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Fundraiser

set for
April 24
BY AMANDA IRWIN
STAFF WRITER
Korean War and World
War II veterans will depart
to see historic memori-
als as part of the largest
Honor Flight the Upstate
of South Carolina has seen
on April 22.
The cost of a single hon-
or flight is about $70,000,
and two are held each year
to honor veterans. The
flights are entirely funded
by donations. On the April
flight, about 100 veterans
will leave from Greenville-
Spartanburg International
Airport to spend the day
in Washington D.C., tour-
ing memorials from wars
the veterans themselves
served in and at no cost to
them.
Anyone wanting to thank
the veterans for their ser-
vice can welcome them as
they land at the North Car-
go FedEx Terminal around
8 p.m. that night.
In an effort to raise
funds for future flights, on
April 24, a fundraiser will
be held at Thomas Creek
Brewery, 2054 Piedmont
Highway, Greenville, from
6-9 p.m. The cost of the
event is $25 and includes
food and beverages, and
Trey Francis of the Dead
27s will perform. Thomas
Creek Brewer, which pro-
vided the venue free of
charge, will offer eight to
10 brews on tap and nearly
all of the proceeds raised
will benefit the cause.
Jason Hucks, an Honor
Flight Upstate SC volun-
teer, became involved
with the organization by
chance. While visiting
Greer three years ago for
Freedom Blast, he saw res-
ident Cliff Harpst with his
red WWII hat and thanked
him for his service. While
speaking with him, he
mentioned the honor flight
and said he told Harpst if
he was interested in going,
he would help him apply.
Months after the two met,
Harpst asked Hucks to go
with him on the flight and
Hucks has been involved
with the organization ever
since.
On his first honor flight,
Hucks was also a guardian
to a veteran, Mr. (James)
Culbertson, who had
served in World War II and
spent 18 months as a pris-
oner of war when his plan
was shot down.
He and just a couple
other individuals that were
on the plane with him I
think survived, Hucks
said. They parachuted
out and when they hit the
ground they were immedi-
ately captured by enemy
soldiers, and one of the
first things they did when
they hit the ground [is]
they took his wings off of
SEE FLIGHT | A11
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GCM Senior Expo
Tuesday
Greer Community Ministries will host
a free expo on Tuesday, April 22 from 9
a.m. - 1 p.m. for seniors or other local res-
idents seeking to learn more about cop-
ing with old age.
The event will ofer resources on
things such as rehab, rheumatism, hos-
pice, hearing aids and more. Representa-
tives will be on hand to answer any
questions.
For more information, call GCM at 877-
1937.
SPELLING SUCCESS: Family creates spelling bee dynasty B7
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 2014 GREER, SOUTH CAROLINA VOL. 101 NO. 16 50 CENTS
BY BILLY CANNADA
EDITOR
The 30th installment of
Greers annual Family Fes-
tival will feature The Mar-
shall Tucker Band.
Greer residents braved
the soggy conditions last
year for the spring event,
but officials are hoping for
better weather this time
around.
This gives us the chance
to showcase our commu-
nity, Rudy Painter, the
events chairman, said.
We try to get the families
down here and enjoy some
of the things they wouldnt
normally get to enjoy. You
know youre coming to a
safe place.
The Pelham Medical Cen-
ter Greer Family Festival
SEE FEST | A7
Greer Family Festival
entertainment set
Voters to
consider tax
increase
BY AMANDA IRWIN
STAFF WRITER
An ordinance prohibiting
the use of mobile phones
for text messaging, elec-
tronic media or emailing
while driving dominated
the April 8 Greer Council
meeting, as councilmem-
bers expressed opposing
views on the issue.
If passed, after court
fees, offenders could pay
$262.50 if ticketed. The
new law would go into ef-
fect on July 1 this year.
Councilmember Judy
Albert requested the
amendment to improve
safety in the community
by minimizing or discour-
aging distracted driving,
however, councilmember
Jay Arrowood expressed
several concerns with the
ordinance, including the
exemption included for
public officials, the ability
of officials to enforce the
law and differentiate be-
tween talking and texting
on a mobile phone. He
questioned effectiveness
of the law if implemented.
The law would not pro-
hibit talking on mobile
phones while driving.
Council voted 4-3 in fa-
vor of the ordinance on
first reading, with Arro-
wood, Lee Dumas and Wry-
ley Bettis voting against it.
Changes to the ordinance
phrasing to specify it re-
lates only to texting will
be made prior to second
reading, which will take
place at the April 22 Greer
Council meeting following
a public hearing on the
matter.
Council passed a resolu-
tion to support Greenville
County Councils referen-
dum allowing registered
county voters consider
imposing a 1 percent sales
and use tax to fund road
improvements and other
related project. Current
needs for the maintenance
of the roads system fund-
ing from all sources comes
out to more than $20 mil-
lion per year for the Green-
ville County.
A Greenville Citizens
Road Advisory Commis-
sion explained the process
by which recommenda-
tions were established by
18 individuals, who com-
SEE COUNCIL | A9
Marshall Tucker
Band
TAKE TWO
Greer City Council
torn on texting ban
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
More than 900 veterans have been fown to Washington D.C. on honor fights at no cost
to them. Above is James Culbertson, a World War II veteran.
Korean veterans to attend honor flight
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
Greer City Administrator Ed Driggers said the city will ofer
opportunities for festival attendees to go green.



Texting ban may be
dif cult to enforce
Thats what the
honor flight is
about. Its those
special moments
that take place
every single time we
go up.
Jason Hucks
Honor Flight Upstate SC volunteer
BY AMANDA IRWIN
STAFF WRITER
Presently, 12 states pro-
hibit the use of hand-held
cellphones while driving
and 43 states ban texting
while driving.
The City of Greer is con-
sidering passing an ordi-
nance to ban texting, email-
ing and the use of electronic
media when driving. Driv-
ers, however, will still be per-
mitted to talk on cellphones.
Despite the push by nu-
merous states to ban mobile
phone use when driving,
whether banning hand-held
use entirely or only texting,
the legislation hasnt proven
to prevent or decrease dis-
tracted driving, according to
a study. In 2010, after three
states and the District of Co-
lumbia had ban the use of
hand-held devices while
driving, a study conducted
by the Highway Loss Data In-
stitute found the laws did
not reduce accident rates,
despite the existing link be-
tween accidents while using
hand-held devices.
Although the solution may
not be obvious, of cials say
the problem is clear. Most
fatalities are drunk drivers or
distracted,said Police Chief
Dan Reynolds at the April 8
Greer Council meeting. The
same year the study on tex-
ting bans was conducted,
distracted driving accounted
for 18 percent of all fatal
crashes killing 3,092 people
and wounding 416,000 peo-
ple nationally, according to
the National Highway Traf c
Safety Administration.
SEE BAN | A9
A2 THE GREER CITIZEN COMMUNITY WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 2014
Ronald McDonald
Live and in Person!
Ronald McDonald is dancing into
town on Saturday, April 19th
and, he will be at the
McDonald' s, Hammett Bridge Rd
@ Hwy 14 at 11:00 AM.
Ronald is sure to bring
lots of surprises and fun.
So be sure to join us!
RED CROSS NEW DISASTER
VOLUNTEER ORIENTATION
An orientation for new
volunteers or people con-
sidering volunteering will
be held on April 17 and
June 19 from 6 8 p.m.
at the Spartanburg Office,
131 E. Main St., and May 6
and June 3 from 6-8 p.m.
at the Greenville Office,
940 Grove Road.
For more information
email wcrdvmt@redcross.
org.
GIVE A SHUCK TO
BENEFIT SOUP KITCHEN
Great Bay Oyster House
and guest shuckers are
teaming to benefit the
soup kitchen on Thursday,
April 24, 7 9 p.m. at The
Great Bay Oyster House,
109 E. Poinsett St.
Diane Christofferson
and daughter, Katie Gam-
brel, will host the benefit
in honor of Stan Christof-
ferson, who passed away
two years ago.
SMALL BUSINESS
SERIES, APRIL 22
A seminar conducted by
Curtis Harper, a franchise
broker from Greenville.
Curtis will discuss avail-
able franchising opportu-
nities and the process of
franchising.
The workshop will be
held on April 22 from 6:30
p.m. 8 p.m. at the Greer
Development Corporation,
11-B S. Main St., Greer, in
the second floor confer-
ence room.
For more information
contact Beth Smith at 592-
6318.
MUSEUM QUILT SHOW
SEEKS QUILTERS
The annual Quilt Show
at the Greer Heritage Mu-
seum will be held April 25
and 26.
The museum is looking
for quilters who want to
display their handmade
quilts in one of two divi-
sions: hand quilted and
machine quilted. Ribbons
will be given for best quilts
and a best-of-show cash
prize will be awarded. In-
terested quilters can bring
their quilts to the museum
on April 23 from 1 4 p.m.
or make arrangements for
other times. There will be
a $5 entry fee for each
quilter.
For more information
call 877-3377.
MTCCS ROLLING
ON THE RIVER APRIL 26
The annual Rolling on
the River fundraiser for
Middle Tyger Commu-
nity Center will be held
on April 26 at 6:30 BMW
Zentrum Center.
The event is an evening
of games, food, music and
prizes and the proceeds
benefit children and fami-
lies served by the MTCC.
Tickets are $50 per person,
which includes dinner.
Call Lisa Hall at 439-7760
for more information.
ROAD TO RECOVERY
NEEDS DRIVERS
The American Cancer
Society needs volunteer
drivers to transport pa-
tients to local treatment
centers.
Anyone interested in
volunteering as a driver
must have a good driv-
ing record, valid drivers
license, automobile insur-
ance and a vehicle in good
working condition. The
American Cancer Society
provides free training for
this program.
For more information on
becoming a Road to Recov-
ery volunteer, contact the
local office at 627-8289.
GODS PANTRY
REQUESTS DONATIONS
Gods Pantry needs
nonperishable food dona-
tions.
Items can be dropped
off at: 100 Enoree Road,
Greer, on Thursdays from
10 a.m. noon, 2481 Rac-
ing Road, Greer, on Thurs-
days 1 4 p.m. or 700
E. Main St., Duncan, on
Wednesdays 9 11 a.m.
For questions or to vol-
unteer call Wendy at 963-
4441.
SHARONS CLOSET NEEDS
NEWBORN CLOTHING
Sharons Closet needs
spring and summer cloth-
ing donations, especially
for girls in sizes newborn
to 6T.
New or gently used
clothing accepted Monday
through Friday 8 a.m. 4
p.m. at 783 S. Line St Ext.,
Greer.
GCM FOOD PANTRY NEEDS
FRUIT, CONDIMENTS, RICE
The Food Pantry needs
canned fruit and condi-
ments, boxed gelatin, corn
muffin mix and 1-pound
bags of rice.
Donate at the ministry,
738 S. Line St. Ext., Greer,
between 8 a.m. 4 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
Visit gcminc.org or call
879-2254 for more infor-
mation.
GREER MEALS ON
WHEELS SEEKS DRIVERS
Greer Community Minis-
tries needs volunteer driv-
ers for Meals on Wheels
routes every other Mon-
day starting April 28 and
every other Tuesday start-
ing April 29.
Substitute drivers are
also needed in Senior Din-
ing on Tuesdays and Fri-
days.
A MOW driver must be
a qualified driver with a
valid drivers license and
have a heart for serving
others. MOW has 19 deliv-
ery routes in the greater
Greer area. Meals are de-
livered Monday through
Friday.
For more information,
contact at 879-2254 or
877-1937.
FAMILY MINISTRIES
COAT DRIVE
District Five Families
Ministries is sponsoring
an ongoing coat drive.
New or gently used coats
for men, women and chil-
dren are accepted. Please
drop off at Middle Tyger
Community Center, at 84
Groce Road, Lyman, to
help a family in need.
You can also call the
center for pickup at 439-
7760.
SEND US YOUR
COMMUNITY NEWS
Those wishing to sub-
mit community news may
email Abradford@greer-
citizen.com.
Community news and
events for the community
calendar can also be sub-
mitted at our office, locat-
ed at 317 Trade Street in
downtown Greer.
Call us at 877-2076 for
more information.
COMMUNITY
NEWS
TODAY, APRIL 16
THE AWANAS CLUB at El
Bethel Baptist Church, 313
Jones Ave., Greer, from 6:30
- 8:15 p.m. Kids ages 3-12 are
invited. Call 877-4021.
THURSDAY, APRIL 17
THE TAYLORS LIONS Club
at 6 p.m. at the Clubhouse,
500 East Main St., Taylors. Call
Allen Culver at 350-6939.
THE TAYLORS LIONS Club
at noon at the Taylors First
Baptist Church Ministry Cen-
ter (old Post Of ce) on Main
Street, Taylors. The meeting
will last approximately one
hour. Call Jerry Hatley at
268-0567.
SATURDAY, APRIL 19
COMMUNITY FOOD BANK
10 -11:30 a.m. at Calvary
Christian Fellowship, 2455
Locust Hill Road, Taylors.
Limited supplies available on
a frst come, frst serve basis.
UPSTATE FIBROMYALGIA
SUPPORT Group at the
Hampton Inn on Fishermans
Drive (behind Earthfare) by
Pelham & 85 at 11 a.m. Call
Rita Forbes at 968-0430 or
Lisa Gambrell-Burns at 268-
5907.
KINGDOM ASSEMBLY
OUTREACH Center will be
handing out free groceries to
qualifed applicants from 10
a.m. - noon at 3315 Brushy
Creek Road, Greer. Call 848-
2728 or visit www.kingdo-
maoc.com.
MONDAY, APRIL 21
THE NEVER ALONE GROUP
OF NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS
at 7 p.m. at the Greer Recre-
ational Center.
GRACE PLACE IN Greer will
have its mini-mall open from
10 a.m. - noon. Grace Place
is located at 407 Ridgewood
Drive. I.D. required.
TUESDAY, APRIL 22
GRACE PLACE in Greer will
have its clothing closet open
from 6-8 p.m. Grace Place is
located at 407 Ridgewood
Drive. I.D. required.
GIG GLUTEN INTOLER
ANCE GROUP) of Greenville
meets at the Taylors Library,
316 W. Main St. The group
meets from 7- 8:30 p.m.
GAP CREEK SINGERS will
rehearse from 7:30-9 p.m.
at The Church of the Good
Shepherd, 200 Jason St.,
Greer. For further informa-
tion or to schedule a perfor-
mance contact Wesley Welsh,
President, at 877-5955.
BARBERSHOP HARMONY
CHAPTER at 7 p.m. at Memo-
rial United Methodist Church,
201 N. Main St., Greer. Call
877-1352.
THE ROTARY CLUB of
Greater Greer at 7:15 a.m.
at Southern Thymes. Call
334-6177.
THE NEVER ALONE GROUP
OF NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS
at 7 p.m. at the Greer Recre-
ational Center.
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23
GRACE PLACE in Greer will
have its mini-mall open from
10 a.m. - noon. Grace Place
is located at 407 Ridgewood
Drive. I.D. required.
THE AWANAS CLUB at El
Bethel Baptist Church, 313
Jones Ave., Greer, from 6:30
- 8:15 p.m. Kids ages 3-12 are
invited. Call 877-4021.
THURSDAY, APRIL 24
KIWANIS CLUB AT 6:30 p.m.
at Laurendas Family Restau-
rant. Call Charmaine Helfrich
at 349-1707.
THE SOAR BINGO CLUB from
10 a.m. - noon at Victor Gym.
The cost is 50 cents per card.
FRIDAY, APRIL 25
GRACE PLACE IN Greer will
have its monthly dinner
at 6:30 p.m. Grace Place is
located at 407 Ridgewood
Drive. I.D. required.
SATURDAY, APRIL 26
COMMUNITY FOOD BANK
10 -11:30 a.m. at Calvary
Christian Fellowship, 2455
Locust Hill Road, Taylors.
Limited supplies available on
a frst come, frst serve basis.
MONDAY, APRIL 28
THE NEVER ALONE GROUP
OF NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS
at 7 p.m. at the Greer Recre-
ational Center.
TUESDAY, APRIL 29
THE NEVER ALONE GROUP
OF NARCOTICS ANONY
MOUS at 7 p.m. at the Greer
Recreational Center.
GAP CREEK SINGERS will
rehearse from 7:30-9 p.m.
at The Church of the Good
Shepherd, 200 Jason St.,
Greer. For further informa-
tion or to schedule a perfor-
mance contact Wesley Welsh,
President, at 877-5955.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 1
GRACE PLACE in Greer will
have its mini-mall open from
10 a.m. - noon. Grace Place
is located at 407 Ridgewood
Drive. I.D. required.
THE AWANAS CLUB at El
Bethel Baptist Church, 313
Jones Ave., Greer, from 6:30
- 8:15 p.m. Kids ages 3-12 are
invited. Call 877-4021.
Calendar deadline is
noon on Tuesdays. Submit
information to Amanda Ir-
win at 877-2076, email to
abradford@greercitizen.
com or mail to The Greer
Citizen P.O. Box 70 Greer,
SC 29652.
COMMUNITY
CALENDAR


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WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 2014 PAGE LABEL THE GREER CITIZEN A3
M
y mother began to receive hospice
care a little over a week ago. As
with the cruelty of the disease,
while her body remains surprisingly
functional, the fingers of dementia have
pinched and plucked within her brain so
she is with us one moment, seized with
anxiety the next, all the while unable to
articulate a desperation those of us in
the present can only imagine to under-
stand.
As the sedatives lull her deeply to
sleep and the scheduled doses of mor-
phine ease the gripping pain of stiff
joints and the beginnings of muscle
wastage, we, her children, take turns
sitting with her, stroking her forehead,
murmuring our gratitude and love, at
times finding a way to snuggle in close,
watching the slow rise and fall of her
chest from the confines of a brown
metal hospital bed, starkly at odds with
the comforting familiarity of her room.
There, on the walls, are the expan-
sive testaments of but one of her gifts:
the remarkable portrait of her mother,
poised and handsome in rich folds
of pale blue silk, russet hair piled as
was the style of that Victorian era, the
watercolor of the blazing autumnal oaks
behind a white-washed church in that
peculiar, tawny light of October, the
austere oil of the Norman church at the
end of the village in Suffolk, where the
remains of her brother and sister-in-law
rest.
These examples, executed from an
array of paint brushes once held pre-
cisely in her hand, this hand I now press
against my face, are as alien to her as
the hospice chaplain that introduces
herself and within a few minutes, tells
me its important to tell my mother Its
OK to go.
Weve had that conversation, I reply.
And dont hesitate to ask her forgive-
ness or tell her you forgive her about
anything that might be between you.
There is nothing to forgive.
Leaving my mother peacefully secure
and in the attentive hands of the staff
dedicated to her care later that night, I
drove the short distance home, unwill-
ing for the comfort of the radio, wanting
only for the headlights to cut down the
gravel drive of the farm. Parking the
truck in front of the house, I followed
the familiar routine of walking into the
barn for bed-check before falling into
my own.
I was greeted by my 23-year-old,
Fozzy, whom Ive had since before he
was 6. My beloved old fellow, always
the first to pop his head over the stall
door in welcome, was unsteady, swaying,
lurching to the right.
Neurological. And a death sentence.
Dr. Freer arrived within minutes. Paul
helped me support my horse as we
walked, falteringly, desperate to prevent
him from collapsing onto the concrete
aisle. In the grass, before the pasture
gate, the initial sedative was adminis-
tered, amid hurried whispers of love and
soothing, but as soon as the drug began
to take effect, Fozzy, desperate to fight
the fiat of stupor, refused to stand obe-
diently and accept his fate- the second
shot which would crumple him to the
ground and he began to spin, staggering,
obliging me to let go of the lead rope
and all of us to step backward to safety.
In the end, left alone beneath a three
quarter moon and splintered stars, I
lay against the warm body of my horse,
comforted by his familiar scent and
cradled next his graceful neck. I stared
heavenward. Was he glancing down at
himself, as reports of people brought
back from the hereafter describe, before
galloping away into the universe? I
raised a hand and waved slowly, just in
case.
I had already given into heaving sobs
earlier. Now there was nothing but a dull
numbness; the moment after a punch
when you know youve lost your breath.
This, I thought, this is the moment a
bit of grit begins to form over the heart.
This is the time when its vulnerability
loses its soft and delicate skin, like that
of a spring leaf, to be replaced by some-
thing dry and unyielding, affixing firmly
in place so that death now becomes
matter-of-fact, saying, Theres no point
in falling apart, my girl. There will be
quite a bit of this in your future and you
must roll up your sleeves and get on
with things.
EDITORIAL |
OPINION
A4 THE GREER CITIZEN WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 2014



