courses/ocw/
 http://creativecommons.org/
 http://www.flickr.com/creativecommons
 Further
Research
 http://www.educause.edu/
 http://www.ted.com/
 http://mediatedcultures.net/ksudigg/
 http://www.rheingold.com/
 http://openedconference.org/program
 http://waol.org/
 http://trendwatching.com/briefing/
 http://www.cudenver.edu/Academics/CUOnline/FacultyResources/Handbook/Pages/Ha ndbook2009.aspx
 http://images.apple.com/support/itunes_u/docs/iTunes_U_Copyright_Overview.pdf
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Healthcare
IT
Program
Guide


17