You are on page 1of 24

SOUTH CAROLINAS PREMIER WEEKLY

INDEX | INSIDE | DEATHS |


TO SUBSCRIBE
TO THE
GREER CITIZEN,
CALL US
TODAY AT
8772076
ADORABLE
GCM holds pet
photo contest
A8
Katherine Paget Joye, 54
Sammie E. Reynolds, 84
NOTABLE |
SWARM
Greer blows past
Riverside
B1
SPORTS |
CLASSIFIEDS B67
COMMUNITY CALENDAR/NEWS A2
CRIME A10
ENTERTAINMENT B10
OBITUARIES A6
OPINION A4
OUR SCHOOLS B9
SPORTS B16
WEATHER A6

Charity music festival
is Sept. 13
The Pitt Hopkins Charity Music Festival
will take place at the downtown Greer
amphitheater on September 13 from 6-
8:30 p.m.
The cost is $5 per person. Children
ages 12 and under get in free.
For more information, visit greersta-
tion.com.
REUNITED: Davenport class of 1944 celebrates 70 years B8
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2014 GREER, SOUTH CAROLINA VOL. 101 NO. 37 75 CENTS
BY AMANDA IRWIN
STAFF WRITER
Commercial and resi-
dential construction in
Greer appears to be on the
upswing compared to pre-
vious years.
Greers commercial con-
struction year-to-date has
reached its highest valu-
ation since 2011, equal-
ing more than $26.4 mil-
lion--the highest January
through July totals in past
four years.
This years commercial
construction exceeded
2013s January through
July totals by about $4
million. By July of 2013,
nearly $22 million in com-
mercial construction oc-
curred. In July of 2012,
$20.1 million in commer-
cial construction occurred
and, by July of 2011, only
about $8.2 million in com-
mercial construction had
occurred.
In July, single-family
housing starts surpassed
2013s year-end total. As
of July, year-to-date there
have been 140 single-fam-
ily housing starts with 22
beginning in the month.
Last year, a total of 137
single-family housing
starts occurred. With five
months of housing starts
to be added to the total
this year, it is likely the
number of single-family
housing starts in 2014 will
exceed the 173 single-fam-
ily housing start total of
2012.
The valuations for this
years single-family hous-
ing starts equals about
$21.4 million, compared
with 2013s approximate
$11.1 million.
In August, the eight
permits issued equaled
$32,372.50 in commer-
cial permit fees, and 51
residential permits is-
sued equaled $26,471 in
residential permit fees.
Including miscellaneous,
mechanical, residential
and commercial permits. A
total of 210 permits were
issued in August, equaling
$88,677.50 in permit fees.
Officials say 782 inspec-
tions were conducted.
Charged in
Donald Harper
Jr. shooting
BY PHIL BUCHHEIT
STAFF WRITER
Two men have been ar-
rested and charged after a
Greer man was murdered
Friday night on E. Poinsett
Street Ext. in Greer.
Keylan Dejuan Mc-
Clintock, 20, of 919 Old
Canaan Road, Spartan-
burg, has been charged
with murder and Sandino
Edward Jackson, 22, of
1629 E. Poinsett Street Ext.,
Greer, has been charged
with assault and battery
of a high and aggravated
nature.
The arrests come after
Donald Travis Harper Jr.
was found shot multiple
times Friday night.
According to the Spar-
tanburg County Sheriffs
Office, a deputy was dis-
patched to 1631 E. Poinsett
St. Ext. at approximately
7:52 p.m. that night in ref-
erence to a fight in prog-
ress.
Police say when the offi-
cer arrived, he saw a crowd
of people gathered around
a white male victim later
identified as Donald Tra-
vis Harper Jr. Reports
said Harper was laying on
the ground unconscious
and bleeding.
Harper died during
transport to Spartanburg
Regional Hospital.
Harpers wife, Nicole
Harper, told Fox Carolina
the incident started when
her husband discovered
his stolen go-cart at a
neighbors house. Harper
went to confront his neigh-
bor (Jackson) about the
stolen go-cart and, after
Jackson threatened Harp-
ers wife, the two men be-
gan fighting. While the two
were fighting, McClintock
appeared and shot Harper,
according to police.
McClintock and Jackson
were both transported to
the Spartanburg County
Jail. They are both being
held without bond.
The incident is still be-
ing investigated.
Greer
man
killed
by train
BY BILLY CANNADA
EDITOR
An Eastbound train
struck a Greer man Sat-
urday afternoon between
Poinsett Street and Moore
Street Extension, killing
him.
Officials identified the
victim as 49-year-old,
James Martin Bruton of
Greer.
According to incident
reports, first responders
were dispatched to the
area after a call came in
regarding the incident.
The Greenville County
Coroner was notified
shortly after the officers
arrived. According to po-
lice, an officer spoke with
the engineer of the train,
who said the train was
traveling eastbound at 47
miles per hour when the
victim crossed a spur line
rail that leads into the in-
land port.
Lt. Jim Holcombe said
the train did not appear to
be at fault.
Theyve got their own
SEE COLLISION| A6
Two arrested in murder investigation

A TOWN DIVIDED
Construction in Greer remains on the upswing
Keylan Dejuan McClintock Sandino Edward Jackson



Lyman
inquest
causes
fallout
Town loses
five employees
BY AMANDA IRWIN
STAFF WRITER
Since residents voted in
favor of changing Lymans
government to council
form, Mayor Rodney Turn-
er, who publicly opposed
the change, has been ab-
sent from council meet-
ings.
Other town employees
have been terminated or
resigned.
SLED and FBI opened an
investigation into illegal
video and audio recording
and wiretapping, which is
a federal offense, in Ly-
man Town Hall. Mayor Pro
Tem Tony Wyatt previous-
ly said that Turner and Al-
len Johnson, who was the
Public Works director, had
access to the recordings.
Initially placed on unpaid
suspension on Aug. 24,
Johnson has since been
terminated.
Search warrants were
SEE LYMAN | A6
0
5
,
0
0
0
,
0
0
0
1
0
,
0
0
0
,
0
0
0
1
5
,
0
0
0
,
0
0
0
2
0
,
0
0
0
,
0
0
0
2
5
,
0
0
0
,
0
0
0
3
0
,
0
0
0
,
0
0
0
1 2 3 4
Commercial
Construction
V
a
l
u
a
t
i
o
n
(
B
a
s
e
d

o
n

J
a
n
u
a
r
y

-

J
u
l
y

t
o
t
a
l
s

f
o
r

e
a
c
h

y
e
a
r
)
2011 2012 2013 2014
Year
Source: City of Greer Building and Zoning Monthly Report
8,287,708
20,170,392
21,990,036
26,409,380


PHOTOS BY PRESTON BURCH
New Byrnes?
Spartanburg District Five voters
focked to the polls during a
special election Tuesday to
decide whether or not the
school district should spend
more than $70 million making
improvements to Byrnes High
School. Results of the election
were not available at press time.
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 10
MTCC TOUR MEETS at the
MTCC, at 84 Groce Road in
Lyman at 10 a.m. Potential
volunteers and interested
parties can tour the facility
and learn about programs
ofered.
THE AWANAS CLUB at El
Bethel Baptist Church, 313
Jones Ave., Greer, from 6:30
- 8:15 p.m. Kids ages 3-12 are
invited. Call 877-4021.
GRACE PLACE in Greer will
have its mini-mall open from
10 a.m. - noon. Grace Place
is located at 407 Ridgewood
Drive. I.D. required.
CANCER SURVIVOR YOGA
class 4-5 p.m. at the Cancer
Institute of Greenville Health
System, 900 W. Faris Road,
Greenville. The classes are
free and registration isnt
required. Call 455-5809.
THURSDAY, SEPT. 11
ALZHEIMERS ASSOCIA
TION SUPPPORT GROUP in
the second foor classroom at
Greer Memorial Hospital, 830
S. Buncombe Road, at 7-8:30
p.m. For more information
call the Alzheimers Associa-
tion at (800) 272-3900 or visit
www.alz.org/sc.
KIWANIS CLUB AT 6:30 p.m.
at Laurendas Family Restau-
rant. Call Charmaine Helfrich
at 349-1707.
CANCER PATIENTS AND
survivors walking club at
12:30 p.m. in the lobby of the
Cancer Institute of GHS. Call
455-5809.
SATURDAY, SEPT. 13
GRACE PLACE in Greer will
have its mini-mall open from
10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Grace Place
is located at 407 Ridgewood
Drive. I.D. required.
COMMUNITY FOOD BANK
10 -11:30 a.m. at Calvary
Christian Fellowship, 2455 Lo-
cust Hill Road, Taylors. Sup-
plies frst come, frst serve.
MONDAY, SEPT. 15
THE NEVER ALONE GROUP
OF NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS
at 7 p.m. at the Greer Recre-
ational Center.
GRACE PLACE IN Greer will
have its mini-mall open from
10 a.m. - noon. Grace Place
is located at 407 Ridgewood
Drive. I.D. required.
TUESDAY, SEPT. 16
GRACE PLACE in Greer will
have its clothing closet open
from 6-8 p.m. Grace Place is
located at 407 Ridgewood
Drive. I.D. required.Gap Creek
Singers will rehearse from
7:30-9 p.m. at The Church
of the Good Shepherd, 200
Jason St., Greer. For further
information or to schedule a
performance contact Wesley
Welsh, President, at 877-5955.
BARBERSHOP HARMONY
CHAPTER at 7 p.m. at Memo-
rial United Methodist Church,
201 N. Main St., Greer. Call
877-1352.
DISABLED AMERICAN
VETERANS and Auxiliary
at 7 p.m., 721 E. Poinsett St.,
Woodmen of the World. Call
Preston Johnson at 979-7758.
THE NEVER ALONE GROUP
OF NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS
at 7 p.m. at the Greer Recre-
ational Center.
THE LIONS CLUB at Lake
View Steak House, Higway 14
at 5:30 p.m.
THE SOAR LUNCHEON from
11 a.m. - 1 p.m. at Victor Gym.
Bring a covered dish and/or
dessert.
CANCER SURVIVOR EX
ERCISE class 10:30-11:30
a.m. at the Cancer Institute
of Greenville Health System,
900 W. Faris Road, Greenville.
The classes are free and
registration isnt required. Call
455-5809.
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 17
GRACE PLACE in Greer will
have its mini-mall open from
10 a.m. - noon. Grace Place
is located at 407 Ridgewood
Drive. I.D. required.
THE AWANAS CLUB at El
Bethel Baptist Church, 313
Jones Ave., Greer, from 6:30
- 8:15 p.m. Kids ages 3-12 are
invited. Call 877-4021.
CANCER SURVIVOR YOGA
class 4-5 p.m. at the Cancer
Institute of Greenville Health
System, 900 W. Faris Road,
Greenville. The classes are
free and registration isnt
required. Call 455-5809.
Calendar deadline is
noon on Tuesdays. Sub-
mit events to Amanda Ir-
win at 877-2076, email to
airwin@greercitizen.com
or mail to The Greer Citi-
zen, P.O. Box 70 Greer, SC
29652.
A2 THE GREER CITIZEN COMMUNITY WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2014
MEMBER FDIC
Scan with smart phone
GreerStateBank.com info@GreerStateBank.com 864-877-2000 fb.me/greerstatebank
New Debit Cards!
Available September 15th
4294
DEBIT
GOOD
THRU
GODS PANTRY
FORCED TO CLOSE
Due to a lack of sup-
plies, Gods pantry, a non-
profit established in 2002
currently serving about
345 families, was forced
to close all 13 of its pantry
sites last week. Gods pan-
try is in desperate need of
volunteers and nonperish-
able food items.
Items can be dropped off
at 100 Enoree Road, Greer,
on Thursdays from 10
a.m. noon; 2481 Racing
Road, Greer, on Thursdays
1 4 p.m.; or 700 E. Main
St., Duncan, on Wednes-
days 9 11 a.m. For ques-
tions or to volunteer call
963-4441.
THRIFT STORE
TAKING DONATIONS
The Community Chest
Thrift Store, located at
52 Groce Road, Lyman, is
open Thursday and Fri-
day 10 a.m. 6 p.m., and
Saturday 10 a.m. 2 p.m.,
hours may extend if vol-
unteers are available and a
need arises.
Donations of gently used
ladies clothing, accessories
and home dcor items are
being accepted and can be
dropped off at the MTCC,
located at 84 Groce Road,
Lyman, or to setup larger
donations or to volunteer
contact Lyn Turner at 439-
7760.
MEALS ON WHEELS
DRIVERS NEEDED
GCM needs drivers for
new Meals on Wheels Greer
route. A Meals On Wheels
driver must be a quali-
fied driver with a valid
drivers license and have
a heart for serving others.
MOW has several delivery
routes in the greater Greer
area. Meals are delivered
Monday - Friday. Call 877-
1937.
ROAD TO RECOVERY
DRIVERS NEEDED
The American Cancer So-
ciety needs volunteer driv-
ers to transport patients
to local treatment centers.
Anyone interested in vol-
unteering as a driver must
have a good driving re-
cord, valid drivers license,
automobile insurance and
a vehicle in good working
condition. The American
Cancer Society provides
free training for this pro-
gram.
Contact the local office
at 627-8289.
SHARONS CLOSET NEEDS
MENS, BOYS CLOTHING
Sharons Closet needs
mens and boys clothing
and underwear.
New or gently used items
accepted Monday through
Friday 8 a.m. 4 p.m. at
783 S. Line St. Ext., Greer.
GCM NEEDS PEANUT
BUTTER, SPAGHETTI
The Food Pantry needs
boxes of gelatin, pea-
nut butter, spaghetti and
canned vegetables and
fruit.
Donate at the ministry,
738 S. Line St. Ext., Greer,
between 8 a.m. 4 p.m.
Monday through Friday.
Visit gcminc.org or call
879-2254.
GREER RELIEF NEEDS
DELIVERY VOLUNTEERS
Weekly Costco donates
bread and pastries to Greer
Relief. Greer Relief needs
volunteers who are willing
to pick up donations and
deliver them to Greer Re-
lief for distribution.
Contact Greer Relief at
848-5355.
COMMUNITY SHRED
DAY ON SEPT. 12
The Greenville Federal
Credit Union, located at
107 W. Church St., is hold-
ing a Community Shred
Day on Sept. 12 from 11
a.m. 4 p.m.
For more information
contact Heidi Payne at
404-3109.
EDWARDS REUNION
ON SEPT. 13
Lindsey and Francess
Edwards family reunion
is Saturday, Sept. 13 at 1
p.m. at Blue Ridge Baptist
Church on Pennington
Road.
MOUNTAIN VIEW HIGH
SCHOOL REUNION
The Mountain View
High School Reunion will
be Saturday, Sept. 13, at
Mountain View Elemen-
tary School, located at
6350 Mountain View Road,
Taylors. Registration is at
5:30 p.m. and a meal will
follow.
All former students,
teachers and friends are
invited. Paper products
will be furnished. Bring
well filled food baskets
and drinks.
MASTERWORKS CONCERT
ON SEPT. 13
Masterworks Concert I:
Featuring Beethovens Pas-
torale Symphony will be
held on Sept. 13 from 7:30
9 p.m. at the J. Harley
Bonds Center, 505 N. Main
St. The event is free and
open to the public.
GIRLS ON THE RUN
BEGINS SEPT. 17
The Girls on the Run and
Girls on Track programs,
which combine training
for a 5K with esteem-en-
hancing workouts for girls
ages 8 15, begins Sept.
17.
The cost of the program
is $199. Visit ghs.org/girl-
sontherun to register. Call
455-3252.
MOONRODGERS REUNION
WILL BE SEPT. 21
The Moon-Rodgers Re-
union will begin at 1 p.m.
on Sept. 21 at Lance Knoll,
located at 1755 Wingo
Road, Campobello. De-
cendents of the late John
Walker and Susan Burch
Moon, William R. (Bob) and
Dorah Campbell Rodgers
will hold an annual family
reunion.
Attendees should bring
picnic lunches. Tableware
and ice will be supplied.
Contact 895-2196.
COMMUNITY
CALENDAR


COMMUNITY
NEWS
WILLIAM BUCHHEIT | THE GREER CITIZEN
Game time
Jakob Jenkins of the Greenville Grizzlies celebrates with his teammates after a halftime
performance at the Eastside High School football game.
The Blood Connection,
Inc. (TBC) recently an-
nounced it would promote
Brian Madden to executive
vice president of opera-
tions.
I am pleased to an-
nounce Brians appoint-
ment which includes a
broader corporate-wide
focus on business develop-
ment, marketing and pub-
lic relations, in addition
to overseeing daily opera-
tions, said President and
CEO Delisa English. Brian
has dedicated his career
to supporting the com-
munity blood supply by
managing important pro-
cesses that help us fulfill
our mission. Whether he
is working with donor re-
lations, technical services
or simply donating blood
at a blood drive, his com-
mitment to this organiza-
tion and its purpose is ex-
emplary.
Madden began his blood
banking career as a phle-
botomist at Greenville
Hospital System before
joining The Blood Connec-
tion hospital services.
Several positions in
manufacturing followed
as he learned the process-
es and technical services
necessary to monitor and
manufacture blood prod-
ucts.
Then, in 2002, Madden
was named Executive Di-
rector of Biologics and
Technical Services, manag-
ing The Blood Connection
state-of-the-art storage,
processing and distribu-
tion center.
In 2003, Madden was
named chief operations of-
ficer. He has since helped
lead the construction of
five donor collection cen-
ters, one acquisition, and
successfully integrated
three new hospitals as full-
service customers, giving
more patients access to
vital blood products.
Most recently, he led a
new business expansion
into Western North Caro-
lina to serve a broader
community and a greater
number of patients in
need of blood. He also
increased activities in the
North Carolina region to
self-sustaining levels with-
in the first 15 months of
expansion.
Madden earned a Bache-
lor of Science in biology at
Erskine College, followed
by a Bachelor of Science
in medical technology at
the Medical University of
South Carolina. He re-
ceived a Master of Busi-
ness Administration in
management and strategy
from Western Governors
University.
The Blood Connection
is well-positioned to serve
the needs of patients in
new communities and I
am enthusiastic about the
opportunities ahead, said
Madden. Im looking for-
ward to my expanded role,
and I remain dedicated to
fulfilling a vital mission
that supports the commu-
nity blood supply.
BY AMANDA IRWIN
STAFF WRITER
Wellford council amend-
ed a zoning ordinance for
a new zoning classifica-
tion passed earlier this
year. The amendment to
the R-2B zoning changes
allow for houses to be
built on smaller lots. When
the new zoning was intro-
duced, the setbacks were
not changed to match the
smaller lot sizes permit-
ted.
Under the amendment
passed, residential setback
requirements changed
from 25 feet in the front,
10 feet on the sides and
30 feet on the rear of
property to 20 feet in the
front, 5 feet on the sides
and 15 feet in the rear of
property.
The zoning amendment
was proposed as a result of
a mulit-phase housing de-
velopment that had been
approved under a previ-
ous council. Because of the
newly established zoning
parameters, the second
phase of the development
was prevented from mov-
ing forward without the
setback changes.
The amendment to the
zoning ordinance was the
only action Wellford Coun-
cil took during the Sept. 2
meeting.
The Wellford Police De-
partment reported that,
in August, the department
received 541 calls for ser-
vices and handled 376
cases. In addition, the de-
partment participated in
Hands Across the Border,
a joint effort with law en-
forcement from Alabama,
Tennessee, North Caro-
lina and South Carolina
to conduct road checks.
In September the depart-
ment will participate in
the Drive Program.
A special called meeting
for Wellford will be Sept.
9 at 7 p.m. and the next
regularly scheduled City
of Wellford council meet-
ing is Oct. 7 at 6 p.m. at
Wellford City Hall, 127 Sy-
phrit Road.
airwin@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2014 NEWS THE GREER CITIZEN A3

Appearing in Concert
Ken Turner & Valor III
Ken Turner, a former Bass singer for the Blackwood Brothers Quartet and Winner of Five Grammy
Awards, Ten Dove Awards and Member of the Gospel Music Hall of Fame will be appearing in Concert.
6:00 p.m. - Sunday, September 21, 2014
Apalache Baptist Church
1915 Gap Creek Road, Greer, SC 29651
Pastor: Rev. Eddie Cooper Music Director: Rusty Brooks
This will be a Love Offering Concert
(A nursery will be provided)
Contact the Church Ofce at (864) 877-6012 for more information
You have a choice!
All hospices are not created
equal. When it comes to
hospice care, our service sets
us apart. You deserve the
best. Make sure you get it.
Ask for us by name!
864.457.9122 www.hocf.org
864-469-9936
300 N. Main Street in Greer www.newdayphysicaltherapy.com
~--..-,~, z-t..-/ ?-/~,
1921 Hwy. 101 South, Greer, SC 29651
(Exit 60 off Interstate 85)
864-968-1133
CHECKS
CASHED
PAY BILLS HERE
MOON-RODGERS REUNION
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 21
ST
, 2014
LUNCH: 1:00 P.M.
Descendants of the late John Walker and Susan Burch
Moon, William R. (Bob) and Dorah Campbell Rodgers
will hold their annual family reunion at Lance Knoll
1755 Wingo Road, Campobello, SC
Off Jug Factory Road
Bring picnic lunch. Tableware and ice furnished.
Info Syble 895-2196
Homer 469-9420 or Earlene 268-2086
Greer Community Min-
istries board of directors
for the 2014-2015 fiscal
year include eight return-
ing and five new members.
The next meeting of the
board is Monday, Sept. 15,
at 5:30 p.m. The public is
invited and encouraged to
attend this months board
meeting held at the min-
istry, 738 S. Line St. Ext.,
Greer.
April Staggs is chair.
She is the vice president
of commercial lending at
Greer State Bank. Martha
White, an educational con-
sultant, returns as past
chair.
Jim Boyd, Shane Lynn,
Ann Sheridan, and Dennis
Trout serve as vice chairs.
Boyd is a senior vice presi-
dent at Greer State Bank
and Lynn is an owner of
Owens Insurance. Sheri-
dan is a sales representa-
tive for Bioventus Global
and Trout is a vice presi-
dent at Citizens Building
& Loan.
Dr. Marc Garcia, minis-
ter at Iglesia Domino, and
Tecora Prince, assistant
principal at Greer High
School are the other re-
turning members.
New to the board this
year are William Marcus,
branch manager at Palmet-
to Bank, Greer, Tom Law
and Don Owens, both re-
tired business executives,
Mack Holliday, a realtor
with Open House Realty,
LLC, Daniel Hughes, a part-
ner with Duggan & Hughes
and Paul Dean, senior pas-
tor at Provi-
dence Bap-
tist Church.
For more
information
about GCM,
visit gc-
minc.org.
GCM announces 2014-
2015 board members
Boyd Garcia Holliday Hughes
Law Lynn Marcus Owens
Prince Sheridan Staggs Trout
White
Wellford council amends
new residential zoning



PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
Hopeful beneft
A beneft for Ashley Nicole Norris, a 4-year-old battling lung cancer, was held Saturday
from noon-8 p.m. at the Fairview Baptist Church ball feld in Greer. Lake Cunningham Fire
Department of cials were on hand to support the cause.