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The Greer Citizen
is published every Wednesday by
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317 Trade St., Greer, S.C. 29651
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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR |
IM JUST
SAYING
PAM STONE
THE UPPER ROOM |
CURIOUSLY
AMANDA
AMANDA IRWIN
Staf reporter
My mothers hand to hold
Watchdogs deserve
public of cials respect
It happens in every county, every small town,
and every school district. It happens at the state
level and at the federal level.
Watchdogs monitor the actions of govern-
ment. They attend meetings. They write letters.
They ask the tough questions. They request
public records under the Freedom of Infor-
mation Act. Sometimes, they sound the alarm
when they believe tax dollars have been wasted
or politicians have misused their power.
To a lot of public officials theyre a pain in
the neck, and life would be a lot easier if theyd
just go away. But watchdog citizens serve an
important purpose. They provide needed over-
sight for government, whether its a local town
council, a school board, or a county govern-
ment. They hold politicians accountable.
Several instances come to my mind in which
citizen-watchdogs questioned their local gov-
ernment and made a difference in their com-
munity.
A few years back, a Midlands woman was
criticized for taking her school district to court
over what she saw as her districts violation of
the states Freedom of Information Act. She
was ultimately successful in her attempt to re-
quire the school district to hold its meetings in
the open.
In one Lowcountry county, vigilant citizens
sounded an alarm when they began to believe
their school district was unlawfully using tax-
payer money in a campaign to sway the result
of a public referendum on a massive school
construction plan. As frequently happens, some
within the school system worked to paint an un-
flattering portrayal of these concerned citizens.
But in February, a top school district official
was indicted on a charge of misusing public
funds for campaign purposes.
Of course, guilt or innocence has yet to be
proven. But the indictment certainly gives cre-
dence to the watchdogs actions.
And if it turns out the school district was, in
fact, using taxpayer dollars to help pass their
ballot measure, these citizens served their com-
munity well by shining a light on the problem.
One issue thats near and dear to my heart
is spending transparency. Shortly after I un-
veiled the states first Spending Transparency
Website a few years ago, I launched a campaign
to encourage towns, cities, counties and school
districts to post their monthly spending reports
online. Most of them initially rejected the idea;
some dismissed it as being useless while others
wrote it off as being too much work.
The idea might never have taken off if not for
the individual efforts of citizen-watchdogs in
communities across our state.
I remember receiving dozens of phone calls
from folks who had heard about the program
and wanted to know how to push their local
town or county to join. They applied pressure
to local politicians, reminding these public of-
ficials that spending transparency was easy and
inexpensive as well as good policy.
The fact that 35 cities, towns and counties
now voluntarily show their spending records on
the Internet is largely a testament to the valu-
able role these concerned citizens play.
Often, citizen-watchdogs are subjected to
scorn and ridicule, even when their actions are
in the public interest. Its a time-honored tac-
tic for a governmental entity to try to discredit
citizens who point out problems or express dis-
senting views.
Thats a shame. Ordinary folks who take the
time to get involved in guiding their commu-
nitys future should be respected even cher-
ished.
And those in public office have a particular
obligation to ensure that citizen-watchdogs feel
free to speak out and ask tough questions. Their
involvement ultimately makes your government
healthier, which in turn makes your community
a better place.
This guest editorial was submitted by South Carolina Comptroller Richard
Eckstrom.
Watching
with Jesus
Read Matthew 26:36-46
J
esus] said to them, My soul
is overwhelmed with sorrow
to the point of death. Stay
here and keep watch with me.
-Matthew 26:38 (NIV)
Eager to accept the chal-
lenge to keep watch with Jesus,
during Lent I set aside a time
to pray for one hour. As I see
Easter approaching, I remem-
ber Christs agony in Gethse-
mane, his disappointment over
one who betrayed him and one
who denied him. On the cross,
Jesus poured out his blood to
purchase eternal life for me
and for all who believe. Im
awestruck for such great love!
After a time, I ran out of
words to express this love,
and I began to think of other
things. I thought about a family
dealing with a job loss. I prayed
that the right job would open
up. I prayed for the childrens
emotional well-being. I prayed
that financial needs would be
met. I wondered, What can I do
to help in a tangible way? When
the answer came, I extended
my prayer to follow through
with action.
In my hour of watching with
Jesus, I discovered that there
are many ways to pray: Write
an uplifting note to someone
who is ill or going through a
tough time. Prepare meals for
a family in crisis. Take a person
who is homebound to lunch
or to a medical appointment.
Anything we do to improve the
well-being of another one of
Gods people can be a way of
watching with Jesus.
Thought for the day: We can
extend our prayers through
acts of service.
Prayer: Dear heavenly Father,
inspire us with creative ways to
watch with Jesus. Amen.
Quick to fine,
not solve
R
ecently, I covered a
controversial texting ban
ordinance purposed at last
weeks Greer Council meeting.
I, myself, sometimes text, play
music from my phone and talk
on my phone while driving, and
though my car has Bluetooth
and talk-to-text capabilities,
I still recognize the potential
dangers of it. Its for these
reasons I open-mindedly took
my seat at the meeting ready to
listen to the ordinance and data
supporting it.
Id like to believe anyone
passing laws has researched,
investigated and genuinely
believes it will better the lives
of the citizens. This wasnt
the case last Tuesday. Sure,
statistics about the dangers of
texting and driving were given
in abundance. Weve all seen
the billboards, commercials
and even taken the pledge.
However, the argument was
never that texting while driving
wasnt dangerous. The argu-
ment was whether this law
would protect citizens and not
simply relentlessly fine them to
no avail.
In part, what was detrimental
to the arguments made was the
lack of statistics regarding local
accidents and deaths related to
distracted driving (which the
Police Department shouldve
looked into) and most im-
portantly whether laws simi-
lar to this have been effective
in other areas, which have in
fact been in place since 2009.
And, upon finding the laws
actually havent been effective
which they havent devel-
oping an alternate solution to
alleviate the problem.
Instead of a well-researched
proposal to combat the prob-
lem, a confusing and poorly
composed ordinance was pre-
sented. The ordinance, though
well intended, wasnt well read
prior to the meeting or care-
fully written to begin with.
Im disappointed the parties
directly involved in the discus-
sion, the Police Department
included, werent prepared to
come forward with knowledge
supported by well-researched
statistics and a clear under-
standing of exactly what the
ordinance being discussed said,
and exactly what each word
they were ready to enforce
meant, and the means by which
it would be enforced. As-
sumptions simply arent good
enough when dangers and a
$250 price tag are attached.
BY BILLY CANNADA
EDITOR
More than 1,000 partici-
pants scavenged for 8,800
Easter eggs during the City
of Greers annual Egg-tas-
tic Easter Event last Satur-
day at Century Park.
We were just hoping
for good weather and we
got that, Justin Miller,
a Greer Parks and Recre-
ation supervisor, said. We
had over 1,100 kids that
came through for the big
hunt and played on the
inflatables, got their faces
painted, made crafts, got
some tattoos and watched
Jack Roper at the magic
show. We had a bunch of
things for them to do, but,
all in all, it was just a great
day.
Local children searched
for thousands of eggs with
candy and other prizes
inside. Each hunt had a
golden egg that gave its
finder the chance to re-
deem it for a bigger prize.
We havent had any
negative feedback at all,
Miller said. We changed
up the format this year
and did 20 kids at a time
and split the ages up in-
stead of one big massive
egg hunt. Overall, with the
new format, everyone re-
sponded well.
Miller said the event will
continue in future years.
Weve done this event
for years and years when
weve been able to have it,
Miller said. Well definite-
ly be looking to keep this
going in the future.
Billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
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(Exit 60 off Interstate 85)
Greer, SC 29651
864-968-1133
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No CDs
for kids
Q: Would it be a good
idea to open CD accounts
for my two small chil-
dren?
DR: No. A CD is a Certif-
icate of Deposit. Basically,
theyre not much more
than savings accounts
which carry early with-
drawal penalties. They
earn about the same as a
regular savings account,
too, which at the moment
is next to nothing. Theres
no reason to open them
for your kids.
Now, is it a good idea to
save money on behalf of
your children? Of course,
it is. But if the idea is
simply to teach and help
them save money, Id rec-
ommend simple savings
accounts. If youre talking
about wanting to save
money for themlike
for a college fundId
suggest an Educational
Savings Account (ESA)
with good, growth stock
mutual funds inside.
Even if you want to put
aside college savings, Id
urge you to go ahead and
open regular savings ac-
counts for each of them.
We did that for our kids,
and I can tell you from ex-
perience, youll find tons
of teachable moments
about saving, giving and
life in general!
Problems
with no
credit
score?
Q: Im 20 years old, and
Im trying to get out of
debt. However, Im con-
cerned about what might
happen when Im older
and dont have a credit
score. My girlfriend says
I wont be able to get a
job or rent an apartment
without a good one. Is
this true?
DR: No, its not true. Im
sure your girlfriend is a
sweet person, but she has
no clue what shes talking
about in this situation.
In either case you can
simply explain that reason
you dont have a credit
score is because you have
no debt. Since you dont
have any debt, you have
something known as
money. That makes you
very stable, and it makes
you a fantastic candidate
as an employee or tenant.
Listen to me. Im a
landlord, and if I had my
choice between a ten-
ant with no debt and no
credit score and someone
with a high credit score
but lots of debt, Id take
the one who has no debt
in a heartbeat. Why? Be-
cause thats the one who
is most likely to pay.
Besides, you already
have a good credit history
if youve paid your bills
on time. Show them proof
of that, if necessary. But
taking on a pile of debt to
have a high credit score
or increase your current
score is just plain stupid.
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 2014 NEWS THE GREER CITIZEN A5
Since you dont
have any debt, you
have something
known as money.
DAVE
SAYS
DAVE
RAMSEY
Egg-hunters claim prizes
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
Eva Maria snagged as many goody-flled eggs as she could
fnd at the City of Greers Easter event.
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
A group of eager Easter egg hunters stormed the feld at Century Park last Saturday. The
event drew more than 1,000 participants.
BY KATIE JONES
STAFF WRITER
Gary Burgess biography
uniquely qualifies him
for the position of South
Carolina state superinten-
dent of education. Includ-
ing his time as a student,
he has spent more than
50 years in South Carolina
public schools.
Burgess wants to focus,
essentially, on getting out
of teachers way and let-
ting them do their jobs.
I believe we have the
best and brightest in
the classroom, he said.
Weve not allowed teach-
ers to teach. We bog them
down with paperwork. We
change curriculums and
standards every five years,
as with common core,
which I oppose.
Burgess grew up in the
Upstate and attended
Chapman High in Spar-
tanburg. He received his
bachelors from Wofford
College.
He grew up poor, but
didnt realize it until he
got to Wofford.
There, I realized I was,
Burgess said. No one
treated me like I was poor.
We were expected to learn,
expected to read.
Throwing money at prob-
lems wont solve them, he
said. Burgess would use
his position to amplify
teachers voices, he said.
The only thing that will
improve achievement in
our schools is to let our
teachers do their job,
Burgess said. Were not
letting teachers do that.
He received his masters
from Converse College
and his doctorate from
the University of South
Carolina.
Burgess taught social
studies, economics, gov-
ernment and world and
U.S. history at Dorman
High before moving into
administration at Byrnes.
He stayed in administra-
tion at different schools
with drastically different
demographics.
During his time at D.R.
Hill, the school went from
under performing to
a National Blue Ribbon
School.
(We) turned it into
a place where kids and
teachers were excited to
be and parents were excit-
ed to help there children,
Burgess said.
Im only the republi-
can candidate, probably
the only candidate period,
who has worked schools
and communities to actu-
ally turn schools around,
he said. I understand
what goes on in schools
from the perspective of
a teacher, but as the su-
perintendent who made
the policy and now as an
elected official represent-
ing schools in Anderson
county.
Hes currently serving
on the Anderson County
School Board.
Burgess has three chil-
dren: a son who attends
the University of North
Carolina at Greensboro
and a son and a daugh-
ter who attend Pendleton
High.
The primary is June 10.
More information on Bur-
gess is available at bur-
gessforsc.org.
Kjones@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
Burgess in the
running for
superintendent
Gary Burgess




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Annie Dilworth
Annie Belle Cape Dil-
worth, 89, of South McEl-
haney Road, Greer, was
welcomed into her heav-
enly home by her Lord and
Savior, Jesus Christ and
her beloved husband of
57 years, G.W. Dilworth,
on April 10, 2014. She
was born on Dec. 28, 1924
to the late Cleve and May
Bell Cape, but lived most
of her life in Upstate. She
worked for 37 years with
JP Stevens.
Annie Belle was also pre-
deceased by an infant son,
Ronald Dilworth, broth-
ers, Alvin, Albert, George
and Noah Cape and sis-
ters, Claudia Cape, Elmer
Tompkins, Mary Casey
and Mae Bedgood. She
is survived by her sister,
Jean Motes of Belvedere,
She is also survived by
her children: daughter and
son-in-law, Doris and Tom
Sinclair, son and daugh-
ter in law, Don and Fran
Dilworth, daughter, Diane
Dilworth; 4 grandchildren:
Chuck Sinclair, Karen (Bry-
an) Halt, David (Emily) Dil-
worth and Debbie (Mike)
Morrison; and 12 great-
grandchildren.
A visitation was held Sat-
urday, April 12, 2014, from
10-11:45 a.m. at Stribling
Funeral Home in Duncan.
Service was at noon in the
Stribling Funeral Home
Chapel. Interment was
held at Graceland Ceme-
tery West Greenville In lieu
of flowers, memorials may
be made to Duncan First
Baptist Church Nicaragua
Missions and Anderson
Mill Road Baptist Church
Missions.
The family will be at the
home.
Online condolences can
be made at http://www.
striblingfuneralhome.net.
Benny R. Greer
Well known and much-
beloved attorney, Family
Court Judge, and specially
appointed Circuit Judge,
Benny R. Greer, age 88,
died March 29, 2014 af-
ter a long illness, at his
home in Darlington, S.C.,
surrounded by his fam-
ily. Services were held at
First Baptist Church, Dar-
lington, at 2 p.m., Monday,
March 31, conducted by
a dear friend of 45 years,
the Reverend Renny John-
son and Pastor Mark W.
Jones. Visitation was in
the church fellowship hall
immediately after the ser-
vice. There was a private
Internment afterwards.
Pallbearers were: his sons
and grandsons, Ray and
Tom Greer, Charles Moss,
Danny Robinson, Cam
Moss, John Ballentine,
great grandson, Jacob Bal-
lentine, and the Honorable
John M. Milling. Honorary
Pallbearers were the Dar-
lington County Bar Associ-
ation. All funeral arrange-
ments were made by Belk
Funeral Home.
Benny was born August
28, 1925, in Greer. He
was the oldest son of the
late Herbert Lee Greer and
Frances Gertrude Vaughn
Greer. As the last living
sibling, he was preceded
in death by sister, Frances
Greer Wilkinson of Char-
lotte, N.C., and by his three
brothers, Jack D. Greer of
Florence, Ted C. Greer of
Murrieta, Calif., and Grady
L. Greer of Florence.
Mr. Greer is survived by
his wife of 66 years, Jean-
nyne Allsbrook Greer,
Special Mother Aunt
Merle Vaughn Mullins of
Greer, and his children B.
Ray Greer and Jackie Hen-
drix of Pensacola, Florida,
Becky and Charlie Moss
of Columbia, Kim and
Danny Robinson of Fripp
Island, Tom and Beth
Greer of Lexington; his
grandchildren: Cam and
Mary Moss, Carrie and
John Ballentine, Blakely
Ann Greer, and Jordan
Elizabeth Greer, and his
great grandchildren, Ja-
cob, Anna Greer, Ben, and
Laura Kate Ballentine, and
Andrea Piper Moss. His
extended children are,
John Milling of Darlington,
Annie and Tommy White
of Sumter, Viola Oakley,
Billie Ann Williams, Susie
Flowers Wall, and Jeannie
Flowers Young, all of Dar-
lington.
Benny was active in fam-
ily and school life as he
grew up in Greer, where
he, at 16-years-old, formed
a gospel quartet that be-
came well known, and
afforded him the oppor-
tunity to sing with many
of the gospel greats up
until he began his college
career. After graduating
from Greer High School,
Benny enlisted in 1943 in
The United States Army,
serving his country in
the Aleutian Islands and
Alaska during World War
II. After leaving the Service
in 1946, he continued his
education at the Universi-
ty of South Carolina, earn-
ing an A.B. Degree, major-
ing in English and Political
Science, and a J.D. Juris
Doctorate degree, all in
five years. At the Univer-
sity he was the recipient
of many honors, including
USC Honor Council, USC
Student Council, president
of Kappa Sigma Kappa,
vice president of Blue Key,
Phi Delta Phi, and one of
the Ten Most Outstanding
Seniors, May 1951.
Benny met Jeannyne
Allsbrook of Columbia
while at the University.
They were married on
June 4, 1947 in Greer, and
lived in Columbia while he
finished his degrees. Four
years later, they made
their home in Darlington,
where Benny became an
associate in law with the
late Senator J. S. Spot
Mozingo. Within ten years,
he had established his
own law firm with the late
A. Lee Chandler that last-
ed 25 years, until Judge
Chandlers election to the
bench. Thereafter, he con-
tinued to practice in part-
nership with John M. Mill-
ing until his own election
to the bench in 1988. Ben-
ny later noted, upon the
election of John M. Milling
to the bench in 1999, that
he was not aware of any
other firm that had ceased
to exist because all of the
partners had been elected
as Judges.
Benny was especially
known and appreciated
for his forte as a trial and
appellant attorney, argu-
ing matters before the
Supreme Court on sev-
eral occasions, as well as
regularly trying cases for
a number of other law
firms. It was once said of
him, Benny never views a
challenge about anything
to be a problem, because
it was always within his
nature to present solu-
tions. He was known as a
lawyers-lawyer because
of his enormous scholar-
ship and knowledge of
the law, practicing before
both state and federal
courts. Beyond that, Ben-
ny often, upon request
of the judiciary, played a
major role in the prepara-
tion and adoption of rules
and procedures for the or-
derly management of our
courts.
Perhaps the ultimate
recognition of his preemi-
nence as a legal scholar
occurred in 1972 when he,
along with the late Randall
Bell, was retained to rep-
resent the South Carolina
Supreme Court, which had
been sued in the Federal
Courts. Their successful
representation in this liti-
gation preserved to our
court a valuable right,
which had been challenged.
He was a member of the
American Bar Association,
the Darlington County Bar
Association, and the South
Carolina Bar Association,
serving as president of the
South Carolina Bar from
1972-1973.
Benny will continue to
walk among us, giving
light to our steps, wisdom
to our lives and hope to
our hearts. His life and
presence were profound,
and he gave enduring gifts
to the city of Darlington,
Darlington County, and
the State of South Caro-
lina. He was engaged in
the general practice of law
for 36 years, representing,
among others, the Darling-
ton County School District
for 27 years, and Carolina
Power and Light Company
for fifteen years.
While still practicing
law early in his career,
Benny was appointed by
Governor John C. West as
a Special Circuit Judge, a
capacity he filled a num-
ber of times when needed
throughout the state for
many years. He served
as chairman of the South
Carolina Judicial Coun-
cil, chairman of the Legal
Council of South Carolina
Judicial Standards Com-
mission, First Executive
Committee of the SC Bar
Association, and in 1988
was elected Judge of the
Family Court, 4th Judicial
Circuit, where he served
until retirement.
In 2006, he was honored
in a special ceremony by
the Darlington County
Bar Association with the
commissioning, presenta-
tion, and unveiling of his
portrait, which currently
hangs in the Darlington
County Courthouse. It
was said of him at that
time, He is a combination
of steel and velvet because
he is kind and gentle, yet
tough and strong. Benny
is never influenced by
the fear of the favor of
men. He was called a
devoted husband and fa-
ther, a devout Christian,
and an honorable man of
sound judgment.
Life was miraculous jour-
ney to Benny, for which he
was always grateful and
humbled. It was the great
privilege of many South
Carolina residents to know
him, work with him, and
be blessed by his life. He
was a special ambassa-
dor for Southern Baptists
of South Carolina, serving
as a trustee for the Bap-
tist Bethea Home for three
terms, and as chairman of
the SC Ministries for the
Aging for seven years, and
was instrumental in devel-
opment and planning for
the Martha Franks Home in
Laurens. His service to his
community included The
Lions Club, member of
V.F.W., and the American
Legion. He also served on
the Coker College Board of
Trustees.
Benny and Jeannyne
were always active in
church, city, and commu-
nity service. They were
faithful members of First
Baptist Church, where
Benny served as Deacon,
deacon chairman, Sunday
school teacher, choir mem-
ber, one time chairman of
the Pulpit Committee and
faithful disciple of Jesus
Christ.
Memorial Gifts to honor
the life of Benny R. Greer
may be made to Barnabas
Ministries, Inc., (Box 215,
Darlington, S.C., 29540),
a ministry formed by his
wife supporting pastors
in Kiev, Ukraine, or to Life
and Godliness Ministries,
(27 Nob Hill Road, Colum-
bia, SC, 29210), a teaching
and discipling ministry co-
founded by his daughter
and husband, Becky and
Charlie Moss, in which
his daughter-in-law, Beth
Greer also travels exten-
sively singing and teach-
ing the gospel.
A guestbook is available
online at www.belkfuner-
alhome.com.
Timothy Scott Llewelyn
Timothy Scott Llewelyn,
M.D., beloved area physi-
cian, passed away April
11, 2014, following a val-
iant struggle against can-
cer at the age of 63. He
actively practiced internal
medicine for 30 years in
Spartanburg, serving over
20 years with the Spar-
tanburg Regional Medical
Group of the Carolinas.
Born Nov. 6, 1950, in
Baltimore, Md., and raised
primarily in Lancaster,
medicine was a natural
following for Tim, as he
was the son of parents
who were both physi-
cians, (Louis G. Llewelyn
and Helen Ensor Llewe-
lyn). His educational
background includes a BS
Degree from Presbyterian
College in Clinton, where
he was President of Pi
Kappa Alpha Fraternity,
a Master of Public Health
degree from East Tennes-
see State University in
Johnson City, a MD degree
from the Medical Univer-
sity of South Carolina in
Charleston, and became
Board Certified in Internal
Medicine after completing
his residency through the
University of South Caroli-
na Medical School, Colum-
bia. He served as a Captain
in the U.S. Army Medical
Corps.
The recipient of numer-
ous honors throughout his
career, he was most proud
to have been named the
2009 D.C. Hull Physician of
the Year, in grateful appre-
ciation of his many years
of dedicated, unselfish
devotion to his patients,
his staff, the Spartanburg
County Medical Society,
and serving as a Trustee
to the South Carolina Med-
ical Association. He was
a Board Member of the
Medical Review of the Car-
olinas, and was a founding
member of the St. Lukes
Free Medical Clinic, the
first free medical clinic in
Spartanburg County where
he chaired the steering
committee and served as
the clinics first Chairman
of the Board. He was a for-
mer Chief of Staff at Spar-
tanburg Regional Medical
Center and served on the
Credentials Committee,
leading many physicians
into the world of Bow Ties
and those with Bow Ties
are encouraged to wear
them in his honor.
Dr. Llewelyn was a mem-
ber of the Episcopal Church
of the Advent in Spartan-
burg, a former member of
the Vestry, former youth
basketball coach, and an
active leader in the Boy
Scouts of America Troop
1. He was a former mem-
ber of the Spartanburg
Downtown Rotary Club
among other clubs and as-
sociations throughout the
upstate.
An avid outdoorsman,
Tim loved skiing, hiking
and mountain climbing.
He trained for a full year
before successfully reach-
ing the peaks of Mt. Rainier
in Washington, Mt. McKin-
ley in Alaska, and Mt. Il-
limani in Western Bolivia,
often described as the
Beast of Bolivia 21 thou-
sand feet of madness. His
passions in life focused on
dancing and gardening.
He was past-president of
the Shamrock Dance Club
and a board member of
the Spartanburg Cotillion
Club. He was a Certified
Master Gardener special-
izing in growing Hydran-
geas. He was also a 35-
year member of the USC
Gamecock Club and rarely
missed attending a USC
football game. Although
he had many and varied
travels, his favorite place
in all the world was be-
ing with his family at their
home by the ocean on the
coast of South Carolina.
Dr. Llewelyn is survived
by his loving wife of 39
years, Shirley Dillard
Llewelyn; his son, Timo-
thy Scott Llewelyn Jr.; his
daughter, Dr. Alison Anne
Llewelyn; Jenni, his Welsh
Springer Spaniel; his
brother, Doug Llewelyn
of Hendersonville, N.C.;
and sister, Deborah Rob-
ertson of Kannapolis, N.C.
In addition to his parents,
he was predeceased by a
sister, Lucinda Llewelyn
Hammond.
Visitation was 6-8 p.m.
Tuesday, April 15, 2014,
at Episcopal Church of the
Advent Parish and Com-
munity Life Center, 141
Advent St., Spartanburg,
S.C. 29302. Funeral Ser-
vice will be 3 p.m. Wednes-
day, April 16, 2014, at the
Episcopal Church of the
Advent. Inurnment will
follow in the church Bell
Tower Columbarium. A
reception will follow in
the Parish and Community
Life Center.
In lieu of flowers, memo-
rials may be made to St.
Lukes Free Medical Clinic,
P.O. Box 3466, Spartan-
burg, S.C. 29304 or to a
charity of ones choice.
Honorary escorts will
be the staff of the Medi-
cal Group of the Carolinas,
Internal Medicine Spar-
tanburg and members of
the Spartanburg Medical
Society.
An online guest register
is available at www.floyd-
mortuary.com.
Velma Stokes Phillips
Velma Colleen Stokes
Belcher Phillips, 88, of
Greer, widow of Odell Phil-
lips, died April 9, 2014 at
Alpha Health and Rehab.
A native of Greenville
County, daughter of the
late Edmond E. and Susie
Atkins Stokes, she was
a retired employee of
Tungsten Industries and a
member of Piedmont Park
Baptist Church.
Surviving are three
daughters and sons-in-
law, Vickie and Johnny
Bruce of Greer, Kathy and
Mike Pruitt of Travelers
Rest, Billie Kae and Larry
Hart of Taylors; a daugh-
ter-in-law, Debra Belcher
of Greer; a sister, Brenda
Burgin of Piedmont; seven
grandchildren and twelve
great-grandchildren.
Mrs. Phillips was prede-
ceased by a beloved son,
Kenny Belcher, a brother,
Jack Stokes, a sister, Bar-
bara Kenney, and Mrs.
Phillips longtime compan-
ion, Roy C. Putnam.
Funeral services were
held 2 p.m. Saturday at
The Wood Mortuary, con-
ducted by Rev. Martin
Atkins. Burial followed
in Mount Lebanon Baptist
Church.
Visitation was held 6-8
p.m. Friday at The Wood
Mortuary.
The families are at their
respective homes.
Memorials may be made
to Piedmont Park Baptist
Church, 801 Piedmont
Park Road, Greenville, S.C.
29607.
The family would like
to thank her sitters, Car-
ole and Melissa and Alpha
Health Care.
Online condolences may
be made at www.thewood-
mortuary.com
OBITUARIES
The Greer Citizen
A6 THE GREER CITIZEN WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 2014
A Arrangement Florist
877-5711
The Upstates Premier Florist
1205 W. POINSETT STREET GREER OPEN MON.-FRI. 8:30-6 SAT. 9-3
www.aarrangementfowers.com
Greers Freshest Flowers Master Designer Shop
VOTED BEST IN THE UPSTATE
Warm Weekend Weather
Warm weather returns for the end of the
week with highs climbing to the low 70s by
the weekend. After a rainy, cold start to the
week we will see dry, warm weather return.
Afternoon highs will stay in the 50s and 60s
for Wednesday and Thursday with overnight
lows in the 30s. By this weekend we will see
temperatures climb to the middle and upper
60s with dry weather on Saturday and Sunday.
Have a great weekend!
Easter Eggstravaganza
Where: Abner Creek Bapist
2461 Abner Creek Rd
Greer
Date: Saturday, April 19
10 a.m.-noon

Temps: Partly sunny. Upper 50s to start
73
48
2.94
13.27
-0.63
6:56 AM
8:02 PM
April 22 April 29 May 6 May 14
68/40 MC 67/40 PS
72/42 PS 73/50 PS
71/54 RN 70/54 PS
73/57 RN 74/58 PS
75/49 PS 75/52 MC
75/49 PS 70/50 PS
80/51 PS 77/52 PS
72/49 PS 73/56 MC
68/40 Mostly Cloudy
67/40 Partly Sunny
70/42 Mostly Cloudy
69/42 Partly Sunny
73/47 Partly Sunny
72/48 Partly Sunny
75/49 Partly Sunny
74/50 Partly Sunny
60
34
65
36
68
42
73
47
72
48
67
51
78
52
Wednesday Thursday Friday
Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday
Weekend Outlook
ONLINE |
View Obituaries
online
at
greercitizen.com
FROM PAGE ONE
will be held throughout
downtown and Greer City
Park on Friday, May 2 and
Saturday, May 3. The Mar-
shall Tucker Band will be
performing on Saturday
night at 7:30 p.m.
We have about 25,000
people come to Greer be-
cause of this festival, said
Greer Chamber of Com-
merce President Allen
Smith. Greer, in a lot of
ways, is a secret to some
people. This provides an
excuse, if you will, for
people to come to Greer
and allow us to showcase
the community. And they
come back. Ive never
heard someone say, I
came to Greer for the first
time in years and didnt
enjoy it. No. People are
blown away by the retail
attractions, the restaurant
attractions, the recreation
attractions and everything
this community offers.
The Family Festival is
free to the public and will
feature crafts, games, food
and other attractions.
Thirty years is a long
run, Painter said. Folks
started this years ago as
a way to give back to the
community. Thats what
weve been able to do and
people have been able to
come out and enjoy them-
selves.
Smith said the festival
never fails to generate a
buzz.
We have such an energy
right now in Greer, Smith
said. Its an energy thats
built around economic de-
velopment growth, com-
munity growth and just
the community spirit. This
festival really is just an
embodiment of all that. It
shows the vitality and the
activeness of our commu-
nity.
The Marshall Tucker
Band got its start in Spar-
tanburg. In 1972, the band
signed with Capricorn Re-
cords, the same label that
guided The Allman Broth-
ers Band, Wet Willie, and
others to national fame.
The MTB opened shows
for The Allman Brothers
in 1973, and the following
year, they began to head-
line their own shows across
America. They toured con-
stantly playing sheds, sta-
diums, theaters, fairs, and
festivals. With singles like
Heard It In a Love Song,
Fire On The Mountain,
Cant You See, and Take
The Highway, The Mar-
shall Tucker Band earned
seven gold and three plati-
num albums while they
were on the Capricorn
Records label. During the
90s, the MTB scored four
hit singles on Billboards
country chart and one on
Billboards gospel chart.
The band was not able
to perform last year due
to inclement weather.
Ive been involved with
this thing since the late
90s and never had weath-
er like we had last year,
Painter said. Hopefully,
the good Lord is going to
shine down on us and well
have a beautiful event.
A full list of food and
craft vendors and enter-
tainment is available on
the event website at greer-
familyfest.com. The event
is alcohol-free and pets,
coolers, skateboards and
bicycles are not allowed
on the event site.
EASTER EGGSTRAVAGANZA
AT ABNER CREEK
Abner Creek Baptist
Church will host its annu-
al Easter Eggstravaganza
on Saturday, April 19 10
a.m.-noon. The event will
feature a puppet show,
games and egg hunt.
The church is located
at 2461 Abner Creek Rd.,
Greer.
Visit abnercreekbaptist.
com, for more informa-
tion.
SUNRISE SERVICE
AT REDEEMER LUTHERAN
Redeemer Lutheran
Church, located at 300
ONeal Rd. in Greer, will
host a sunrise service at 7
a.m. on Sunday, April 20.
There will be no Sunday
school. Regular service
will begin at 10 a.m.
For more information,
contact 877-5876.
EASTER ARGH HUNT
AT RIVERSIDE BAPTIST
Riverside Baptist Church,
located at 1249 S. Suber
Rd., Greer, is hosting its
Easter Argh Hunt on Fri-
day, April 18 at 6:30 p.m.
Those planning to attend
are asked to dress as their
favorite pirate.
For more information,
call 879-4400.
BIBLE SCHOOL FUNDRAISER
AT UNITED CHRISTIAN
United Christian Church
is conducting a vacation
bible school fundraiser on
Saturday, April 26 from 11
a.m.-8:30 p.m. at Pizza Inn
on Wade Hampton Blvd. in
Greer.
There will be a car wash
and a table set up for do-
nations. Pizza Inn will do-
nate 10 percent for orders
supporting the cause.
GODS KIDZ
AT UNITED CHRISTIAN
United Christian Church,
located at 105 Daniel Ave.,
Greer, will have puppets,
songs, cupcakes, games
and an Easter egg hunt for
kids on Saturday, April 19
at 11 a.m.
For more information,
call 895-3966 or 561-
8195.
HOW THE WEST WAS WON
AUDITIONS
The Palmetto Statesmen
barbershop singers invite
men who sing to audition
for a show entitled How
The West Was Won.
Those interested my try
out any Monday evening at
7 p.m. until May 26 at the
Duncan United Methodist
Church.
The show will be pre-
sented Sept. 13 in Duncan
at the District 5 Fine Arts
Center. Learning tracks
and sheet music will be
provided.
Call 322-0165 for de-
tails.
CONCERT AT GROVELAND
BAPTIST CHURCH
Jane Greene Johnson,
singer and member of
the Gaither homecoming
family, will be in concert
on Sunday, April 27 dur-
ing the 11 a.m. service at
Groveland Baptist Church,
located at 2 Groveland Dr.,
Taylors.
The concert is free and
open to the public. Con-
tact, 908-6659.
OFFERING FREE FOOD
EBENEZER WELCOME
The Bread of Life Food
Pantry at Ebenezer Wel-
come Baptist Church, 4005
Highway 414, Landrum, is
open on Thursdays from
2-4 p.m.
The pantry is open to
families in need of as-
sistance. Photo ID is re-
quired.
For more information,
call 895-1461.
SMOKE ON THE MOUNTAIN
AT HOLLY SPRINGS
Holly Springs Bap-
tist Church will present
Smoke on the Mountain
April 26 at 7 p.m. and
April 27 at 6 p.m.
This bluegrass musical
comedy is set in 1938 as
the new preacher intro-
duces the church to its
first singing.
The church is located at
251 Hannon Road, Inman,
off Highway 357.
For more information,
visit hollyspringsbc.org or
call 877-6765.
SUNRISE SERVICE
AT HARMONY FELLOWSHIP
Harmony Fellowship
church will host an Easter
Sunrise Service on Sunday,
April 20 at 7 a.m. on the
church lawn by the cross-
es.
The church is located at
468 S. Suber Rd. in Greer.
SINGLES BIBLE STUDY
PELHAM ROAD BAPTIST
Pelham Road Baptist
Church, 1108 Pelham
Road, Greer, hosts a Sin-
gles Bible Study each Sun-
day from 6-8:30 p.m.
SMALL GROUPS
GREER FIRST BAPTIST
ENGAGE Small Groups
continue at Greer First
Baptist Church.
Groups offered include
Co-Ed Young Adult Sin-
gles (twenty-somethings
- 35), Newlywed Married
Couples (couples married
less than five years), Mar-
ried with Children (middle
adult ages with children
or youth) and Co-Ed Older
Adults (married or single
over 35).
Groups will meet in the
Family Life Center.
Doughnuts and coffee
will be available beginning
at 9:15 a.m. and the class
begins at 9:45 a.m.
There will be a large
group time and the last
part of the class will con-
sist of small group discus-
sion times.
Class will be lead by Pas-
tor Rick.
GRIEFSHARE
FAIRVIEW BAPTIST
Fairview Baptist Church,
1300 Locust Hill Road,
Greer, will host Grief-
Share, a support group led
by Carol Allen, on the sec-
ond Sunday of each month
from 4:45 - 6:30 p.m.
For more information,
contact Carol Allen at 292-
6008.
CHURCH SUNDAY SCHOOL
REDEEMER LUTHERAN
Redeemer Lutheran
Church, 300 ONeal Road,
Greer, conducts Sunday
School at 9 a.m., followed
by the worship service at
10 a.m. each Sunday.
Redeemers pastor is
Scottie Burkhalter.
For more information,
call 877-5876.
BY BILLY CANNADA
EDITOR
A new church will take
shape in downtown Greer
on Easter Sunday and, for
two local pastors, it has
been a long process of
careful thought and hard
work.
Rev. Trevor Hoffman
and Rev. David Eill were
recently commissioned
by The Church at Cher-
rydale (TCC) to begin The
Church at Greer Station
(TCGS), which will meet at
738 S. Line St. Ext. (Greer
Community Ministries),
throughout the summer.
Eill, who has lived in the
Greer area all his life, said
he is excited for the op-
portunity.
It is a joy to come back
to my hometown to start a
church, he said. For me,
coming back to the town
where I have so many good
memories has been a pro-
cess of setting aside my
own experiences with old
acquaintances and seeing
that its not about me, but
rather about the power of
the Gospel transforming
my heart to forgive and
minister.
The new church plant is
one of many The Church at
Cherrydale hopes to send
out. Rev. Matt Rogers, who
leads as teaching pastor
at TCC, said another plant
in Blue Ridge is already in
the works.
The landscape of most
southern cities is chang-
ing and this requires local
churches to rethink their
missionary strategy, Rog-
ers said. This is certainly
true in a city like Greer.
The changing population
demands healthy existing
churches, as well as the
starting of new churches,
in order to truly make a
difference.
Hoffman, who spent
two years as a pastoral
resident at TCC, said the
new church is anxious to
become a part of Greers
growing community.
Greer is a city dedicat-
ed to its revitalization and
has worked hard the last
decade to be reborn into
the prosperous commu-
nity is has become, Hoff-
man said. Greers past
was bright, but its future
is ever brighter. The peo-
ple of Greer love their city
and its infectious.
As for Sundays at TCGS,
Hoffman said he and Eill
just want to keep things
simple.
We are a simple church,
he said. We just want to
make disciples who love
Jesus, love His people and
love their neighbors. Our
Sunday gatherings are
geared at making these
disciples through prayer,
and the reading, singing
and preaching of Gods
word.
Though the process has
been lengthy, Eill, who
completed his Masters of
Divinity at Southeastern
Baptist Theological Semi-
nary, said he is excited to
finally see dreams become
reality.
This is a new thing for
me being a pastor. I am
so thankful for the pas-
tors that have mentored
me over the years, he
said. I am nervous about
pastoring because it is a
weighty task to shepherd
people. Some of my nerves
are just excitement to see
what the Lord will do.
Hoffman said he hopes
the new start will give the
church opportunities to
reach out to the surround-
ing communities.
We believe no true
civic revitalization comes
apart from Gods people
preaching the Gospel and
Gods people working for
the good of the city, he
said. As such, we aim to
connect with Greers tre-
mendous non-profits and
love the city well. By Gods
grace, He will embed us
in Greer for many, many
years and teach us to love
Greer even more.
Eill said The Church at
Greer Stations mission is
simple.
We want to faithfully
preach the Bible, connect
people in meaningful com-
munity of relationships
and train to send people
to serve others, he said.
For us, if we focus on
anything else, we are not
doing what we should.
For more information,
visit tcgreerstation.com.
billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
RELIGION
The Greer Citizen
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 2014 THE GREER CITIZEN A7
Church plant to begin ministry in Greer
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
David Eill, left, and Trevor Hofman will pastor The Church at Greer Station, which will
begin services on Easter.

CHURCH
NEWS

For peace of mind
Choose a provider that has a Hospice House
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864.457.9122 www.hocf.org
FEST: Organizers hope for better weather
[The festival] shows
the vitality and the
activeness of our
community.
Allen Smith
President, Greer Chamber
of Commerce
301 McCall St. Greer
848-5500
Highway 14 Greer, SC
879-7311
Management & Employees
ASHMORE
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Greer
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Riverside Baptist Church 1249 South Suber Road Greer
And they were calling to one another: Holy, holy, holy is the LORD Almighty;
the whole earth is full of his glory. - Isaiah 6:3
BAPTIST
Abner Creek Baptist Church
2461 Abner Creek Rd., Greer 877-6604
Airport Baptist Church
776 S. Batesville Rd., Greer 848-7850
Apalache Baptist
1915 Gap Creek Rd., Greer 877-6012
Bible Baptist Church
6645 Mountain View Rd., Taylors 895-7003
Blue Ridge Baptist Church
3950 Pennington Rd., Greer 895-5787
BridgePointe
600 Bridge Rd., Taylors 244-2774
Burnsview Baptist Church
9690 Reidville Rd., Greer 879-4006
Calvary Baptist
101 Calvary St., Greer 877-9759
Calvary Baptist
108 Forest St., Greer 968-0092
Calvary Hill Baptist
100 Edward Rd., Lyman
Calvary Road Baptist Church
108 Bright Rd., Greer 593-2643
Camp Creek Baptist Church
1100 Camp Creek Rd., Taylors
Cedar Grove Baptist Church
109 Elmer St., Greer 877-6216
Community Baptist Church
642 S. Suber Rd., Greer 848-3500
Double Springs Baptist Church
3800 Locust Hill Rd., Taylors 895-1314
Ebenezer-Welcome Baptist Church
4005 Highway 414, Landrum 895-1461
El Bethel Baptist Church
313 Jones Ave., Greer 877-4021
Emmanuel Baptist Church
423 S. Buncombe Rd., Greer 877-2121
Enoree Fork Baptist Church
100 Enoree Dr., Greer 268-4385
Fairview Baptist Church
1300 Locust Hill Rd., Greer 877-1881
First Baptist Church
202 W. Poinsett St., Greer 877-4253
Freedom Fellowship Greer High 877-3604
Friendship Baptist Church
1600 Holly Springs Rd., Lyman 877-4746
Good News Baptist Church
1592 S. Highway 14, Greer 879-2289
Grace Baptist Church
760 W. Gap Creek Rd., Greer 879-3519
Grace Place
407 Ridgewood Dr., Greer 877-7724
Greer Freewill Baptist Church
110 Pine Ridge Dr., Greer 968-0310
Heritage Chapel Baptist Church
218 Alexander Rd., Greer 989-0170
Highland Baptist Church
3270 Hwy. 414, Taylors 895-5270
Hillcrest Baptist Church
111 Biblebrook Dr., Greer 877-4206
Hispanic Baptist Iglesia Bautista Hispana
199 Hubert St., Greer 877-3899
Holly Springs Baptist Church
250 Hannon Rd., Inman 877-6765
Locust Hill Baptist Church
5534 Locust Hill Rd., Travelers Rest 895-1771
Maple Creek Baptist Church
609 S. Main St., Greer 877-1791
Milford Baptist Church
1282 Milford Church Rd., Greer 895-5533
Mount Lebanon Baptist Church
572 Mt. Lebanon Church Rd., Greer 895-2334
New Hope Baptist Church
561 Gilliam Rd., Greer 879-7080
New Jerusalem Baptist Church
413 E. Poinsett St., Greer 968-9203
New Life Baptist Church
90 Becco Rd., Greer 895-3224
Northwood Baptist Church
888 Ansel School Rd., Greer 877-5417
ONeal Baptist Church
3420 N. Highway 101, Greer 895-0930
Pelham First Baptist Church
2720 S. Old Highway 14, Greer 879-4032
Peoples Baptist Church
310 Victor Avenue Ext., Greer 848-0449
Piney Grove Missionary Baptist Church
201 Jordan Rd., Lyman 879-2646
Pleasant Grove Baptist Church
1002 S. Buncombe Rd., Greer 877-6436
Pleasant Hill Baptist Church
4899 Jordan Rd., Greer 895-3546
Providence Baptist Church
2020 Gibbs Shoals Rd., Greer 877-3483
Rebirth Missionary Baptist Church
2375 Racing Road, Greer 877-0449
Riverside Baptist Church
1249 S. Suber Rd., Greer 879-4400
Second Baptist Church
570 Memorial Drive Ext., Greer 877-7061
Southside Baptist Church
410 S. Main St., Greer 877-2672
St. Johns Baptist Church
2 Groveland Rd., Taylors 879-2904
Suber Road Baptist Church
445 S. Suber Rd., Greer 801-0181
Taylors First Baptist Church
200 W. Main St., Taylors 244-3535
United Family Ministries
13465 E. Wade Hampton Blvd., Greer 877-3235
Victor Baptist
121 New Woodruff Rd., Greer 877-9686
Washington Baptist Church
3500 N. Highway 14, Greer 895-1510
Welcome Home Baptist Church
1779 Pleasant Hill Rd., Greer 901-7674
CATHOLIC
Blessed Trinity Catholic Church
901 River Rd., Greer 879-4225
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Riverside Church of Christ
2103 Old Spartanburg Rd., Greer 322-6847
CHURCH OF GOD
Church of God - Greer
500 Trade St., Greer 877-0374
Church of God of Prophecy
2416 N. Highway 14, Greer 877-8329
Eastside Worship Center
601 Taylors Rd., Taylors 268-0523
ONeal Church of God
3794 Berry Mill Rd., Greer 895-4273
Pelham Church of God of Prophecy
139 Abner Creek Rd., Greer 801-0528
Praise Cathedral Church of God
3390 Brushy Creek Rd., Greer 879-4878
EPISCOPAL
Good Shepherd Episcopal
200 Cannon St., Greer 877-2330
LUTHERAN
Abiding Peace Ev. Lutheran Church
401 Batesville Rd., Simpsonville 288-4867
Apostolic Lutheran Church
453 N. Rutherford Rd., Greer 848-4568
Immanuel Lutheran Church & School LCMS
2820 Woodruff Rd., Simpsonville 297-5815
Redeemer Lutheran Church, ELCA
300 Oneal Rd., Greer 877-5876
METHODIST
Bethel United Methodist Church
105 E. Arlington Ave., Greer 879-2066
Covenant United Methodist Church
1310 Old Spartanburg Rd., Greer 244-3162
Ebenezer United Methodist Church
174 Ebenezer Road, Greer 987-9644
Faith United Methodist Church
1301 S. Main St. (S. Hwy. 14), Greer 877-0308
Fews Chapel United Methodist Church
4000 N. Highway 101, Greer 895-2522
Grace United Methodist Church
627 Taylor Rd., Greer 877-7015
Lee Road United Methodist Church
1377 East Lee Rd., Taylors 244-6427
Liberty Hill United Methodist Church
301 Liberty Hill Rd., Greer 968-8150
Liberty United Methodist Church
4276 Highway 414, Landrum 292-0142
Memorial United Methodist Church
201 N. Main St., Greer 877-0956
Mountain View UMC
6525 Mountain View Rd., Taylors 895-8532
Sharon United Methodist Church
1421 Reidville Sharon Rd., Greer 879-7926
St. Mark United Methodist Church
911 St. Mark Rd., Taylors 848-7141
St. Paul United Methodist Church
3856 N. Highway 101, Greer 895-5570
Victor United Methodist Church
1 Wilson Ave., Greer 877-5520
Woods Chapel United Methodist Church
2388 Brown Wood Rd., Greer 879-4475
Zoar United Methodist Church
1005 Highway 357, Greer 877-0758
PRESBYTERIAN
Blue Ridge Presbyterian Church
2094 Highway 101 North, Greer 483-2140
Devenger Road Presbyterian Church
1200 Devenger Rd., Greer 268-7652
Fellowship Presbyterian Church
1105 Old Spartanburg Rd., Greer 877-3267
First Presbyterian Church
100 School St., Greer 877-3612
Fulton Presbyterian Church
821 Abner Creek Rd., Greer 879-3190
OTHER DENOMINATIONS
Agape House
900 Gap Creek Rd., Greer 329-7491
Anglican Church of St. George the Martyr
427 Batesville Rd., Simpsonville 281-0015
Bartons Memorial Pentacostal Holiness
Highway 101 North, Greer
Bethesda Temple
125 Broadus St., Greer 877-8523
Beulah Christian Fellowship Church
1017 Mauldin Rd., Greenville 283-0639
Calvary Bible Fellowship
Holiday Inn, Duncan 266-4269
Calvary Chapel of Greer
104 New Woodruff Rd. Greer 877-8090
Christ Fellowship
343 Hampton Rd., Greer 879-8446
Christian Heritage Church
900 N. Main St., Greer 877-2288
Christian Life Center 2 Country Plaza 322-1325
Christian Outreach 106 West Rd. 848-0308
El-Bethel Holiness 103 E. Church St. 968-9474
Faith Family Church
3339 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors 244-0207
Faith Temple
5080 Sandy Flat Rd., Taylors 895-2524
Glad Tidings Assembly of God
Highway 290, Greer 879-3291
Greer Mill Church 52 Bobo St., Greer 877-2442
Harmony Fellowship Church
468 S. Suber Rd., Greer 877-8287
Harvest Christian Church
2150 Highway 417, Woodruff 486-8877
International Cathedral of Prayer
100 Davis Avenue Greer 655-0009
Lifesong Church
12481 Greenville Highway, Lyman 439-2602
Living Way Community Church
3239 N. Highway 101, Greer 895-0544
Mountain Bridge Community Church
1400B Wade Hampton Blvd., Greer 350-1051
New Beginnings Outreach
104 New Woodruff Rd., Greer 968-2424
New Birth Greenville
3315 Brushy Creek Rd., Greer 848-2728
New Covenant Fellowship
2425 Racing Rd., Greer 848-4521
New Hope Freedom
109 W. Wade Hampton Blvd. Greer 205-8816
New Life in Christ 210 Arlington Rd. 346-9053
Point of Life Church
Wade Hampton Blvd. Duncan 426-4933
Springwell Church
4369 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors 268-2299
Trinity Fellowship Church
3610 Brushy Creek Rd., Greer 877-0419
1700 N. Pleasantburg Dr, Greenville 244-6011
United Anglican Fellowship
1001 W. Poinsett St., Greer 629-3350
United Christian Church
105 Daniel Ave., Greer 879-0970
United House of Prayer
213 Oak St., Greer 848-0727
Upstate Friends Meeting (Quaker)
39 Hillcrest St., Lyman 877-9392
Upstate Tree of Life
203 East Bearden St., Greer 848-1295
Victorian Hills Community Church
209 Victor Ave. Ext., Greer 877-3981
Vine Worship Center
4373 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors 244-8175
A8 THE GREER CITIZEN PAGE LABEL WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 2014
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FROM PAGE ONE
When the proposed ordi-
nance was frst addressed at
the council meeting, despite
councilmembers being un-
able to fnd common ground
regarding the wording and en-
forcement of the ordinance, it
passed on frst reading with a
4-3 vote and will be heard for a
second and fnal reading fol-
lowing a public hearing.
When youre texting youre
using three items: youre using
your visual, youre using man-
ual, youre using and youre us-
ing mental,councilmember
Judy Albert said during the
meeting, after citing statistic
indicating texting while driv-
ing increases the risk of acci-
dents, which she stressed not
only harms the driver and pas-
sengers, but other cars on the
road as well.
In an efort to minimize dis-
tracted driving, Albert spear-
headed the ordinance to out-
law texting, but because of the
way the ordinance was writ-
ten, it is unclear if the law
could have also, if unintention-
ally, ban telecommunication
or talking on a cell phone, as
well as talk-to-texting use
while driving.
Councilmember Jay Arro-
wood questioned the portion
of the ordinance stating: the
use of voice operated technol-
ogy while the device is being
used for telephonic communi-
cation, provided the driver is
not holding the device while
driving, seemed to ban hold-
ing a device at all while driving
wasnt allowed. Mayor Rick
Danner and Albert both reiter-
ated that the intent is only to
ban texting not calling or talk-
ing on a mobile phone. As a
result, it was recommended
the questioned portion of the
ordinance be removed or re-
written prior to second read-
ing.
The way this is written is
they put the telephonic, I be-
lieve, in there because, if I see
you dialing your phone, I dont
know if youre texting or call-
ing someone on your phone,
Reynolds said. If you get so
specifc and say only texting,
how am I going to tell? Thats
why the general clause, I as-
sume, is there.
The law wont allow phones
to be seized and searched
without a warrant or consent.
Because it the telephonic
portion of the ordinance is be-
ing removed, if passed, it
could make the law more dif -
cult to enforcement.
Understand this, I cant take
your phone and look at it. The
only way I can fnd out if youre
texting, if youre specifcally
texting, is to ask you. If you re-
fuse to tell me theres nothing I
can do because I cant take the
phone from you,Reynolds
said.
The department did not re-
spond to eforts for further
clarifcation in time for publi-
cation.
The Highway Loss Data In-
stitute also found the risk of
crashing while using a hands-
free phone and a hand-held
phone are the same.
Council approved the ordi-
nance on frst reading with the
intent to make amendments
to the ordinance. A public
hearing will be held prior to
the second reading of the or-
dinance, and the next regular-
ly scheduled council meeting
is April 22 at 6:30 p.m. at Greer
City Hall.
abradford@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
FROM PAGE ONE
prise four subcommittees
of the commission: resur-
facing, bridges, pedestrian
and sidewalks and roads.
Following seven public
information sessions con-
ducted by the commis-
sion, citizen feedback was
collected from more than
600 comments and 800
surveys to identify the
needs of the communities.
Each subcommittee cre-
ated and applied its own
methodology to prioritize
the projects.
Roads recommended in
order by the commission
include, Brushy Creek Road
between Buncombe Road
and Main Street, Ham-
mett Bridge Road between
South Suber and Bun-
combe Road, North High-
way 101 between Highway
290 and Milford Church
Road, Brushy Creek Road
between South Buncombe
and Spartanburg Road,
Milford Church Road be-
tween Highway 290 and
Highway 101 and Highway
290 between Highway 101
and Highway 253.
The sidewalk subcom-
mittee recommended
sidewalks near Greenville
County schools, however
it would be in financial
partnership with schools
under the recommenda-
tion that a new classifica-
tion is created to include
sidewalks on school cam-
puses. The commission
recommended addressing
Suber Road to Hammett
Bridge Road and Gibb
Shoals Road near River-
side Middle School, Gibb
Shoals Road to Wood-
land Elementary School
across Suber Road, South
Buncombe Road to Wade
Hampton, Jones Street to
Buncombe Road, Hender-
son Gap Road, Memorial
Drive Extension, Highland
Drive and Milton Way.
Maria Lynn is the sec-
ond petitioner this year
to address council and
request consideration for
the allowance of chickens
in the city limits, which
is already permitted by
Greenville County. Reni-
naldo Rementeria posed a
similar request at a Janu-
ary council meeting, but
council hasnt taken pub-
lic action on the matter.
The Gambrell brothers,
Danny, David and Gerald,
were recognized for their
96 combined years of ser-
vice to the city. The three
brothers worked as fire-
fighters and their family
has cumulatively served
Greer for more than 170
years.
Its a real testimony to
a commitment, not only
that an individual has
made, but also their fam-
ily, Danner said.
The next regularly
scheduled Greer Council
meeting is April 22 at 6:30
p.m. at Greer City Hall.
abradford@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
FROM WSPA
NEWS PARTNER
Jessica Nicole Mathis
Ramirez-Dela Rosa, 25, of
Greer died Saturday night
after being thrown from a
vehicle involved in a crash
on I-26.
According to Highway
Patrol, the crash occurred
at 10:15 p.m. at mile mark-
er 6 when the driver of an
eastbound vehicle with
four passengers attempt-
ed to avoid hitting a deer
and ran off the roadway.
The driver and three
passengers were trans-
ported to an area hospital
with injuries. Dela Rosa,
who was not wearing a
seatbelt, died after being
thrown from the car. The
wreck remains under in-
vestigation.
(Note: All information
contained in the following
blotter was taken directly
from the official incident
reports filed by the Greer
Police Department or The
Spartanburg County Sher-
iffs Office or The Green-
ville County Sheriffs Of-
fice. All suspects are to be
considered innocent until
proven guilty in the court
of law.)
SIMPLE POSSESSION
Tashane Octavious An-
ton Dodd, 19, of 300 Sun-
nyside Drive C, Greer, has
been charged with simple
possession of marijuana.
According to incident
reports, an officer was op-
erating stationary radar
when he observed a silver
Chevy traveling 76 mph
in a 55 mph zone. The
officer initiated a traffic
stop on the vehicle. Upon
approaching the vehicle,
the officer observed the
driver and two passen-
gers moving around the
vehicle excessively and
acting very nervously. Due
to the suspects behavior
and knowledge of previ-
ous drug activity, officers
asked to search the vehicle
and were granted permis-
sion from the driver.
Two baggies of green-
ish leafy substance were
located inside the vehicle.
Dodd, who was a passen-
ger in the vehicle, admitted
the marijuana belonged to
him. He was arrested and
transported to the Greer
City Jail.
DUI
Wendy Jean Voecks, 49,
0f 310 Chandler Road,
Greer, has been charged
with DUI (second) and
driving under suspension.
According to incident re-
ports, an officer observed
a gray Dodge Ram truck
traveling down South Main
Street swerving and un-
able to maintain lane con-
trol. The officer activated
his blue lights to initiate a
traffic stop on the vehicle,
but the vehicle continued
on until eventually stop-
ping.
The officer made con-
tact with the driver,
Voecks, and immediately
detected a strong odor of
alcohol coming from her
person. The officer ob-
served Voecks speech to
be slurred and her eyes to
be glossy.
A series of field sobriety
tests were performed on
Voecks that she failed. She
was arrested and trans-
ported to the Greer City
Jail where she registered
.27 percent on a breatha-
lyzer. She also had a sus-
pended drivers license.
DUI
Patrick Emmanuel Pick-
ett, 43, of 212 Oakland
Ave., Greer, has been
charged with DUI (sec-
ond).
According to incident
reports, an officer was dis-
patched to Wade Hampton
Boulevard. in reference to
a reckless driver traveling
from Greenville toward
Greer. The officer spot-
ted a vehicle matching the
provided description and
observed it swerve into the
oncoming lane. The officer
initiated a traffic stop on
the vehicle and its driver,
Pickett.
Upon approaching Pick-
ett, the officer observed
his eyes to be bloodshot
and his speech slurred.
The officer also detected
a strong smell of alcohol
coming from inside the
vehicle. The officer of-
fered Pickett a series of
field sobriety tests, but he
refused to take them.
He was arrested and
transported to the Greer
City Jail, where he refused
a breathalyzer.
MULTIPLE CHARGES
Charles Brandon Suggs,
22, of 103 School St. 356,
Greer, has been charged
with shoplifting, trespass
and use of a vehicle with-
out the owners consent.
According to incident
reports, an officer was
dispatched to Walmart in
reference to an auto theft.
Upon arrival, the officer
met with the victim, who
stated he had driven Suggs
to Walmart so he could
buy a cellphone card. The
victim told officers Suggs
went inside the store and
returned with two TVs.
When the victim asked
Suggs where he had got-
ten the TVs, Suggs told
him he had taken them
from inside Walmart. At
this point, the victim told
Suggs he wasnt going to
drive him anywhere with
stolen televisions.
The victim said he then
got out of his vehicle and
Suggs jumped into his ve-
hicle and drove off. Suggs
and the vehicle were later
located, as well as the tele-
visions he had stolen.
Suggs had already been
placed on trespass notice
from Walmart in January
for another shoplifting.
He was arrested and trans-
ported to the Greer City
Jail.
POSSESSION
Jonathan Blake Soles-
bee, 24, of 202 Riverside
Towne Circle, Greer, has
been charged with posses-
sion of drug parapherna-
lia and has a warrant for
property crimes enhanced
pending.
According to incident re-
ports, an officer respond-
ed to Walmart in reference
to a shoplifting call.
Upon arrival, the officer
met with the complainant,
who stated a white male
(later identified as Soles-
bee) had come into the
store and inquired about
a laptop computer before
leaving the store with the
computer along with a
charger and a case with-
out paying. The complain-
ant saw Solesbee get into
a white Toyota and drive
away. Officers were able
to later locate Solesbee. He
told officers he had taken
the computer to a place
in Taylors and sold it for
$200.
A search of the vehicle he
was in yielded two hypo-
dermic syringes, a spoon
and 10 cotton swabs. He
was arrested and trans-
ported to the Greer City
Jail.
DUI
Mark Christopher Halbig,
39, of 104 Kylemore Lane,
Greer, has been charged
with DUI and disregarding
a red light.
According to incident
reports, an officer was on
routine patrol when he ob-
served a dark sedan run
the traffic light at the in-
tersection of Gibb Shoals
and East Suber roads. The
officer initiated a traffic
stop on the vehicle and its
driver Halbig.
Upon approaching the
vehicle, the officer detect-
ed a strong odor of alcohol
and noticed Halbigs eyes
to be bloodshot. Halbig
was asked to step out of
the vehicle at which point
he was offered a series of
field sobriety tests that he
refused. He was placed un-
der arrest and transported
to the Greer City Jail.
MULTIPLE CHARGES
Juan Felipe Tovar-San-
chez, 26, of 13 7th St.,
Greer, has been charged
with: DUI, faulty equip-
ment, no state drivers
license, no proof of insur-
ance, improper left turn,
open container and no
possession of vehicle reg-
istration.
According to incident
reports, an officer was on
routine patrol when he ob-
served a burgundy Ford
truck make a wide turn
onto Buncombe Street with
a nonfunctioning third
brake light. The officer
initiated a traffic stop on
the vehicle and its driver,
Tovar-Sanchez. The offi-
cer immediately observed
Tovar-Sanchez making a
lot of movements from in-
side the vehicle.
The officer made con-
tact with Tovar-Sanchez
and learned he didnt have
a drivers license. The offi-
cer then asked him to step
out of the vehicle so he
could place him under ar-
rest for no drivers license.
Tovar-Sanchez became un-
cooperative and attempt-
ed to pull away from the
officer. The officer also
detected a strong odor of
alcohol coming from his
person and observed his
eyes to be bloodshot. Due
to his lack of cooperation
and attempts to keep the
officer from arresting him,
no field sobriety tests were
administered on Tovar-
Sanchez.
Eventually, the officer
was able to place Tovar-
Sanchez under arrest.
A search of his vehicle
yielded five full beers, two
empty beers and one half
empty beer.
Tovar-Sanchez was
transported to the Greer
City Jail, where he failed to
properly blow in a breath-
alyzer.
PUBLIC DRUNKENNESS
Wayne Leon Campbell,
49, of 225 Ponder Road,
Greer, has been charged
with being drunk in public
and resisting arrest.
Campbell was arrested
and transported to the
Greer City jail.
POLICE AND FIRE
The Greer Citizen
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 2014 THE GREER CITIZEN A9
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Greer woman dead after I-26 crash