BY BILLY CANNADA
EDITOR
Local officials and vet-
erans were on hand last
Friday to celebrate the
unveiling of the Veter-
ans Corridor of Honor, a
12-mile stretch of road on
Interstate 385 recognizing
six 20th and 21st century
wars.
Greer resident Lewis
Vaughn, who served in
the U.S. Army during the
Korean War, used his past
experience as a state law-
maker to help push the
project through to a reso-
lution earlier this year.
Along with other mem-
bers of the Korean War
Veterans Association,
Vaughn pitched the idea
in Columbia, suggesting
that each two miles honor
a different war.
The wars recognized are
World War I, World War II,
the Vietnam War, the Ko-
rean War, the Persian Gulf
War and all the Undeclared
Wars.
Its taken on a life of its
own and has turned out
really great, Vaughn said.
The state House and
Senate passed a resolu-
tion calling for the South
Carolina Department of
Transportation to fulfill
the request in May.
We have to give a lot
of credit to our Greenville
County legislative delega-
tion, said Vaughn, who
served 18 years in the
state House and two years
in the state Senate. Rep.
Mike Burns, Sen. Tom
Corbin and Sen. Mike Fair
shepherded it through
the General Assembly at
record speed. I spent 20
years down there, and
things just dont happen
that fast. This one hap-
pened fast.
The signs, costing
around $250 each, were
not paid for with state
money.
The (SCDOT) wouldnt
pay for the signs. Theyre
not allowed to pay for
stuff like that, Vaughn
said. The Korean War Vet-
erans Association raised
the money and has come
up with about $4,000 to
pay for the signs. We just
got out there and raised
the money, and it didnt
take long to do it.
For Korean War veter-
ans, Vaughn said these
monuments will hold spe-
cial importance.
The Korean War was
known as a forgotten
war, he said. It was not
identified as a war until
recently. For Korean War
veterans, it will be great
because they are now be-
ginning to get recognition
they have not had in the
60 years since the war.
billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
Interstate veterans
corridor unveiled
The Blood Connection
promotes Brian Madden
Brian Madden
H
eres the deal: if youre going to be
nekkid and take what could end
up potentially being agonizingly
embarrassing photographs of yourself,
you really cant be too surprised when
they end up in the hands of others.
Or a few million others.
Its not that I am giving any sort of
free pass to the slimy hackers that
recently pilfered through the storage
computer clouds of celebrities, in
various states of undress and behavior,
and revealed them for financial gain, its
just that, even if you had photographs
locked up in a desk or a safe at your
home, there is still always the chance
that someone, anyone, could find and
steal them: a common thief, your kids, a
divorce attorney...
So maybe decide against that tipsy,
spur-of-the-moment madness involving
a sombrero and Nutella.
Really.
Yes, its your private life and yes, you
should be able to document any event
you like, but what are you going to do
with those shots, anyway?
Pull them out on your wedding an-
niversary, in a few years time, to prove
to yourselves you once actually were
happy-go-lucky and spontaneous?
Or savor the 28 waistline before the
twins?
Sure, its nice to have a record of how
you looked in the halcyon days of youth
and strength.
When Lauren Bacall passed away, each
obituary I read showed her at her siz-
zling best: the smoky eyes, the cascading
river of hair framing her face.
But luckily, as she and Bogie were
together before the invention of Pola-
roid, there was no temptation to record
any particular exploits they might have
fancied.
Perhaps some quick sketches, but I
doubt either one was much of a doodler.
And how nice for the rest of us that
both of them will only be remembered
in a sort of gossamer haze of timeless
glamour and elegance.
Then theres Rihanna.
Shes just one of dozens of celebrities
whose privacy was compromised after
this targeted attack although, frankly,
most of Rihanna can already be seen
from the countless selfies and insta-
grams that she has already personally
released.
And Mrs Kardashian-West, who insists
we see close-ups of her at the pool,
featuring her ample derriere in a thong,
which, to me, always look like shes sit-
ting on the heads of two, bald men, cant
be terribly embarrassed, can she?
By the way, Kim, just because a thong
is a size XXL doesnt mean one must feel
compelled to wear it (Id like a saucer of
milk, please).
Boy, am I delighted there are no lurid
photographs of me to be found--and
relieved.
Because, besides the fact that there
were no such things as camera phones
during the most hectic time of my life on
the road, with friends I hear were later
paroled, Im not someone who ever felt
particularly proud enough of my body to
have anyone record it wrapped around a
dancers pole.
In fact, there would be little difference
between the two.
And if I had done such a thing, believe
me, even if my face was covered, I would
be sweating bullets right now.
The thought of possibly being mistak-
en for Keith Richards, is horrifying.
EDITORIAL |
OPINION
A4 THE GREER CITIZEN WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2014



All advertisements are accepted and published
by the Publisher upon the representation that
the advertiser/agency is authorized to publish
the entire contents and subject matter thereof.
It is understood that the advertiser/agency will
indemnify and save the Publisher harmless from
or against any loss or expense arising out of
publication of such advertisements, including,
without limitation, those resulting from claims
of libel, violation of rights of privacy, plagiarism
and copyrights infringement. All material in
this publication may not be used in full or in
part without the expressed written consent of
management.
Established 1918
The Greer Citizen
The Greer Citizen
is published every Wednesday by
The Greer Citizen, Inc.
317 Trade St., Greer, S.C. 29651
Telephone 877-2076
Periodicals Postage Paid at Greer, S.C.
Publication No. 229500
POSTMASTER - Send address changes to
The Greer Citizen, P.O. Box 70
Greer, S.C. 29652
Phil Buchheit Photographer
Preston Burch Photographer
Mandy Ferguson Photographer
William Buchheit Staf Reporter
Amanda Irwin Staf Reporter
Mail subscription rate
Greenville and Spartanburg Counties..................................... $33/year
Elsewhere in South Carolina................................................... $43/year
Elsewhere in Continental U.S. ................................................ $53/year
By Carrier and On Newsstand
75 Cents Per Copy
Steve Blackwell | Publisher
Billy Cannada | Editor


The Greer Citizen

Katie Jones Staf Reporter
Shaun Moss Advertising
Suzanne Traenkle Advertising
Julie Holcombe Graphic Artist
T
he Greer Citizen accepts Let-
ters to the Editor. Letters
should be 125 words or less
and include a name and a phone
number for verification.
The Greer Citizen reserves the
right to edit any content.
Letters to the Editor can be
mailed to 317 Trade St., Greer
29651.
SEE LETTERS | A5
Submission guidelines
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR |
IM JUST
SAYING
PAM STONE
THE UPPER ROOM |
CURIOUSLY
AMANDA
AMANDA IRWIN
Staf reporter
Shop locally and improve
your community
In Gods
presence
Read Psalm 73:23-28
C
ome near to God and he will
come near to you. - James
4:8 (NIV)
As my parents age, they
are becoming more and more
dependent on my help. I do
what I can, but it is not easy
since I work and have respon-
sibilities in my own immediate
family as well. Because life
has become such a struggle
for Mom and Dad, our every
visit or phone conversation has
become focused on the next list
of requests they have for me.
Sometimes I feel I have merely
become a facilitator of all their
needs. Im happy to help as
much as I can, but I miss just
chatting and laughing and do-
ing things together the way we
used to.
This may be how God feels
when I pray only when I have
a list of requests. I know that
God cares about my needs, and
I often mention them in prayer.
But I very seldom pray to wor-
ship and be near God. I regret
looking to God merely as a fa-
cilitator of requests. More and
more I am realizing that God
wants more than my requests;
God wants my heart.
Thought for the day: Today I
will treasure my time with God.
Prayer: Dear Lord, reignite
our hearts with love for you.
Remind us that our times of
communion together can be
not only about our needs but
about spending time with you.
Amen.
The benefits of shopping locally cant be over-
stated.
When we spend our money at locally owned
businesses, were often reinvesting in our com-
munity. The dollars spent at local stores, shops,
restaurants, garages and other businesses tend
to remain in local circulation, boosting the local
economy and keeping many people in jobs.
Various studies have tried to quantify the
benefit. The York County Regional Chamber
of Commerce estimates that 45 cents of every
dollar spent at a local business stays within a
community, compared to just 15 cents of every
dollar spent at national chains and other non-
local businesses.
And when we support our local businesses,
they often return the favor by giving back to the
community. They sponsor little league teams,
form partnerships with local schools and sup-
port civic groups. Some national chains do that
too, but one report I read recently concluded
that nonprofit organizations receive about 250
percent more support from small or local busi-
nesses than from large businesses or national
chains.
Many people think of economic development
as being outside investment by big-name man-
ufacturers or national chains. And certainly,
those larger businesses have their place. But
small businesses are the driving force behind
our local, state and national economies--ac-
counting for more than 6 out of every 10 jobs
in the U.S.
With that in mind, here are a few easy ways we
can all help our hometown businesses thrive:
1. Eat at locally owned restaurants. If you dine
out frequently, make an extra effort to visit lo-
cal, family-run establishments. In Greer, its no
secret that some of the most delicious food can
be found at our smaller mom-and-pop restau-
rants. And these places are more likely to offer
great customer service because they know how
vital local patrons are to their success.
2. Network when you visit local stores. If
youre trying to drum up a little business your-
self, shopping locally can be great for network-
ing. Whether youre a salesman trying to spread
the word about a product, or a hair stylist want-
ing new clients, introduce yourself to the owner
or manager whenever you visit a local business.
Leave a business card if you have one. Theyll
sometimes reciprocate if they need a service
you offer.
3. Try to pick up a copy of your towns com-
munity newspaper each week. Local newspa-
pers strengthen the communities they serve by
spotlighting positive, local news and connect-
ing us with our neighbors. They also provide
an affordable way for small businesses, which
often lack large advertising budgets, to get out
the word about what they have to offer. (If you
decide to patronize one of these advertisers,
make sure to mention you saw their ad in the
local paper!)
4. For a night out, consider local sports or
cultural events. Whether youre planning a date,
a get-together with friends or a night out with
family, why not check to see if one of your ar-
eas high school or college sports teams has a
game scheduled? Or consider a play, concert or
some other cultural event. This can be a fun and
inexpensive way to support your community.
5. Visit your local farmers market. We all need
fruit and vegetables, and the local produce sold
at a farmers market are often the freshest and
tastiest available. Shopping at a local farmers
market or the State Farmers Market in Colum-
bia supports family farmers.
6. Share your experience. If you have a good
experience with a local business, tell your
friends and neighbors. Share it on social media.
Because they operate on tight budgets, many lo-
cal businesses rely on word-of-mouth to help
them gain new customers.
Many of these businesses are run by people
working to build their own piece of the Ameri-
can dream. Some invest their life savings into
their business. But competition from national
chains represents a tall challenge, and, sadly,
over half of all small businesses fail within five
years of opening.
If you stop to think about it, even a modest
shift in our personal spending habits can help
level the playing field for small businesses--and
improve our communities as well.
This guest editorial was submitted by South Carolina Comptroller Richard
Eckstrom.
Celebrities and compromising photographs
Maybe decide against that
tipsy, spur-of-the-moment
madness involving a sombrero
and Nutella.
Protections
lacking
A
fter the video of Ray Rice
allegedly abusing his
finance was released, the
cold, victim-blaming reality of
domestic abuse has dominated
new outlets. Unfortunately,
S.C.s lack of protections make
it the second deadliest state in
the country for women who are
victims of domestic violence.
Initially I was surprised, but
then my roommate and I went
to the police station to file
harassment charges in hopes
of grasping at some sense of
security. The blatant absence of
caring on the faces of the two
men at the station washed away
any hopes we had for a legal
route of protection.
My roommates ex sent nearly
50 unanswered texts daily,
emails, phone calls and pur-
chased a second phone with
an unrecognizable number, in
addition to unexpected visits to
our house at night, purposely
stopping at public places where
he saw her vehicle, showing up
at her work and causing prop-
erty damage at our house. What
finally pushed us through the
doorway of the police station
were threatening texts toward
her boyfriend with his address.
The police said because she
hadnt specifically told him to
cease contact it wasnt harass-
ment and we were told to get a
concealed weapons permit. The
very individuals tasked with
protecting us literally told us to
protect ourselves.
About 67 percent of gun own-
ers own guns for protection, but
there is no credible evidence
that owning a gun reduces
the risk of being victimized.
According to an investigative re-
port published by the Post and
Courier, nearly seven out of 10
of the 300 women killed in the
past decade by a partner were
killed with guns. In tears, my
roommate left the police sta-
tion feeling helpless and more
unprotected than ever.
A piece of paper and short jail
times do little to protect indi-
viduals in domestic abuse situ-
ations. About 36,000 domestic
abuse incidents are reported
annually. Animal abusers can
serve up to five years for their
crimes, while someone who
beats their partner one first
offense only serves a maximum
of 30 days in jail. South Caro-
lina needs to implement longer
jail sentences, rehabilitation
programs, early intervention
measures and laws that prohibit
issuing firearms to convicted
abusers.
I regret looking to God
merely as a facilitator of
requests.
BUSINESS
The Greer Citizen
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2014 THE GREER CITIZEN A5
Truliant is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration
and is an Equal Housing Lender. (1) Rates and promotional terms are subject to
change. Loans are subject to credit approval. Maximum APR for Home Equity Lines of Credit is
18.00%. Available in FL, GA, NC, OH, SC, TN and VA only.
Whether you express comfort with bold
colors or subtle hues, well help bring
your vision to life.
Truliant offers a variety
of home equity options
to help you fnance
home improvements and
upgrades that create a
lasting impression.
Loan amounts from
$10,000 to $350,000
Variable rate
Easy application process
Home Equity Loans also available
Improving your life is why we exist.
Visit us, call or apply online to get started today
let us help you guide your future, so you can
focus on what really matters.
Truliant.org/HomeEquity | 800.822.0382
Roe Farm
Services
Lime & Fertilizer Spreading
Weed Control
Bush Hogging
C
a
ll fo
r F
a
ll
S
p
e
c
ia
l!
864-630-1768
Gene Roe
To the editor,
I was glad to see you are
addressing the FOIA (Free-
dom of Information Act)
as it is ignored in South
Carolina.
A few years ago, the
University of South Caro-
lina Upstate did some-
thing rather suspicious
by awarding a contract to
Office Max to outsource
its printing. I tried, in vain,
to contact Vice Chancellor
Skul about the irregulari-
ties without reply. When
I finally did confront her,
she refused to even ac-
knowledge me.
In that time, I filed 17
FOI requests and, although
I even contacted both the
USC chancellor and legal
department in Columbia,
my FOI requests were nev-
er replied to except from
the campus police, who
sent me the record of their
illegal threat ordering me
off campus.
What was strange about
the award to Office Max is
that it never was advertised
until after the fact, leading
me to have a strong suspi-
cion that Office Max actu-
ally wrote the specs. There
was never a study of costs
v. benefit (value analysis).
Having started my career
in procurement, I real-
ized there was something
really underhand being
perpetrated by the admin-
istration. Ms. Skuls office
also issued, after the fact,
a scathing evaluation of
their printing department,
which a year earlier and for
many years prior, received
high praise from the vice
chancellors office.
The purchasing agent at
USC Upstate quit suddenly
and I was able to talk to him
before he quit. He claimed
that the whole scheme
went around his office, in
disregard of all laws and
procedures. I contacted
the Attorney Generals of-
fice only to learn that the
Attorney Generals office
does not protect the pub-
lic. It only exists to defend
state employees from law-
suits. There is much more
to this story, but it would
take the whole page to
print it all.
Good luck on reforming
South Carolinas FOI Act.
You are up against a cadre
of legal criminals.
John J. Helfrich
Greer
Q: My husband and
I have been living on a
budget for a few months,
and for some reason there
seems to be leaks in our
budget. Its just a few dol-
lars here and there, but
added together it makes
a huge dent. Can you give
us some advice?
DR: This kind of thing
happens a lot in house-
hold budgeting, especially
to folks who are new to
the game. Here are some
ideas to help stretch your
dollars and plug those
leaks.
Use the cash-only
method, especially when
shopping for groceries.
Take only the amount you
have budgeted, and dont
use your debit card or a
check. Also, use coupons
only for items you would
buy anyway. You can also
stock up on items you use
often when there is a big
sale. These little things
will add up.
Try eating out only on
special occasions, drink
water as your beverage
and dont be afraid to use
coupons in restaurants.
When it comes to buy-
ing clothes, make a habit
of checking out the sale
rack first. You can shop
at thrift and consign-
ment stores, and sell the
clothes you dont wear
anymore.
With entertainment, use
dollar-off and buy-one-
get-one-free coupons
whenever you can. See a
matinee or a second-run
movie, and if youre going
somewhere with a bunch
of people, call ahead and
ask for a group discount.
Youll be amazed at how
much money these tactics
will save.
DAVE
SAYS
DAVE
RAMSEY
LETTER TO THE EDITOR |
In response
to the Sept. 3 editorial
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
Meet and greet
Tom Ervin, a candidate for governor, was in Greer last Tuesday holding a town hall
meeting for local residents at Georges Brick Oven Bistro.

We need help
with our budget!


FROM PAGE ONE
issued for the search of
Turners and Johnsons
homes. The Greer Citizen
requested the search war-
rants, but was told they
are not currently public
record. According to a
SLED representative, there
are currently no charges
against Johnson or Turner.
Once SLED completes the
investigation, the informa-
tion will be presented to
the state attorney, solici-
tors office or the prose-
cutors offices, depending
what is found. The office
that reviews the informa-
tion will determine the
charges, if any.
Wyatt announced during
Monday nights meeting
that Turner advised coun-
cil he was out for medical
reasons, but Wyatt said
he was not given reasons
for Turners absence from
previous meetings.
I dont want to specu-
late as to why, Wyatt said.
He did communicate to us
last night that there were
medical issues and he has
been on medical leave. The
other meetings he really
didnt offer an explanation
and you would have to ask
him about that.
According to Jeff Shack-
er, with the Municipal
Association, there is no
law that requires mayors
to be present at council
meetings. Furthermore,
the only way a mayor, be-
ing an elected official, can
be removed from office is
if the governor chooses to
remove them because they
violated the section of the
state code of laws that
governs municipalities.
The governor can also re-
move a mayor if they are
convicted of a felony crime
of moral turpitude.
Terry Richards resigned
from his position as police
chief following councils
receipt of a letter accusing
Richards of an affair along
with other allegations. Lt.
Jay Hayes is serving as in-
terim police chief.
A young lady delivered
[a letter] to the town It
details information about
accusations related to the
chief, related to an extra-
marital affair, Wyatt said.
SLED is investigation the
allegations against Rich-
ards, which Wyatt said
to his knowledge isnt in
connection with an ongo-
ing investigation being
conducted by SLED and
the FBI regarding illegal
recordings in Lyman Town
Hall.
In addition to Johnsons
termination and Richards
resignation, another offi-
cer was terminated on Aug.
29, a part-time employee
in the Streets Department
resigned and a part-time
Police Department office
position was eliminated.
Wyatt said the employees
who were terminated or
who have resigned are not
connected to the illegal re-
cordings investigation.
Theres been turnover
in town employees since
the election Please keep
in mind that the town is
an at-will employer, which
means that both the town
as the employer and the
employee can terminate
the employee relationship
at any time for any reason,
or for no reason at all.
All employees know this
when they go to work for
the town, Wyatt said in
a statement at the council
meeting.
At the council meeting,
council approved a motion
amending an ordinance re-
lating to the form of gov-
ernment and powers of
mayor and council. The
amendment gives a coun-
cil member signature and
banking authority. Coun-
cilmember Daisy Carter
was nominated as the
councilmember with that
authority.
Council also passed the
first reading of an ordi-
nance relating to the pre-
siding officer at council
meetings as well an amend-
ment for an ordinance to
add a fourth council per-
son to the Policy and Per-
sonnel Committee.
The next regularly
scheduled Lyman Town
Council meeting is Oct. 6
at 6 p.m. at Lyman Town
Hall. It was mention that a
special called meeting may
be held prior to then.
airwin@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
OBITUARIES
The Greer Citizen
A6 THE GREER CITIZEN WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2014
Activate Your
Online Account
Today
greercitizen
.com
If you already
have a print
subscription to
Jr 0rrrr 0itirn
but you dont have
access to The Greer
Citizen online,
call us today and let
us setup your online
account for free!
864-877-2076
A Arrangement Florist
877-5711
The Upstates Premier Florist
1205 W. POINSETT STREET GREER OPEN MON.-FRI. 8:30-6 SAT. 9-3
www.aarrangementfowers.com
Greers Freshest Flowers Master Designer Shop
VOTED BEST IN THE UPSTATE
Cool, Fall-Like Weekend
Sunshine and cool temperatures move in
this weekend. After a week of warm, humid
weather we will see temperatures fall into the
70s this weekend. A cold front on Thursday
will bring rain chances for Thursday and Fri-
day with sunshine and cool temperatures this
weekend. Highs on Saturday and Sunday will
stay in the low to middle 70s with overnight
lows near 60. Have a great weekend!
Greer Mill Village History
Where: Greer Library
505 Pennsylvania Ave.
Date: Friday, Sept. 12
2-4 p.m.