COUNCIL: Road advisory committee lists recommendations
CRIME REPORT |
BAN: Public hearing April 22


The Greer Lions Club re-
cently held its 84th annual
awards banquet at Greer
City Hall, recognizing local
community leaders.
The 2013-2014 winners
included:
Citizen of the Year: Ju-
nior Holder, Manager of
Quality Foods
Holder received the
award based on his many
years of supporting com-
munity civic groups
and non-profit agencies
throughout the Greer area
including Greer Commu-
nity Ministries Big Thurs-
day event.
Lion of the Year: Jim
Brown, owner of Jim Brown
Insurance Agency
Former Club President
July 2012 through June
2013, Brown is actively in-
volved in all club fundrais-
ers. He holds the record
for the highest number
of new member sponsor-
ships within the Club.
Melvin Jones Fellow-
ship: James Wright, retired
employee of the former
Community Cash grocery
chain.
The Melvin Jones Fellow-
ship is the highest honor
that is awarded within the
international organiza-
tion. Wright distinguished
himself during WW II on
the Pacific battlefields.
He has been involved in
all Lions fundraisers and
at 95 years of age, Wright
attends all meeting and is
considered the King of
Broom Sales.
With more than 300
chapters, Lions Club is the
largest civic organization
in the world. The motto of
Lions International is We
Serve, and the Greer club
has served the community
for 97 years. Eye Conserva-
tion is the organizations
mission and they offer
assistance to those less
fortunate that need eye
exams and glasses. The
funds to support this pro-
gram are generated from
the organizations annual
April golf tournament.
The Club meets the first
and third Tuesday eve-
nings of every month at
Lakeview Steak House.
For more information,
visit lionsclub.org.


A10 THE GREER CITIZEN NEWS WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 2014
Pastor Keith Kelly and the entire body of believers
at His Vineyard invite you and your family to
Communion
on
Feel free to bring friends, family, or out-of-town guests.
Community Wide Communion
656 Arlington Road. Greer 29651
801-0544
April 18th 7:00 p.m.
Luke 22:19 And he took bread, gave thanks and broke it,
and gave it to them, saying, This is my body given for you;
do this in remembrance of me.
Good Friday
Get Back into the
Swing of Spring!
300 N. Main St. Greer www.newdayphysicaltherapy.com
864-469-9936
Since 1948
Fowlers
French Dry Cleaners
Corner of South Main & Brushy Creek
877-1378
YOUR CLOTHES DESERVE
PROFESSIONAL DRY CLEANING
Let Us Clean Your Winter Clothes
Before Putting Them Up For The Summer
Greer Lions Club awards
Holder, Brown, Wright
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
Quality Foods Manager Junior Holder was named the Greer Lions Clubs Citizen of the
Year. He has been involved with local civic agencies for many years.
BY AMANDA IRWIN
STAFF WRITER
Jim Campbell, Interim
Director of Spartanburg
County Parks and Recre-
ation, requested Duncan
Council consider rejoining
the Recreation District.
Duncan has been working
toward a Streetscape and
Pockets Parks project for
the downtown area, and
council advised the request
would be considered, but if
approved, it would impose
a tax increase on Duncan
residents.
Duncan left the Recre-
ation District when former
Mayor John Hamby was
serving, and the decision
to leave was made after
disagreements with for-
mer Recreation District
administration, leading to
councils decision to vote
out of the district.
Andrea Moore and
Wanda Fowler addressed
council to request finan-
cial support for the Middle
Tyger Community Center.
The non-profit services
low-income families, ado-
lescent, parents and chil-
dren in the Duncan, Well-
ford and Lyman areas. If
Duncan concedes to pro-
vide the funds, the money
will be used to employ
case managers, who work
directly with families and
individuals receiving as-
sistance from the facility
to, not only provide assis-
tance, but also to alleviate
the problem preventing
dependency. Council said
the request would be con-
sidered.
Council received a re-
quest to consider looking
into animal tethering and
minimum fencing laws.
Before a proposal for a
law can be made, Duncan
will have to consult Spar-
tanburg County Animal
Control to ensure that if
a law is passed, it can be
enforced.
The next regularly
scheduled Duncan Coun-
cil meeting is May 12 at 6
p.m. at Duncan Town Hall,
153 W. Main St., Duncan.
abradford@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
Duncan asked to join
Recreation District
T
his past week, we
spent a number of
very long days on the
floor as we cleared as
much legislation off the
House calendar before the
May 1 crossover dead-
line which is essentially
the day all legislation
must reach the Senate to
be considered.
The House Education
and Public Works Com-
mittee approved legisla-
tion that removes South
Carolina from the group
of states developing a
test to assess the Com-
mon Core standards. The
legislation also prevents
schools from sharing
data about students. The
House Caucus has op-
posed the implementation
of Common Core in our
2014 Agenda, and we are
excited that this legisla-
tion will be on the House
floor before the crossover
deadline on May 1. The
Senate is considering
similar legislation.
We approved legislation
this past week that would
allow the state to oversee
county election commis-
sions that dont follow
the law. This comes in the
wake of the debacle in
Richland County in 2012
when poll workers knew
the county didnt send
enough election machines
to certain, very busy
precincts. This will allow
the state to step in and fix
the problem ensuring
everyone has a chance to
cast their vote in future
elections.
The House approved a
statewide ban on texting
while driving. The penalty
is the same as not wear-
ing a seat belt and we
prevented the police from
seizing your cell phone.
The House believes that
distracted driving is a
serious problem, though
we disagree about the
best way to stop it. Be-
cause major cities such as
Charleston, Mount Pleas-
ant, and most recently
Greenville, have approved
texting bans, the need for
a statewide regulation to
trump local bans is gain-
ing importance.
Ive written extensively
about Emmas Law over
the past few weeks, but
Im proud to announce
that, as I write this, the
Senate has approved the
Houses bill and Emmas
Law is going to Governor
Haleys desk. This bill
is a critical step toward
stopping the repeat DUI
offenders that endanger
all of us on the road.
The House will be on
furlough for this week
and next week, as we
take our traditional
Easter break to be with
our families. For more
than a decade, the House
has approved measures
to shorten our legisla-
tive session one of the
longest in the nation,
especially when compared
to the size of our state.
However, the Senate has
never approved the mea-
sures.
If we count the two
weeks where winter
weather cancelled ses-
sion, the House will have
taken a month off this
year and we still have a
strong record of achieve-
ment and saved the state
$50,000 every week we
were not here. Here are
only a few of the achieve-
ments passed by the
House so far: a balanced
budget, the Restaurant
Carry bill, the Depart-
ment of Administration
government restructuring
bill, legislation keeping
violent offenders from
being released on bond,
new restrictions on abor-
tions after 20 weeks, and
Emmas Law.
And on top of all of
that, were anxious to
debate the Common Core
law, and a committee was
hard at work this past
week re-writing the Ethics
Reform Act that doubled
in size when it returned
from the Senate a few
weeks ago. This furlough
will save the taxpayers
$100,000.
Im looking forward to a
very busy final six weeks
of this years session.

Beating the crossover deadline
YOUR VOICE
IN COLUMBIA
REPRESENTATIVE
RITA ALLISON
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 2014 NEWS THE GREER CITIZEN A11



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T
his week, the Huffing-
ton Post published an
article entitled, 22
Common Phrases We All
Secretly Hate.
Among their choices
were At the end of the
day, My bad, and If its
meant to be, its meant
to be.
While those phrases
are certainly aggravating,
there are others I find far
more prevalent and excru-
ciating: The following are,
in no particular order, the
modern-day terms and
sayings I hate the most.
1. I know, right?
This one goes way back
for me. About nine years
ago, I dated a girl whod
lived in New York City for
a few years and picked
the phrase up there. As a
result, I was subjected to
it several years before it
completely infiltrated the
rest of America. If you ask
me, its a phrase people
use when trying to sound
hip, and I flat-out hate
it. When you agree with
someone, just say yes,
true, or simply nod your
head.
2. Selfie Maybe Im
just getting older and
more cantankerous, but
I cringe each time I hear
this word. And I hear it
a lot. For me, it typifies
everything geeky, techno-
logically annoying, wimpy
and self-indulgent about
modern American culture.
3.Its six one way, a
half-dozen the other I
think that people who say
this one really just like
hearing themselves talk.
Why not just say, either
way or its the same,?
Either one requires fewer
syllables and doesnt
make you want to gouge
somebodys eyes out
when they say it.
4. Really? While this
question is often used
legitimately, there is a
disturbing trend of people
using in a lame attempt
at drama or humor. Like
a lot of truly irritating
trends, it was born on
television, starting off
as a Saturday Night Live
segment in which Seth
Meyers and Amy Prohler
used it to blast celebrities
for improper or idiotic
behavior. Unfortunately,
it spread like some new
virus across America, and
now everyday people use
it every day to advance
their self-important
monologues. As Billy
Crystal would say, Its
neither funny nor fun.
5. Absurd concoctions
of words. Examples of
these include, ginor-
mous, ridonkulous and
fantabulous. Much like
selfie, these words have
a wimpy, self-satisfied
ring to them that make
you want to punch some-
one in the mouth. Perhaps
it is acceptable for young
children to use them, but
coming from adults and
teens, they are infurigrat-
ing (a mix of infuriating
and grating).
6. Imbecilic text ab-
breviations. Possibly the
worst of the worst. You
know the usual sus-
pects and have probably
used them on occasion
yourself: LOL, OMG,
LMAO, IMO. To me,
these are even more
annoying than the little
emoticons (yellow faces)
that people use to add
flavor or perspective to
their messages. The most
appalling is LOL, prob-
ably because I never laugh
out loud when Im alone
and its very difficult for
me to imagine someone
really doing it. Even more
aggravating is when they
attach LOL to their own
comment. If they were
as funny as they thought
they were, theyd be rat-
tling off their shtick from
the stage instead of their
cell phones.
Popular phrases I hate
THE BUCK
STOPS HERE
WILLIAM
BUCHHEIT
Greer
woman has
tree turned
into seat
BY KATIE JONES
STAFF WRITER
When Carolyn Greenes
nearly 20-year-old pau-
lownia tree got too big for
her backyard, she saw the
glass as half-full. About 17
rings date the tree.
The tree was causing
problems for the rest of
her yard limbs were
hanging over the fence. It
towered over other vegeta-
tion, hogging sunlight and
water.
That one had gotten
so big it had taken over,
Greene said. The limbs
were hanging all the way
to the back fence. We re-
ally planted it too close to
the house. If wed known
how big and fast it was go-
ing to grow, wed have put
them all farther down the
hill.
Paulownias have a large
root system. Her husband
planted the trees, which
were a gift from her broth-
er.
There are roots going
all over out there. In fact,
the guy that cut it down
said it was probably suck-
ing down all the nutrients
out of our backyard be-
cause the roots just go ev-
erywhereIts pretty well
grounded, Greene said.
Its not a very pretty tree,
either, as you can tell. It
does have beautiful, light
purple blossoms later in
the spring or the early
summer. Its pretty then,
but the rest of the time,
its not a very attractive
tree.
Instead of saying good
riddance, to the problem-
atic tree, she asked the
tree service to leave the
stump. And a back.
I asked him, When you
cut this down, can you
leave me a little seat? I
love being out in the yard,
sitting in the hammock. I
thought, if I had a bench
right there, that would be
pretty neat, she said.
Now, in her backyard,
Greene can sit and read,
listen to birds and watch
wildlife.
I can sit out here and
listen to birds, she said.
We have raccoons in the
yard sometimes we see
raccoons. Theres coyotes
in the neighborhood, chip-
munks and squirrels, of
course.
Reclining in nature
MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN
When Carolyn Greene had to cut down a 20-year-old tree
in her yard, she decided to get practical use out of it.
If wed known how
big and fast it was
going to grow, wed
have put them all
further down the
hill.
Carolyn Greene
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
Lending a hand
Sandy McDaris and Jan Helling are seen organizing donated clothes for the fre victims
at Riverwood Farms Subdivision. The blaze displaced several families in the Greer
community two weeks ago.

FLIGHT: Veterans depart for the capital
FROM PAGE ONE
his uniform. And he made
a point about it, he said,
I was always so proud of
the fact that I had earned
my wings and then I never
got them back.
I asked him before he
started if I could record
him telling me about his
experiences, and he said
absolutely as he went
through all this and we
were getting ready to get
on the plane I thought
that one particularly piece
was very interesting, that
he had lost his wings and
he had made a big point
of that, so I shared that
little piece of it with the
pilot on the plane, he
said. After we had taken
off and we were in flight
the pilot came back into
the cabin area and came
over to where I was sit-
ting with [Mr. Culbertson]
and he took his wings off
of his chest and he said,
Mr. Culbertson I under-
stand nearly 70 years ago
your wings were taken in
service to our country, Id
like to take this opportu-
nity to give you mine. Mr.
Culbertsons face just lit
up. It wasnt the fact that
he got his wings again, it
was that he was being told
thank you in so many ways
that day
A week after the flight,
when Hucks followed up
with him, Mr. Colbertson
told him he had cancer
and he passed away five
weeks later.
Because of the honor
flight, because of the op-
portunity to say thank you
to these veterans, I was
able to record his story
and share it with his fam-
ily, so that, now that hes
no longer with us, we
havent lost his story, he
said.
On a most recent honor
flight, after visiting several
war memorials in Washin-
ton D.C., the group of vet-
erans and their guardians
arrived at the Iwo Jima
memorial.
This gentlemen that
was in a wheelchair, on ox-
ygen, and he was hunched
over. He tapped me on my
elbow as I went by and he
said, Would it be OK if I
walked up and just placed
my hand on the memorial
for a moment? He said
this in a very labored voice
because of the oxygen and
everything Hucks said.
The veteran, sitting in
his wheelchair, was sepa-
rated from the memorial
by steps and rope.
I hadnt said anything
to him, but I dont think
they wanted us to get up
there, and I looked over
at him and he just, again
in a labored voice, he said
I had the opportunity to
serve during that battle.
I thought immediately,
who am I to tell you you
cant go up to the memo-
rial? This is for you.
With the assistant of
another person, Hucks
helped the veteran over
to the memorial past the
rope and he placed his
hand on the memorial and
stood there for about two
minutes and he began to
cry, stood up as tall as he
could and saluted the me-
morial.
Thats what the honor
flight is about, he said.
Its those special mo-
ments that take place ev-
ery single time we go up.
The World War II memo-
rial is extremely important
and thats the basis for us
going, but its about the in-
dividual experiences each
of these men and women
have while theyre on that
flight.
For more information
about Honor Flight Upstate
SC, to donate or to apply a
veteran for a flight, visit
honorflightupstatesc.com
or call 869-8387.
abradford@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
A12 THE GREER CITIZEN WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 2014
THE 30th ANNUAL PELHAM MEDICAL CENTER
GREER
FAMILY FEST
PRESENTED BY THE CITY OF GREER & THE GREER CITIZEN
FRIDAY 6 PM-10PM SATURDAY 10AM-10PM
VISIT WWW.GREERFAMILYFEST.COM FOR MORE FESTIVAL INFO
INFLATABLES RIDES FERRIS WHEEL LIVE MUSIC ON TWO
STAGES FOOD CRAFT VENDORS VETERANS WALK
ANNE HELTON CREATION STATION SATURDAY 11 - 3PM
Over 30 FREE Arts & Crafts Stations for kids at the Mitsubishi Creation Station!
FRIDAY:
FAMILY NIGHT
$15 ALL YOU CAN RIDE
AMUSESMENT BRACELETS
SATURDAY:
MARSHALL TUCKER BAND
FREE CONCERT AT 7:30!
MAY 2-3, 2014
F
R
E
E
FREE
Presented y:
Presented y
CB&L VETERANS WALK OF HONOR SATURDAY 7PM


Phelps
comeback
needed
W
hile perusing the
national sports
pages this week, I
came across some happy
news.
Olympic swimmer
Michael Phelps has opted
out of retirement and
could return for the 2016
games in Rio.
I frowned at the news
of his retirement after the
2012 games in London,
mainly because I grew up
watching this guy dazzle
homes across the nation,
which otherwise would
probably not pay a bit of
attention to the sport.
Lets face it. The
Olympics are a parade
of sports you have no
business watching at
any other time. Sports
like football, basketball
and baseball dominate
our countrys entertain-
ment scene, leaving no
room for fans to enjoy
the pleasures of sports
like badminton, curling
and my personal favorite,
handball.
On a sidenote: If there
was ever an Olympic
sport that I feel I could
go in and dominate right
this minute, its handball.
This sport, while it looks
very fun and entertaining,
belongs more in college
intramurals rather than
international competition.
I digress, of course.
Without Michael Phelps,
what would the sum-
mer Olympics really be?
Sure there will be other
star athletes and other
reasons to cheer for our
country in the games, but
without the 22-time Olym-
pic medalist, it wouldnt
be the same.
During my first year at
North Greenville Uni-
versity in 2008, I was
struggling to adjust to
my new surroundings. I
just transferred in from
a school in West Virginia,
and I didnt have a clue
who anyone was or how I
was going to fit in.
My orientation hap-
pened to coincide with the
Olympics and the school
threw a viewing party
each night in the student
center for newcomers to
get together and socialize.
Bored with unpacking and
trying to start awkward
conversations with my
roommates, I decided to
crash the party. This mo-
ment, Ive discovered, was
the moment I became a
fan of swimming.
I was nearing the stu-
dent union when I heard
loud screams. Thinking
I was missing something
good, I hurried my pace
toward the center of the
room. Phelps was racing,
and he had been on a
magical run, winning what
would ultimately be eight
gold medals.
I waited around to
watch his final race of
the night and it didnt
disappoint. Risking his
gold medal streak, Phelps
touched the wall a split
second before Milorad
Cavic, erupting a quiet
student union at North
Greenville and educing
loud chants of U-S-A,
U-S-A from college kids
who barely knew each
another.
After high-fiving a few
strangers next to me, I
became a permanent fan
of Michael Phelps, as Im
sure most did.
I think hes just go-
ing to test the waters a
little bit and see how it
goes, Phelps coach Bob
Bowman told ESPN.com.
I wouldnt say its a full-
fledged comeback.
If he were to make
a full-fledged and
compete in Rio, it would
simply add to the legacy
of one of the worlds
greatest athletes.

SPORTS
The Greer Citizen
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 2014
BLAME
CANNADA
BILLY
CANNADA
B
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
The Eastside boys soccer
team continued its perfect
season last week, earning
wins over Blue Ridge and
rival Riverside.
Despite a double-digit
blowout win over the
Tigers, the Eagles were
brought back down to
earth in a narrow 2-0 vic-
tory over the Warriors.
I thought we played
great, Eastside coach Bill
Martin said. We thought
Riverside was going to be a
really good test for us. My
appeal to the team all year
has been that our confer-
ence is our biggest enemy.
Some of the teams are not
real strong teams. We have
to be able to get up against
a good team, and we knew
that this would be a good
test for us.
The two teams went into
the half knotted at zero,
but Eastside pulled away
in the second half, scoring
early and adding another
goal late to pad the lead.
We played well. A lot
of the things we did were
very effective, Martin
said. It was a very strong
performance for us.
Martin said his team was
happy to have bragging
rights over a cross-town
rival for another year.
They were excited to
go to Riverside and beat
Riverside on their home
field, Martin said. I try
not to think a whole lot
about home and away. A
field is a field and a ball
is a ball, but theres some-
thing about going into a
rivalry and beating the
other team on their own
home turf that makes it
very special.
A lot of these guys play
together at the club level
and play against each oth-
er in high school, he said.
Its a real rivalry and its
always a great match.
The Eagles have not al-
lowed a goal in confer-
ence play this season, and
have dominated teams as
of late. Martin said a close
match was good for his
team.
I was thinking on the
bench, about halfway
through the first half, that
it was just good to be in
a real game, Martin said.
This is a team that really
was fast and technical. It
was a nice matchup. Our
last game we had won 13-
0, so to finally be in a real
game was very refresh-
ing.
Eastside will face games
against Pickens and Greer
next week.
This was a great result
for us, Martin said. It re-
minds us of the things we
need to work on to get bet-
ter prepared for the next
Riverside and the next big
game. I think it was very
good for us. It was a good
result, but a good eye
opener as well.
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
Not many teams have
been able to hang with the
Eastside girls soccer team
this season, but the Lady
Eagles got all they could
handle from cross-town ri-
val Riverside last week.
Eastside managed a 1-0
victory over the Warriors,
moving its overall record
to an impressive 16-1 on
the year.
It was obviously a big
night for both teams,
Eastside coach Andy Rob-
inson said. I thought we
came out with some good
control from the beginning
and really put some pres-
sure on them. I thought we
responded well and began
to settle in.
Eastside scored midway
through the first half and
stellar defensive play, in-
cluding a last minute save,
gave the Lady Eagles the
win.
It was just back and
forth, Robinson said. It
was a typical Eastside-
Riverside game. They had
SEE WIN | B4
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
Three early runs would
be the difference for Blue
Ridge, as it escaped with
a 3-2 win over Riverside
Monday afternoon.
The game was part of a
spring break tournament
that saw four area teams
compete outside of region
play.
All three Tiger runs
came in the top of the sec-
ond inning.
We were able to get a
lead, which really helped
us, Blue Ridge coach
Travis Henson said. Af-
ter that, we played pretty
soundly.
Solid pitching to close
the ball game helped seal
the win for Blue Ridge.
We had a 3-2 lead and
we brought in John Mason
Reynolds who threw the
last two and a third and
shut them down, Henson
said. We were able to get
three up and three down
in the bottom of the sev-
enth.
Henson credits his de-
fense with the win.
Our guys did a great
job and made some plays
defensively, Henson said.
That was the key. To get
a good win early in the
spring break tournament,
especially against a team
like Riverside, is exciting.
Although his team is
catching its breath, Hen-
son said his guys are using
the time out of school to
prepare for the playoffs.
The biggest thing about
these tournaments is that
you find some things out
about yourself, about
your team and about
some individual players
too, Henson said. I think
we found a few of those
things [against Riverside].
We have some guys that
are willing to fight.
Spring break has always
prepared us for a playoff
run and thats what were
using this week for, he
said.
Henson said his team
has shown it can finish
games.
Weve shown that we
can go out and finish
games, Henson said. You
get a one run lead and you
can hold it in the last in-
ning of the game against a
good team, thats being re-
silient. Thats what I really
wanted to see. If we can
finish games, were going
to be in great shape.
Blue Ridge took on Lau-
rens on Tuesday at East-
side as part of the tour-
nament. Results were not
available at press time.
The last two weeks of
the season are going to
come down to clutch hits,
Henson said. Were going
to pitch and were going to
defend, but we have to get
clutch hits. If we do, were
going to finish strong.
billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
Taking
SIDES
EASTSIDE
RIVERSIDE
on the soccer feld
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
Eastsides defense did not allow Riverside to get anything going last week, shutting the
Warriors down in a 2-0 victory.
EHS boys down rival RHS
Blue Ridge holds off Riverside, 3-2
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
Riversides Abby Easterday, left, battles Eastsides Lauren
Thomas for position.
Lady Eagles
edge Warriors
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
A solid fnal inning helped Blue Ridge slide past Riverside Monday afternoon during the
opening game of a spring break tournament at Eastside.
Weve shown that
we can go out and
finish games. You
get a one run lead
and you can hold it
in the last inning of
the game against
a good team, thats
being resilient.
Travis Henson
Blue Ridge baseball coach

PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
The top-ranked Eagles have not allowed a goal since
conference play began.
To benefit
Goodwill
Industries
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
Runners from around
the Upstate and beyond
descended upon Green-
ville for Goodwills bi-an-
nual mud run, featuring
a treacherous course with
30 obstacles.
The event drew quite the
crowd, officials said.
We thought the event
went pretty well overall,
said Brad Majors, vice
president of marketing
and development with the
run. We had about 2,500
runners that ran through
Saturday and Sunday.
From that standpoint, we
thought the event went re-
ally well.
The fan-favorite event
occurs in Greenville, both
in the fall and spring.
Its very popular, Ma-
jors said. Were the largest
in the Upstate and I think
we were the first in the Up-
state. People tend to really
like it. I think it probably
takes most people a week
to get all the mud and
sand out of their ears, but
its very popular.
The run was not without
mishap, as one participant
left with a muddy injury.
We did have one person
injured, he said. Were
not certain of how serious
the injury is, so that cer-
tainly made us concerned.
Were used to scraped el-
bows and shins, but we
generally dont have peo-
ple that may be injured
seriously.
The event seeks to raise
funds for what officials be-
lieve to be a worthy cause.
Our foundation looks af-
ter funding the mission of
Goodwill, which is to put
South Carolinians back to
work, Majors said. They
look at kind of having a
longer term perspective
and funding it for decades
to come.
Majors said runners
seemed to enjoy the 3.5-
mile trek.
The course was in re-
ally good shape, Majors
said. We try to improve
it each year and think of
a few things to do that
we can do differently.
Its a 3.5 mile 30 obstacle
course. The U.S. Marine
Corps helps manage it and
we have really appreciated
them being involved. They
really help with the au-
thenticity and encourage
the runners.
St. Francis sports medi-
cine staffers were also on
hand to monitor injuries
and provide first aid.
billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
B2 THE GREER CITIZEN SPORTS WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 2014
WILLIAM BUCHHEIT | THE GREER CITIZEN
Jamie Lee of team 4 out of 9 crawls under the ropes and through the dirt at the end of last weeks event. The team
fnished in 54:56.
SPRING
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3284 E. Gap Creek Rd.
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New Saturday Hours
8:00 am to 12:00 pm
KUBOTA OPEN HOUSE
APRIL 26TH
(hotdogs, snacks, drinks, giveaways)
Mud run showcases 2,500 participants
WILLIAM BUCHHEIT | THE GREER CITIZEN
Two members of the three female, one male team, For the Love of Mud, help a
teammate over a tall wooden wall Saturday morning.
WILLIAM BUCHHEIT | THE GREER CITIZEN
Marco Diaz trudges through the pool of mud at the
start of the race. His all-male team, the Pelzer Puddle
Jumpers, fnished the event in 47:46.
WILLIAM BUCHHEIT | THE GREER CITIZEN
Two marines bark at team Mud, Sweat and Beers as
they crawl toward the fnish line of last weekends
race. The two male, two female team fnished the
event in 49:30.
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 2014 SPORTS THE GREER CITIZEN B3


Bounce
back from
0-3 week
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
The Byrnes boys soc-
cer team has worked its
way back from a rough
start, earning a 5-2 win
over Woodruff after an 0-3
week before spring break.
Byrnes coach Paul Hil-
derbrand said his team
has not had an easy road,
playing in what he believes
to be one of the toughest
regions in the state.
Youve got three teams
in our region that are
ranked in the top 12 of the
state, Hilderbrand said.
Thats always going to be
a big factor, but the thing
about our region is that ev-
ery one of games is going
to be a battle. The teams
that were playing against
are truly varsity teams in
that theyre starting 11
th

and 12
th
graders.
Every team that weve
played against in our re-
gion has been extremely
big and extremely fast, he
said. You can definitely
tell theyre making use of
their time in the weight
room and working on their
speed and agility.
The Rebels struggled
before the break, losing
three straight. Byrnes lost
to Wade Hampton, 2-0, fell
to Chapman, 4-1 and came
up short against Dorman,
4-0.
Its been kind of a roller
coaster, Hilderbrand said.
Were up and then were
down. Well have one good
half, but we just have not
put together one full game
to our potential. Well
play a half that will look
amazing and well play a
half that you will be won-
dering what happened.
These guys are fighters
and theyre going to give it
their all to get back in ev-
ery match.
Hilderbrand said he will
need to see some improve-
ment in his teams defense
moving forward.
Were going to look to
improve in our center mid-
field play, Hilderbrand
said. We have to work on
our defensecoming out
of the back and working a
lot better.
Hilderbrand said the
teams goals of making the
playoffs remain the same.
We want to push to
make the last playoff
spot, he said. We would
like to win at least four
of our remaining region
matches. Thats shoot-
ing pretty lofty, because
our region is so tough.
Billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
The Byrnes softball team
is continuing to dominate
on the diamond, knocking
off Gaffney for a second
time last week.
With the win, the Rebels
are now 15-3 on the year.
I was happy with how
we played, Byrnes coach
Brandi Aiken said. Last
time we only won 3-0 so
I was happy to see us put
up a few more runs.
Bailey Pearson threw a
two-hitter against the Indi-
ans and struck out six bat-
ters in the 7-0 win.
Byrnes was coming off
a recent double-header
sweep over Riverside. Ai-
ken said she has seen im-
provement from her team
over the course of the sea-
son.
Weve had a few ups
and downs, but Im hoping
well be able to continue
to play at a high level in
these last two weeks and
into the playoffs, Aiken
said. We have to be able
to come through in some
of those big games.
While the Lady Rebels
are happy with their start,
there are still some areas
that need fine-tuning.
We leave a lot of people
on base right now, Aiken
said. Were hitting the
ball well, but were not
necessarily scoring the
runs that we need to in the
big games. We lost to Boil-
ing Springs and left seven
or eight people on base.
Thats going to be the big-
gest key for us.
Aiken said she is con-
tinuing to stress the little
things.
We need to execute
the little things getting
bunts down and playing
solid defense, Aiken said.
Weve done those things
for the most part. We
havent made many errors
this season and that has
shown in the games that
weve won.
The Rebels will face
Mauldin this week, but
will also be looking ahead
to matchups against Dor-
man and Wade Hampton if
weather does not cooper-
ate.
If we dont get the game
in against Mauldin, well
use the week to work on
some little things, Aiken
said. Its very rare, this
time of the year, that you
have a week of practice. I
just hate to not get some
games in and have such
a big week the next week,
but it should be good for
us. It definitely provides
some rest for our pitch-
ers.
Billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
The Yellow Jacket base-
ball team fell behind early
in its 14-2 loss to Wade
Hampton on Monday, but
coach Bob Massullo said
he remains confident in
how his team has per-
formed as of late.
The Generals used sev-
eral big hits to pile on the
runs early, causing the
game to be stopped in the
fifth inning in conjunction
with the 10-run rule.
Well, we looked at
those balls flying out of
here pretty well, Massullo
said. We didnt make any
errors and had one strike-
out, but we just dont hit it
like they do. They hit the
crap out of it tonight.
Massullo said his guys
just faced a tough team
Monday afternoon.
Were not frustrated,
Massullo said. Its just
hard to defend anything
that goes out like that.
They will put one off the
fence and then, when we
make adjustments on the
field, theyre going where
were not, so what are you
going to do. Youre go-
ing to run into ball games
like that, even in the pros,
where you just cant get
the guys out.
They were on today,
he said.
Although Greer began
the season with inexperi-
ence on the roster, Mas-
sullo said his team has
grown.
Were right there, Mas-
sullo said. We had a great
week last week. We won
three conference games
and fought really hard in
an 8-5 loss to Travelers
Rest Saturday. As far as
maturing, theyre coming
around. Theyre starting
to play like I thought they
could play, but every once
in a while youre going to
run into a game like this.
The team began to
fire on all cylinders
last week, as it defeat-
ed Blue Ridge at home.
Blue Ridge came to the
house, and we finally de-
cided that we were going
to do what we could do,
Massullo said. Weve just
been coming around.
Massullo said he does
not believe the Wade
Hampton loss will linger
in his players minds
This kind of thing rolls
of their back like ducks
in water, he said. Thats
what bothers me some-
times because I take loss-
es to heart, but these kids
know theyll play again to-
morrow.
Moving forward, Greers
goal is to take things one
game at a time.
Our goal is to practice
this week, Massullo said.
I told the kids that were
going to use this week
as practice games to get
ready for next week.
Massullo hopes, with a
little luck, a playoff spot
will still be available.
I think we still might
have an outside shot, with
a little bit of help, if we win
our next three next week,
Massullo said. There will
definitely be a shot.
Greer will face Pickens,
Southside and Blue Ridge
next week.
I think we have a chance
to win those three games
if we play like we know
how, Massullo said. If
maybe Blue Ridge or Berea
could help us out, we
might sneak in there [in a
playoff spot]. Thats what
were hoping.
Billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
Greer Middle College se-
nior Samantha Hofmann
will run cross country for
North Greenville next sea-
son, signing a recent letter
of intent with the school.
Hofmann said choosing
the Crusaders was an easy
decision to make.
My family has been kind
of involved with North
Greenville for a long time
because my youth pastor
used to be the baseball
coach there, Hofmann
said. Ive always loved
the campus. Its a gor-
geous campus. Every time
Ive been up there, Ive felt
pretty much at home.
A visit to the Tigerville
campus sealed the deal,
she said.
I did the sneak preview
thing there and I loved it
so much, Hofmann said.
I felt like I fit in so well
with everyone there. I just
loved it.
Hofmann said she will
be joining an already suc-
cessful program.
I have met the coach
and Ive also met some
of the girls that run cross
country there, Hofmann
said. I know that theyve
had some great teams in
the past. I love their cross
country team. All the girls
that Ive met are so sweet
and I really love the coach
too.
Hofmann said she hopes
to bring encouragement to
the team as a freshman.
I really like to encour-
age my teammates, so I
hope I can be someone
they can look to when they
need encouragement,
Hofmann said. Im really
dedicated to everything
I do. I try to always stick
with everything and be the
best that I can be, and try
to make others want to be
the best they can be too.
Im just excited about
this season, she said. I
just will have to wait and
see what happens. Hope-
fully I can get my times
down a lot for the 5K. My
[personal record] this year
was 25:00, so I want to get
down to about 19:00.
Despite the short com-
mute, Hofmann will still
be close enough to home
to grab a hot meal every
now and then.
Its about 10 minutes
away from my house so,
while it didnt play much
of a factor in where I de-
cided to go to college, it is
kind of nice to have that
option to go home when-
ever I want to, she said.
Hofmann will major in
secondary mathematics.
During my freshman
year, I had a really awe-
some math teacher and
she just made me love
math so much, Hofmann
said. Ever since then, Ive
always wanted to teach Al-
gebra I and Algebra II.
Billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
Lady Rebels blank
rival Gaffney, 7-0
Hofmann to run for
North Greenville
Rebels aim to finish strong
Wade Hampton jumps on Greer, 14-2

PHOTO | SUBMITTED
Greer Middle Colleges Samantha Hofmann, pictured center, recently signed her letter of
intent to run cross country at North Greenville University.
I really like to encourage my teammates,
so I hope I can be someone they can look to
when they need encouragement.
Samantha Hofmann
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
The Byrnes softball team continued its hot season, beating
Gafney 7-0 to earn its 15th win of the year.
We have to be able to come through in
some of those big games.
Brandi Aiken
Lady Rebels softball coach
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
Greer was forced to battle Wade Hampton runners all aftrenoon on Monday, as the
Generals stormed out to an early lead.

PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
The Byrnes soccer team earned a much-needed win over
Woodruf Monday night, improving to 5-7 on the year.
B4 THE GREER CITIZEN SPORTS WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 2014
FROM B1
their opportunities and
really ratcheted up their
play in the second half. I
thought our defense did a
great job of adjusting to
those changes.
Robinson said his team
got all it could handle.
This is why I love these
games, Robinson said.
Theyve got such a talent-
ed young team. Im excited
about the rivalry and that
its going to continue on.
Its going to be great on
into the future.
Despite dominating their
region schedule, Robin-
son said the success has
hurt the team in tougher
games.
I really felt like the first
10-15 minutes of the game
really showed why our re-
gion hurts us, Robinson
said. Riverside played at
a much faster tempo and
we werent quick. It was
a good indicator that we
have to play differently be-
fore we get into the play-
offs. We did adjust and we
were able to step it up and
create opportunities.
The head coach said he
was proud of the way his
team responded.
I was very proud of
the girls, Robinson said.
It was a great way to fin-
ish off the midway point
of the season going into
spring break. Now, hope-
fully, well be able to rest
some injuries and get
healthy.
Since March 20, East-
side has outscored its op-
ponents 70-0. Robinson
said the scoreless streak
is something that does not
matter to his team.
Its something that
well probably look back
on at the end of the season
when everything is said
and done, Robinson said.
Things like that come
and go, and ultimately
its something thats not
important to us because
it can change in the blink
of an eye. If were hanging
our hats on those kind of
things, it gets in the way
of the big picture, which is
success at the end of the
season.
Wed give up five goals
to win a state champion-
ship if we score six, he
said. Its really about the
big picture of what we can
do for the team.
With spring break this
week, Eastside will look to
use the time wisely.
This is kind of a de-
compress week for us,
Robinson said. We get to
nurse our injuries and get
back after spring break.
Its a good time to take a
step back and catch our
breath.
Will take
part in NFL
documentary
Former North Greenville
star Jonathon Sharpe got
another chance at pur-
suing a career in the Na-
tional Football League, as
he took place in the NFL
Super Regional Combine,
in Detroit.
The combine, held Satur-
day, April 12 at Ford Field,
home of the Detroit Lions,
was shown live on the NFL
Network.
Sharpe, who donned the
number five on his jersey
in 2013, was one of the
leaders on the Crusader
defense in his two years
on the team, racking up
132 tackles including 23.5
for a loss, 5.5 sacks, and
three interceptions, one of
which was returned for a
touchdown.
Sharpe got some NFL
attention in 2013, and
was invited to the Seattle
Seahawks mini camp, nar-
rowly missing a spot on
the practice squad roster.
In addition, Sharpe will
also take part in an NFL
Network documentary,
which will follow several
former college football
players from small col-
leges and universities as
they pursue a career in the
National Football League.
The documentary is sched-
uled to air in the next few
months.
MENS TENNIS
The North Greenville
mens tennis team con-
tinued its solid 2014
campaign on Tuesday af-
ternoon, earning a 5-4 de-
cision over South Atlantic
Conference member Mars
Hill College.
The Crusaders started
the day taking two of
three from the Lions in
doubles competition. Mars
Hill grabbed an early 1-0
lead with an 8-1 win over
North Greenvilles Rafael
Lenz and Jose Castillo,
but the two and three po-
sitions would pick up
the slack. Sergio Araujo
Filho and Santiago Robles
would even the tally at 1-1
with an 8-3 victory, while
Sjors van Eck and Marcel
Yshikawa would earn the
Crusaders a 2-1 advantage
with their 8-5 doubles vic-
tory.
Mars Hill sneaked its
way back into the game,
however, with a strong
start in singles competi-
tion winning three of the
first four positions to take
a 4-3 lead. North Green-
villes only win in the
first four singles games
was recorded by van Eck
who picked up a 7-6/6-1
victory. North Greenville
got just what it needed in
the final two singles sets,
however. Jonathan Stanga
earned a hard fought 2-
6/6-4/10-5 win to tie the
overall tally a 4-4 while
Yshikawa won his second
game of the day in another
three point thriller (2-6/6-
4/10-5), earning NGU the
5-4 win.
The Crusaders improve
to 8-9 on the season.
MENS GOLF
The North Greenville
mens golf team contin-
ued its late season tear
this week, turning in its
second first place finish
in two tournaments, after
taking the pole position in
the Tennessee River Rum-
ble with a two day total of
587.
The Crusaders finished
day one with a comfort-
able 12-stroke lead, af-
ter carding a team total
286. Day two seemed to
challenge North Green-
ville, however, as Walters
State put together a solid
second round, finishing
the day within just three
strokes of North Green-
ville and putting together
one of just two sub 300
rounds on the day.
North Greenville fought
off the Senators come-
back, thanks in part to
Tucker MacDonald. Mac-
Donald took home the
individual title, shooting
even par. His second day
71 was the only under par
round of the day. Also
turning in a top five finish
for North Greenville was
last weeks tournament
winner, Josh ONeal. ONeal
shot a 146 overall, earning
a fourth place finish, and
a spot on the All-Tourna-
ment Team.
North Greenville had
one other top 10 finisher
in Mac Bradley, who card-
ed a 148, earning himself
a tie for 10th.
Christian Constance
rounded out the top 20
finishes for North Green-
ville with a 17th place fin-
ish after shooting a two
round total of 151, while
Sam Goodnight shot a
156, finishing him in a tie
for the 28th position.
GREER HIGH GOLF
FUNDRAISER MAY 2
The Greer High School
Booster Club is hosting
its first golf fundraiser on
Friday, May 2 at Greer Golf
and Country Club.
Lunch will be served
with a shotgun start at 1
p.m.
The cost for a four-man
team is $300, which in-
cludes green fees, a cart,
range balls and lunch.
Holes can be sponsored
for $50. Red tees and mul-
ligan are $10 per person.
For more information,
contact Todd Center at
444-1403 or Tony Tipton
at 385-0493.
UPCOMING TRYOUTS FOR
SOCCER FOOTHILLS CLUB
Tryouts for Soccer Foot-
hills Club in Greer are as
follows:
U9/U10, U11, U12 Girls:
May 19-20 at 5:30 p.m.
U9/U10, U11, U12 Boys:
May 19-20 at 6:30 p.m.
U13, U4 Girls: May 22-23
at 5:30 p.m.
U13, U14 Boys: May 22-
23 at 6:30 p.m.
There is a $10 Try-out
fee and all tryouts will be
held at Suber Road fields,
located at 305 South Suber
Road, Greer.
D5 NIGHT AT FLUOR
FIELD NEXT WEEK
On Wednesday, April
23, the Greenville Drive is
partnering with the Dun-
can community to host
D5 night at Fluor Field.
This is the third year
Spartanburg District Five
Schools has taken center
stage in downtown Green-
ville and representatives
from all 12 of the districts
schools will take part in
the recognition and fun
planned before and during
the games.
The Greenville Drive
host the Asheville Tourists
at 4 p.m. and will be fol-
lowed by Byrnes v. Wade
Hampton at 7 p.m. This is
the first professional/high
school double-header in
Fluor Field history.
Throughout the games,
the District Five teach-
ers, support employees
and Terrific Kids of the
Year from each of the
schools will be recognized
in the stands and on the
DriveVision.
Participating faculty,
students and staff will
take part in the on-field,
between inning entertain-
ment and games.
Special pre-game ac-
tivities will include a Pa-
rade of Champions, led
by the Byrnes High drum
line, state finalist cheer
team, committed college
athletes, and SAC Youth
Teams. Ceremonial first
pitch, honorary captains,
play ball Announcer and
other pre-game honor-
ary roles will be filled by
distinguished student
leaders, faculty and staff.
The Byrnes Singers will
perform the National An-
them.
Tickets are $7 and can
be purchased by visiting
or calling the Drive Box
Office at 240-4528.
GCM GOLF TOURNAMENT
SCHEDULED FOR MAY 9
The Dick Brooks Honda
Meals on Wheels Invita-
tional golf tournament
will be held on May 9 at
Greer Country Club. The
17th annual tournament
benefits Greer Community
Ministries.
Competitions this year
include Closest to the Pin,
Hole in One, Closest to the
Line and a putting con-
test.
There are many levels of
sponsorship support avail-
able: partner, $5,000; plat-
inum, $2,500; gold $1,500;
contest sponsor, $500 and
hole sponsors, $125.
The Meals on Wheels
Golf Tournament provides
funds needed to continue
serving over 300 home-
bound senior adults in the
Greater Greer area with a
hot meal Monday through
Friday. The meals are pre-
pared on site in the Greer
Community Ministries
kitchen and volunteer
drivers deliver them.
For more information,
contact Hannah Rainwater,
GCM events coordinator,
877-1937 or hrainwater@
gcminc.org.
GREENVILLE DRIVE 5K
MONDAY BEFORE GAME
The Greenville Drive,
emediagroup, Caine Halter
YMCA and Setup Events
have combined to coordi-
nate the Spirit of Boston
Run, a timed 5K, on Mon-
day, April 21.
The 5K will begin at 5:30
p.m. and will lead into the
Drives game against the
Asheville Tourists at 7:05
p.m.
All funds raised will go
to the City of Greenville
Community Youth Base-
ball Program, which pro-
vides inner city children
with an opportunity to
play baseball at their com-
munity park.
We are thrilled to host
the Spirit of Boston Run
on April 21st, said Drive
General Manager Eric Ja-
rinko.
With over $20,000
raised, last years Run
for One event was a huge
success in support of the
events at last years Bos-
ton Marathon, and making
this an annual event will
be a great step as we con-
tinue our efforts to bring
the Greenville community
closer to the city of Bos-
ton.
We are proud of our af-
filiation with the Boston
Red Sox, and the run will
live up to its namesake by
channeling the spirit of
Boston on the same day as
the Boston Marathon, he
continued.
That, combined with
all funds benefiting the
City of Greenvilles Youth
Baseball Program, will
make this an exciting day
for everyone involved.
Runners and walkers
will start at the Caine Hal-
ter YMCA at 5:30 p.m. The
course will wind its way
through Cleveland Park
from the YMCA and have
its own version of Boston
Marathons Heartbreak
Hill.
Runners and walkers
will finish by entering
Fluor Field, running by its
own version of the iconic
Green Monster and cross-
ing home plate while high-
fiving players and coaches
from the Drive.
We believe that having
Drive players and coaches
greeting runners as they
finish adds a nice touch
to the event, said Jarinko.
They have aspirations of
playing or coaching in Bos-
ton one day, so they under-
stand the significance of
this event and how much
the Red Sox organization
means to Boston.
The Drive collected new
and lightly used equip-
ment at the Hot Stove
event in January and, part-
ly because of the Drives
efforts, the league is all set
for play in 2014.
Having the Greenville
Drive as the Title Sponsor
of the Community Youth
Baseball Program has been
a huge benefit as the pro-
gram continues to grow,
said Dana Souza, Parks
and Recreation director
for the City of Greenville.
The Drive is such a posi-
tive force in the entire
Upstate Region, and we
are pleased that their gen-
erous support allows so
many children to enjoy
a happy and healthy life-
style through baseball.
The Drive will provide all
participants with a t-shirt
and a complimentary tick-
et to attend that evenings
game against the Tourists.
PARIS MOUNTAIN PARK
FRIENDS DAY APRIL 26
Nature lovers of all ages
can enjoy Friends Day
events set for 11 a.m.-3
p.m. on Saturday, April
26, at Paris Mountain State
Park.
Activities include live
entertainment, boating on
Lake Placid, childrens ac-
tivities, interactive nature
exhibits from several local
groups, a one and a half
hour aquatic ecology hike
at noon from Park Center
to Mountain Creek.
Admission is free on
Friends Day, though dona-
tions to the Paris Moun-
tain State Park Friends will
be accepted.
For more information,
call 244-5565 during of-
fice hours from 11 a.m. 5
p.m. or visit www.pmspf.
org.
Paris Mountain State
Park is off S.C. 253 (State
Park Road), six miles north
of downtown Greenville.
On all other days, admis-
sion is $2 for ages 1664,
$1.25 for S.C. seniors and
disabled persons. Children
under 16 are not charged
admission.
SEND US YOUR
UPCOMING SPORTS NEWS
Send all of your upcom-
ing sports events and news
to Billy Cannada at billy@
greercitizen.com, P.O. Box
70, Greer, SC 29652 or call
877-2076. Deadlines for
submission are Monday at
8 a.m.
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This newspaper will not
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in violation of the law. Our
readers hereby informed
that all dwelling advertised
in this newspaper are avail-
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SPORTS
ROUNDUP
Grad Sharpe
competes at
NFL combine
CRUSADER
CORNER



PHOTO | SUBMITTED
Masterful start
Greers Bill Haas led all contenders after the opening
round of The Masters, shooting a 68 through the frst 18.
He fnished the tournament tied for 20th.
WIN: Eagles outscore opponents 70-0


PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
After wins over Blue Ridge
and Riverside, Eastside has
set its sights on lofty goals.
I was very proud
of the girls. It was a
great way to finish
off the midway
point of the season
going into spring
break.
Andy Robinson
Eastside soccer coach
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 2014 THE GREER CITIZEN B5
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6. The Readers` Choice 2014 results will be published in
The Greer Citizen on May 21, 2014. Contest results do
not refect the views of The Greer Citizen.
7. Judges` decisions are fnal.
S
E
C
O
N
D

A
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E-mail _______________________ Phone ____________________
Please mail competed questionnaire to:
READERS CHOICE
PO Box 70, Greer, SC 29652 or 317 Trade Street, Greer, SC 29651
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4-16,23
AUCTIONS
PURSUANT TO S.C. SELF
STORAGE LAW 39-20-45,
the following units will be
auctioned on Friday, April
25th, 2014 at 10:00 a.m. at
Foothills Storage, Inc. 255
Harvard Ct Lyman SC.
Unit #s & tenant names:
18: Michael Ballenger,
20:Deborah Slatten,
40: Ricky Wolfe,
42: Tammy Hughes,
L09: Grayon Allen,
L25:Faye Johnson,
L54: Shelia Young,
W23: Alice Rice,
W40: Kahil Priester,
W52: Travis Rice,
W55:Erica Jackson,
W57: Tweet Pearson,
W72: Jeffrey West
All units contain a combina-
tion of houshold items, furni-
ture, clothing and tools. For
more information you may
contact the offce at 949-
0105
4-16, 23
AUCTION EVERY THURS-
DAY 11am in old ABC Build-
ing 317 S. Buncombe. Visit
auctionzip.com
4-2,9,16,23-30-TFN
On-Line Premier Auction!
Wedgwood, Art, Sterling,
Jewelry, Coins, MORE! Apr.
24th 6PM Preview Mon. Apr.
21st 3-7PM or call for appt.
Shelleys Auction Gallery
(NCAL 6131) 429 N. Main St.,
Hendersonville NC J. Hum-
phrey, Auctioneer (NCAL
6556) www.shelleysauction.
com 828.698.8485
ADVERTISE YOUR AUC-
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pers for only $375. Your 25-
word classifed ad will reach
more than 2.6 million read-
ers. Call Donna Yount at the
S.C. Newspaper Network,
1-888-727-7377.
Piedmont Open Equipment
Auction Saturday, May
3rd 10am, I-77 Speedway,
Chester, SC Live & Online
Bidding through Equip-
mentFacts.com Accepting
consignments! 803-909-
4555, theligoncompany.com
SCAL1716/NCAL8951
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED: Need
someone to cut grass, paint,
etc. Call 879-2015.
4-16, 23, 30 - TFN
EARN $500 A DAY: Insur-
ance Agents Needed; Leads,
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Paid Daily; Lifetime Renew-
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Life License Required Call
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COLONIAL LIFE is seeking
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Training & leads. Sales ex-
perience required, LA&H
license preferred. Call Elisa-
beth at 803-391-5536.
SPECIAL OPS U.S. Navy.
Elite training. Daring mis-
sions. Generous pay/ben-
efts. HS grads ages 17-30.
Do you have what it takes?
Call Mon-Fri 800-662-7419

HELP WANTED DRIVERS
Drivers: DEDICATED. RE-
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4-16,23
SOUTHEAST REGIONAL
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Limited positions available
- Only 5 positions remain.
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Southeast regional runs.
Guaranteed weekly mini-
mum pay. Excellent com-
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and timelines expected.
Drivers are based out of the
ATL Terminal. Must be 21-
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CDL. At least 6 months
OTR experience required.
Call Super Service at 888-
408-5275.
4-16
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4-16, 23, 30, 5-7
Reliable Tank Line is accept-
ing applications and offering
a sign on bonus for Local
Drivers to haul petroleum
products out of Spartan-
burg, SC. Complete beneft
package including medical,
dental, and vision, 401k with
company match and proft
sharing! Must have a clean
driving record, stable work
history and possess Class A
CDL with hazmat and tanker
endorsement. One year of
verifable Class A driving
experience required. Ap-
ply online at www.reliable-
tankline.com or call 1-800-
672-6604 x 160 for specifc
questions.
Experienced OTR Flatbed
Drivers earn 50 up to 55
cpm loaded. $1000 sign on
to Qualifed drivers. Home
most weekends. Call: 843-
266-3731 / www.bulldoghi-
way.com EOE
Hiring One Ton and 3/4 Ton
Pickup trucks to deliver RVs.
10/mile Sign-on Bonus, 4
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cations. Call 866-764-1601
or www.foremosttransport.
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New Pay-For-Experience
program pays up to $0.41/
mile. Class A Professional
Drivers Call 866-501-0946
for more details or visit Su-
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GUARANTEED PAY!
CLASS-A -CDL FLATBED
DRIVERS NEEDED! Lo-
cal, regional, OTR. Great
pay package/benefts/401k
match. 1yr exp. required.
Call JGR 864-488-9030 Ext.
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SC locations. www.jgr-inc.
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WE NEED DRIVERS!! Im-
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drivers, minimum 1yr. OTR
experience. Late model con-
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trailers. Top pay, insurance.
Home most weekends. Senn
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ADVERTISE YOUR DRIV-
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papers for only $375. Your
25-word classifed ad will
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readers. Call Donna Yount
at the S.C. Newspaper Net-
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Superior Transportation
New Careers for OTR Driv-
ers Class A CDL 2yrs Exp
Flatbed. Get paid for your
Experience! Weekly Salary
& Extra pay for weekends!
Call 800-736-9486 Ext266
FOR SALE
REDUCED: 2011 Cherokee
Grey Wolf 19 camper,
Make: Forest River Mint
condition, taken on two trips
only. Forced to sell due to
illness. Full width back door
makes a ramp. Convenient
for loading / unloading /
traveling with a scooter/ mo-
torcycle, ATV etc. Included:
two full propane bottles,
two stabilizing bars, and a
heavy-duty extension power
cord - $ 9,000.00 Call Ron
@ 864-616-2514 Call Nell
@ 864-895-1694
4-2,9,16, 23
DOWNSIZING - MUST
SELL! Queen bed - com-
plete set, three large chairs,
other items. Call 864-202-
0313 or 864-381-0446.
4-16, 23
Two adjoining cemetery
plots. Prime location at
Woodland Memorial Park.
Selling at less than market
value. Interested, call 864-
263-3558 or 864-421-3655.
4-16, 23
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Professional, U.S.-based
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SERVICES
TEAROFFS, REROOFS,
AND ROOF REPAIRS.
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MISCELLANEOUS
WERE YOU IMPLANTED
WITH A ST. JUDE RIATA
DEFIBRILLATOR LEAD
WIRE between June 2001
and December 2010? Have
you had this lead replaced,
capped or did you receive
shocks from the lead? You
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Charles Johnson 1-800-
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AIRLINE CAREERS begin
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Financial aid for qualifed
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assistance. Call Aviation In-
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367-2513
Healthcare CAREERS -
Looking for caring people
to train for work in hospitals,
clinics, health. Financial aid
if qualifed. Call Centura
College Charleston 888-
242-3623 / Columbia 888-
891-1658.
HVAC Careers Start here
- Heat things up with hands
on training in months not
years. Financial aid if quali-
fed. Job placement assis-
tance. Call Centura College
888-891-1658.
Yard sale
CHURCH YARD SALE
SATURDAY, MAY 17,
8:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Pleasant Hill Baptist. 4899
Jordan Road, Greer.
VENDORS WELCOME!
CALL 864-895-3546
TO RESERVE SPACE.
4-165-14
GREAT 4-FAMILY YARD
SALE. Christmas in April.
Lots of clothes, chairs and
tables. 4-19-14, 7 a.m.-2
p.m. If rain, 4-26-14. 211
Zoar Heights, Greer.
4-16
SHELDON FARMS
COMMUNITY YARD SALE
SATURDAY, APRIL 26TH,
starting at 7:00 a.m. Com-
munity located off Gibbs
Shoals Road, Greer.
4-16,23
B6 THE GREER CITIZEN CLASSIFIEDS WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 2014
EMERYS
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Find Just What
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in

CLASSIFIEDS
MINI-WAREHOUSES
FOR RENT
Jordan Rental Agency
329 Suber Rd.
Greer, SC 29651
879-2015
3
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8
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t
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Last weeks answers
OAKLAND
PLACE APARTMENTS
NOW ACCEPTING
APPLICATIONS
FOR 1, 2, 3, AND 4
BEDROOMAPARTMENTS
212 OAKLAND AVENUE
GREER S.C. 29650
Affordable Section 8,
please call 864-879-4552
for more information
GREER
HOUSING
AUTHORITY WILL ACCEPT
APPLICANTIONS FOR THEIR
SECTION 8
PROGRAM
BEGINNING APRIL 24TH, 2014
ENDING MAY 8TH, 2014.
APPLICATIONS WILL BE
ACCEPTED ONLY ON
TUESDAYS AND THURSDAYS
FROM 10:00AM TILL 2:00PM
AT OUR OFFICE ON
103 SCHOOL STREET
GREER, SC 29651.
GREER HOUSING AUTHORITY
COMPLIES WITH THE FAIR
HOUSING ACT.
APARTMENTS
FOR RENT
AUCTIONS
DRIVERS/
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
YARD
SALES
CALL FOR SERVICES
MISCELLANEOUS
COMPUTERS
Name drawn
from hat at
trade show
BY KATIE JONES
STAFF WRITER
Machine tool students at
the J. Harley Bonds have
one more tool in their ar-
senal to help prepare them
for the real world.
The newest addition at
the career center is a Haas
simulator for the pro-
gram, which machine tool
instructor Roy Morris won
at a trade show.
You put your name in
a hat and they drew my
name out, he said.
The simulator is worth
about $2,000, Morris said,
and will allow students to
work on their program-
ming.
Haas machines are re-
ally a mainstream piece
of machinery in Greenville
County and around the
world, he said. Its all G-
codes its pretty intense
but we have little learning
books that we give the stu-
dents. We say, What does
G1 do, what does G2 do
and so on and so on. But
every one of those dots
and dashes means some-
thing. If you leave one of
them out, it wont work.
But what this does, it
allows you to do a pro-
gram, see your program
and then plug in your USB
on the side and then test
it. Once its tested, take it
out on a machine, insert it
on a machineand then
make your parts.
The simulator will ex-
pose students to real
work-place tools. Simula-
tors like the one Morris
won can be found at GE,
in the continuing educa-
tion program at Greenville
Tech and similar compa-
nies and programs.
Morris wanted a simula-
tor, said Anna Chappell,
guidance counselor.
It was on his wish list
anyway, so its perfect,
Chappell said. We still
have some more on his
wish list.
Greer High will launch
a pilot introduction to
manufacturing program
next year for freshmen
and sophomores. Greer
was selected because the
building has the room to
accommodate it, Chappell
said.
It will also give the stu-
dents a head start, Morris
said.
They will get the first
part of this program here
the introductory to man-
ufacturing part, he said.
The lathes, the mills, all
the introductory stuff.
What that means is when
they become juniors and
transfer here they will al-
ready have a head start.
kjones@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
LIVING HERE
The Greer Citizen
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 2014 THE GREER CITIZEN B7
KEEPING UP
WITH JONES
KATIE
JONES
Moving
on up
L
ike Greer Citizen
Editor Billy Cannada,
I too have been house
hunting. Im a little more
lenient on my hot tub
requirements than Billy is,
though.
On Monday morning,
Dale and I made an offer
on a house. This is one of
the most exciting, most
terrifying, most long-term
things Ive ever done.
And while writing
this column, Monday
afternoon we came to
an agreement. So many
things are still pending
-- inspections, tons of pa-
perwork and packing up
all my possessions for the
third time since graduat-
ing college.
Im excited for obvious
reasons. This will be my
first home and I am so,
so excited to make it my
home. Its twice as big as
my apartment and has a
yard. I cant wait to grow
flowers and vegetables.
(Stay tuned for the col-
umn where I mourn this
garden, which will inevita-
bly happen.)
Just as quickly as Im
excited, terror swoops in.
A 30-year mortgage? That
is some scary, serious
business.
Ill turn 26 in June.
Thats a serious commit-
ment. I struggle with long-
term planning. What do
I want to be when I grow
up? No clue.
The whole process
makes me want to giggle
with excitement, cry,
vomit and cross my
fingers. I also feel like Im
in dire need of a nap, but
that is true for me most
of the time.
Dale has been house-
crazy for much longer
than I have. He claims this
has been his dream since
he graduated high school
his words. He may have
a flair for drama. Birds of
a feather, right?
Ive been in an apart-
ment for almost seven
years now and lived in a
dorm my first year of col-
lege. Id be lying if I said
I didnt enjoy. From May
through October of last
year, I practically lived at
the pool. The apartment
I lived in during college
had an awesome gym.
Having maintenance
crews handle any repairs
has been a lifesaver for
me. Confession time: I am
incredibly clumsy. In ad-
dition to my maintenance
saviors fixing routine
issues like clogged drains
and outdated air condi-
tioners, theyve fixed two
garbage disposals after I
accidentally turned it on
with glasses in them and
replaced a mirror closet
door after I fell into it
while trying to put it back
on its track.
But owning a home
means Dale and I will be
responsible for our own
maintenance. Hes far
handier than I could ever
hope to be.
We did the tiniest bit of
house hunting about this
time last year. We saw one
house (it was horrible)
and then life became
crazier than usual and we
renewed the lease at our
apartment.
Homeownership will
hopefully be a fun, terrify-
ing adventure for us.