Temps: Partly cloudy. Mid to low 80s.
84
64
1.57
36.53
+3.03
7:08 AM
7:43 PM
Sept. 15 Sept. 23 Oct. 1 Oct. 8
86/64 ISO 81/62 ISO
86/64 ISO 84/64 ISO
88/76 ISO 88/76 ISO
88/76 ISO 88/76 ISO
90/70 ISO 89/69 ISO
91/70 ISO 88/68 ISO
94/72 ISO 94/72 ISO
89/68 ISO 84/66 ISO
73/59 Sunny
72/60 Sunny
74/60 Sunny
73/62 Sunny
79/65 Sunny
75/63 Sunny
80/66 Sunny
76/64 Sunny
86
70
90
71
86
66
79
65
75
63
76
61
78
63
Wednesday Thursday Friday
Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday
Weekend Outlook
Katherine Paget Joye
Katherine Kathy Paget
Joye, 54, of Columbia, died
Wednesday, Sept. 3.
Kathy, born in Greer
on Jan. 4, 1960, was
the daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Ben Paget (Nancee).
Kathy was the middle of
three daughters raised in
Greer. She graduated from
Clemson University with
a Bachelor of Science. Af-
ter college, Kathy made
Columbia her home and
married the love of her
life, Steve, in 1984. She
dedicated her life to her
loving husband and four
children. Kathy most en-
joyed spending time with
her family as well as gar-
dening, cooking, reading,
and time at the beach. Her
selflessness and giving
nature was what created
a happy and loving home
for everyone. Kathy was a
member of First Presbyte-
rian Church.
Survivors include her
husband, Stephen Russell
Joye of Columbia; her par-
ents, Benjamin Lee Paget
and Nancee King Paget of
Garden City; children, Eliz-
abeth Joye Weathers (Gill),
Stephen Russell Joye, Jr.,
Madeline Louise Joye and
Katherine Paget Joye, all
of Columbia; and sisters,
Susan Amick (Brian) of
Lexington and Patty Joye
(Chris) of Columbia.
A memorial service for
Mrs. Joye was held at 11
a.m. Saturday, Sept. 6, at
First Presbyterian Church,
1324 Marion St., Colum-
bia, with Dr. Derek W.H.
Thomas and The Rev. L.
Craig Wilkes officiating.
Visitation with the fam-
ily followed in Jackson
Hall. A private burial at
Greenlawn Memorial Park
took place prior to the
service. Memorials may be
made to the Oliver Gospel
Mission, P.O. Box 7697,
Columbia, 29202.
Memories and condo-
lences may be shared at
ShivesFuneralHome.com.
Sammie E. Reynolds
Veteran
Sammie Edward Reyn-
olds, 84, of 475 Wood
Road, died Sept. 6, 2014 at
his home.
A native
of Greenville
County, he
was a son of
the late Lloyd and Lucille
Shirley Reynolds, a retired
employee of J.P. Stevens
Taylors Plant, retired from
the U.S. Army and was
a member of the Hejaz
Shrine.
Surviving are his wife,
Anna Victoria Stefansky
Reynolds of the home;
two sons, David Eston
Reynolds, Samuel Edward
Reynolds both of Taylors;
two daughters, Lois Ann
Merckle of Greer and Gail
Lynn Cannon of Taylors;
two brothers, James and
Daniel Reynolds both of
Taylors; two sisters, Betty
Wooten and Janice Taylor
both of Greer; ten grand-
children and eight great-
grandchildren.
Mr. Reynolds was pre-
deceased also by one son,
Donald Stephen Reynolds
and three brothers, Hor-
ace, Bobby, and Billy Reyn-
olds.
Funeral services were
held at 11 a.m. Monday at
the Wood Mortuary, con-
ducted by Pastor Shane
Hull. Burial followed in
Hillcrest Memory Gardens
with full military honors
and Masonic Rites.
Visitation was held 5-7
p.m. Sunday at the mortu-
ary.
The family is at the
home.
Online condolences may
be made at www.thewood-
mortuary.com.
Obituaries can be emailed
to obits@greercitizen.com or
dropped of at 317 Trade St.
Deadline: noon Tuesdays. Cost:
$40; with photo $55.
FROM PAGE ONE
police that investigate
their collisions, but look-
ing at it with what we saw,
it does not appear there
was anything wrong on
[the trains] end of it, Hol-
combe said.
The engineer told po-
lice the victim stopped,
and it appeared as if he
was going to wait until
the train passed, but in-
stead stepped out onto
the tracks.
Greer police have seen
others struck by trains in
the past.
Weve probably had
four [pedestrians hit by
a train] in the last six or
seven years, he said. I
think its been about eight
months or so, but one oc-
curred up further toward
the Century B area. Its not
very common, but it does
occur for some reason.
I dont know why, but it
does.
Holcombe said the area
where the incident on Sat-
urday occurred was on a
straight away.
Where that one was, its
a nice, long straight away.
[Im not sure] how you
dont see a train is com-
ing. Its not like its com-
ing around a curve, he
said. People need to pay
attention to it.
Greer Police encourage
caution to anyone cross-
ing the tracks.
The tracks themselves
are no trespassing zones.
You shouldnt be walking
along the tracks, Hol-
combe said. People still
do it, but you shouldnt
be on the tracks. If youre
crossing them, its just
like crossing a roadway
you have to make sure you
look both ways and cross
as quickly as possible.
Phil Buchheit also contributed to this story.

Southern
Thymes
could
soon
reopen
BY BILLY CANNADA
EDITOR
Southern Thymes res-
taurant has been sold to
its former owner, Wendy
Mitchell, who currently
manages Lakeview Steak-
house on Highway 14.
Mitchell is making strides
to reopen the Trade Street
restaurant, which closed
recently.
Mitchell said in an email
she, [Hopes] to be open-
ing within a months time.
According to the owner,
it all depends on inspec-
tions.
While the management
will be familiar to South-
ern Thymes customers,
the name may not be.
Mitchell said she is cur-
rently in discussions with
the restaurants former
owners about using the
name Southern Thymes
Caf.
Check back with The
Greer Citizen for more on
this story and potential a
reopening date.
billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
Picture perfect
Uptown Art of Greenvilles Tamara Preston performs a painting demonstration during a
class at Praise Cathedral last Thursday.

COLLISION: Investigation is ongoing
LYMAN: Dealing with resignations, terminations




Weve probably had four [pedestrians hit
by a train] in the last six or seven years. I
think its been about eight months or so,
but one occurred up further toward the
Century B area.
Lt. Jim Holcombe
Greer Police Department
A young lady
delivered [a letter]
to the townIt
details information
about accusations
related to the
chief related to an
extramarital affair.
Tony Wyatt
Lyman Mayor Pro Tem
RELIGION
The Greer Citizen
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2014 THE GREER CITIZEN A7
Do you make a mean apple pie? Bring your pie to the
farm by 10:30 am to enter it in the Apple Pie Contest!
You could win $200!
Saturday, September 20th
10:00am - 6:00pm
Live Bluegrass by the Sweet Potato Pie Kids
Hayrides, corn maze, gem mining,
apple picking, pumpkin patch,
pedal car track, and bushels of
family fun!
130 Orchard Dr. Moore, SC (off Bethany Church Road) 864.576.4195 or 864.574.8889
www.nivensapplefarm.com
BBQ, chargrilled hamburgers and hot
dogs, chicken Mediterranean wraps ,
and amazing sides available for
purchase all day!
Special thanks to
our Sponsors:
ABNER CREEK
HOSTING SIMULCAST
Abner Creek Baptist
Church will be hosting:
THE WORD: CLOSER TO
HOME with Beth Moore.
The Living Proof Live Si-
mulcast will take place
Saturday, Sept. 13 from
9:30 a.m.-4:15 pm. Tick-
ets are $25 per person
(including lunch) and are
available online at abner-
creekbaptist.com. The si-
mulcast will be broadcast
at 2461 Abner Creek Rd.
in Greer.
MAPLE CREEK
PREREVIVAL CONCERT
Maple Creek Missionary
Baptist Church, located
at 609 South Main St. in
Greer, will present its an-
nual pre-revival concert
on Saturday, Sept. 20 at 4
p.m.
The concert will fea-
ture the Maple Creek Mu-
sic Ministry, along with
the Greer/Taylors Choral
Union Choirs. For more in-
formation, call 877-1791.
EL BETHEL BAPTIST
HOMECOMING
El Bethel Baptist Church
will celebrate Old Fash-
ioned Day and Home-
coming at 10:30 a.m. On
Sunday, Sept. 21. A cov-
ered-dish luncheon will
follow the service. Old-
fashioned attire is option-
al. The church is located
at 313 Jones Ave., Greer.
For more information, call
877-4021.
ANNIVERSARY
CELEBRATION
Liberty Hill Methodist
Church will have home-
coming to celebrate its
165th anniversary. This
service will be Sept. 21
at 11 a.m. with lunch
following. A slide show
will be presented dur-
ing the lunch. Everyone
is welcome. Liberty Hill is
located at 301 Liberty Hill
Rd., Greer, 29651.
CEDAR GROVE HEALTH
AND WELLNESS FAIR
Cedar Grove Baptist
Church will host its sec-
ond annual community
health and wellness fair
on Sept. 27 from 10 a.m.-
2 p.m. For more informa-
tion, call Tamaya Ellis at
275-0412.
TREE OF LIFE
HOMECOMING
Upstate Tree of Life
Church, located at 203 E.
Bearden St. in Greer, will
host a homecoming cel-
ebration on Saturday, Oct.
4 at 10:30 a.m. The special
speaker will be Lloyd Mor-
gan and special singers
will be the Dover family.
Call 848-1295.
APALACHE BAPTIST
CALENDAR
Senior Adults from Mt.
Lebanon Baptist Church
and Holly Springs Bap-
tist Church will join the
Apalache Baptist Church
seniors on the annual
beach trip Sept. 15-18.
The seniors will meet at
Petes Restaurant in Greer
on August 28 at 6 p.m. for
the evening meal.
FINANCIAL PEACE
UNIVERSITY
Riverside Baptist Church
continues to host Dave
Ramseys Financial Peace
University, a nine-week
course on finances. The
cost is $93. Call 879-
4400.
BY KATIE CRUICE SMITH
FOR THE GREER CITIZEN
On Sept. 16, Greenville
resident, Dan Cruver, will
be honored, along with
about 140 other people, as
an Angel in Adoption in an
awards ceremony in Wash-
ington, D.C. The event will
be followed by a gala on
Sept. 17.
Cruver is being recog-
nized for his work in advo-
cating orphan care around
the world through the or-
ganization he co-founded,
Together for Adoption.
It all began when Cru-
ver and his wife, Melissa,
had their second child,
Daniel. Although Melissas
pregnancy was normal,
just 13 hours after Daniel
was born, he began hav-
ing seizures, ending up in
the neonatal intensive care
unit where doctors could
not seem to figure out
what was happening.
When Daniel began to
have between 40 to 70
seizures a day, the Cru-
vers were sent for further
observation at Duke Uni-
versity Medical Center,
then to Philadelphia, and
finally to Johns Hopkins
Hospital.
But no one could seem
to figure out how to help
the Cruvers son.
We were told that the
chances were 25 percent
that our next child would
have the same condition,
said Dan.
Thats when the Cru-
vers started to seriously
consider adoption. They
adopted their son, Isaiah,
when Daniel was 2 years
old, and their daughter,
Hannah, was 5 years old.
The Cruvers thought that
Daniel would live into his
teens, but five weeks af-
ter his third birthday, he
passed away.
Daniels suffering and
our inability to find treat-
ment helped us to think
of other children in the
world who are suffering,
said Cruver. There are
children suffering without
parents and the love and
support of a family.
A year after Daniel died,
the Cruvers added Noah
to their family, but their
journey into adoption was
only just beginning.
In 2005 and 2006, Cru-
ver served on two mission
trips to a Chinese orphan-
age and began to wonder
what more he could do.
I began to ask, How
could we better equip peo-
ple? said Cruver. To-
gether for Adoption was
born out of the suffering
of our second biological
child not just sympathiz-
ing but emphasizing as
well.
Together for Adoption
or T4A began in 2008
when Cruver was ap-
proached by a friend at the
Abba Fund (an adoption
assistance organization)
to speak at a conference in
Greenville on the theology
of adoption and orphan
care. There were 175 peo-
ple at the first conference,
so the idea was formed
to do another conference
somewhere else.
Orphan care and the
adoption movement in
evangelicalism started
growing in leaps and
bounds 10 years ago, said
Cruver, who was a pastor
for several years and a col-
lege professor of Bible and
theology. But the move-
ment wasnt rooted in bib-
lical text and theology like
it should be in order to be
sustainable for the long
haul. We are dealing with
140 to 150 million orphans
who have lost at least one
parent, plus different
country problems and the
stigma of at-risk children.
We need to see the church
more engaged.
After the initial confer-
ence, Cruver was intro-
duced to Scotty Smith,
who is the pastor of Steven
Curtis Chapman, Christian
music artist and founder
of Show Hope, an organi-
zation that promotes the
care of orphans.
In 2009, 650 people at-
tended the conference at
Christ Community Church
in Franklin, Tennessee.
We decided that we
wanted to do a confer-
ence every year, said
Cruver. Next we were in
Texas, and it was there
we broke the 1,000 mark.
At that point, we decided
we wanted to partner with
churches and non-profits
in other countries in order
to provided training [for
orphan care].
The first T4A interna-
tional conference was held
in Melbourne, Australia,
where, according to Cru-
ver, there is a very nega-
tive view of adoption.
We focused on what
Scripture teaches about
adoption, said Cruver.
There were almost 200
people there.
In addition to speak-
ing at the T4A confer-
ences, Cruver also wrote
four chapters of a book
in collaboration with John
Piper, Scotty Smith, Rich-
ard D. Phillips, and Jason
Kovacs to promote adop-
tion awareness called Re-
claiming Adoption: Mis-
sional Living Through the
Discovery of Abba Father.
The book was translated
into Amharic for Ethiopian
pastors in 2011.
Cruver has also part-
nered with World Orphans
in training pastors and
churches to help the or-
phans in their own coun-
try. Just three months
after the 2010 earthquake
in Haiti, Cruver held a
three-day training session
with 10 Haitian churches
to help equip them to care
for the orphans there.
In 2012, he traveled with
World Orphans to Nica-
ragua, and he held a T4A
conference in South Africa
in 2013.
It was neat to see how
it was resonating not just
with Christians in the U.S.
but across the globe, said
Cruver. People are rising
up and adopting orphans
in their own countries.
World Orphans places
children with families in
their churches. There are
no orphanages [in some
of these countries]. The
church is taking it on;
families are not isolated
and alone.
On Oct. 17-18, T4A is
coming back to where it
started. The 2014 confer-
ence will be held at First
Baptist Church in Simp-
sonville.
This year, we are ad-
dressing the tough issues
the movement has faced
over the years, said Cru-
ver. We are looking at
orphan prevention, foster
care, and how to equip the
church.
In addition to Cruvers
session, thirty-minute ses-
sions will be presented
by Brandon Hatmaker,
co-founder or Restore
Communities; Dr. Eliza-
beth Bartholet, Harvard
law professor; Dr. John
Sowers, president of The
Mentoring Project; Jedd
Medefind, president of
Christian Alliance for Or-
phans; and Jason Kovacs,
co-founder of T4A. Ten-
minute sessions will also
be presented.
We have 30 to 50 ex-
hibitors who have the
reputation of strong, ethi-
cal practices, said Cruver.
We will have workshops
and breakout session to
get [pastors] to plug into
their church. Once mem-
bers get a hold of this, then
people are equipped to do
orphan care, and the pas-
tors dont have to cham-
pion it themselves. We cut
through all the noise to
help the [churchs] people
do well with a ministry
like this.
Cruver was nominated
by Senator Tim Scott to re-
ceive the Angels in Adop-
tion award, which was
first awarded in 1999 at a
Congressional press con-
ference.
The Angels in Adoption
program is CCAIs sig-
nature public awareness
campaign and provides an
opportunity for all mem-
bers of the U.S. Congress
to honor the good work
of their constituents who
have enriched the lives
of foster children and or-
phans in the United States
and abroad, according
to a press release issued
from the Congressional
Coalition on Adoption In-
stitute. Each year, more
than 140 angels are hon-
ored through the Angels
in Adoption program.
Cruver is already mak-
ing plans for the future of
T4A. He is already work-
ing with Summit Church in
Raleigh, North Carolina, in
planning a conference for
2015. He is also meeting
with the World Orphans
president to talk about a
future international trip
to India. But for Cruver,
that is short-term. He is
hoping to be able to equip
the churches to care for
orphans for the next 50
years.
I am most excited about
the award exposing what
T4A is doing, said Cru-
ver. Well see what fruit
comes with that.
For more information on
T4A or the 2014 confer-
ence in Greenville, visit to-
getherforadoption.org.
Local adoption advocate to receive award
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
Dan Cruver, co-founder of Together for Adoption, leads a conference in Austin, Texas.
Cruver is the recipient of the 2014 Angels in Adoption award.

CHURCH
NEWS
A8 THE GREER CITIZEN NEWS WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2014
CBLGreer.com
229 Trade Street | Greer, SC | 877-2054
Visit our new Online Mortgage Center where you can check
interest rates and conveniently apply online for a mortgage.
There is NO Application Fee PLUS:
We originate and underwrite all our home loans so every
application is considered case-by case.
We dont require PMI (Private Mortgage Insurance) which
results in lower monthly payments and may mean you can
afford a shorter term mortgage.
We service your loan, so you always deal with people you know.
Apply Online for
Your Mortgage at
Keeping it Simple:
CBLGreer.com
Your Local Mortgage Lender Since 1907
Sanders
Heating & Air Conditioning
Indoor air quality experts since 1951
864- 288- 7671
621 Keith Drive
Greenville, SC 29607
www.SandersHeatCool.com
6
1
Y
e
a
r
s
S
e
r
v
in
g
Y
o
u
r

C
o
m
m
u
n
it
y
$25 SERVICE CALL
with repairs
when you mention you saw us in
The Greer Citizen
Call Cindy or Dawn for appointment.
Sanders - Service Call ad.indd 1 8/18/14 10:51:42 AM
Farr wins
grand prize
Tatertot Farr is the
grand prize winner in the
Greer Community Minis-
tries (GCM) Pet Photo Con-
test for Meals on Wheels
(MOW). Tatertot was one
of 16 entries in the contest
that was created to bring
awareness to the need for
pet food donations for
Meals on Wheels clients in
the Greater Greer area.
Category winners were
also named: Best Dressed:
Gracie Posey, Best Action
Shot: Duke Ruffle, Looks
like Owner: Chief and
Austin Ashmore, Pets are
Family: Timmy Ruffle, and
Facebook winners: Samp-
son and Emma Sobolews-
ki.
Prizes, including gift
cards to Pet Smart, free
nail trim from Dog Gone
Beautiful, and doggie day
care and overnight stays
at Wood Ruff Pet Re-
sort will be given to win-
ners. All contestants can
be seen in a video on the
GCM Facebook page or at
gcminc.org.
The contest netted $150
and 250 pounds of pet
food. The food will be dis-
tributed to local Meals on
Wheels clients with pets.
We are pleased with
the results of our first Pet
Photo Contest, said Wen-
dy Campbell, MOW coordi-
nator. Bringing awareness
to this vital need in our
community is so impor-
tant. When we give them
pet food they are less like-
ly to feed their own meal
to their pet.
Donations of pet food
are needed throughout
the year and are accepted
Monday through Friday
from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., 738
S. Line St. Ext., Greer.
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
Tatertot Farr
GCM contest raises
$150, food for MOW
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
Chief and Austin Ashmore
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
Duke Rufe
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
Sampson and Emma
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
Timmy Rufe
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
Gracie Posey