BY KATIE JONES
STAFF WRITER
The Bridwell family will
travel to Washington, D.C.
in late May for the Scripps
National Spelling Bee,
where Kalika will com-
pete.
It is Kalikas second time
competing, but the sev-
enth time the family has
gone. Kalikas older broth-
er Zane competed when
he was in eighth grade and
her older sister Keiko com-
peted fifth-eighth grade.
Kalika, the youngest in
the family at 13 years old,
spelled the words correct-
ly on stage last year, but
didnt score high enough
on the written test to move
onto the semifinals. She
studies some every day.
The list for the begin-
ning of the spelling bee
just came in so I just start-
ed studying the spellings
and definitions of those,
said Kalika, a Florence
Chapel seventh grader.
Theres a website with
vocabulary quizzes, so we
go on there.
Kalika likes writing and
said English/Language
Arts comes easier before
of her knack for spelling.
It has helped all three
of them with standard-
ized tests like ACT and
that kind of thing because
vocabulary is a big part
of that, said Barry, their
dad. That was a big help
for Keiko back when she
was taking those tests.
The tests also help ex-
pose them to science and
social studies terms, said
Karen, their mom.
Zane, now 16 and a ju-
nior at Byrnes, was not
interested in the spelling
bee when he first became
eligible and did not com-
pete until his last year of
eligibility. Zane also didnt
score high enough on the
written test.
It was at the classroom
level of spelling bees.
There wasnt a set list of
words, so I never knew
what to expect and didnt
know how to prepare for
that, he said. Once I got
past that finally in eighth
grade, they gave me a
list. If you give me a list,
Im going to memorize it.
I knew 100 percent of all
the words.
Thats his thing hes
amazing at memorizing,
Karen said. He has been
since he was little. He was
five and he memorized all
the presidents.
Keiko made it to nation-
als for the first time in
fifth grade and went every
year through eighth grade,
which is the age limit.
The first two years, she
was eliminated before the
semifinals, but did so her
last two years and placed
17th both times.
In seventh grade, she
misspelled phrenicec-
tomy, surgical removal
of the phrenic nerve; in
eighth, it was thylacine,
an extinct Tasmanian
wolf.
It was a really great ex-
perience. The best part,
the competition, is great.
It taught me so much, but
the best part was being
with the people there,
she said. All the spellers,
they came from totally dif-
ferent backgrounds. They
have so many different
interests, but they all had
that one thing in common,
which was that they all
loved words. They were
crazy about words.
Keiko, a freshman at the
University of South Caro-
lina, is majoring in linguis-
tics.
Im exploring different
branches of it right now,
she said. I might look at
neurolinguistics. I might
look at speech pathology.
I really dont know yet.
Keiko was proud to see
her siblings follow in her
footsteps.
I knew that this was
something I had gotten the
family interested in, which
I really enjoyed knowing
that I had given this expe-
rience to my family and it
would continue on, she
said. I knew that they had
both put a lot of work into
it. This is not an easy thing
to do. Im just incredibly
proud of the fact that they
were able to go.
Barry Bridwell has
coached all three of his
children. Preparation is
key, he said.
We always know the list
really well, Barry said. We
study other things from
other lists to get them
practice at guessing based
on what they know about
languages and certain ten-
dencies of words to make
an educated guess at it.
All five family members
have gone every time.
They grew watching the
bee, Barry said of Kalika
and Zane. They went to
all her regional competi-
tions and national com-
petitions. Even before
they went, they were fa-
miliar with it and had sat
through the competitions.
Wed always sit there with
notepads and try to guess
the words. They had the
experience of doing that,
but I didnt know if they
would pursue it. I knew
they were capable of doing
it, but after Keiko finished
up, I thought we may nev-
er be back here.
Dynasty: D-Y-N-A-S-T-Y
KEIKO
ZANE
KALIKA
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
The Bridwell family, left to right: Zane, Keiko, Kalika, Barry and Karen. The Bridwells are
headed to Washington, D.C. for their seventh trip to the Scripps National Spelling Bee
where Kalika will compete for the second time.
..they all had
that one thing in
common, which was
that they all loved
words. They were
crazy about words.

MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN
Jonathan Phillips roughs out a die in his Machine Tool class at the
J. Harley Bonds Career Center.
Bonds Career
Center teacher
wins simulator
MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN
Machine tool instructor Roy Morris shows of his prize, a Haas simulator. It will give
exposure to real-world workplace tools.
It was on
his wish list
anyway, so
its perfect. We
still have some
more on his
wish list.
Anna Chappell
Guidance counselor
The whole process
makes me want
to giggle with
excitement, cry,
vomit and cross my
fingers.
FANTASTICKS COMING
TO FLAT ROCK PLAYHOUSE
Flat Rock Playhouse
presents the worlds lon-
gest running musical in
the history of musicals,
The Fantasticks, from
April 17May 11.
Part of its Season of
Laughter and Love pre-
sented by The Cliffs, the
Playhouse is pleased to
offer this installment of
love, with music by Harvey
Schmidt and lyrics by Tom
Jones, loosely based on
the play The Romancers
by Edmond Rostand.
This musical tells the
story of two neighboring
fathers who trick their
children, Luisa and Matt,
into falling in love by pre-
tending to feud. The fa-
thers hire traveling actors
to stage a mock abduction,
so that Matt can heroically
seem to save Luisa, ending
the supposed feud.
When the children dis-
cover the deception, they
reject the arranged love
match and separate. Each
then gains disillusioning
experiences of the real
world, seen in parallel fan-
tasy sequences. They re-
turn to each other bruised,
but enlightened and they
renew their vows with
more maturity.
The show is directed
by Producing Artistic Di-
rector for the Playhouse,
Vincent Marini. In addi-
tion to producing the in-
novative Music on the
Rock series, Marini has
directed Les Miserables;
For The Glory; A Few Good
Men; Guys and Dolls; The
Buddy Holly Story; Celtic
Christmas; Our Show of
Shows; Cotton Patch Gos-
pel; and Hank Williams:
Lost Highway.
The Fantasticks will
be Wednesday through
Saturday at 8 p.m.; mati-
nees Wednesday, Thurs-
day, Saturday and Sunday
at 2 p.m. There will be no
performance on Easter
Sunday. All tickets are $40
and can be purchased by
calling the Playhouse box
office at 828-693- 0731,
toll-free at 866-732-8008
or online at flatrockplay-
house.org.
UPCOUNTRY MUSE TO
BENEFIT UPSTATE FOREVER
Upstate Forever will re-
ceive all proceeds from
Upcountry Muse, an
event featuring the world
premiere of nature-based
music and dance April
24 at the Greenville Fine
Arts Center, beginning at
7 p.m.
The original perfor-
mances include:
Nocturne, for cello
and piano, by Jon Jeffrey
Grier, performed by Alan
Weinstein, cello, and Eliza-
beth Bachelder, piano.
A Pondering Moment,
solo dance choreographed
and performed by Rebecca
Lee.
Walking the Blue Ridge,
for piano, four hands, by
Sally Wyche Coenen, per-
formed by Michael Coenen
and Sally Wyche Coenen.
Pisgah Songs, by Jon
Grier, based on poems by
Jan Bailey, Marian Willard
Blackwell, Keller Cush-
ing Freeman, and Sue
Lile Inman, performed
by Brittnee Siemon, mez-
zo-soprano, and Lisa Lee,
piano.
Following the perfor-
mances there will be a
silent auction of art by
students at the Fine Arts
Center.
Tickets are $50 per per-
son and are available now
at upstateforever.org/up-
countrymuse/.
SUNDAY ARTMARKET
RETURNS TO CHAPMAN
The reappearance of
springtime weather signi-
fies the return of Chap-
man Cultural Centers
Sunday ArtMarket, a ba-
zaar of handcrafted items
by regional artisans.
The ArtMarket, held
1-5 p.m. in the outdoor
Zimmerli Plaza, is part of
the Centers Sundays Un-
plugged program to pro-
vide a casual and relaxed
atmosphere for patrons to
unplug.
Dozens of local artists
have sold hundreds of
handmade artworks since
the ArtMarkets inception
in July of last year. The
event provides vending
opportunities to local art-
ists in order to encourage
a culturally vibrant com-
munity. With the exception
of winter months, the Art-
Market is open year round.
All items for purchase are
locally handmade and
come from a wide array
of mediums: photography,
soaps, paintings, pottery,
metalwork, glass art, and
more. All sales are received
wholly by the artists.
Any local artist interest-
ed in participating must
pay $10 per year and com-
plete the application. Find
the form online or ask for
one upon arrival. Only
individuals or non-profit
artist groups are eligible.
Ten-foot by 10-foot spac-
es are allotted on a first-
come-first-serve basis, but
artists must provide their
own tables, chairs, tents,
etc. and be able to set up
without staff assistance.
Items for sale have to be
local and original. For
more information on how
to become a vendor, con-
tact Melissa Earley at 278-
9685.
For more information
call 542-ARTS or visit
ChapmanCulturalCenter.
org.
BARBERSHOP CHORUS
IS HOLDING AUDITIONS
The Palmetto Statesmen
barbershop singers invite
men who sing to audition
for a show entitled How
The West Was Won.
Try out any Monday eve-
ning at 7 p.m. through May
26 at Duncan United Meth-
odist Church. The show
will be presented Sept. 13
in Duncan at the District 5
Fine Arts Center.
Learning tracks and
sheet music will be pro-
vided. Call 322-0165 for
details.
EASTER CONCERT COMING
TO CHAPMAN APRIL 20
Spartanburg Community
Band will play an Easter
at 3 p.m. April 20 at the
Chapman Cultural Center.
Admission is $5.
In reference to the
concerts title, primav-
era translates literally to
first green, but generally
refers to spring. Some of
the Bands musical selec-
tions refer to a first of
some kind, such as the
Light Cavalry being first
into battle.
For tickets, call 542-
ARTS or visit Chapman-
CulturalCenter.org.
YOUTH THEATRE PRESENTS
TREASURE ISLAND
Spartanburg Youth The-
atres 2013-2014 season
will culminate with one of
the most popular pirate
stories ever written, Trea-
sure Island, which will
take the Chapman Cul-
tural Center stage on Fri-
day, April 18, at 4:30 and
7 p.m. and on Saturday,
April 19, at 2 p.m.
Treasure Island is
the answer to every ad-
venture-starved childs
dreams. At the center of
it all are Jim Hawkins, a
14-year-old boy who longs
for adventure, and the in-
famous Long John Silver,
who is perhaps the most
famous hero-villain of all
time. This is the first ad-
aptation of Robert Louis
Stevensons Treasure Is-
land to include both male
and female pirates, in-
spired by real-life female
adventurers.
Directed by Paul Board,
Treasure Island features
an exciting cast of 18 young
actors from throughout
Spartanburg County. Tick-
ets are $12 for adults and
$9 for students, and can
be purchased in person
at the Chapman Cultural
Center ticket office, by
phone at 542-2787 or on-
line at chapmancultural-
center.org
SEE EVENTS | B10
ENTERTAINMENT
The Greer Citizen
B8 THE GREER CITIZEN WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 2014
DVD previews
COUCH THEATER |


By Sam Struckhof
NEW RELEASES
FOR WEEK OF APRIL 28
PICKS OF THE WEEK
Gimme Shelter (PG-13)
-- A tattooed teen named
Apple (Vanessa Hudgens)
runs away from her abu-
sive addict mother (Rosa-
rio Dawson), and finds a
new set of hardships ahead
of her. Apple -- shaken,
unwashed, starving and
pregnant -- finds her fa-
ther (Brendan Fraser) in an
affluent New Jersey sub-
urb. Eventually, she finds
her way into a shelter for
pregnant teens and forms
real human connections.
While based on true
events, the story is told
in stilted, cliched lines
that sound like they could
only be put together from
scraps of old PSAs. This
isnt to discredit the per-
formances. Hudgens has
never been further from
her peppy Disney Channel
image.
Gloria (R) -- Single and
over 50, Gloria leads a ful-
filling life outside of her
office job. Shes into yoga,
self-improvement classes
and keeping up with her
adult children. The audi-
ence first sees her mov-
ing confidently through
a nightclub, dancing and
checking out other singles.
Glorias life turns a corner
when she meets Rodolfo,
a slightly older man who
helps Gloria embrace her
passion for life.
This Chilean import
strikes a fine balance be-
tween laughter and drama.
Gloria isnt a wacky older
dame, nor is she a sad sto-
ry about lifes later years.
Shes a three-dimensional
person at a point where
she wants love in her life,
but shes strong enough to
not fall apart without it.
The Rocket (Unrated)
-- Ahlo is a 10-year-old
Laotian boy who must be
bad luck. He was born a
twin, but his brother did
not survive -- an ill omen,
as superstition says that
one twin will be cursed
and the other blessed. One
day, Ahlos village receives
news that they have to
leave their land because
it will be flooded to make
the reservoir for a new
dam. Of course, people are
quick to blame such mis-
fortune on Ahlo once they
find out hes a twin. The
boy decides hes going to
re-write his fate -- hes go-
ing to enter a rocket-build-
ing contest and win. The
Rocket tells a unique,
transporting and uplifting
story.
The Selfish Giant
(Unrated) -- Best pals and
partners in crime, Arbor
and Swifty are perpetually
in trouble at home and
at school. Both are ado-
lescents living in a bleak
and recessed British town
brimming with abandoned
lots and rusty metal. Arbor
is the wilier one who gets
Swifty to ditch school. The
boys start getting paid by
a local scumbag for bring-
ing in stolen scrap metal
and wires with their horse
carriage. From the begin-
ning, you can see tragedy
stalking the pair.
TV RELEASES
Masterpiece: Mr. Self-
ridge Season 2
Hill Street Blues: The
Complete Series
Francis the Talking Mule
Complete Collection
Dynasty: Season 8, Vol.
1 & 2 (2-Pack)
Father Brown: The Com-
plete Collection
Bob Hope Classic Com-
edy Collection
(c) 2014 King Features Synd., Inc.
Suthep Po-ngam in The
Rocket
THINGS
TO DO
Poets and literary artists
will convene to celebrate
National Poetry Month at
Chapman Cultural Center
with workshops, readings,
and poetry slams on Sat-
urday, April 26.
The events, collectively
called Poetry Saturday,
are spread throughout the
day, with workshops start-
ing at 11 a.m., readings at
6 p.m., and the first poetry
slam shortly thereafter.
The workshops, facilitat-
ed by well-known profes-
sional poets, are free and
open to the public. They
are designed not only to
advance participants
skills in spoken word and
slam poetry, but also to
augment the publics un-
derstanding of how poetry
slams work.
A poetry slam is a fast-
paced showcase of com-
petitive performance
poetry, usually where au-
dience members on a scale
of 0-10 judge individuals.
Slam poetry, invented in
the 80s, has become a
worldwide literary phe-
nomenon, often featuring
thought-provoking themes
in a highly lyrical style.
Moody Black, an author,
poet, and youth advocate,
will facilitate the first
workshop entitled Meta-
phor 101, 11 a.m.-noon.
The following workshop,
The Life & Death of a Con-
cept, held 12:10-1:10 p.m.,
will be facilitated by Lyri-
cally Blessed, a slam coach
and professional poet.
Author, poet, and col-
lege professor Kelly Rae
Williams leads the next
workshop, 2:40-3:40 p.m.,
called A Picture is Worth
1000 Words: The Impor-
tance of Imagery. The final
session, The 3 Lives of a
Poem: Concept, Creation &
Performance, will be facili-
tated by current Individual
World Poetry Slam cham-
pion Edward Mabrey Jr.
South Carolina Gover-
nors Schools Mamie Mor-
gan will conduct a written
poetry workshop, 1:30-
2:30 p.m., for authors who
are more interested in
writing non-performance
pieces.
Those who participated
the Spartanburg Soar-
ing! Written Poetry Com-
petition in March will
be included in the days
events as well. The first
and second place winners
from each of the four age
brackets will be invited to
read their winning poems.
Second graders up to long-
time adult residents took
part in the contest, all
writing about what makes
Spartanburg soar. The
poetry readings are free
to the public, and will al-
low the writers to share
their vision of what makes
the city great, starting at 6
p.m.
Poetry slams begin
shortly thereafter in the
Chapman Cultural Cen-
ter theater with the com-
mencement of the amateur
category competition. At 7
p.m., the experienced cat-
egory competition begins.
Amateurs will perform
twice while experienced
slammers will perform
three times. Admission to
watch all slams is $5 per
person. Winners of both
poetry slams will receive
cash prizes: $200 for
the amateur winner and
$1500 for the experienced
winner.
For more information,
visit SpokenWordSpartan-
burg.com. Go to Chapman-
CulturalCenter.org or call
542-ARTS.
Thursday
through
Saturday
Now in its 17th year of
telling the gospel story
through living displays of
art, the annual Living Gal-
lery at Bob Jones Universi-
ty has become an Upstate
Easter tradition.
Programs will be in
Rodeheaver Auditorium
April 17-19 at 4:30 p.m.
and 7:30 p.m., with an ad-
ditional program April 19
at 2 p.m.
The program features
drama, music and life-size
recreations of masterpiec-
es brought to life with live
human models.
This years Living Gal-
lery drama is set 500 years
before the coming of Jesus
Christ.
Jerusalem is in ruins--
conquered by the Babylo-
nians. Only a remnant of
believing Jews cling to the
promise of a Messiah, who
will one day rescue them
from bondage and free
them from their sin.
The program highlights
the Old Testament proph-
ecies of this Messiah, and
illustrates their fulfillment
in the life, death, and res-
urrection of Jesus Christ,
said Director David Eoute,
Jr. This years production
features new works of art,
including Sbastian Bour-
dons Moses and the Bra-
zen Serpent and Jocapo
Bassanos Crucifixion.
Tickets are $11 for
adults and $9 for children
ages 6-12.
Tickets may be pur-
chased at the BJU Programs
and Production box office
from noon to 5 p.m., Mon-
day-Friday, online through
www.livinggallery.bju.edu
or by calling 770-1372
from noon 5 p.m.
The Museum and Gallery
at Bob Jones University is
open for extended hours,
2-7 p.m., on Living Gallery
performance days.
Tickets to the Living Gal-
lery provide free admis-
sion to both M&G sites at
Bob Jones University and
at Heritage Green on April
17-19.
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
Bob Jones University will host its annual Living Gallery April 17-19 at 4:30 p.m. and 7:30
p.m. The program features drama, music and recreations.
BJU Living Gallery
brings artwork to life
Chapman Center
hosts poetry slam,
readings April 26



RMS STUDENT RECITES
SPECIAL OLYMPICS PLEDGE
Riverside Middle School
student Spencer Burton re-
cited the athletes pledge
at the opening of the Spe-
cial Olympics April 8.
RMS STUDENT PLACES
THIRD IN CONTEST
Eighth grade student
Muayad Sarhan won third
place in the State of South
Carolinas Letters about
Li t er at ur e
c o n t e s t ,
sponsored
by The Cen-
ter for the
Book and
the U.S. Li-
brary of
Congress.
WASHINGTON CENTER
SPONSORS WALK & ROLL
The Washington Center
PTA will sponsor the annu-
al Washington Center Walk
and Roll at 9 a.m. April 26
on the Brookwood Church
campus in Simpsonville.
This one-mile walk
promises to be a special
celebration for a special
school. The events pri-
mary purpose is to raise
community awareness for
Washington Center, the
Greenville County School
for special needs students,
and to enhance funding for
the schools multi-faceted
program. Students from
area schools, along with
families and community
supporters, will partici-
pate to cheer their friends
who have disabilities.
Information and reg-
istration are available
through Washington Cen-
ter PTA on Facebook.
WASHINGTON CENTER
PAYS IT FORWARD
Washington Center stu-
dents and staff recently
held their first Pay It For-
ward Spirit Day.
This event demonstrat-
ed to students how to help
others.
Students walked or were
pushed in their wheel-
chairs on a rotating sched-
ules throughout the school
day for laps around the
gym to simulate a mara-
thon.
Sponsors pledged mon-
etary support for stu-
dents in each class along
with staff fundraiser
projects. Final donations
totaled $1,275.
Annually, two charities
will be the recipients of
money raised. The PTAs
Walk and Roll will be the
standard recipient, along
with another charity mean-
ingful to students. The
British charity Whizz
Kidz was chosen this
year to help fund student
wheelchairs in the United
Kingdom.
The Spirit Day Marathon
was a celebration with
team banners, cheerlead-
ers and music. During the
week, lessons centered on
nutrition, health, exercise,
United Kingdom, helping
others and marathons.
The mini-marathon served
to kick-off the month of
fundraisers and Special
Olympics.
Students and staff look
forward to this annual
opportunity to learn, be
healthy and share with
others.
WASHINGTON CENTER
STUDENTS VISIT FRANKIES
Every year, each teacher
at Washington Center is
given the opportunity to
apply for a PTA Grant.
This year, Amy Garbes
class used their PTA grant
to fund a trip to Frankies
Fun Park.
The students played
skeeball, Guitar Hero, rode
a motorcycle in a video
game and played lots of
other fun games. The day
ended with hamburgers
and French fries at Johnny
Rockets.
Students practiced using
appropriate social skills
and had positive interac-
tions with those in the
community.
RIVERSIDE MIDDLE IMOVE
SCHEDULED FOR MAY 3
The 4th annual Riverside
Middle iMOVE 5K Run/
Walk will be May 3, 2014.
Check in will be at 8 a.m.,
pre-race warm up at 8:30
a.m. and the start of the
race/walk at 9 a.m.
All proceeds will be
donated to Let There Be
Mom and Palmetto Ani-
mal Assisted Life Services
(PAALS).
For more information,
please visit the RMS web-
site.
CAREER VOLUNTEERS
NEEDED AT RMS
Riverside Middle is seek-
ing parents and people in
the community that may
be interested in coming to
speak to students about
their career to expose stu-
dents to a variety of ca-
reer opportunities and/or
would like to host a stu-
dent for a job shadowing
experience for a day.
Contact Brooke Howard
at 355-7987 or kbhow-
ard@greenville.k12.sc.us
LANGSTON CHARTER HELD
PARKING LOT PARTY
Langston Charter Middle
School hosted its first-
ever Parking Lot Party
April 5 in tandem with a
Ford Drive 4UR Commu-
nity event sponsored by
Fairway Ford. The schools
goal was to conduct 300
test drives from their cam-
pus that day and earn $20
from Ford Motor Company
for each test drive.
Food trucks, the Blood
Mobile, craft vendors,
live music and The Game
Truck were all on sight
to help draw the crowd,
which resulted in Langs-
ton reaching its goal and
earning $6,000 from Ford
Motor Company.
Langston is the first
middle school in Green-
ville to reach that number
in a single event. In addi-
tion, Kohls Department
Stores contributed $1,000
towards Langston through
its Kohls Cares program
and sent ten employee vol-
unteers to help out during
the event.
LANGSTON PLANS SIXTH
GRADE MEET AND GREET
All rising Langston
Charter Middle School
sixth graders are invited
to a meet and greet dinner
from 5-7 p.m. April 28 at
Stevi Bs Pizza on Wood-
ruff Road.
Rising sixth graders
will have an opportunity
to meet other students in
addition to teachers and
staff.
Langston T-shirts, hood-
ies, water bottles and mag-
nets will be for sale at the
event.
LANGSTON CHARTER
HOLDING SUMMER CAMPS
A variety of summer
camps will be offered to all
area students at Langston
Charter Middle School this
summer. study skills, cre-
ative writing and science
camp information can be
found langstoncharter.org
under the LCMS SUMMER
CAMPS tab.
Lego Robotics Level 1
and Lego Sumo summer
camps will be offered at
Langston Charter Middle
School to all area rising
fourth through eighth
grade students. An insect-
collecting summer camp
will be offered to all area
rising sixth grade stu-
dents.
Cost is $100 for Lego
camps and $80 for insect
collecting. Space is lim-
ited. For dates, times and
information on available
discounts, contact David
Leeke at dleeke@langston-
charter.org.
APEX Adventures Out-
door Day Camp will be of-
fered as a summer camp
through Langston Charter
Middle School. The camp
features hiking, mountain
biking, whitewater raft-
ing and stand-up paddle
boarding.
The camp is open to
ages 11-14. For more in-
formation or to register
go to apexadventurecamp.
com.
DUNCAN ELEMENTARY
VISITS GREENVILLE ZOO
Duncan Elementary
kindergarten students re-
cently visited the Green-
ville Zoo to see animals
in their habitats and first
grade students went to the
Greenville Museum.
Third grade students
also traveled to the mu-
seum to go back in time as
they experienced different
displays there.
RIVER RIDGE STUDENTS
GET PRESIDENTIAL MAIL
With the help of their
River Ridge teachers, Iisha
Pinckney and Kristina
Berry, students wrote per-
sonal letters to President
Barack Obama and asked
him questions about his
job, family and living in
the White House.
His response letter
encouraged the kids to
dream big and work
hard in school. He also
sent them pictures of his
two dogs, a map of the
White House, and an auto-
graphed picture, which are
hanging up at River Ridge
now.
DISTRICT FIVE STUDENTS
SHOW DURING ART MONTH
In Spartanburg Coun-
ty, schools celebrate art
month with a massive art
display held in the hall-
ways of the Chapman Cul-
tural Center. District Five
had 60 pieces of artwork in
the show, with representa-
tion from all 12 schools.
The following students
had pieces in the show:
Abner Creek Academy
Ainsley Hodge
Pierce Harvley
Cadence Ly
Gabrielle Ashmore
Byrnes Freshman
Academy
Coleman Eubanks
Jennifer Paton
Jake Baynes
Josue Martinez
Byrnes High
Callie Matson
Katherine Guardado
Anna McCarth
Leana Batson
Jennifer Paton
Carley Hall
Berry Shoals
Intermediate School
Hannah Owens
Haylee Steadman
Jacob Troxel
Ryan Truong
Carsyn Dillard
Beech Springs
Intermediate School
Ruby Jimenez
Shykira Stewart
Janiah Turner
Colby Sexton
Nigal Lighty
Duncan Elementary
Jakira Wright
Dana Chimal-Cruz
Daniell Pacheco
Will Warner
Alex Cruz
D.R. Hill Middle
Taylor Chastain
Savannah Leopard
Alex Trejo
Grace Boyles
Victoria Denishchich
Florence Chapel Middle
School
Emariely Umana
Morgan Arts
Angela Rogers
Niya Cheeks
Sarah Reel
Lyman Elementary
Jackson Howard
Noel Charping
Kaylee Brown
Meri Cole McMakin
Maddie Cathcart
River Ridge Elementary
Noah McMore
Michael McDonald
Arcenia Cuello
Gabriela Foessel
Sami Workman
Reidville Elementary
Addison Williams
Kodi Howard
Yowanha Manteghi
Bekah Jeffrey
Jenna Hollis
Wellford Academy
Karalyne McAbee
Corbin Gilbert
Steven Doughty
Kaena Aviles
Layla Foster
SEE SCHOOLS | B10
OUR SCHOOLS
The Greer Citizen
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 2014 THE GREER CITIZEN B9
$
$
$
$
O
ne Itemat R
egular Price
Coupon Coupon
COUPON FOR IN-STORE OR ONLINE USE!
Cash Value 1/10.
Coupon
Code:
Offer good for one item at regular price only.
One coupon per customer per day. Must present coupon at time of purchase.
Offer is not valid with any other coupon, discount or previous purchase.
Excludes CRICUT products, Tim Holtz Vagabond Machine, Silhouette CAMEO Machine,
helium tanks, gift cards, custom orders, special orders, labor, rentals or class fees.
A single cut of fabric or trim by the yard equals one item.
Online fabric & trim discount is limited to 10 yards, single cut.
TAYLORS
6007 Wade Hampton Blvd.
(Located near Fatz Cafe)
864-848-1610
STORE HOURS: 9-8 MONDAY-SATURDAY
CLOSED SUNDAY
#328 Taylors, SC
The Greer Citizen
March 31, 2008
ELEMENTARY
Thursday - No school.
Friday No school.
Monday - Chicken gumbo
over brown rice, toasted
cheese sandwich, vegetation
station, tomato basil soup,
vegetable medley, choice of
fruit, milk.
Tuesday - Baked fsh
sandwich, beef and cheese
nachos, vegetation station,
southwest chicken and
brown rice soup, corn, choice
of fruit, milk.
Wednesday - Roasted chick-
en, pasta marinara, whole
grain garlic bread stick for all,
vegetation station, chicken
noodle soup, carrots, choice
of fruit, milk.
MIDDLE
Thursday - No school.
Friday No school.
Monday - Roasted chicken
with whole grain roll, bar-
becue sandwich, mandarin
chicken salad with whole
grain roll, corn, carrots, as-
sorted fruit, milk.
Tuesday - Spaghetti with
meat sauce with whole grain
garlic bread stick, spicy chick-
en wrap, southwest chicken
salad with whole grain roll,
green beans, garden salad,
assorted fruit milk.
Wednesday - Fish nuggets
with macaroni and cheese,
deli sandwich, chicken Caesar
salad with whole grain roll,
fresh vegetable with dip, lima
beans, assorted fruit, milk.
HIGH
Thursday - No school.
Friday No school.
Monday - Roasted chicken
with whole grain roll, bar-
becue sandwich, mandarin
chicken salad with whole
grain roll, corn, carrots, as-
sorted fruit, milk.
Tuesday - Spaghetti with
meat sauce with whole grain
garlic bread stick, spicy chick-
en wrap, southwest chicken
salad with whole grain roll,
green beans, garden salad,
assorted fruit milk.
Wednesday - Fish nuggets
with macaroni and cheese,
deli sandwich, chicken Caesar
salad with whole grain roll,
fresh vegetable with dip, lima
beans, assorted fruit, milk.
LUNCH
MENUS
GREENVILLE COUNTY |

SCHOOL
NEWS
GREENVILLE COUNTY |
DISTRICT FIVE |
Boosterthon
a success
Riverside Middle School
wrapped up Spirit Week
with the Color Run
Boosterthon on March
31. Students, parent
volunteers, faculty and
staf all got in on the action
of the paint splattering
color run.
Photos | Submitted
Sarhan
FROM B8
UPSTATE FOREVER SETS
BOOK LAUNCH EVENTS
Upstate Forever has
scheduled events for its
upcoming book, Web
of Water: Reflections of
Life Along the Saluda and
Reedy Rivers.
The book consists of im-
ages collected in the Sa-
luda-Reedy watershed by
four South Carolina pho-
tographers: Tom Blagden,
Clay Bolt, jon holloway
and Ben Geer Keys, and
essays by Upstate nature
writer John Lane.
The Greenville book
launch will be held on
April 22 at Studio 220,
Hyatt (220 N. Main St.,
Greenville). The Spartan-
burg book launch will be
held on May 6 at Indigo
Hall (190 Ezell Street, Spar-
tanburg). The Spartanburg
launch will also celebrate
the 10th anniversary of
Upstate Forever in Spar-
tanburg.
All events are scheduled
for 5 7 p.m. The events
are open to the public.
GREER OPRY HOLDS
SATURDAY DANCE
The Greer Opry House at
107 Cannon St. presents
Classic Country Band with
Ed Burrell on Saturdays at
8 p.m.
Admission is $9 per
person. Free line dancing
from 6:30 - 7:30 p.m. No
alcohol, smoking or out-
side food and drink.
Family entertainment.
Visit greeropryhouse.5u.
com.
CHILDRENS AUTHOR
COMING TO GREENVILLE
Local Childrens book au-
thor and pilot Paul Hohm-
ann will be signing copies
of his new book, The Tale
of Tango at 11 a.m. May
3 at the Runway Caf, 21
Airport Road Ext., Green-
ville. It tells the uplifting
story about a little plane
named Tango, a content
and happy plane, yet ner-
vous about the inevitable
changes in his life.
Throughout the book,
the reader experiences
each of these changes with
Tango, finding themselves
cheering him on as he
overcomes his fears and
enjoys each new adven-
ture. It weaves an enter-
taining story for children
with a lesson about fac-
ing and overcoming their
fears. The book includes
enough facts about air-
craft to keep children en-
gaged while reading and
aims to spark an interest
in them to learn even more
about aviation.
LAUGHTER CONTINUES
AT FLAT ROCK PLAYHOUSE
Flat Rock Playhouse pres-
ents the classic Neil Simon
comedy, Laughter on the
23rd Floor, through April
19 at The Clyde and Nina
Allen Mainstage.
Inspired by Simons
early career experience as
a junior writer for Your
Show of Shows, the play
focuses on Sid Caesar-
like Max Prince, the star
of a weekly comedy-vari-
ety show circa 1953, and
his staff who maintain a
running commentary on
the writing, fighting, and
wacky antics which take
place in the writers room.
The harried writing staff
frantically scrambles to
top each other with gags
while competing for the
attention of star madman
Max Prince.
Allergy Partners of West-
ern North Carolina pres-
ents Laughter on the 23rd
Floor at The Clyde and
Nina Allen Mainstage at
Flat Rock Playhouse, April
3-19. Performances will
be Wednesday through
Saturday at 8 p.m.; mati-
nees Wednesday, Thurs-
day, Saturday and Sunday
at 2 p.m. All tickets are
$40 and can be purchased
by calling the Playhouse
box office at 828-693-
0731, toll-free at 866-732-
8008 or online at flatrock-
playhouse.org. Discounts
available for seniors, AAA
members, military person-
nel, students and groups.
The Clyde and Nina Allen
Mainstage is located at
2661 Greenville Hwy in
Flat Rock, N.C.
EVENTS AT STOMPING
GROUNDS
BearCastle Plantation
7:30-10:30 p.m. April 18
Chris & Brett, a father
and son duo, 7:30-10:30
p.m. April 19
B10 THE GREER CITIZEN LIVING HERE WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 2014
Sout h Car ol ina
Newspaper Network
FROM B9
BEECH SPRINGS STUDENTS
GO GREEK FOR LESSON
Students in Ms. Rob-
erts social studies class
at Beech Springs Interme-
diate recently got to treat
their minds and their taste
buds with a special les-
son. As they wrapped up
a unit on Greece, Roberts
invited classes and their
families to the local Olive
Tree restaurant to enjoy
some of the countrys fin-
est dishes.
The restaurant, which
is owned by two of the
schools parents, helped
put together a special
menu just for the Beech
Springs students.
CAMPBELL SHINES
AT STAR PROGRAM
Duncan Elementary
School teacher, Ginny
Campbell was one of 10
e duc a t or s
who par-
ticipated in
St r at egi es
for Teacher
A d v a n c e -
ment and
R e n e w a l
( S T A R ) ,
held at Seabrook Island in
March.
STAR is a bi-annual
reward and recognition
program for outstanding
South Carolina veteran
teachers, sponsored by
the Foundation for Profes-
sional Development and
Palmetto State Teachers
Association.
The program was start-
ed by the Palmetto State
Teachers Association to
enhance the teachers
commitment to the edu-
cation profession and to
provide them with oppor-
tunities for personal and
professional growth. More
than 500 educators have
participated since 1994.
BERRY SHOALS ORCHESTRA
SCORES SUPERIOR
Berry Shoals Intermedi-
ates sixth grade orchestra
received a Superior rat-
ing for its performance at
Concert Festival.
The orchestra received
a rating reserved for un-
commonly exceptional
groups that stand out as
having performances that
are nearly flawless.
WELLFORD RAISING MONEY
FOR MARCH OF DIMES
Wellford Academy has
been raising money for
the March of Dimes. Along
with crazy hat day and
enjoying Carolina Shaved
Ice, the students voted
with donations for the two
teachers they most want-
ed to see kiss a pig and a
chicken.
P.E. teacher, Darrell
Green took the top spot
and kissed Earl, the pig,
while fourth grade teach-
er, Brian Riordan, puck-
ered up to Dottie, the
chicken. Students had a
good time and raised $800
in the process.
MARIONETTE GROUP
PERFORMS AT RIVER RIDGE
The Columbia Mari-
onette Theater visited
River Ridge Elementary to
present Litter Trashes Ev-
eryone, a litter awareness
puppet show.
The show taught chil-
dren how to keep their
communities clean. The
children were challenged
to pick up one piece of lit-
ter each day and to always
remember not to drop
cups and other trash on
the ground.
The performance was
sponsored by Palmetto
Pride and the Governors
Task Force on Beautifica-
tion and Litter.
BYRNES BETA CLUB TAKING
ITEMS FOR YARD SALE
The Byrnes beta club is
accepting clean, gently
used items for a yard sale.
Donations of handmade
craft items or small busi-
ness products (such as
Tupperware, Mary Kay,
Thirty-One, etc.) would
also be helpful.
Volunteers for the bake
sale are also needed.
The Yard Sale will be 7
a.m.-1 p.m., May 17.
To donate items, contact
Amber Hedgpeth at am-
ber.hedgpeth@spart5.net
or call the school at 949-
2355 and leave a message.
All yard sale proceeds
will be used to fund a trip
to National Beta Conven-
tion in Richmond, VA in
June.
MTCC ROLLIN ON THE
RIVER APRIL 26
Its time to get ready to
go Rollin on the River
for Middle Tyger Commu-
nity Center.
Tickets are $50 and are
now on sale for the 5th
Annual Riverboat Fun and
Games Night to benefit
Middle Tyger Community
Center. This years event
will be April 26 at the BMW
Zentrum. The event will in-
clude blackjack, roulette,
food, live music and much
more. Prizes and sponsors
are also needed.
MTCC COLLECTING PURSES
WITH PURPOSE
Ladies, if that Coach
or Gucci bag is taking up
space in your closet, now
is the time to donate it to a
good cause. Middle Tyger
Community Center is col-
lecting donations of new
and gently used purses
and accessories for their
Purses With Purpose
fundraiser.
Donations will be ac-
cepted through April 23
and the sale will be held
May 1 and 2, from 10 a.m.-
6 p.m. Contact Lyn Turner
at lyn.turner@spart5.net
or Lisa Hall at lisa.hall@
spart5.net for more infor-
mation.
TECH STUDENT WINS
TRANSFER SCHOLARSHIP
Eight out of the last
nine recipients of the Al-
den Transfer
Scholarship
at Furman
Uni ver si t y
have come
from Green-
ville Techni-
cal College,
and this
year is no
except i on.
Camden Burns of Greer, a
student in the Honors Pro-
gram at Greenville Tech,
has received the award
and plans to major in psy-
chology or sociology at
Furman.
The Alden Transfer
Scholarship is a full tu-
ition, two-year scholarship
for transfer students at
Furman. The Honors Pro-
gram at Greenville Techni-
cal College is designed to
enhance the college expe-
rience for bright, highly
motivated students. Small,
challenging classes en-
courage give and take be-
tween student and instruc-
tor, enhance opportunities
for independent research,
and allow the student to
pursue individual goals.
The program is a mem-
ber of the National Col-
legiate Honors Council,
follows the guidelines es-
tablished by the council,
and has continually re-
ceived favorable external
reviews by that organiza-
tion.

THREE INDUCTED INTO PHI
KAPPA PHI HONOR SOCIETY
The following local resi-
dents recently were initi-
ated into The Honor Soci-
ety of Phi Kappa Phi, the
nations oldest and most
selective collegiate honor
society for all academic
disciplines.
Anna Reiter of Duncan
initiated at Armstrong At-
lantic State University.
Emily Henderson of
Greer and Jackelyn Payne
of Greer initiated at Col-
lege of Charleston.
These residents are
among approximately
32,000 students, faculty,
professional staff and
alumni to be initiated into
Phi Kappa Phi each year.
Membership is by invita-
tion and requires nomi-
nation and approval by a
chapter.
Only the top 10 percent
of seniors and 7.5 per-
cent of juniors, having at
least 72 semester hours,
are eligible for member-
ship. Graduate students
in the top 10 percent of
the number of candidates
for graduate degrees may
also qualify, as do faculty,
professional staff, and
alumni.
SPARANO ON CITADEL
COMMANDANTS LIST
Kenneth Carl Sparano II
of Taylors has been named
to the Commandants Dis-
tinguished Service List at
The Citadel, The Military
College of South Carolina.
Sparano is a Business Ad-
ministration major.
Citadel cadets named
to the Commandants List
are recognized for having
made the most positive
contributions to their pla-
toon, company, battalion,
or staff, the South Caro-
lina Corps of Cadets and
The Citadel during the
previous semester.
The Citadel, founded in
1842, is a public, coedu-
cational military college
in Charleston, that offers
a classic military educa-
tion for young men and
women seeking a college
experience that is intense,
meaningful and academi-
cally strong.
BJU STUDENT WINS FIRST
IN BROADCASTING
Kristyn Barrett was
one of three Bob Jones
University students who
were recently awarded
first place for their Public
Service Campaign at the
Intercollegiate Broadcast-
ing Systems 74th Annual
International School/Col-
lege Radio/Webcast Con-
ference awards ceremony,
held March 8 in New York
City.
Barrett, a senior journal-
ism and mass communi-
cation major from Greer,
helped lead a public ser-
vice campaign titled Sav-
ing Lives Together, which
united three local univer-
sities--BJU, Furman, and
North Greenville--as they
collected nearly 1,500
units of blood for the lo-
cal Greenville community
through The Blood Con-
nection last fall.
RUSSO EARNS PLACE ON
2015 SUMMERALL GUARDS
The 2015 Summerall
Guards, a silent drill pla-
toon at The Citadel, made
its debut during Corps Day
Weekend March 15, 2014.
The Corps of Cadets this
year celebrated its 171st
birthday.
Joseph Russo of Greer
has earned a position
on the 2015 Summerall
Guards.
The 2015 Summerall
Guards made its debut on
March 15, 2014, during
Corps Day Weekend. The
Corps of Cadets this year
celebrated 171 years.
The platoon was created
in 1932 and named for
Gen. Charles P. Summerall,
former chief of staff of the
U.S. Army and president
of The Citadel from 1931
until 1953. Its purpose is
to exemplify the exactness
and thoroughness with
which Citadel cadets are
trained. The drill, verbally
passed down from class to
class, is a unique series of
movements based on the
old German close order
drill and performed to a
silent count. Each years
Summerall Guards take
responsibility for teaching
the next years unit the in-
tricate steps of the drill.
SCHOOLS: District Five and higher education events and accomplishments
Campbell
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
Langston Charter Middle School hosted its frst-ever Parking Lot Party on April 5
in tandem with a Ford Drive 4UR Community event, sponsored by Fairway Ford. The
school earned $6,000 from Ford Motor Company.
HIGHER EDUCATION |
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
Counting Crows will perform at the Peace Center for the
Performing Arts on June 15 as part of a major worldwide
tour. For tickets, visit peacecenter.org or call 467-3000 or
toll-free (800) 888-7768.
EVENTS: Book signings, concerts and performances ofered throughout the area

Burns
BY DANA BLOCK
THE BOLD AND
THE BEAUTIFUL
Bill decided to pursue
custody of Will. Liam and
Hope shared a passion-
ate kiss. Justin informed
Bill about the poor state
of his publishing busi-
ness. Quinn urged Wyatt
to do everything could to
win back Hope. Karen ar-
rived in town to try to get
Spencer Publications back
on track. Hope recalled
the good times with Liam.
Brooke called Karen and
asked to meet in secret.
Katie pulled Donna into
the middle of her quarrel
with Brooke. Bill pleaded
his case to Karen as to
why he should be renamed
CEO. Maya recorded her
conversation with Oliver
about his intentions to-
ward Aly. Katie grew sus-
picious of Justins loyalty
after he asked for more ac-
cess to the company files.
Wait to See: Carter ques-
tions Mayas motives.
DAYS OF OUR LIVES
Nicole tried to come
clean with Daniel. Mary-
beth stirred up trouble
for JJ and Paige. Aiden got
honest with Marlena. Rafe
was determined to figure
out Gabis secret. Later,
Gabi had a fit when Will
brought up the idea of a
custody agreement. Eric
informed Marlena that he
was going to marry Ni-
cole. Brady told a disap-
pointed Theresa he had
to stop seeing her. Aiden
and Hope ran into a major
snag while planning the
St. Lukes summer gala.
A mysterious figure de-
livered the incriminating
photos of EJ and Abigail to
the DiMera mansion. Rafe
was hot on Nicks trail. JJ
confided in Paige before
kissing her. Hope was put
in an awkward position
with Roman. Wait to See:
Daniel pressures Theresa
to confess.
GENERAL HOSPITAL
Sonny verbally lashed
out at Olivia during one
of his depressive epi-
sodes. Patrick and Sa-
brina learned the gender
of their baby. Anna and
Dante took Carlos in for
questioning, while Ava
tried to help him form an
action plan. Jordan proved
her loyalty to her new
boss by confiding that she
wanted in on his covert
business. Ned didnt trust
Lukes motives for marry-
ing Tracy. Anna and Dante
secretly arranged to get a
DNA sample from Carlos.
Lulu asked Britt whether
she should trust Obre-
chts latest offer. Luke
tried to erase any doubts
Tracy had about marrying
him. Sonny tried to make
things right with Olivia.
Franco let Carly in on his
new scheme. Wait to See:
Michael mourns AJ.
THE YOUNG AND
THE RESTLESS
Summer missed her
mom more than ever.
Chelsea and Chloe butted
heads behind the scenes
at the fashion show. Stitch
asked Victoria out on
a date. Abby and Tyler
planned their engagement
celebration. Noah gave
his parents his blessing,
but Sharon was worried
about how Victor would
react. Kelly reached out to
Summer by telling her that
her mother, Phyllis, would
be proud of her. Connie
warned Chelsea and Chloe
to behave themselves.
Noah asked Courtney to
be his date at the engage-
ment party. Victor assured
Nikki that Ian would never
hurt anyone in their fam-
ily again. Avery taped the
first episode of her show,
Real Folk Food. Wait to
See: Everything changes
for Victor.
DEAR DR. ROACH: For
several years, when I have
had blood drawn it has
shown an elevation in the
alkaline phosphatase. It
has been as high as 377 in
recent tests. I have had the
test to see if it was from
the liver, but it was all
right. I recently had a bone
scan, and the doctor sus-
pects Pagets disease and
is referring me to a bone
oncologist. Do you have
any comments in regard
to this? -- D.C.A.
ANSWER: Alkaline phos-
phatase is an enzyme that,
when found in the blood,
usually comes from the
liver. Conditions such as
gallstones or others that
affect bile flow are the
most likely to increase the
level in the blood. How-
ever, alkaline phospha-
tase also may come from
the bone, and in this case,
Pagets disease is the most
likely cause. Your doc-
tor may have determined
where the alkaline phos-
phatase is coming from by
ordering a special isoen-
zyme blood test. The bone
scan is usually diagnostic
for Pagets.
Pagets disease is
thought to result from
abnormal osteoclasts, the
cells that normally remod-
el bone. The osteoclasts
break down bone, and os-
teoblasts build it back up
again. Bone needs to be re-
placed over time to repair
any microscopic cracks
that have formed. Without
normal bone turnover, the
bones become brittle.
In Pagets disease, the
bone remodeling in one
or more particular areas
is excessive, causing bone
buildup. The most com-
mon sites are the skull,
spine, pelvis and leg bones.
Pagets disease is very
effectively treated with
medications such as zole-
dronic acid (Reclast or Zo-
meta). Not all people with
Pagets need treatment;
however, a high alkaline
phosphatase level usually
is a reason to treat.
***
DEAR DR. ROACH: I
have two grandchildren
who spike fevers and get
sick a lot. How valuable are
natural wellness formulas
to build up their system
and get them stronger?
Their doctor has told them
it will not help, but he isnt
giving them anything to
help their immune system
get stronger. Any sugges-
tions? -- K.L.
ANSWER: The immune
system gets stronger as
kids age. The key to a
healthy immune system
remains a good diet, good
exercise and sleep, and
avoiding too much stress.
Good hand hygiene is nec-
essary for reducing expo-
sure to bacteria and virus-
es. I am skeptical of the
ability for supplements to
improve the immune sys-
tem.
That being said, there
are vitamins and trace
minerals that are essen-
tial for the immune sys-
tem to function at peak
level. Most of us can get
adequate amounts from a
healthy diet. The supple-
ments sold to boost the
immune system generally
are multivitamins with
some additional unproven
ingredients.
***
DEAR DR. ROACH: Im
a 70-year-old man in good
health. I exercise daily and
eat wholesome foods. I
now realize that my sexu-
al activity is better in the
mornings. On occasion,
I get up, take Viagra and
go for a brisk walk, have
breakfast and go back to
bed. Is the testosterone
level higher in the morn-
ings? -- Anon.
ANSWER: Yes, testoster-
one levels are higher for
both men and women in
the mornings. Even young-
er men often notice this.
Also, Viagra works much
better if it is taken on an
empty stomach and given
one to two hours to work.
Dr. Roach regrets that
he is unable to answer
individual letters, but he
will incorporate them in
his column whenever pos-
sible. Readers may write or
request newsletters at P.O.
Box 536475, Orlando, FL
32853-6475.
OUT ON A LIMB by Gary Kopervas |
AMBER WAVES by Dave T. Phipps |
RFD by Mike Marland |
THE SPATS by Jef Pickering |
SOAP UPDATES


TO YOUR
GOOD HEALTH
KEITH
ROACH, M.D.
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 2014 FUN AND GAMES THE GREER CITIZEN B11
Pagets disease:
Bone building gone wild
Lisa LoCicero stars as Olivia
on General Hospital
B12 THE GREER CITIZEN PAGE LABEL WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 2014
T-BONE
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