Oct. 4
event helps
GCM
The 8th annual Benson
OctoberFAST Classic Car
Show and Twilight 5K
is Saturday, Oct. 4. The
fundraiser, benefitting
Greer Community Minis-
tries (GCM), will be held at
Greer First Baptist Church
with the Car Show from
noon to 5 p.m., a Kids Fun
Run at 5:30 p.m. and the
Twilight 5K through Greer
at 6 p.m.
The family-friendly
event includes live music
and a German food booth
from noon to 4 pm.. with
plates available for $8 that
include bratwurst, German
potato salad, cabbage, Ger-
man chocolate cake and a
drink and $5 for a hot dog
plate with chips, cake and
drink. All proceeds ben-
efit GCMs four programs,
which include a Food
Pantry, Sharons Clothing
Closet, Senior Dining and
Meals on Wheels.
We are excited about
this years event, and
were hoping for a record
turnout, said Cindy Sim-
pler, Executive Director.
We will have good food,
good fun and good mu-
sic. Thanks to Greenville
Health System, you can
get a free flu shot there as
well. This annual fundrais-
ing event helps raise com-
munity awareness of the
services we provide, all at
no cost to individuals and
families.
Car registration begins
at 10 a.m. in the parking
lot at Greer First Baptist
and is open to all car en-
thusiasts for a $15 dona-
tion. The Classic Car Show
runs from noon to 5 p.m.
and is free to the public.
This year, a Kids Fun Run
has been added to include
children of all ages. Sign
up the day of the event by
donating a new or gently
used coat or by making a
$10 donation. The first 50
participants receive a spe-
cial gift.
Runners may register for
the Twilight 5K Run/Walk
now at go-greenevents.
com. Fee is $25 until Oct.
1 and $30 the day of the
event and includes a tech-
nical t-shirt. Packet pick
up begins at 4 p.m. the
day of the event and the
race starts at 6 p.m. The
flat, fast course through
Greer is now certified.
Cash prizes awarded to
the top three finishers and
special awards to the top
three finishers in each age
category.
A special four-week
training program is avail-
able at gcminc.org for first
time participants. Click on
the picture of the shoes
to gain access to this pro-
gram.
We want to encourage
those who may have nev-
er participated in a race
before to join us, said
Wendy Campbell, Meals on
Wheels Coordinator and
race director. It doesnt
matter how fast you run.
When you pay your entry
fee, you help us feed our
Meals on Wheels and Se-
nior Dining clients. Get a
group of friends and make
it a fun time of exercise to-
gether.
For more information
about the event or spon-
sorship opportunities,
visit gcminc.org or call
877-1937.
OctoberFAST offers
classic cars, 5K run
We want to encourage those who may
have never participated in a race before to
join us. It doesnt matter how fast you run.
When you pay your entry fee, you help
us feed our Meals on Wheels and Senior
Dining clients.
Wendy Campbell
Meals on Wheels coordinator and race director
301 McCall St. Greer
848-5500
Highway 14 Greer, SC
879-7311
Management & Employees
ASHMORE
BROTHERS
Commercial Residential
Asphalt Paving Site Preparation
SINCE 1930
BENSON
Collision Repair Center
Ofce Hours:
7:30-6:00 Mon.-Fri.
848-5330
400 W. Wade Hampton Blvd.
Greer
Free Estimates
120 Years Combined Experience
Rental Car Competitive Rates
State of the Art Equipment & Facilities
www.bensongreer.com
989-0099
1409 W. Wade Hampton Blvd.
10% DISCOUNT WITH CHURCH BULLETINS ON SUNDAYS
NEW HOMES
ADDITIONS
PAINTING
ROOFING
FLOOR
COVERINGS
CUSTOM
CABINETRY &
COUNTER TOPS
DECKS
PRIVACY
FENCING
864-578-4100
Free Estimates - 35 Years Experience
Taylors First Baptist Church 200 West Main Street Taylors
And they were calling to one another: Holy, holy, holy is the LORD Almighty;
the whole earth is full of his glory. - Isaiah 6:3
BAPTIST
Abner Creek Baptist Church
2461 Abner Creek Rd., Greer 877-6604
Airport Baptist Church
776 S. Batesville Rd., Greer 848-7850
Apalache Baptist
1915 Gap Creek Rd., Greer 877-6012
Bible Baptist Church
6645 Mountain View Rd., Taylors 895-7003
Blue Ridge Baptist Church
3950 Pennington Rd., Greer 895-5787
BridgePointe
600 Bridge Rd., Taylors 244-2774
Burnsview Baptist Church
9690 Reidville Rd., Greer 879-4006
Calvary Baptist
101 Calvary St., Greer 877-9759
Calvary Baptist
108 Forest St., Greer 968-0092
Calvary Hill Baptist
100 Edward Rd., Lyman
Calvary Road Baptist Church
108 Bright Rd., Greer 593-2643
Camp Creek Baptist Church
1100 Camp Creek Rd., Taylors
Cedar Grove Baptist Church
109 Elmer St., Greer 877-6216
Community Baptist Church
642 S. Suber Rd., Greer 848-3500
Double Springs Baptist Church
3800 Locust Hill Rd., Taylors 895-1314
Ebenezer-Welcome Baptist Church
4005 Highway 414, Landrum 895-1461
El Bethel Baptist Church
313 Jones Ave., Greer 877-4021
Emmanuel Baptist Church
423 S. Buncombe Rd., Greer 877-2121
Enoree Fork Baptist Church
100 Enoree Dr., Greer 268-4385
Fairview Baptist Church
1300 Locust Hill Rd., Greer 877-1881
First Baptist Church
202 W. Poinsett St., Greer 877-4253
Freedom Fellowship Greer High 877-3604
Friendship Baptist Church
1600 Holly Springs Rd., Lyman 877-4746
Good News Baptist Church
1592 S. Highway 14, Greer 879-2289
Grace Baptist Church
760 W. Gap Creek Rd., Greer 879-3519
Grace Place
407 Ridgewood Dr., Greer
Greer Freewill Baptist Church
110 Pine Ridge Dr., Greer 968-0310
Heritage Chapel Baptist Church
218 Alexander Rd., Greer 989-0170
Highland Baptist Church
3270 Hwy. 414, Taylors 895-5270
Hillcrest Baptist Church
111 Biblebrook Dr., Greer 877-4206
Hispanic Baptist Iglesia Bautista Hispana
199 Hubert St., Greer 877-3899
Holly Springs Baptist Church
250 Hannon Rd., Inman 877-6765
Locust Hill Baptist Church
5534 Locust Hill Rd., Travelers Rest 895-1771
Maple Creek Baptist Church
609 S. Main St., Greer 877-1791
Milford Baptist Church
1282 Milford Church Rd., Greer 895-5533
Mount Lebanon Baptist Church
572 Mt. Lebanon Church Rd., Greer 895-2334
New Hope Baptist Church
561 Gilliam Rd., Greer 879-7080
New Jerusalem Baptist Church
413 E. Poinsett St., Greer 968-9203
New Life Baptist Church
90 Becco Rd., Greer 895-3224
Northwood Baptist Church
888 Ansel School Rd., Greer 877-5417
ONeal Baptist Church
3420 N. Highway 101, Greer 895-0930
Pelham First Baptist Church
2720 S. Old Highway 14, Greer 879-4032
Peoples Baptist Church
310 Victor Avenue Ext., Greer 848-0449
Piney Grove Missionary Baptist Church
201 Jordan Rd., Lyman 879-2646
Pleasant Grove Baptist Church
1002 S. Buncombe Rd., Greer 877-6436
Pleasant Hill Baptist Church
4899 Jordan Rd., Greer 895-3546
Providence Baptist Church
2020 Gibbs Shoals Rd., Greer 877-3483
Rebirth Missionary Baptist Church
2375 Racing Road, Greer 877-0449
Riverside Baptist Church
1249 S. Suber Rd., Greer 879-4400
Second Baptist Church
570 Memorial Drive Ext., Greer 877-7061
Southside Baptist Church
410 S. Main St., Greer 877-2672
St. Johns Baptist Church
2 Groveland Rd., Taylors 879-2904
Suber Road Baptist Church
445 S. Suber Rd., Greer 801-0181
Taylors First Baptist Church
200 W. Main St., Taylors 244-3535
United Family Ministries
13465 E. Wade Hampton Blvd., Greer 877-3235
Victor Baptist
121 New Woodruff Rd., Greer 877-9686
Washington Baptist Church
3500 N. Highway 14, Greer 895-1510
Welcome Home Baptist Church
1779 Pleasant Hill Rd., Greer 901-7674
CATHOLIC
Blessed Trinity Catholic Church
901 River Rd., Greer 879-4225
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Riverside Church of Christ
2103 Old Spartanburg Rd., Greer 322-6847
CHURCH OF GOD
Church of God - Greer
500 Trade St., Greer 877-0374
Church of God of Prophecy
2416 N. Highway 14, Greer 877-8329
Eastside Worship Center
601 Taylors Rd., Taylors 268-0523
ONeal Church of God
3794 Berry Mill Rd., Greer 895-4273
Pelham Church of God of Prophecy
139 Abner Creek Rd., Greer 801-0528
Praise Cathedral Church of God
3390 Brushy Creek Rd., Greer 879-4878
EPISCOPAL
Good Shepherd Episcopal
200 Cannon St., Greer 877-2330
LUTHERAN
Abiding Peace Ev. Lutheran Church
401 Batesville Rd., Simpsonville 288-4867
Apostolic Lutheran Church
453 N. Rutherford Rd., Greer 848-4568
Immanuel Lutheran Church & School LCMS
2820 Woodruff Rd., Simpsonville 297-5815
Redeemer Lutheran Church, ELCA
300 Oneal Rd., Greer 877-5876
METHODIST
Bethel United Methodist Church
105 E. Arlington Ave., Greer 879-2066
Covenant United Methodist Church
1310 Old Spartanburg Rd., Greer 244-3162
Ebenezer United Methodist Church
174 Ebenezer Road, Greer 987-9644
Faith United Methodist Church
1301 S. Main St. (S. Hwy. 14), Greer 877-0308
Fews Chapel United Methodist Church
4000 N. Highway 101, Greer 895-2522
Grace United Methodist Church
627 Taylor Rd., Greer 877-7015
Lee Road United Methodist Church
1377 East Lee Rd., Taylors 244-6427
Liberty Hill United Methodist Church
301 Liberty Hill Rd., Greer 968-8150
Liberty United Methodist Church
4276 Highway 414, Landrum 292-0142
Memorial United Methodist Church
201 N. Main St., Greer 877-0956
Mountain View UMC
6525 Mountain View Rd., Taylors 895-8532
Sharon United Methodist Church
1421 Reidville Sharon Rd., Greer 879-7926
St. Mark United Methodist Church
911 St. Mark Rd., Taylors 848-7141
St. Paul United Methodist Church
3856 N. Highway 101, Greer 895-5570
Victor United Methodist Church
1 Wilson Ave., Greer 877-5520
Woods Chapel United Methodist Church
2388 Brown Wood Rd., Greer 879-4475
Zoar United Methodist Church
1005 Highway 357, Greer 877-0758
PRESBYTERIAN
Blue Ridge Presbyterian Church
2094 Highway 101 North, Greer 483-2140
Devenger Road Presbyterian Church
1200 Devenger Rd., Greer 268-7652
Fellowship Presbyterian Church
1105 Old Spartanburg Rd., Greer 877-3267
First Presbyterian Church
100 School St., Greer 877-3612
Fulton Presbyterian Church
821 Abner Creek Rd., Greer 879-3190
OTHER DENOMINATIONS
Agape House
900 Gap Creek Rd., Greer 329-7491
Anglican Church of St. George the Martyr
427 Batesville Rd., Simpsonville 281-0015
Bartons Memorial Pentacostal Holiness
Highway 101 North, Greer
Bethesda Temple
125 Broadus St., Greer 877-8523
Beulah Christian Fellowship Church
1017 Mauldin Rd., Greenville 283-0639
Calvary Bible Fellowship
Holiday Inn, Duncan 266-4269
Calvary Chapel of Greer
104 New Woodruff Rd. Greer 877-8090
Christ Fellowship
343 Hampton Rd., Greer 879-8446
Christian Heritage Church
900 N. Main St., Greer 877-2288
Christian Life Center 2 Country Plaza 322-1325
Christian Outreach 106 West Rd. 848-0308
El-Bethel Holiness 103 E. Church St. 968-9474
Faith Family Church
3339 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors 244-0207
Faith Temple
5080 Sandy Flat Rd., Taylors 895-2524
Glad Tidings Assembly of God
Highway 290, Greer 879-3291
Greer Mill Church 52 Bobo St., Greer 877-2442
Harmony Fellowship Church
468 S. Suber Rd., Greer 877-8287
Harvest Christian Church
2150 Highway 417, Woodruff 486-8877
International Cathedral of Prayer
100 Davis Avenue Greer 655-0009
Lifesong Church
12481 Greenville Highway, Lyman 439-2602
Living Way Community Church
3239 N. Highway 101, Greer 895-0544
Mountain Bridge Community Church
1400B Wade Hampton Blvd., Greer 350-1051
New Beginnings Outreach
104 New Woodruff Rd., Greer 968-2424
New Birth Greenville
3315 Brushy Creek Rd., Greer 848-2728
New Covenant Fellowship
2425 Racing Rd., Greer 848-4521
New Hope Freedom
109 W. Wade Hampton Blvd. Greer 205-8816
New Life in Christ 210 Arlington Rd. 346-9053
Point of Life Church
Wade Hampton Blvd. Duncan 426-4933
Springwell Church
4369 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors 268-2299
Trinity Fellowship Church
3610 Brushy Creek Rd., Greer 877-0419
1700 N. Pleasantburg Dr, Greenville 244-6011
United Anglican Fellowship
1001 W. Poinsett St., Greer 629-3350
United Christian Church
105 Daniel Ave., Greer 895-3966
United House of Prayer
213 Oak St., Greer 848-0727
Upstate Friends Meeting (Quaker)
39 Hillcrest St., Lyman 877-9392
Upstate Tree of Life
203 East Bearden St., Greer 848-1295
Victorian Hills Community Church
209 Victor Ave. Ext., Greer 877-3981
Vine Worship Center
4373 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors 244-8175
For information
about advertising
on this page,
call 864-877-2076.
Greer Gas,
Inc.
864-578-5886
arolina
L
awn
T
ractor &
4389 Wade
Hampton Blvd.
Taylors
864-292-1842
C
arolina
L
awn
T
ractor &
DILL CREEK COMMONS
1379 W. Wade Hampton, Greer
864-848-5222
For information
about advertising
on this page,
call 864-877-2076.
For information
about advertising
on this page,
call 864-877-2076.
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2014 PAGE LABEL THE GREER CITIZEN A9
Worship With Us
Hospice Care at Home
You dont have to do this alone
Ask for us by name!
864.457.9122 www.hocf.org
COMMERCIAL RENTALS RESIDENTIAL
www.mcculloughproperties.com
McCullough
Properties
864-879-2117
Forest Hills Funeral Home
6995 Highway 101, Woodruff
(864)576-9444
(864)288-8700
(864) 476-9898
www.foresthillsfuneralhome.net
Greer Storage
LLC
Let us handle
your storage needs!
FREE
MOVE IN TRUCK
14372 E. Wade Hampton Blvd.
Greer, SC 29651
864-879-2117
Greer
Q
UALITY
F
OODS
508 North Main St. 877-4043
7 am - 10 pm Mon.-Sat.
For information
about advertising
on this page,
call 864-877-2076.
For information
about advertising
on this page,
call 864-877-2076.
Two Duncan men were
arrested last week after
breaking into a house on
River Falls Drive, Duncan.
Dustin Robert Pollard, 18,
of 106 S. Lakeview Drive,
Duncan and Luke Patrick
Carter, 18, of 174 River
Falls Drive, Duncan, have
both been charged with
second degree burglary.
According to incident
reports obtained from
the Spartanburg County
Sheriffs Office, deputies
responded to River Falls
Drive when a concerned
citizen, who was walk-
ing in the neighborhood,
called 911 after seeing two
suspicious males, wearing
bandanas covering their
noses and mouths and
carrying backpacks, run
from the rear area of a res-
idence on River Falls Drive.
When deputies arrived on
scene they spoke with the
citizen who had called 911
and she informed them
both subjects had run into
the woods.
Deputies used a K9 to
search the area and even-
tually located one of the
subjects inside the Ingles
grocery store on Highway
290 and the other subject
was located behind the
store. Both Pollard and
Carter were arrested and
transported to the Spar-
tanburg County Detention
Center.
The victim whose house
had been broke into told
a deputy he was upstairs
when he heard the door-
bell ring and heard his
dogs bark.
The victim thought it
was his sister, who had re-
turned to the house after
forgetting something. He
then, however, heard what
he described as fiddling
at the kitchen door and
heard the kitchen door
open. The victim heard
one of the suspects yell
out, Is anyone home.
When the victim respond-
ed, both men ran out of
the kitchen door.
Schools in Spartanburg
District Five were notified
about the incident and de-
cided to go into lock down
until the suspects were lo-
cated and arrested.
I doubt the situation
would have been resolved
so quickly and safely if
not for her quick thinking
and action, said Lt. Kevin
Bobo with the Spartanburg
County Sheriffs Office.
Bobo stressed the impor-
tance of neighborhoods
staying active with neigh-
borhood watch programs
as a means to preventing
and solving crimes.
He said neighborhoods
often become passionate
about having an effective
neighborhood watch after
a crime is committed in
their neighborhood, but
after an amount of time
goes by without further
crime, the neighborhood
often becomes compla-
cent.
Most neighborhood
watch programs flair up
after a crime but then end
up going stagnant. People
get busy, complacent and
in a routine. We (The Spar-
tanburg County Sheriffs
Office) encourage neigh-
bors to share information
with each other through
ways such as an email
chain, said Bobo.
Though the natural per-
ception is that citizens
usually do dial 911 when
they see a crime being
committed or have infor-
mation regarding a crime,
Bobo said that unfortu-
nately often times this is
not the case.
People use fear of retal-
iation as an excuse for not
giving us information, he
said.
Bobo said in his numer-
ous years of law enforce-
ment work, he has rarely,
if ever, seen any cases in
which retaliation for pro-
viding information ever
occurred.
INMAN MAN FACES
MULTIPLE CHARGES
An Inman man is be-
hind bars facing serious
charges after authorities
said he broke into a for-
mer coworkers home and
then held her against her
will while sexually assault-
ing her.
Robbie Randall Robin-
son, 50, of 5471 New Cut
Road, Inman, was charged
with first degree criminal
sexual conduct, kidnap-
ping and first degree bur-
glary.
According to The Spar-
tanburg County Sheriffs
Office, a deputy was dis-
patched to a home in Boil-
ing Springs on Sunday
afternoon around 2:30
p.m. in reference to rape.
Upon arrival, the officer
met with the victim, who
stated Robinson, a former
co-worker, forced entry
into her home through a
storm door and held her
against her will and sexu-
ally assaulted her. He then
prevented her from leav-
ing the residence.
She told the deputy Rob-
inson had fled the scene on
a moped. The victim iden-
tified Robinson through a
photo line up and depu-
ties arrested Robinson at
his Inman home later that
day.
He was booked into The
Spartanburg County De-
tention Center where he is
currently being held with-
out bond.
GCSO SEEKS HELP IN
LOCATING MISSING PERSON
The Greenville County
Sheriffs Office is asking
the public for their help in
locating a missing Green-
ville woman who has not
been seen or heard from
since last Thursday. 69-
year-old Frances Louise
Stewart was last seen on
foot in the area of Mc-
Gee Street and East North
Street in Greenville last
Thursday wearing a a dark
blue shirt, tan pants and
carrying a green bag.
Stewart is described as
being 5-3 and weighing ap-
proximately 220 pounds
with gray hair and green
eyes.
According to Stewarts
family, she suffers from
Dementia along with men-
tal illness as well as seri-
ous medical conditions,
including diabetes, respi-
ratory and heart related
issues. Her family told the
sheriffs office Stewart re-
quires insulin injections to
treat her diabetes and they
believe she may not be in
possession of her proper
medication or the means
to administer it.
Anyone with informa-
tion regarding Stewarts
whereabouts is asked to
call 271-5210.
(Note: All information
contained in the following
blotter was taken directly
from the official incident
reports filed by the Greer
Police Department or The
Spartanburg County Sher-
iffs Office or The Green-
ville County Sheriffs Of-
fice or The Duncan Police
Department. All suspects
are to be considered inno-
cent until proven guilty in
the court of law.)
POWERLESS?
Christopher Way McCall,
38, of 108 Snow Street,
Greer, has been charged
with theft of electric cur-
rent and possession of
methamphetamine.
According to incident
reports, officers respond-
ed to the above address
in reference to a welfare
check. Upon arrival, of-
ficers observed that a red
tag had been placed on
the power meter, showing
the power to the residence
had been disconnected. As
officers were knocking on
the door, McCall pulled
up to the residence and
informed officers he was
the resident of the home.
Officers informed McCall
they were at his residence
to perform a welfare check
on his children due to the
fact that they had received
a report that his power
and water had been dis-
connected.
McCall told the officers
that his children were not
living at the residence.
A representative with
CPW then informed offi-
cers that 801 kw/hrs had
passed though the meter
since the power was termi-
nated on Aug. 26.
Officers observed Mc-
Calls behavior to be very
nervous and he became
adamant about getting his
lighter out of the truck.
When an officer went to
retrieve McCalls lighter
from his truck, upon Mc-
Calls request, the officer
observed a razor blade
with white residue. McCall
gave the officer consent to
search his truck and the
officer located a bag of
meth.
McCall was arrested and
transported to the Greer
City Jail.
CDV
Malcom Tomik Arnold,
22, of 212 Oakland Ave.
169, Greer, has been
charged with criminal do-
mestic violence of a high
and aggravated nature.
According to incident
reports, officers were
dispatched to the above
address in reference to
a domestic disturbance
call. Upon arrival, officers
observed a female victim
with blood on her face. She
told the officer she and
her boyfriend (Arnold) got
into an argument and he
grabbed her by the neck
and threw her into a coun-
ter before throwing her
into a car and then slam-
ming her into the ground.
A witness of the incident
confirmed the victims
account of what had oc-
curred. The officer learned
that Arnold had pled
guilty in December 2012
to a charge of criminal do-
mestic violence of a high
and aggravated nature in
Pickens County.
Arnold was located in
the front of the apartment
complex and he was ar-
rested and detained. He
was transported to the
Greer City Jail.
NO PAIN, NO GAIN
David Wayne Cohen, 53,
of 909 Jones Ford Road,
Union, has been charged
with DUI and possession
of drugs.
According to incident
reports, an officer was on
routine patrol at Cannon
Avenue and Pelham Street
when he observed a vehicle
with a cracked windshield
cross the center line three
times. The vehicle con-
tinued to weave back and
forth and the officer initi-
ated a traffic stop on the
car and its driver (Cohen).
Upon approaching the
vehicle, the officer ob-
served Cohen to be shak-
ing and his eyes appeared
bloodshot. The officer had
Cohen step out of the ve-
hicle, at which time he
asked him if he had any-
thing illegal on his person.
Cohen stated he did have a
narcotic and the officer re-
trieved a pill of acetamino-
phen/hydrocodone.
A series of field sobriety
tests were performed on
Cohen, most of which he
failed. Cohen admitted to
the officer he was under
the influence of pain med-
ication and amphetamine
salts.
He was arrested and
transported to the Greer
City Jail. He was then
transported to the hospi-
tal, where he provided a
urine sample before being
transported back to jail.
SCRAP THAT PLAN
Steven Craig Sudduth,
43, of 879 Victor Hill Road,
Greer, has been charged
with driving under suspen-
sion, misrepresenting ID
to law enforcement, faulty
equipment and failure to
pay child support.
Gary Robert Adams, 35,
of 115 Keith St., Greer, has
been charged with posses-
sion of drug parapherna-
lia.
According to incident
reports, an officer was on
routine patrol when he
observed a green minivan
turn onto Hampton Road
with a cracked windshield
and a broken rear window.
The officer also observed
that one of the vehicles
brake lights was inopera-
ble and the driver was not
wearing a seatbelt.
The officer initiated a
traffic stop on the vehicle
and its driver (Sudduth).
The officer asked Sudduth
for his name and he pro-
vided the officer with a
false identification.
Sudduth gave the of-
ficer consent to search
the vehicle, so the officer
had Sudduth and his pas-
senger (Adams) step out
of the vehicle. When Ad-
ams stepped out of the
vehicle a case containing
six needles and nine bag-
gies (six which were empty
and three contained small
pieces of cotton) fell out
of his pants. A search of
the vehicle yielded a paper
receipt from CRC Scrap
Metals that showed Sud-
duth had scrapped metals
earlier that day.
This receipt revealed
Sudduths true identity.
The officer then learned
Sudduths drivers license
was suspended and that
he had an active failure to
pay child support warrant
out of Greenville County.
Both Adams and Sud-
duth were arrested and
transported to the Greer
City Jail.
Sudduth was then picked
up by Greenville County
for his active warrant.
DUI
Brandon Ray Cooper,
33, of 4 Spindleback Way,
Greer, has been charged
with DUI with BA equal to
or greater than .16 and im-
proper lane change.
According to incident
reports, an officer was on
routine patrol on South
Main Street when he ob-
served a vehicle drive off
the road and onto the
sidewalk nearly striking a
railroad posting. The offi-
cer initiated a traffic stop
on the vehicle and its driv-
er (Cooper).
Upon approaching the
vehicle, the officer detect-
ed a strong odor of alcohol
coming from inside the
vehicle. Cooper eventually
admitted to consuming
three beers and a series of
field sobriety tests were
performed on him that he
failed.
He was placed under ar-
rest and transported to
the Greer City Jail, where
he blew a .26 percent on a
breathalyzer.
MULTIPLE CHARGES
Mark Anthony King,
38, of 1325 Pleasant Hill
Road, Landrum, has been
charged with possession
of methamphetamine,
DUI, simple possession of
marijuana, possession of
drug paraphernalia and
faulty equipment.
Barry Kip Foster, 46, of
130 Howard Road, Lan-
drum, has been charged
with possession of drugs.
According to incident
reports, an officer was
dispatched to an area of E.
Wade Hampton Boulevard
in reference to supplying
backup to a DNR agent
who had pulled over a ve-
hicle for a suspected DUI
and speeding.
Upon arrival, the officer
met with the DNR agent,
who had noticed slurred
speech coming from the
vehicles driver (King) and
also located a small bag
containing methamphet-
amine and a small bag
containing marijuana in
Kings hand.
The officer searched
King and located more
marijuana and some roll-
ing papers in his sock.
A series of field sobriety
tests were performed on
King that he failed. He was
placed under arrest and as
he was being placed into
the officers car, another
bag containing metham-
phetamine was located
on his person. A search of
one of the vehicles pas-
sengers (Foster) yielded
two pills of Clonazepam.
A search of the vehicle
yielded a glass pipe con-
taining white residue.
Both King and Foster
were arrested and trans-
ported to the Greer City
Jail. King blew a .00 per-
cent on a breathalyzer,
but refused to go to the
hospital to provide a urine
sample.
POLICE AND FIRE
The Greer Citizen
A10 THE GREER CITIZEN WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2014
Burning Feet?
Electric Shocks?
Pain & Numbness?
Pins & Needles?
Creepy Crawlies?
You might have
PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY
This condition affects 20 million Americans. It begins in the feet and
lower legs and can advance to the hands. Treatment of oral medi-
cations and injections often dont work.
Weve utilized a NEW TREATMENT that may take away most, if not
all, of your pain. Its safe and highly effective for most people, even
diabetics. Its covered by many insurance plans.
Call 864-847-6020 now to schedule
a FREE conference with one of our doctors.
Pain Relief at
Complete Healing & Wellness Center
24 E. Main St., Williamston, SC CompleteHealing.net
FDA Cleared | Safe and Effective
Dr. Robert Walker, MD Internal Medicine,
Greg Furness, PA-C, Kevin Burnham, PA-C,
Marylouise and Jack Wise, DC
1921 Hwy. 101 South
(Exit 60 off Interstate 85)
Greer, SC 29651
864-968-1133
CIGARS
S.C.s Largest Humidor
WILLIAM BUCHHEIT | THE GREER CITIZEN
Woods Chapel crash
Greer Police, Spartanburg Highway Patrol and Spartanburg
EMS responded an accident near 1200 Woods Chapel
Road, Duncan, on Monday. The driver was transferred to
the hospital. Because highway patrol (and not the Greer
Police) handled the report, no further information about
the crash was available at press time.
Two men charged after River Falls burglary
PHOTO |SUBMITTED
Greenville County Sherifs Of ce is seeking help in
locating Frances Louise Stewart, who was last seen in the
area of East North Street and McGee Street in Greenville.
Anyone with information is asked to call 271-5210.
Robbie R. Robinson
CRIME REPORT |
L
ast Wednesday, state
lawmakers met in
Columbia to discuss
the legalization of medi-
cal marijuana. Currently,
about half of U.S. states
allow medicinal cannabis,
and there are many good
reasons why we should
join them.
1. It has proven to be an
effective drug
First and foremost,
marijuana has proven a
solid antidote to pain,
nausea, seizures and
suppressed appetite. Its
been prescribed to cancer
and AIDS patients for
years now with consistent
results.
2. It is inexpensive
Its a sad thing to see
when young children and
elderly patients have to
suffer because they cant
afford some cost-inflated
prescription drug a phar-
maceutical company has
patented. Marijuana is
easy to grow and distrib-
ute and, without some big
pharma company monop-
olizing it, would presum-
ably be cheap to produce
and buy.
Uncoincidentally, this
is the very reason the
FDA hasnt yet approved
marijuana as a safe and
effective drug. They
know they cant make big
money from it. Its cer-
tainly revealing that the
FDA has approved two
synthetic drugs (Cesamet
and Marinol) that have the
same active ingredient as
marijuana (THC). After
all, if its made in a lab,
you can bet that some-
body is making money
from it.
3. Its a lot safer than
whats already on the
market
This one goes hand in
hand with No. 2. We all
know that marijuana has
never killed anybody, yet
the drug companies and
FDA continue to demon-
ize it as a dangerous and
addictive street drug.
The fact is the FDA has
approved many drugs
that are far more danger-
ous. Narcotic pain killers
(hydrocodone, oxycodone)
for example, kill about
20,000 Americans each
year and wreck millions
of lives. According to Sci-
ence Daily magazine, 60
percent of those deaths
occur in patients who
have legitimate prescrip-
tions for those medica-
tions.
The kicker is this: ac-
cording to the American
Medical Associations
study of all opioid related
deaths between 1999 and
2010, the (then) 13 states
where medical marijuana
was legal had 25 percent
less people die from
narcotic overdoses than
states that didnt.
Quite simply, marijuana
can effectively treat many
of the same symptoms,
injuries and ailments
that opiates do, without
damaging your organs or
creating a life-threaten-
ing physical addiction.
Therefore, if legalized for
medicinal use, it would
obviously compete with
these dangerous narcotics
and put a major dent in
the bottom line of phar-
maceutical companies.
Still not convinced its
a money issue? Consider
this. The Nation maga-
zine recently revealed
that Purdue Pharma was
one of the biggest donors
of the Partnership for
Drug-Free Kids (formerly
Partnership for a Drug-
Free America). As you
might expect, one of the
organizations primary
goals is to fight cannabis
legalization of any kind,
with the logic that even
medical marijuana would
make the drug more ac-
cessible to children. The
inescapable irony is that
Purdue is the company
that created Oxycontin 20
years ago, which almost
single-handedly started
the prescription drug
crisis our country faces
today.
Im not saying that
Oxycodone doesnt have
its place in pain treat-
ment, but hundreds of
thousands of people have
suffered fatal overdoses
from it in the last two
decades. Marijuana also
has its place in medical
practice. It treats a whole
host of maladies, wont
kill anyone and might
even put some farmers in
our state back in busi-
ness. If, of course, the
government isnt still too
afraid to stand up to big
pharma.
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2014 NEWS THE GREER CITIZEN A11
Kubota Tractor Corporation, 2014
S0 doWr, 0 A.P.R. lrarc|rg lor up lo 18 rorlrs or purcrases ol reW Kuoola equ|prerl (exc|ud|rg T, 0R, 0, F, Z100/Z0100 & v3 3er|es) |s ava||ao|e
lo qua||led purcrasers lror parl|c|pal|rg dea|ers' |r-sloc| |rverlory lrrougr 9/30/2011. Exarp|e: A 18-rorlr rorlr|y |rsla||rerl repayrerl lerr al
0 A.P.R. requ|res 18 payrerls ol S20.83 per S1,000 lrarced. 0 A.P.R. |rleresl |s ava||ao|e lo cuslorers |l ro dea|er docurerlal|or preparal|or lee
|s crarged. 0ea|er crarge lor docurerl preparal|or lee sra|| oe |r accordarce W|lr slale |aWs. lrc|us|or ol |re||g|o|e equ|prerl ray resu|l |r a r|grer
o|erded A.P.R. Nol ava||ao|e lor Rerla|, Nal|ora| Accourls or 0overrrerla| cuslorers. 0 A.P.R. ard |oW-rale lrarc|rg ray rol oe ava||ao|e W|lr
cuslorer |rslarl reoale ollers. F|rarc|rg |s ava||ao|e lrrougr Kuoola Cred|l Corporal|or, u.3.A., 3101 0e| Aro 8|vd., Torrarce, CA 90503; suojecl lo
cred|l approva|. 3ore excepl|ors app|y. 0ller exp|res 9/30/2011. 3ee us lor dela||s or lrese ard olrer |oW-rale opl|ors or go lo WWW.|uoola.cor lor
rore |rlorral|or. 0pl|ora| equ|prerl ray oe sroWr.
www.kubota.com
6et more
"
go" jor less dough wlth Z700 Serles commerclol-grode mowers!
$
0 0own, 0
X

Flnonclng, jor up to 48 Months
'
A.P.k.
McAbee Tractor & Turf
3284 E. Gap Creek Rd.
Greer,SC 29651
(864) 848-0174
McAbee Tractor & Turf
3284 E. Gap Creek Rd. (3 miles north of Greer on Hwy 14)
Greer, SC 29651
(864) 848-0174
Kubota 725 KH60
List $8,799

$
1,000 REBATE
$
7,799
Payments
As Low As
$
175
*
Per Month
** See dealer for details. Program ends 10/31/14
This Weeks Ad In
Located at the Barnyard Flea Market
2000 Hwy. 101 5. - 0reer 1ust 1 miIe oh l-85 at exit 60
O
P
EN

S
ATU
R
D
AY
South Carolina
SHRIMP
AND
FISH
Sperry Canvas
SALE
Mens, Womens
& Kids
Name Brands
Located
At ooths
H51-52 RESAS
Crocs
Kids Toms
Ladies Toms
Rainbow
Sperry Leather
Uggs
Bearpaw
Nike Slides
O
P
EN

S
U
N
D
AY
DISCOUNT
PRICES!!
DISCOUNT
PRICES!!
10% OFF IF YOU
MENTION THIS AD!
10% OFF IF YOU
MENTION THIS AD!
10% OFF IF YOU MENTION THIS AD!
Time to legalize medical marijuana
THE BUCK
STOPS HERE
WILLIAM
BUCHHEIT
Quite simply, marijuana can effectively
treat many of the same symptoms, injuries
and ailments that opiates do, without
damaging your organs or creating a life-
threatening physical addiction
Dining Out
A12 THE GREER CITIZEN PAGE LABEL WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2014
HOURS: MONDAY-SUNDAY 10:00 AM-9:00 PM
Lil Rebel
Family Restaurant
2608 Locust Hill Road (SC Highway 290)
Just past Greenville Tech Greer Campus
Taylors, South Carolina 29687
View our menu at
www.lilrebel290.com
864-879-1042
GOOD ONLY AT:
103 Hammett Bridge Rd.
@ Hwy. 14
GREER 879-0607
MONDAYS-FRIDAYS 11 A.M.-2 P.M.
All Extra Value Meals $5.00
TUESDAYS
6-Piece Chicken McNuggets 99

Bacon Clubhouse
Burger
Also available with Crispy or Grilled Chicken
RESTAURANT
603 West Poinsett St.
877-5768
EXPRESS
1328 Wade
Hampton Blvd.
968-0420
TWICE AS NICE!
Thank You Greer
for voting us
BEST CASUAL DINING
BEST HAMBURGER
LUNCH SPECIAL
Mon.-Sat. 10-3 Only
$
1.50
OFF
$10 or more order
Expires September 30, 2014.
Must bring coupon.
Good at both Clock locations.
Breakfast Served
Monday-Saturday 7 a.m.-10 a.m.
Lunch Served
Monday-Saturday 11 a.m.-2 p.m.
Famous Breakfast Bites
All of our breakfast bites are muf n sized and come two to an order.
Omelet Bites $4.
95
Filled with eggs, grated potatoes, diced ham, peppers and cheddar cheese.
Bacon Egg & Cheese Bites $4.
95
Filled with bacon, eggs and cheddar cheese.
Potato Bites $4.
95
Filled with grated potatoes, eggs, onions and cheddar cheese
Gatherings Breakfast Specialties
Breakfast Burrito $5.
95
Jumbo tortilla flled with pork sausage, peppers, eggs and cheddar cheese.
Garnished with homemade salsa and a side of sour cream.
Heavenly Honey Ham Croissant $5.
95
Croissant served with black forest ham, Swiss Cheese, honey mustard and
drizzled with honey.
Biscuit Lovers $5.
95
Choice of Bacon or Sausage biscuit with scrambled eggs and American
cheese.
Country Style Gravy Biscuit $4.
95
Two biscuits smothered with pork sausage gravy.
Half order is $2.95
Fancy French Toast $4.
95
Two pieces of cinnamon texas toast grilled to perfection and sprinkled with
powdered sugar. Served with choice of syrup or molasses.
Half order is $2.95.
Addfruit andwhipcreamfor $1.00
Optional Selections
2 Pieces of Bacon $1.
55
2 Sausage Patties $1.
55
2 Pieces of Toast $1.
55
Bowl of Oatmeal $2.
55
AddSeasonal Fruit Toppingfor $0.50
Bowl of Grits $1.
55
Addcheese or baconfor $0.50 each
Seasonal Fresh Fruit Cup $2.
55
Addyogurt for $1.00
Scones $1.
95
See server for favor selections.
Jumbo Mufns $1.
95
See server for favor selections.
All entrees are servedwiththe choice of baconor sausage, grits, oatmeal, toast or freshseasonal fruit cup.
Beverages
Coffee (Regular or Decaf) $0.
99
Orange Juice $1.
65
Hot Tea $2.
45
Sweet or Unsweet Iced Tea $1.
65
Fruit Infused Iced Tea $2.
45
Cafe & Retail Hours
Monday-Saturday 7 a.m.-5p.m.
(864) 655-7111 www.gatheringsonmain.com
Featuring our 99

Coffee
ADVERTISE
YOUR
BUSINESS
HERE.
CALL
877-2076!
DILL CREEK COMMONS, GREER
1379 West Wade Hampton Blvd. 848-5222
OPEN MON.-SAT. 6:30AM-10PM, CLOSED SUN.
chicklaofgreer.com
ADVERTISE
YOUR
BUSINESS
HERE.
CALL
877-2076!
ADVERTISE
YOUR
BUSINESS
HERE.
CALL
877-2076!
ADVERTISE
YOUR
BUSINESS
HERE.
CALL
877-2076!
SPORTS
The Greer Citizen
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2014
B
BLAME
CANNADA
BILLY
CANNADA
Remember
T
hirteen years ago,
our nation changed
forever.
It blows my mind it has
been that long. My wife,
a fifth grade teacher,
is currently teaching a
group of kids that werent
even alive when the World
Trade Center buildings
came crashing down on
September 11, 2001.
It was a horrifying day.
More than 2,700 people
lost their lives.
Now, its history.
But it doesnt feel like
history. I can remember
that day vividly. I was in
school when my teacher
flipped on the television.
Rumors had begun to
spread about what was
happening in New York,
and for the rest of the day
normal class activities
were put on hold.
My English teacher,
along with rest of the
class, stared at the news
silently. Trying to figure
out what was happening.
Hours went by before an-
swers came. I was living in
Charleston, West Virginia,
far away from the danger
in New York, but fear was
everywhere.
Each class was the
same.
Eyes glued to the TV.
Occasional interruptions
allowed teachers to dis-
miss students to fright-
ened parents.
I was one of the only
students left in my sci-
ence class after lunch, but
my parents came to get
me as well.
I had so many ques-
tions: What was going
on? Why were my parents
coming to get me? Were
our friends in New York
OK?
My parents didnt have
answers.
We just drove around
after leaving school,
avoiding our house and
any more news coverage.
When we did get home,
my brother and I tuned
into the news again, won-
dering if anything else
had happened.
My parents tried to
discourage it, but they
wanted to know too.
We sat in disbelief as a
family, not knowing what
was coming next.
My Sept. 11th story is
probably similar to yours.
Its one of those Where
were you? moments in
history.
I think this day is so
fresh in my memory
because were still seeing
the impact of it.
In the days months and
years that followed our
hearts remained heavy.
I remember being in
New York more than a
month after the attacks,
seeing bodies still being
pulled out of the rubble.
I remember the day my
brother joined the United
States Air Force, know-
ing our country was still
heavily involved in the
war on terror.
Sept. 11th changed us
as a nation, but we still
face the same threats
today.
With terrorists and mili-
tants creating chaos in the
Middle East and around
the world, we can only
hope to avoid another
tragedy and more war.
As we remember this
horrific day, take some
time to pray for peace.


Sanders
Heating & Air Conditioning
Indoor air quality experts since 1951
864- 288- 7671
621 Keith Drive, Greenville, SC www.SandersHeatCool.com
Good Luck
from our winning team
to yours!
In 35-7
win Friday
BY LELAND BURCH
FOR THE GREER CITIZEN
Greer took the wind out
of Riversides sails with
a 97-yard opening drive
and went on to sink the
Warriors 35-7 Friday night
in the annual cross-town
football clash.
Although the result was
familiar, Greer Coach Will
Young declared it was a
scary situation for us be-
cause Riverside had some
momentum, and if we
had come over here flat,
it could have gotten ugly
for us. But our kids were
up for the game and took
care of business.
There was funny busi-
ness as well. Riverside
twice attempted onside
kickoffs that Greer recov-
ered for prime field posi-
tion and one quick touch-
down. The Yellow Jackets
also lost a sixth touch-
down on a rarely seen play
when reserve quarterback
Brice Green scrambled 31
yards to the goal line only
to fumble. The loose ball
was batted around before
tumbling out of the end
zone where it was de-
clared a touchback, and
Riverside took over at the
20-yard line.
I dont know if we im-
proved much from last
week other than I thought
the kids played extremely
well early in the game.
Then we could relax and
enjoy the second half,
Young said. Our kids
played very physical. Our
offensive and defensive
SEE GREER | B6
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
The 42-game winning
streak was in trouble Fri-
day night.
Eastside quarterback
Drake Turnquist had just
found Ty Thomason on
a touchdown connection
with time winding down in
the third, giving the Eagles
a 28-16 advantage over
Christ Church.
Thats when everything
fell apart for Eastside.
The Cavaliers went on
to score five unanswered
touchdowns in the last
14 minutes, extending
their state record winning
streak to 43 games.
We gave them every-
thing they could handle,
Eastside coach Jeff Thom-
ason said. The defensive
staff did a great job and
the offensive staff did a
great job. We just dealt
with a few little mental
things here or there, but
thats going to happen. We
have to get our guys used
to being in these games
and being in these situa-
tions, and more things like
this will get done.
Turnquist threw two of
his three touchdown pass-
es in the first half, running
for one before the break to
give Eastside a 21-9 advan-
tage.
The last Eastside score
came just before Christ
Church returned a punt
for a touchdown in the
third quarter, shifting the
momentum and starting
an offensive showing that
could not be stopped.
Weve got a bunch of
kids trying to do a whole
lot of stuff, Thomason
said. Theyre fighting
their guts out and Im
proud of each and every
one of these guys. What
you saw was a bunch of
kids trying to make plays
SEE EAGLES | B6
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
If you want to catch the
Byrnes game this Friday
night, you will have to hop
the next flight to Califor-
nia.
For those not up for the
road trip, the Rebels can
be seen taking on De La
Salle at 10:15 p.m. (EST)
this Friday on ESPNU.
For new Byrnes coach
Brian Lane, organizing an
early season away game
on the west coast has been
easier than expected.
Theyre a very good
team, Lane said. I cant
say enough about coach
[Justin] Alumbaugh. Hes
just been great as far as us
working out logistics and
getting out there. Those
guys have done a heck of
a job in getting us situ-
ated.
Lane said Alumbaugh
and company do things a
little differently.
They have some grown
men up front on both sides
of the ball, he said. Its a
different kind of football
team out there. Theyre a
private school and it cost
about $16,000 to go there
a year. Its just a different
kind of atmosphere and
Im looking forward to see-
ing how our guys do. With
the trip and everything
thats going on, Im look-
ing forward to how theyll
respond.
De La Salle runs a 4-2 de-
fensive set.
Theyll run some cover
three, Lane said. They
disguise some things well
and theyll run some dif-
ferent coverages. Well
have to do a good job of
executing.
Lane said De La Salle is
efficient.
They tackle really well,
he said. Thats one thing I
noticed on video. They just
dont miss a lot of tackles.
Were going to have our
hands full.
While it may not be the
biggest game Lane has
ever competed in, its cer-
tainly the furthest.
I would say any state
championship game was
a big game for me, Lane
said. I dont know if this
is the biggest game, but
its definitely the furthest
weve ever been. Youve
just got to make sure ev-
erythings tied down and
on point. At the end of the
day, we have to be ready
to play.
billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
Byrnes eyeing
ESPN matchup
with De La Salle
MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN
Greers Adrian McGee rushed for 68 yards and two touchdowns Friday night at Riverside,
helping his team secure a 35-7 victory.
Fourth quarter surge dooms Eagles
I dont know if this
is the biggest game,
but its definitely the
furthest weve ever
been. Youve just
got to make sure
everythings tied
down and on point.
Brian Lane
Byrnes head coach



Jackets sink Warriors
WILLIAM BUCHHEIT | THE GREER CITIZEN
A tough performance from Eastside wide receiver Ty Thomason was not enough for the Eagles to hold of Christ Church,
which used a fourth quarter comeback to win its 43rd consecutive game Friday night.
Theyre fghting
their guts out and
Im proud of each
and every one of
these guys.
Jef Thomason
Eastside head coach
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
Blue Ridge nose guard
James Martin had 11 solo
tackles, two tackles for
loss and five assisted tack-
les during the Tigers 29-
15 victory over JL Mann
last Friday night, but the
stats were not what im-
pressed his coaches.
Mann was threatening
a late score inside the
Tigers 10-yard line that
would have put Blue Ridge
in a tight spot, but Martin
stepped up to make four
clutch tackles on consecu-
tive plays to seal the vic-
tory.
For his performance,
Martin earns Defensive
Player of the Week honors
from The Greer Citizen
and Owens Insurance.
I just like to play hard,
Martin said. Nobody gets
down the field if Im there.
Our defense is there to get
stops.
The defense did what it
needed to do early Friday
night, helping to build a
19-0 lead on the visitors.
We leave no doubt on
the field, he said. Thats
kind of our mentality. Play
hard and leave no doubt.
Martin said although he
was having a stellar per-
formance, he was not fo-
cusing on statistics.
I dont pay attention to
how many tackles Im get-
ting, Martin said. I just
play. I can see all the stats
on Monday. I cant dont
worry about all that.
During the last few
weeks of practice, Martin
said the focus has been on
effort.
Were talking about ef-
fort and giving it our all,
he said. Weve been watch-
ing film and we think we
have what it takes to get it
done.
Martin wants to demon-
strate leadership by ex-
ample during his junior
season.
My role is just to show
everybody Im there for
them and Im playing for
them, Martin said. The
seniors only have one
more year, so Im just
going out there to play
for them. You dont want
those guys to go out on a
bad season.
The Tigers will travel
to Georgia to take on Ste-
phens County this Friday
at 7:30 p.m.
I dont know about Ste-
phens County, but I know
Im going to show up and
play, Martin said. Im go-
ing to give it my all and
continue to leave no doubt
on the field.
B2 THE GREER CITIZEN SPORTS WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2014
Truliant is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration.
(1) Rates and promotional terms are subject to change. Loans are subject to credit
approval. Floor rate on auto loans is 1.74% APR. (2) Additional terms apply for refnancing
existing Truliant auto loans.
Your travel companions are ready to go.
Our auto loans can get you moving.
Let Truliant be the starting
point for your next getaway.
We have auto loans to ft
your needs, so you can begin
making new memories today.
Turn to Truliant for:
Low rates and fexible terms
Up to 100% fnancing for qualifed borrowers
Rate discounts available
Easy application process
PLUS, if you have a vehicle fnanced elsewhere,
Truliant can help you save by lowering your
monthly payment and interest rate.
2
Visit us, call or apply online to get started today.
Let us help guide your future, so you can focus
on what really matters.
Truliant.org/Auto | 800.822.0382
J
A
M
E
S

M
A
R
T
I
N
#
61
Position: NG
Age: 16
Class: Junior
Mother: Angel Cassell
Away from the feld: Enjoys fshing
Favorite football team: Georgia Bulldogs
Pre-game ritual: Praying
Favorite artist: Brantley Gilbert
Favorite athlete: Todd Gurley
The Greer Citizen
DEFENSIVE PLAYER OF THE WEEK
Martin comes through in clutch

M
A
R
I
O

C
U
S
A
N
O
#
11
Position: QB
Age: 16
Class: Junior
Parents: Kim and Phil
Away from the feld: Enjoys hanging out with family, friends
Favorite athlete: Brett Favre
Favorite movie: Battleship
Favorite video game: Madden
Pre-game ritual: Likes to focus, refect
Actor who would play you: Adam Sandler
Favorite artist: Phil Collins
The Greer Citizen
OFFENSIVE PLAYER OF THE WEEK
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
Yellow Jacket quarter-
back Mario Cusano threw
for 129 yards while rush-
ing for 103 yards during
Greers 35-7 win over Riv-
erside last Friday, earning
Offensive Player of the
Week honors from The
Greer Citizen and Owens
Insurance.
Cusano threw for one
touchdown on 10 of 12
passing, rushing for a
score as well.
I mostly pass, but I can
also run, he said. Most
people dont know that.
Against Riverside, they
didnt know that. If they
watched the Clinton film,
they didnt see me run-
ning because we didnt do
a lot of that, but I like to
think of myself as a dual
threat.
The junior said the game
was about staying focused
and executing on offense.
We stayed physical and
did some things we want-
ed to do, Cusano said.
We knew that we could
win the game. We didnt
want to play down to
them. Thats what we did
last year to Blue Ridge and
we didnt like the outcome
of that game.
Cusano started off hot,
giving the No. 7 ranked
Jackets a 28-7 halftime
cushion.
I just wanted to get
off to a good start, get a
few completions and gain
some confidence, he said.
I got that confidence and
it carried over throughout
the rest of the game.
Cusano was able to get
several of his teammates
involved and the Greer of-
fense totaled 403 yards on
the night.
You have to spread
it around and make the
defense worry about ev-
erybody, not just one big
player, Cusano said. You
have to move it around
and get everybody going
because once everybody
is going, you can see the
outcome.
On Friday, Greer will
travel to Union to compete
in the Jacket Bowl.
These next two coming
up are going to be the big-
gest games of the whole
schedule, he said. We
just have to play them
tough.
Cusano said he knows
his role on this team is an
important one.
Ive got to be a leader,
Cusano said. On the field,
I have to control the tem-
po. Off the field, Ive got to
make sure everybodys do-
ing what they need to do
and not potentially hurt-
ing the team.
billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
Cusano is dual
threat for Greer
I just wanted
to get off to a
good start, get a
few completions
and gain some
confidence. I got
that confidence
and it carried over
throughout the rest
of the game.
Mario Cusano
I just like to play
hard. Nobody gets
down the field if Im
there. Our defense
is there to get stops.
James Martin


PLAYERS OF WEEK 1
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
Blue Ridges John Patrick, center, received the Defensive
Player of Week award from Shane Lynn, owner of Owens
Insurance, left, and coach Steve Eoute.
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
Riverside s Ryan Cerino, center, received the Ofensive
Player of Week award from Shane Lynn, owner of Owens
Insurance, left, and head coach Phil Smith.
FOOTBALL CONTEST
$
50
WIN
a _______________________________
b _______________________________
c _______________________________
d _______________________________
e _______________________________
f ________________________________
g _______________________________
h _______________________________
i ________________________________
j ________________________________
k _______________________________
l ________________________________
m _______________________________
n _______________________________
o _______________________________
p _______________________________
q _______________________________
r ________________________________
NAME ________________________________________________________________________
ADDRESS _____________________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________________________
TIE BREAKER
Pick Total Score in Game Appearing Below In This Box. No
Scores, Just Total Points
Georgia vs. South Carolina _________________
HOW TO PLAY
1. Choose the team in each pairing you think will win
and write the teams name beside the corresponding
letter on the entry form.
2. Only one entry per week per person. (Multiple entries
will be disqualied)
3. Entries can be hand delivered to 317 Trade St.
before noon on Friday. Mailed entries can be sent
to PO Box 70, Greer, SC 29652. Entries must be
postmarked by Friday.
4. In the case of a tie, the tiebreaker will apply. If there is
still a tie, the money will be equally split.
5. One winner per month per household.
6. Judges decisions are nal.
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2014 SPORTS THE GREER CITIZEN B3
E
M
E
R
Y
S
TREE SERVIC
E
,
IN
C
.
emerytreeservice.com
4460 Skyland Dr., Greer, SC 29651
(864) 895-1852
24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE
Fertilization
Stump Removal
Lot Clearing
Trimming
Thinning
Fully Insured
2
0
1
4
a. Georgia vs. South Carolina
Travelers Rest | Marietta | Berea | Greenville | Greer/Taylors
864-834-9031 | 888-557-2265
www.bankoftravelersrest.com
City Tire & Alignment
120 W. Poinsett St. Greer (864) 879-2522
Across from Greer Fire Department
Specializing In
4 Wheel Computer Alignments
Oil Changes
C.V. Axles & Bearings
We Handle Most Major Brand Tires New & Used
Complete Brake Service
Shocks & Struts
Tune Ups
DJs Jewelry & Pawn, Inc.
We Buy, Sell and Trade
Bill Payment Center
Guns, Gold, Tools
14171 E. Wade Hampton Blvd.
Greer, SC 29651
864-877-3707
864-801-0800
14189 E. Wade Hampton Blvd., Greer, SC 29651
www.dickbrookshondapre-owned2.com
408 W. Poinsett St.
Greer, SC 29650
864-877-8456
www.trustowens.com
South Carolina
Gun Company, LLC
242 W. Wade Hampton Blvd.
Suite E Greer, SC 29650
864-334-5151
Amy & Darrell Golden
$15 TRANSFERS + FRIENDLY SERVICE = NO HASSLES!
803 A. West Poinsett Street Greer
968-8887
Home Cooking & Catering
Sanders
Heating & Air Conditioning
Indoor air quality experts since 1951
621 Keith Drive, Greenville 864-288-7671
www.SandersHeatCool.com
Good Luck from our winning team to yours!
RESTAURANT
603 W. Poinsett St.
877-5768
EXPRESS
1328 Wade Hampton Blvd.
968-0420
VISIT BOTH LOCATIONS
Greer
Q
UALITY
F
OODS
508 North Main Street
(across from Greer State Bank)
877-4043
7 a.m. - 9 p.m. Monday - Saturday
Greer Awning & Siding, Inc.
877-7722 or 877-7138 GVL 235-5659
610 South Main Street - Greer, S.C.
www.greerawningandsiding.com
ALUMINUM GUTTERS & GUTTER COVERS
ALUMINUM & WROUGHT IRON RAILING
AWNINGS CARPORTS PATIO COVERS
SCREEN ROOMS ROOMENCLOSURES
2096 East Main Street, Duncan, SC Next to Verizon
Open Mon-Fri. 9 a.m. - 6 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m. - 3 p.m., Closed Sundays
Family Owned and Operated Charles Kelly - Owner
14372 E. Wade Hampton Blvd., Greer, SC 29651
Phone (864) 879-2117 Fax (864) 877-0286
Greer Storage LLC & McCullough Properties
302 TRADE STREET GREER
Open Monday 6:00 p.m., Closed Tues. Open Wed-Fri. 4:00 p.m.
Open Sat. & Sun. at 11:00 a.m. Last Call at 1:30 a.m.
Kredit
Kars
SONNY CARTER
Sales
132 Spartanburg Highway Lyman, SC
864-336-4246
No Kredit Checks
Buy Here
Pay Here
b. N.C. State vs. South Florida
c. West Virginia vs. Maryland
d. Louisville vs. Virginia
e. Greer vs. Union County
f. Minnesota vs. TCU
g. UCLA vs. Texas h. Penn State vs. Rutgers
i. Nebraska vs. Fresno State
j. Arizona State vs. Colorado k. Wake Forest vs. Utah State l. Iowa vs. Iowa State
m. Byrnes vs. De La Salle n. Eastside vs. Wade Hampton
o. Arkansas vs. Texas Tech
p. Woodmont vs. Riverside q. Blue Ridge at Stephens Co., Ga r. Boiling Springs vs. Dutch Fork
LAST WEEKS WINNER: MARY B. BRIGHT, OF GREER


B4 THE GREER CITIZEN SPORTS WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2014
RIVERSIDE HIGH
Warriors
HEAD COACH - PHIL SMITH
AUG. 29 31 EASTSIDE 7
SEPT. 5 7 GREER 35
SEPT. 12 WOODMONT
SEPT. 19 AT HILLCREST
SEPT. 26 SPARTANBURG
OCT. 3 BOILING SPRINGS
OCT. 10 AT BYRNES
OCT. 17 AT MAULDIN
OCT. 24 J.L. MANN
OCT. 31 AT WADE HAMPTON
NOV. 7 DORMAN
BYRNES HIGH
Rebels
HEAD COACH - BRIAN LANE
AUG. 22 30 NORTHWESTERN 22
AUG. 29 50 T.L. HANNA 0
SEPT. 12 AT DE LA SALLE, CA
SEPT. 19 AT GAFFNEY
SEPT. 26 BOILING SPRINGS
OCT. 3 AT SPARTANBURG
OCT. 10 RIVERSIDE
OCT. 17 AT J.L. MANN
OCT. 24 MAULDIN
OCT. 31 AT DORMAN
NOV. 7 WADE HAMPTON
EASTSIDE HIGH
Eagles
HEAD COACH - JEFF THOMASON
AUG. 29 7 RIVERSIDE 31
SEPT. 5 28 CHRIST CHURCH 51
SEPT. 12 AT WADE HAMPTON
SEPT. 19 BLUE RIDGE
SEPT. 26 AT CHAPMAN
OCT. 3 GREER
OCT. 10 AT SOUTHSIDE
OCT. 17 BEREA
OCT. 24 AT TRAVELERS REST
OCT. 31 AT EMERALD
BLUE RIDGE HIGH
Fighting Tigers
HEAD COACH - SHANE CLARK
AUG. 29 34 WADE HAMPTON 33
SEPT. 5 29 J.L. MANN 15
SEPT. 12 AT STEPHENS CO., GA
SEPT. 19 AT EASTSIDE
SEPT. 26 BEREA
OCT. 3 AT EMERALD
OCT. 10 TRAVELERS REST
OCT. 17 SOUTHSIDE
OCT. 24 CHAPMAN
OCT. 31 AT GREER
THIS WEEKS GAMES
BLUE RIDGE AT STEPHENS CO.
BYRNES AT DE LA SALLE
EASTSIDE AT WADE HAMPTON
GREER AT UNION CO.
RIVERSIDE WOODMONT
BLUE RIDGE 29 J.L. MANN 15
EASTSIDE 28 CHRIST CHURCH 51
GREER 35 RIVERSIDE 7
GREER HIGH
Yellow Jackets
HEAD COACH - WILL YOUNG
AUG. 29 23 CLINTON 14
SEPT. 5 35 RIVERSIDE 7
SEPT. 12 AT UNION
SEPT. 19 AT EMERALD
SEPT. 26 TRAVELERS REST
OCT. 3 AT EASTSIDE
OCT. 10 BEREA
OCT. 17 CHAPMAN
OCT. 24 AT SOUTHSIDE
OCT. 31 BLUE RIDGE
WEEKLY FOOTBALL WRAP
LAST WEEKS SCORES
PLAYERS OF THE WEEK
DEFENSE
James
Martin
BRHS
OFFENSE
Mario
Cusano
GHS


BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
Week three of the young
football season is going to
require a little more travel
than usual for Blue Ridge.
The Tigers hit the road
this week to face Stephens
County, Georgia, which
will present another huge
task for the 2-0 squad.
Its a little bit more dis-
tance than were used to,
head coach Shane Clark
said. They way things
shook out, we added this
game to week three. It will
add to the challenge for
our guys. We know its go-
ing to be a long trip get-
ting there, but hopefully
well respond well getting
off the bus.
The Indians are coming
off a 35-20 loss to Elbert
County.
Every week, were work-
ing to get better, he said.
Stephens County is a good
football team. Weve had
the opportunity to look
at those guys and theyre
solid across the board.
Clark said most of Ste-
phens Countys strength
comes from its size on the
front lines.
Theyve got some pret-
ty big guys on both sides
of the ball, Clark said.
Theyve got a big 6-7 340
pound offensive tackle
that everybody talks
about. Theyre going to be
big in the middle and its
going to be a huge chal-
lenge for us.
Defensively, the Indians
line up in a 4-4 or 4-3 set.
They do a lot of things
well, Clark said.
Friday kicksoff at 7:30
p.m. in Toccoa, Georgia.
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
Something has to give
this Friday night at Wade
Hampton, as two teams,
desperate for wins, collide
at 7:30 p.m.
The Eagles will hit the
road to face the Gener-
als, who have lost three
straight games in the early
going. Wade Hamptons
most recent defeat came
against Hillcrest during an
embarrassing 71-8 show-
ing.
Eastside is licking its
wounds too, however,
coming off a devastat-
ing 51-28 loss to Christ
Church.
The Eagles had the lead
for most of the game
against a Cavalier team
that holds the state record
for most consecutive wins.
A few late turnovers, how-
ever, resulted in Eastsides
second loss of the season.
Were going to be fine,
head coach Jeff Thomason
said. Were going to build
of this. In the big picture,
[the Christ Church game]
doesnt mean a whole lot
as far as region stand-
ings and stuff like that.
Two weeks from now is
when we really need to
be geared up and pushing
ourselves.
Wade Hampton will pres-
ent a 4-3 look on defense.
The Generals have also
lost games to Blue Ridge
and Dorman this season.
Thomason said this
week is just about getting
better.
I think youll see this
team grow as we keep
moving forward, he
said. These kids believe
in each other as much as
any other team Ive ever
coached. Theyve grown
up. I think theyve shown
exactly what theyre made
of and well be fine.
Billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
Against
Woodmont
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
The intensity was not
there for Riverside last
Friday night against Greer.
Thats what head coach
Phil Smith hopes to change
that this week as the War-
riors get set to take on
Woodmont.
We did lose and we lost
bad, Smith said. Its over
and weve got to move on.
We cant let one loss beat
us twice.
Smith said his team
struggled early and often
during a tough rivalry
game against the Yellow
Jackets.
The intensity that we
went out with against
Eastside just wasnt what
we went out with against
Greer, Smith said. We
played a dominant game
last Friday against East-
side and I think we didnt
play well [against Greer].
The Warriors had some
woes on defense in the
first half last week.
Defensively, we did
not play well at all, he
said. There were a lot of
missed assignments and
simple things we covered
all week. Weve talked a lot
about the intensity level
and how bad it was in the
first half. In the second
half, we went out there
and started playing bet-
ter, but we couldnt get it
done.
Riverside is hoping to
stabilize what they believe
can be a good offensive at-
tack.
We had some drives
where we shot ourselves
in the foot, but Greer also
made some great plays, he
said. I was proud of what
our offense did. There are
definitely some positives
to take away from it.
Against Woodmont, the
Warriors will have to de-
fend against the spread.
Theyre a spread team,
he said. They run the
counter and they run
some misdirections. They
run a little bit of isolation
and they run some two-
back. They also do some
option.
Defensively, Woodmont
will present multiple looks,
such as a 3-4 or a 4-2.
I think it will be a good
matchup, Smith said. It
was a close game last year
that we ended up losing.
I think a tackle here or a
tackle there could make
the difference in this
game.
I think we match up
well with what they do,
he said. Hopefully, well
have our guys back from
injuries this week so we
think well bounce back.
Kickoff for Friday nights
game is set for 7:30 p.m.
at The Reservation.

BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
Greer will hit the road
to face Union County this
Friday night and head
coach Will Young said his
team will be in for another
tough game.
Its always been a tight
ball game, he said. Both
schools have a lot of tradi-
tion. Their kids believe in
what their doing and were
expecting a hard fought
ball game. I dont think
this year is going to be any
different. Theyre really
good.
The Jackets are fresh off
a 35-7 blowout win over
rival Riverside, but this
week has been about im-
proving and fine tuning.
Weve just been trying
to get better at what we
do, Young said. Every-
body adds something to
their package every week
and weve added some
stuff to our package. Were
working on that [this week]
and well see if we can find
a way to hang in there with
Union.
Union Countys defense
is based out of a 3-3 set.
Theyre kind of back
to the old Union County
where their defensive front
is pretty good, Young
said. Theyve got a good
defensive line, good line-
backers and theyre very
talented in the secondary.
Theyre just very good.
In the first two weeks of
the regular season, Greer
has seen offensive pro-
duction come from several
different places.
Different kids have
played bigger roles in both
ball games, Young said.
In the first ball game,
a lot of it fell on Dorian
(Lindsey), but in the last
ball game, very little of it
did. A lot of it fell on Mario
(Cusano) and Adrian Mc-
Gee against Riverside.
Thats what we have to
do all year. We knew that
coming in, he said. We
knew we had some pretty
good players out there on
the edges and we needed
to find ways to get them
the football.
Kickoff is set for 7:30
p.m.
Warriors hope
to rebound
Eagles search
for first win
WILLIAM BUCHHEIT | THE GREER CITIZEN
The Eagles will need to put last Fridays loss behind them if
they hope to have success against Wade Hampton.
We cant let one
loss beat us twice.
Phil Smith
Riverside coach

Greer faces Jacket Bowl showdown
MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN
Greer quarterback Mario Cusano provided the spark on ofense against Riverside, rushing
and throwing for more than 200 total yards and two touchdowns.
Tigers hit the road for week three
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
Blue Ridge will make the drive to Stephens County,
Georgia, Friday in search of its third win.
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2014 SPORTS THE GREER CITIZEN B5


Spartanburg Medical Center 14-4542
Publication: Greer Citizen
Size: 4.9167 x 10.75
Agency: CHR Communications 704-243-6080
Sports Medicine Institute
Injuries Can Happen
Whether your athlete is on the eld or cheering on the
sidelines, fall sports can mean a visit to the doctor. The
new Sports Medicine Institute at the Upward Star Center in
Spartanburg is here to help your athlete get back in the game.
Headed by John Lucas IV, MD, the Sports Medicine Institute
will be staffed by doctors with expertise in sports medicine
and orthopaedic surgery, including spine surgery and joint
replacement.
9768 Warren H. Abernathy Hwy., Suite B, Spartanburg, SC 29301
864-560-BONE (2663) SpartanburgRegional.com
For an appointment or to learn more about
the Sports Medicine Institute,
call 864-560-BONE (2663).
Sports Concussion Clinic for concussion
or post-concussion symptoms
Saturday Clinic designed to deliver
medical care to athletes injured at Friday
night athletic events
Ultrasound-Guided Injection Clinic
provides precise delivery of medication
in musculoskeletal injections
The Institute also offers three clinics:
The car and driver to
beat in the 2014 chase
for the NASCAR Sprint
Cup identified themselves
emphatically on Saturday
night at Richmond Inter-
national Raceway.
Brad Keselowski led all
but 17 of 400 laps in win-
ning the Federated Auto
Parts 400, the final race of
the NASCAR Sprint Cup Se-
ries regular season. In the
process, he won his fourth
race of the season and
secured top seeding for
the 10-race chase, which
starts Sunday, Sept. 14 at
Chicagoland Speedway (2
p.m. ET on ESPN).
Ryan Newman and
Greg Biffle secured the fi-
nal two of 16 chase spots
on points, Newman with
a solid ninth-place run,
Biffle with a much shakier
19th-place finish, two laps
down.
But it was Keselowski
who made the statement
in securing the 400th vic-
tory across all racing se-
ries for team owner Roger
Penske.
What a night, Kesel-
owski said. Part of me, I
pulled into victory lane and
I pinched myself once to
make sure I wasnt dream-
ing. These are nights you
dont forget as a driver
and you live for.
Were ready. We want
to run for another cup. We
really feel like this team
has it. Team Penske is re-
ally clicking 400th win
for Team Penske, and this
feels so lucky, man, to
have such an incredible
team and a car like we did
tonight and be able to ex-
ecute it and not have any
bad luck. Weve had plenty
of bad luck over the last
few weeks, but, wow, what
a night!
Keselowski, the Coors
Light pole winner, took the
lead for the final time on
Lap 127 when he beat race
runner-up Jeff Gordon and
Kevin Harvick, the races
only other leader, off pit
road. From that point on,
Keselowskis No. 2 Ford
was untouchable.
Gordon made it inter-
esting in the closing laps,
finishing .797 seconds be-
hind the Keselowski, who
won for the first time at
the .75-mile short track
and the 14th time in his
career. Clint Bowyer ran
third but failed to make
the Chase.
Jamie McMurray came
home fourth, one spot
ahead of Harvick, whose
car faded in the final 110
laps.
For the first three quar-
ters of the race, Keselows-
ki was totally dominant,
leading 283 of the first 300
laps. Harvick provided the
only competition for the
No. 2 Team Penske Ford
in the early stages of the
race, running a high line in
the corners and taking the
point twice for a total of
17 laps before Keselowski
regained control after a re-
start on Lap 132.
Bowyer grabbed the sec-
ond position from Harvick
with an aggressive move
on a Lap 271 restart. Kes-
elowski continued to lead,
but Bowyer stayed close
for the first 50 laps of
the subsequent green-flag
run.
Gordon charged past
Harvick for the third spot
on Lap 290 and took off
in pursuit of Bowyer,
who surrendered the sec-
ond position on Lap 319,
10 circuits before a fan
caused a caution with an
ill-advised, albeit success-
ful attempt to scale the
catchfence in Turn 4.
But if that caution gave
the drivers behind him
a glimmer of hope, Kes-
elowski quickly snuffed
it out, pulling away from
Gordon, Bowyer and Har-
vick after a restart on Lap
337 and opening a two-
second advantage by Lap
355.
Though Gordon got
closer as the run contin-
ued, Keselowski had built
too big a lead in the early
stages for Gordon to chal-
lenge for the win.
The four-time series
champion acknowledged
he couldnt compete with
Keselowski on the short
runs, but Gordon wasnt
about to concede the title
to his Team Penske rival.
I didnt feel like we
had a car that could com-
pete with Brad at certain
portions of the night, but
we just never gave up on
it great pit stops, great
adjustments, and there at
the end, we were closing
on him, Gordon said. It
wasnt a win, but still great
momentum to carry into
the chase.
This team is on fire,
and we just cant wait to
get it all started. Its been
a heck of a year. Our fans
and the way that theyve
embraced this season has
been extremely motivat-
ing, and I know how proud
they are. And were proud
of the effort and the re-
sults that were getting this
year. Ten more weeks that
weve got to get it done,
and this team is ready to
do that.
Though Bowyer finished
just seven points behind
Biffle in the battle for the
final chase position, real-
istically, the driver of the
No. 15 Michael Waltrip
Racing Toyota had to win
the race to make the post-
season.
And Bowyer left nothing
on the table.
That was our best ef-
fort, he said. Thats all I
had. Thats all we had as a
race team. We put it all out
there, and still, we were
just third best.
Recorded
639 yards
of offense
The North Greenville
University football team
opened the 2014 season
on a high note last Thurs-
day with a 45-21 victory
over Ave Maria University.
On just the second drive
of the game, the Crusaders
jumped on the board with
a four-play, 57-yard drive
that ended with a 13-yard
touchdown pass from ju-
nior Nelson Hughes to
sophomore Robbie Brown.
The Gyrenes and Cru-
saders traded possessions
before Ave Maria tied the
game at 7-7 with a five-
yard touchdown pass from
quarterback Clayton Ueker
to Dan Mervos with under
two minutes remaining in
the quarter.
North Greenville junior
Trey Walker would score
on the teams next drive on
a 49-yard touchdown rush
as the first quarter came
to a close, giving North
Greenville a 14-7 lead.
Junior Darius Custard
blocked an Ave Maria punt
to open the second quar-
ter. Ashton Heard convert-
ed the turnover into a 26-
yard touchdown to move
the North Greenville lead
to 21-7.
The Crusaders scored
again on a 68-yard
touchown pass from
Hughes to Brown and a 25-
yard field goal from senior
Justin Gravely put North
Greenville ahead 31-7 go-
ing into halftime.
Ave Maria used an 83-
yard touchdown pass on
the first play of the sec-
ond half to cut the Cru-
sader lead to 31-14. Heard
scored his second touch-
down of the game on an
ensuing drive, however,
making the score 38-14
as time ticked away in the
third.
Hughes and Brown
would connect again, this
time on a 49-yard score
near the end of the quar-
ter, to give North Green-
ville a 45-14 edge.
The Crusaders put up
639 total yards of of-
fense. Hughes finished
the game 15-25 with 324
passing yards and three
touchdowns. Backup Mike
Calabro also got in on
the action, completing all
five pass attempts for 44
yards, while rushing four
times for 67 yards on the
ground.
Walker went over the
century mark on the
ground, recording 131
yards on 12 carries with
a score. Heard totaled 11
carries for 57 yards and
two touchdowns. Brown
was the leading receiver
with seven catches for 206
yards and three touch-
downs. Senior Brock Fris-
bee caught two passes for
53 yards. Ten different
Crusaders caught a pass
in the game.
On defense, North
Greenville limited Ave Ma-
ria to just 59 yards on the
ground. Sophomore KJ Mc-
Donald led the charge with
nine tackles and two tack-
les for loss. Sophomore
Nigel Gay recorded six
tackles in the contest. Fel-
low sophomore Sam Hous-
ton also totaled six tackles
with a forced fumble.
North Greenville will
travel to Spartanburg on
Saturday, Sept. 13 for a
date with Division I FCS
Wofford College at 7 p.m.
Keselowski dominates
Crusaders open with
45-21 win over Gyrenes
PHOTO | COURTESY OF NASCAR.COM/GETTY IMAGES
Brad Keselowski led all but 17 of 400 laps, winning the Federated Auto Parts 400, the fnal
race of the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series regular season.

BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
Blue Ridge has senior
Eric Diaz to thank for Fri-
day nights win against JL
Mann.
Diaz picked off a pass
and returned it 69 yards
for a touchdown, giving
the Tigers a 29-15 lead
that would hold up as the
final 60 seconds ticked off
the clock.
With the win, Blue Ridge
moves to 2-0 on the sea-
son.
Our defense stepped
up, head coach Shane
Clark said. Eric Diaz had
a great play, which kind of
sealed it for us.
That defense forced a
fumble on Manns open-
ing drive, and Blue Ridge
would take advantage
in the opening minutes.
Sophomore quarterback
Jay Urich hit Mikey Urueta
for a 17-yard touchdown,
capping an ensuing 97-
yard drive. Wide Receiver
Tay Jenkins then took a
handoff 49 yards, giv-
ing Blue Ridge its second
touchdown of the game to
open the second.
That 13-0 advantage was
moved to 16-0 after a 39-
yard Jon Michael Bright
field goal in the second.
Bright would nail two
more in the contest.
Our guys started out
pretty good, he said. We
had some really crazy pen-
alties and things that took
us out of some scoring op-
portunities.
After giving up a safety,
the Tigers then conceded
their first touchdown of
the night with only 11 sec-
onds left in the first half.
The Tigers went into the
break ahead 19-9.
A third Bright field goal
gave Blue Ridge a 22-9
lead, but Mann answered
in the fourth with a touch-
down of its own, narrow-
ing the margin to 22-15.
With Mann threaten-
ing another scoring drive,
Diaz scored the game-win-
ning touchdown.
We had a couple of
huge stops, he said. Our
defense stepped up big for
us.
James Martin also had
a big night for the Blue
Ridge defense, racking up
11 solo tackles, five assist-
ed tackles and two tackles
for loss.
We saw exactly what we
thought wed see, Clark
said. They fought pretty
tough and theyre a much
improved team over the
last couple of years. They
played very hard through-
out the game.
Clark said he wants his
team to finish more drives
instead of settling for
three points.
Weve got to work hard
and continue to finish
drives this week, he said.
We kicked three field
goals, which was great.
Weve just got to work
harder to finish drives of-
fensively.
With Urich and Jenkins
providing the only two of-
fensive touchdowns of the
night, Clark said his group
will have to continue to
look for more opportuni-
ties.
Its coming together,
Clark said of the offense.
It just takes a little bit of
time. This is the first time
all these guys are work-
ing together, but we think
good decisions are being
made and things are going
pretty well.
Billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
Tigers hold off Mann
PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
After securing a 19-0 lead against JL Mann at home Friday, Blue Ridge hung on to put
away its second win of the season.
These are nights
you dont forget as
a driverand you
live for.
Brad Keselowski
NASCAR driver
B6 THE GREER CITIZEN SPORTS WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2014
FROM B1
lines were physical, and
that is huge going into a
couple of very big games
the next two weeks.
Riverside Coach Phil
Smith was unhappy with
the outcome, saying, I
was disappointed. We had
some kids out with inju-
ries like our big play guy
Emmanuel Jackson, and
everybody has go to step
up. But we did not start
out like we were ready,
and thats my fault.
Smith added, Greer is a
physical team with a lot of
speed, but I was proud of
the way our offense dug in
there tonight.
The Warriors appeared
ready to pick up where
they had left off at East-
side by taking the opening
kickoff and mounting a
50-yard drive. With the aid
of a penalty, the Yellow
Jackets finally stopped
Riverside at the 31-yard
line, but the Warriors
pinned Greer at the three
with a punt.
GREER GAINS MOMENTUM
The Yellow Jackets
gained the momentum by
cruising to the opposite
end zone on a 12-play
drive, overcoming 30-yards
in penalties in the process.
Quarterback Mario Cusano
reeled off a 32-yard gain
along the way before fir-
ing a 34-yard touchdown
pass to Zach Glidden. Nick
Robersons conversion
kick was wide, but Greer
led 6-0 at the end of the
opening period.
Greer wasted no time
scoring again with a five-
play, 57-yard drive. Zeke
Whiteside scampered 17
yards on a wide sweep to
set up the score that came
on a four-yard burst by
Adrian McGee. The Yellow
Jackets tacked on a two-
point conversion with the
Cusano-to-Glidden pass
combination to make it
14-0 early in the second
period.
Three plays later Greer
linebacker Bobby Far-
rington recovered a War-
riors fumble at the 29-yard
line to set up a third score.
McGee again did the hon-
ors, reeling off 15 yards
on first down and shoot-
ing 14 yards off left tackle
on the next play. Rober-
sons extra point pushed
the tally to 21-0.
The Warriors made
Coach Smith proud with
a 14-play scoring march
that consumed the next
five minutes. Quarter-
back Ryan Cerino started
the 69-yard drive with a
13-yard pass to Matt Wat-
son, and finished it with
a fourth down scoring
toss of five yards to Corey
Bridges. Antoine Kahaleh
added the extra point.
That set the stage for Riv-
ersides first onside kickoff
that Isaiah Long recovered
at the Greer 48-yard line.
The Yellow Jackets took
advantage of the break by
scoring in just four plays.
McGee launched the drive
with runs of seven and
36 yards. Freshman Quay
Thackston took over and
got the final 19 yards in
two carries. Robersons
conversion made it 28-8.
The Greer kicker got an-
other scoring opportunity
on the last play of the half
following a 37-yard pass
from Cusano to Dorian
Lindsey. But the 36-yard
field goal attempt was
wide of the uprights.
Smith defends onside
kicks
Riverside opened the
second half with another
on-side kickoff that Long
also recovered. Greer ap-
peared to be headed to the
house with two quick first
downs, but Thackston
fumbled at the seven-yard
line where a host of War-
riors pounced on the ball.
Greer got the ball right
back when Lindsey picked
off a Cerino pass at the 16-
yard line. Cusano scored
on a quarterback draw on
the next play to put Greer
up by four touchdowns
with 2:39 left in the third
period.
Im not second-guessing
the onside kickoff calls,
Smith said afterward. We
had to try to make some-
thing happen, to get the
football any way we could.
Besides, statistics prove
that no matter how you
kick off, the final results
are about the same.
Young was suspicious
that the onside kicks may
have been illegal. The
rules say the kicker must
be clearly identified, and
that was not the case be-
cause Riverside had sev-
eral kids crisscrossing like
they might kick the ball,
he contended.
The fourth period was
uneventful, as both teams
began playing reserves,
until the final two min-
utes. Thats when Green
converted a fourth-and-six
into an apparent 31-yard
touchdown that he failed
to cash in.
Until then, Cusano had
turned in a spectacular
performance. The junior
quarterback rushed for
113 yards on 10 carries,
scoring once in the pro-
cess. He also threw a 34-
yard touchdown pass as
part of a 10-14 passing
performance that piled up
128 yards
With Cusano at the top
of his game, Greer had no
need to use the wildcat
featuring Dorian Lindsay.
Young explained, We
have an excellent quar-
terback in Cusano, and
the things we were doing
were successful. I thought
Thackston and McGee
both ran well. We have a
balanced offense, but we
knew that is what it would
take going into the season
because we graduated our
all-time leading rusher,
Quez Nesbitt.
In the process of im-
proving to 2-0, the Yellow
Jackets ran up huge mar-
gins in the stat columns.
Greer amassed 440 total
yards for 19 first downs.
The Yellow Jackets rushed
for 312 yards, and had
128 air yards. Greer lost
one fumble and suffered
six penalties for 85 yards.
The Warriors recorded
138 yards of total offense
for 13 first downs. River-
side rushed for 69 yards
net, and Cerino completed
10 of 23 passes for 69
yards. Riverside lost one
fumble and had a pass in-
tercepted while being hit
with eight penalties for 70
yards.
SCORE BY QUARTER:
Greer 6 22 7 0 -- 35
Riverside 0 7 0 0 -- 7
Greer scoring: Glidden
34-yard pass from Cu-
sano, extra point failed;
McGee 4-yard run, Glidden
2-point conversion pass
from Cusano; McGee, 14-
yard run, Roberson kick;
Cusano, 16-yard run, Rob-
erson kick.
Riverside scoring: Bridg-
es, 5-yard pass from Ceri-
no, Kahaleh kick.
Greer rushing: Cusano,
10-113 yards; Thackston,
11-40 yards; McGee, 6-68
yards; Lindsey, 2-16 yards;
Whiteside, 2-21 yards;
Xavier Wright, 1-4 yards;
Green, 2-31 yards.
Greer receiving: Lind-
sey, 3-51 yards; Glidden,
2-41 yards; X. Wright, 4-36
yards.
Riverside rushing: Don-
dre Thompson, 5-5 yards;
Cerino, 15-37 yards; Aus-
tin Brouwer, 10-40 yards;
Robert Morrow, 3-2 yards;
Will Urich, 1-minus 15
yards.
Riverside receiving:
Morrow, 6-18 yards; Mark
Thompson, 2-22 yards;
Urich, 1-8 yards; Matt Wat-
son, 1-13 yards; Bridges,
2-8 yards.
FROM PAGE ONE
and trying get the extra
yard. Thats just what we
do.
Late turnovers cost the
Eagles. Eastside turned
the ball over on a kickoff
return early in the fourth
and threw an interception
on a later drive.
Were not going to say
anybody did anything
wrong, he said. We
popped a few balls loose
ourselves. Thats just how
it goes.
Coming off a loss to ri-
val Riverside, the Eagles
feel good about their week
two showing.
They really rebounded
from last week, Thoma-
son said. Last week, we
just had bad execution.
They forgot about all that
and they executed well
[against Christ Church].
Thomason said his guys
will have to learn to finish
ball games.
We were a little tired
toward the end, but thats
OK, he said. Were al-
right. We think were in
better shape than any
team we face. Thats what
we kept telling them. The
second half didnt quite go
our way, but thats part of
trying to get this program
back where it needs to be.
We have to learn how to
finish some things.
Were going to be a
better team from here on
out, Thomason added.
Thomason said his team,
and even the student sec-
tion, believed they could
be the ones to knock off
Christ Church.
Weve got kids that
bought it and we talked
all week about believing,
he said. The student sec-
tion was over there saying,
why not us. All you hear
about is the streak, well
why cant we be the ones
to beat them? Our kids
believed in that and thats
what they fed on and kept
pushing for.
Eastside faces Wade
Hampton this Friday on
the road at 7:30 p.m.
NOTICES
NOTICE All real estate ad-
vertised in this newspaper is
Subject to the Federal Fair
Housing Act of 1968 which
makes it illegal to advertise
any preference, limitation or
discrimination based on race,
color, religion, sex, handicap,
familial status, national origin
or an intention to make such
preference, limitation or dis-
crimination. This newspaper
will not knowingly accept any
advertising for real estate
which is in violation of the law.
Our readers hereby informed
that all dwelling advertised
in this newspaper are avail-
able on an equal opportunity
basis.
9-3,10,17,24-TFN
LEGAL NOTICE
STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA
COUNTY OF CHEROKEE
IN THE FAMILY COURT
DOCKET NO.: 2014-DR-11-
160
AMENDED SUMMONS
John and Jane Doe,
Plaintiffs,
vs.
Richard Roe,
Defendant.
IN RE:
Girl Doe, born November
10, 2006
Boy Doe, born May 31,
2009
Minors under the age of
fourteen (14) years of age.
TO: THE DEFENDANT
ABOVE NAMED YOU ARE
HEREBY SUMMONED and
required to answer the Com-
plaint in this action, a copy
of which is hereby served
on you, and to serve a copy
of your Answer to the said
Complaint on the Petitioners
or their attorney, William G.
Rhoden, WINTER & RHO-
DEN, LLC at 221 East Floyd
Baker Boulevard, Gaffney,
South Carolina 29340 within
thirty (30) days after the ser-
vice hereof, exclusive of the
day of such service, and if
you fail to Answer the Com-
plaint within the time afore-
said, the Petitioner will apply
to the Court for rendering of
judgment by default for the
relief demanded in the Com-
plaint.
Dated at Gaffney, South
Carolina on the 20th day of
June 2014.
William G. Rhoden
WINTER & RHODEN, LLC.
221 E. Floyd Baker Blvd.
Gaffney, South Carolina
29340
TEL: (864) 489-8128
FAX: (864) 489-8806
Attorney for Plaintiffs
STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA
COUNTY OF CHEROKEE
IN THE FAMILY COURT
DOCKET NO.: 2014-DR-11-
160
AMENDED
NOTICE OF FILING
John and Jane Doe,
Plaintiffs,
vs.
Richard Roe, a/k/a Christo-
pher Blake Lawing,
Defendant.
IN RE:
Girl Doe, born November
10, 2006
Boy Doe, born May 31,
2009,
Minors under the age of
fourteen (14) years of age,
TO: CHRISTOPHER BLAKE
LAWING, DEFENDANT:
NOTICE is hereby given
that the Amended Sum-
mons of which the forego-
ing is a copy of in the above
entitled action together with
the Notices and Complaint
were led in the ofce of the
Clerk of Court for Cherokee
County, South Carolina, on
the June 27, 2014.
William G. Rhoden
WINTER & RHODEN, LLC.
PO Box 1937
Gaffney, South Carolina
29342
TEL: (864) 489-8128
FAX: (864) 489-8806
Attorney for Plaintiffs
Gaffney, South Carolina
July 9, 2014.
9-10, 17, 24
LEGAL NOTICE
PUBLIC SERVICE
COMMISSION OF
SOUTH CAROLINA
CLERKS OFFICE
NOTICE OF FILING
DOCKET NO. 2009-238-S
JACABB Utilities, LLC Re-
quest for the Approval of
Amendment Number One
to Agreements between The
Cliffs at Mountain Park, LLC
and JACABB Utilities, LLC
and Village Overlook Con-
dominium Association and
JACABB Utilities, LLC
JACABB Utilities, LLC (JA-
CABB or the Company) has
led a Request for the Ap-
proval of Amendment Num-
ber One to Agreements be-
tween The Cliffs at Mountain
Park, LLC (The Cliffs) and
JACABB Utilities, LLC and
Village Overlook Condomin-
ium Association (VOCA) and
JACABB Utilities, LLC with
the Public Service Commis-
sion of South Carolina (the
Commission). The Amend-
ment Approval Request
was led pursuant to 10 S.
C. Code Ann. Regs. 103-
541. The Application states
that the Company received
Commission approval of
Agreements with The Cliffs
at Mountain Park, LLC and
with the Village Overlook
Condominium Association
pursuant to Order No. 2009-
518. The Company seeks
Commission approval of the
Agreements under Amend-
ment Number One (Amend-
ment), which accompanies
the Application as Exhibit
A. The effective date of
the Amendment is April 13,
2011.
Amendment Number One,
Exhibit A, of the Application
provides that The Cliffs and
JACABB entered into their
Agreement for Sewer Ser-
vices between The Cliffs and
JACABB on March 3, 2009
(Cliffs 2009 Agreement).
The proposed amendment
to the Cliffs 2009 Agreement
states, The Developer will
be responsible to construct
the uncompleted 9,000 gal-
lons per day (gpd) portion of
Phase I Wastewater Treat-
ment Plant to complete its
capacity of 27,000 gpd as
needed for the VOCA as
new units are constructed
and additional sewer treat-
ment capacity is needed.
VOCA and JACABB entered
into their Sewer Service
Agreement on April 24, 2009
(VOCA 2009 Agreement).
The proposed amendment to
the VOCA 2009 Agreement
states, The VOCA under-
stands that all of its 18,000
gpd of sewer treatment
capacity is not presently
constructed and that the De-
veloper will construct it when
needed to meet the VOCAs
need for sewer treatment
as additional condominium
units are constructed.
A copy of the companys
Application can be found on
the Commissions website
at www.psc.sc.gov under
Docket No. 2009-238-S.
Additionally, a copy of the
application is available from
the ofce of Stephen R.
Goldie, Managing Owner,
JACABB Utilities, LLC, 210
West North Second Street,
Seneca, South Carolina
29678.
A public hearing, if sched-
uled, will be held in Colum-
bia, South Carolina in the
ofces of the Commission lo-
cated at 101 Executive Cen-
ter Drive, Columbia, South
Carolina 29210, for the pur-
pose of receiving testimony
and other evidence from all
interested parties regarding
this Application. The time
and date of this hearing will
be furnished to all interested
parties at a later date.
Any person who wishes to
participate in this matter as
a party of record, should le
a Petition to Intervene in
accordance with the Com-
missions Rules of Practice
and Procedure on or before
October 6, 2014. For the re-
ceipt of future Commission
correspondence, please
include an email address
in the Petition to Intervene.
Please refer to Docket No.
2009-238-S and mail a copy
to all other parties in this
docket. Any person who
wishes to testify and present
evidence at the hearing, if
scheduled, should notify, in
writing, the Commission; the
Ofce of Regulatory Staff at
1401 Main Street, Suite 900,
Columbia, South Carolina
29201; and the company
at the above address, on
or before October 6, 2014.
Please refer to Docket No.
2009-238-S.
For the most recent informa-
tion regarding this docket,
please refer to www.psc.
sc.gov and Docket No.
2009-238-S.
Persons seeking informa-
tion about the Commissions
procedures should contact
the Commission at (803)
896-5100 or visit its website
at www.psc.sc.gov.
9/4/14
9-10
CLASSIFIEDS
CALL 864-877-2076
RATES
20 words or less: $13.50 frst insertion
Discount for additional insertions
DEADLINE
5pm Monday
for insertion Wednesday
TERMS
Cash in advance. We accept Visa, MasterCard,
American Express, and Discover Card

PUBLIC NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE

GREER GIRLS TENNIS
FALLS TO EASTSIDE
Greer 2 Eastside 4
No. 1 singles: K. San-
dusky (Greer) def. C. Stel-
ling 6-1, 6-1
No. 2 singles: H. Taylor
(Greer) def. A. Wannam-
acher 6-2, 6-4
No. 3 singles: M. John-
ston (Eastside) def. M. Har-
vey 6-3, 6-0
No. 4 singles: H. Jeong
(Eastside) def. G. Harvell
6-2, 6-2
No. 5 singles: C. Brock-
man (Eastside) def. E.
Swearingin 6-0, 7-6
No. 2 doubles: E.
Galloway/H. Henson
(Eastside) def. H. Henline/
O. Turner 7-6, 6-1
FREE BASKETBALL CAMP
AT GREER FIRST BAPTIST
A free basketball camp
for girls ages 6-10 will be
held at Greer First Bap-
tist Church for six weeks,
beginning Sept. 22. The
camp will run from 6-7:30
p.m. on Mondays. No reg-
istration is required. For
more information, call
Paul Lister at 630-6625.
GREER BOOSTERS TAKING
HALL OF FAME NODS
The Greer High Booster
Club is accepting nomina-
tions for induction into
the Athletic Hall of Fame.
Nominees must have grad-
uated from Greer High a
minimum of five years be-
fore becoming eligible.
The deadline for nomina-
tions is Oct. 3. They must
be submitted in writing
to GHS Hall of Fame, 121
Rubiwood Circle, Greer,
29651. The Hall of Fame
will induct new members
in ceremonies at 7 p.m. on
Oct. 17.
THURSDAY, SEPT. 11
Volleyball .......................................... Travelers Rest @ Blue Ridge, 7 p.m.
Eastside @ Southside, 6 p.m.
Berea @ Greer, 7 p.m.
Byrnes @ JL Mann, 7 p.m.
Tennis ........................................................ Riverside @ Mauldin, 4:30 p.m.
FRIDAY, SEPT. 12
Football ..................................Blue Ridge @ Stephens County, 7:30 p.m.
Woodmont @ Riverside, 7:30 p.m.
Greer @ Union County, 7:30 p.m.
Byrnes @ De La Salle, 10:15 p.m. (EST)
Eastside @ Wade Hampton, 7:30 p.m.
SATURDAY, SEPT. 13
Cross Country ..................................................... Greer @ Blue Ridge, 9 a.m.
Riverside @ Coaches Classic, 8:30 a.m.
Swimming ...................................................Christ Church @ Greer, 9 a.m.
TUESDAY, SEPT. 16
D-Team Football ............................ Wade Hampton @ Blue Ridge, 6 p.m.
Riverside @ Greer, 6 p.m.
Berea @ Eastside, 6 p.m.
Volleyball ................................................ Southside @ Blue Ridge, 7 p.m.
Chapman @ Greer, 7 p.m.
Riverside @ JL Mann, 7 p.m.
Byrnes @ Mauldin, 7 p.m.
CALENDAR |
GREER: Runs away with rivalry showdown at Riverside
EAGLES: Give up fve unanswered touchdowns in loss to streaking Christ Church




SPORTS
ROUNDUP
LEGAL NOTICE
AIRLINE
CAREERS
START HERE
Get trained as FAA certifed Aviation Technician.
Financial aid for qualifed students.
Job placement assistance.
Call Aviation Institution of Maintenance
for free information
866-367-2513
AUCTIONS
AUCTION EVERY THURS-
DAY, 11am in old ABC Build-
ing 317 S. Buncombe. Visit
auctionzip.com
9-3,10,17,24-TFN
Live Auction w/Online Si-
mulcast, Wake County De-
velopment Tracts Divided,
Sept. 18th at 3pm. Auction
at Wingate By Windham
Raleigh South, Iron Horse
Auction Co. 800-997-2248.
NCAL3936. www.ironhor-
seauction.com
ONLINE REAL ESTATE
AUCTION 396 Pine Hills Rd.
Prosperity, SC Bidding clos-
es September 18 at 1:00pm
R.H. Lee & Co. Auctioneers
Inc. SCAL 192 www.rhlee.
com 803-337-2300
Real Estate & Contents
Auction Monroe, NC Real
Estate Sells On-Site 9/20
at 12pm Contents Online
9/9 through 9/19 www.theli-
goncompany.com 803-366-
3535 NCAL8951/SCAL1716
NCRL183864/SCRL17640

ADVERTISE YOUR AUC-
TION in 107 S.C. newspa-
pers for only $375. Your 25-
word classifed ad will reach
more than 2.6 million read-
ers. Call Donna Yount at the
S.C. Newspaper Network,
1-888-727-7377.
VACATION RENTALS
ADVERTISE YOUR VACA-
TION PROPERTY FOR
RENT OR SALE to more
than 2.6 million S.C. news-
paper readers. Your 25-word
classifed ad will appear in
107 S.C. newspapers for
only $375. Call Donna Yount
at the South Carolina News-
paper Network, 1-888-727-
7377.
HOMES AND LAND FOR
SALE
HOUSE FOR SALE. Down-
town Greer, 2 bedroom, 1
1/2 bath, new carpet and li-
noleum. $55,000. Possible
fnancing. 915-1016
9-10, 17
LAKE GREENWOOD. 1.58
acres, waterfront lot with
16x70 mobile home. 3 bed-
room, 2 bath and 16x70 add-
ed on room. 84 East Stage-
coach Road, Cross Hill.
$90,000. 864-621.7991
8-209-17
APARTMENTS FOR RENT
FOR RENT: ONE BED-
ROOM FURNISHED duplex
apartment in nice neighbor-
hood close to downtown.
$400 per month. 877-2946
9-3,10
MOBILE HOMES FOR
RENT
3 BEDROOM 2 BATH,
doublewide in good commu-
nity off of Mt. Lebanon Road.
$600 per month. Deposit and
references required. Call
380-1451.
9-3,10,17,24-TFN
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED: NEED
someone to cut grass, paint,
etc. Call 879-2015.
9-3,10,17,24-TFN
COLONIAL LIFE is seeking
B2B sales reps. Commis-
sions average $56K+/yr.
Training & leads. Sales ex-
perience required, LA&H
license preferred. Call Elisa-
beth at 803-391-5536.
HELP WANTED DRIVERS
DRIVERS: CDL-A. Average
$52,000 per yr. plus. Excel-
lent Home Time + Week-
ends. Monthly Bonuses up
to $650. 5,000w APUs for
YOUR Comfort + E-Logs.
Excellent Benefts. 100% no
touch. 877-704-3773
9-3,10
CDL-A COMPANY Teams:
Start .55 cpm! $3000 Sign-
On Bonus! $2000 of it is
PAID at Orientation! All
MILES PAID! 1-866-204-
8006
9-3,10
DRIVERS: CDL- A Company
Drivers. Quickway Transpor-
tation is Hiring. Home Every
Other Day, Excellent Ben-
efts, High Earnings. Call
877-600-2121 www.quick-
waycarriers.com
9-10
NEW PAY-FOR-EXPERI-
ENCE program pays up
to $0.41/mile. $1000 Sign
On Bonus for Exp Drivers!
SE Regional Needed! Call
866-501-0946 or SuperSer-
viceLLC.com
9-10
New Pay-For-Experience
program pays up to $0.41/
mile. $1000 Sign On Bonus
for Exp Drivers! SE Regional
Needed! Call 866-501-0946
or SuperServiceLLC.com
9-10
SOUTHEAST REGIONAL
DRIVER OPPORTUNITIES
$1,000 Sign On Bonus for
Exp Drivers.
Be home most weekends
Southeast regional runs
Guaranteed weekly
minimum pay Excellent com-
munication skills, dedication
and timeliness expected.
Drivers are based out of
the ATL Terminal. Must be
21-yeas or older with Class-A
CDL. At least 6 months OTR
experience required.
Call Super Service at 888-
408-5275.
9-10
OTR DRIVERS- Local car-
rier needs company drivers.
Southeast & Midwest lanes,
home most weekends. Va-
cation, Holidays, Ins., Ard
Trucking, 1702 N. Gov. Wil-
liams Hwy, Darlington SC.,
843-393-5101
DRIVERS: Owner Operators
and small feet owners need-
ed, call USA Truck today.
866-545-2014
Experienced OTR Flatbed
Drivers earn 50 up to 55 cpm
loaded. $1000 sign on to
Qualifed drivers. Home most
weekends. Call: 843-266-
3731 / www.bulldoghiway.
com EOE
GUARANTEED PAY! CLASS-
A -CDL FLATBED DRIVERS
NEEDED! Local, regional,
OTR. Great pay package/
benefts/401k match. 1yr exp.
required. Call JGR 864-488-
9030 Ext. 319, Greenville and
Gaffney SC locations. www.
jgr-inc.com
ADVERTISE YOUR DRIVER
JOBS in 107 S.C. newspa-
pers for only $375. Your 25-
word classifed ad will reach
more than 2.6 million readers.
Call Donna Yount at the S.C.
Newspaper Network, 1-888-
727-7377.
FOR SALE
TWO BURIAL PLOTS at
Woods Memorial Gardens
(side-by-side). Will sell both
lots for $1,750.00. Contact
907-4299. Lots presently
selling for $1,040.00 each
plus $50 transfer fee. Please
leave message.
9-10, 17, 24, 10-1
MTD ROTO TILLER for sale.
18 wide, 205 cc 4 stroke
engine. Like new condition,
Call 439-2830.
DirectTV. 2 Year Savings
Event! Over 140 channels
only $29.99 a month. Only
DirecTV gives you 2 YEARS
of savings and a FREE Ge-
nie upgrade! Call 1-800-908-
5974
DISH TV Retailer - Starting at
$19.99/month (for 12 mos.)
& High Speed Internet start-
ing at $14.95/month (where
available.) SAVE! Ask About
SAME DAY Installation! CALL
Now! 1-800-635-0278
REDUCE YOUR CABLE
BILL!* Get a whole-home
Satellite system installed at
NO COST and programming
starting at $19.99/mo. FREE
HD/DVR Upgrade to new call-
ers, SO CALL NOW 1-800-
631-7038
MISCELLANEOUS
1989 HONDA GL1500
givnig away for free due
to the death of previous
owner. Please email rob-
inpeter4009@gmail.com if
interested.
8-27-9-3,10
AIRLINE CAREERS begin
here - Get started by train-
ing as FAA certifed Aviation
Technician. Financial aid
for qualifed students. Job
placement assistance. Call
Aviation Institute of Mainte-
nance 866-367-2513
SERVICES
All Things Basementy! Base-
ment Systems Inc. Call us for
all of your basement needs!
Waterproofng, Finishing,
Structural Repairs, Humid-
ity and Mold Control. FREE
ESTIMATES! Call 1-800-307-
8128
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Tuesday, September 16,
2014, is the last day to re-
deem winning tickets in the
following South Carolina Edu-
cation Lottery Instant Game:
(669) Cash Spectacular
YARD SALE
HUMONGOUS
YARD SALE
FRIDAY & SATURDAY Sep-
tember 12 & 13. 8:00 a.m.
until at 300 East Fairview Av-
enue, Greer.
9-10
BIGGEST
YARD SALE EVER
FIRST HOUSE BEHIND
Fews Chapel Church off
Hwy. 101 North. Thursday &
Friday, September 11 & 12.
7:00 a.m. until. Too many
items to list. Come see. If
rain, sale will be in base-
ment and under carport.
9-10
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2014 CLASSIFIEDS THE GREER CITIZEN B7
EMERYS
TREE
SERVICE
Fertilization
Thinning
Removals
Stump Grinding
Fully Insured
Free Estimates
895-1852
HELP WANTED
327 Suber Road
1 & 2 Bedroom
879-2015
NOW LEASING!
JORDAN
MINI-WAREHOUSES
FOR RENT
Jordan Rental Agency
329 Suber Rd.
Greer, SC 29651
879-2015
3
-
8
-
t
f
n
c
Last weeks answers
To schedule an interview,
visit KOHLSCAREERS.COM
Kohls is now hiring
Credit Associates!
MUST BE 17 YEARS OR OLDER TO APPLY EOE A DRUG-SCREENING COMPANY
Part-Time/Temporary Positions:
Kohls Department Stores is seeking friendly,
outgoing people to greet customers and solicit
and process Kohls Charge applications during
the Grand Opening of our new store in:
These positions are part-time, temporary
assignments (9/21-10/11) with the potential for
further employment. A friendly, customer-focused
attitude and some data entry experience are
required. We offer fexible hours and merchandise
discounts. Several positions are available with an
opportunity to earn a bonus!
GREER
PLACE YOUR AD IN
107 S.C. NEWSPAPERS
and reach more than 2.5 million readers
using our small space display ad network
South Carolina
Newspaper Network
Donna Yount 888.727.7377
scnewspapernetwork.com
Statewide or regional buys available
AUCTIONS
MOBILE HOMES
FOR RENT
HELP WANTED
DRIVERS/
HELP WANTED
VACATION
RENTALS
HOMES AND
LAND FOR SALE
APARTMENTS
FOR RENT
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
ANNOUNCEMENTS
CALL FOR SERVICES
YARD
SALES
MISCELLANEOUS
WANT IT!
FIND IT!
BUY IT!
SELL IT!
The
Greer
Citizen
CLASSIFIEDS
877-2076
LIVING HERE
The Greer Citizen
B8 THE GREER CITIZEN WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2014
KEEPING UP
WITH JONES
KATIE
JONES


Adios,
readers
I
have news. This will
likely be the last Keep-
ing Up With Jones
column. I will no longer
be with The Greer Citizen.
I know, I know youre
devastated.
Ive joined the Ameri-
Corps Upstate program
and will be at Greer Relief,
starting Sept. 8.
I am incredibly excited
about this opportunity.
Despite what some peo-
ple think (cough, cough,
Greer Citizen crew), I am
not disppearing.
Im not dying or joining
the witness protection.
Im not even leaving
downtown Greer.
Ive loved, loved, loved
my time in journalism.
Its been crazy, in the best
way.
I have met so many
wonderful people and got-
ten to do so many things
I would have never done
otherwise.
I snuggled a baby bear!
Lets not forget that.
I dont know if this is a
goodbye to journalism
or a see you later.
Its no secret Im work-
ing on my masters degree
in library and information
science.
Im not getting that for
the fun of it Im making
a career change.
Im excited, most defi-
nitely, for the change, but
Im sad too.
I joined my first news-
paper staff in middle
school. It was then that
I decided this is what I
wanted to do.
When I was 6 or so, I
wrote (and very poorly
illustrated) my first story.
It was not good.
I like to think Ive im-
proved since then. Writing
has been a big part of my
life since I learned how to
do it.
Im an indecisive per-
son. A worrier.
I make mountains out
of molehills and will bury
my head in the sand when
possible.
With the house, for
example, it has taken
me weeks to pick paint
colors.
Once I do make a
choice, I fret for a while
about whether or not its
the right choice.
Imagine what changing
career fields could do to
me.
But Im more than ready
for a change.
I feel good about this
decision.
Im excited to learn new
skills and immerse myself
in a new world.
The past few years have
been downright crazy.
Ive grown up just
enough to know that I
really have no idea what
Im doing.
Ive learned enough to
know I really know next
to nothing in the grand
scheme of things.
So, its time to try some-
thing new. Keep learning
new things.
Its been fun, Greer. Ill
be around.
Locally owned and operated
for over 45 years.
49
39
29
Expires 10-31-14
$
$
$
Remembers
Davenport
High
BY BILLY CANNADA
EDITOR
I
ts been seven decades
since Don Owens
graduated from Greer
High School, but he and
several classmates still
keep in touch.
The class of 1944 cel-
ebrated a milestone last
week, holding its 70th
reunion at Greer First
Baptist Church.
For Owens, the class
student body president, it
was a time to reflect.
This is the first time
weve had one in six
years, Owens said. Wed
just put it off and put it
off.
Owens said its good to
see familiar faces again.
Theyve changed, but
most have stayed the
same, he said. There
hasnt been too much
change from six years
ago. Weve lost some
people during that six
years, but there were 80
of us when we started.
About 21 of the 80 are
still living, he said. You
can figure were all 86 to
88 years old.
Back then, the school
was known as Davenport
High School, named for
D.D. Davenport, who paid
most of the construction
costs. Davenport served
as Greers high school un-
til 1953. Thats when the
North Main Street build-
ing was completed. The
old building then became
Davenport Junior High,
until it burned down in
1970.
Owens said he enjoyed
school at Davenport.
We went to Greer High
where Davenport used to
SEE REUNION | B12
From D&D
Motors
donation
BY KATIE JONES
STAFF WRITER
Donations continue
to come in for the Daily
Bread Ministries Shelter
to Empower People (STEP),
a rehabilitation homeless
shelter set to break ground
on East Poinsett Street on
Oct. 1.
Most recently, D & D Mo-
tors has help, donating
$10,000 to the shelter.
I think its a fantastic
idea, said Skip Daven-
port, D & D president and
general manager. Theres
so many people in need in
our area.
D & D knows what a great
job Daily Bread Ministries
does, Davenport said.
Our goal is to help out
people in our local com-
munity who are in need,
he said. When it comes to
having something to eat,
thats about as basic of a
need as you can get. Help-
ing people transition off of
needing help to being able
to help themselves just
takes the whole process
in the right direction. We
felt like they were right on
target and wanted to help
out.
The Davenport fam-
ily has been helping the
Greer community for 75
years, said Norm West,
STEP construction project
manager.
I know, because I come
here at least once a year,
asking for donations for all
different kinds of stuff
and they always help out,
West said. Theyve always
supported the community,
as far as the soup kitchen,
cancer everything.
The shelter, estimated
to cost $475,000, will be
modeled after the pro-
gram at Triune Mercy Cen-
ter in Greenville. It will
house three individuals or
families in 90 or 180-day
programs where they will
receive counseling.
The Greer community
doesnt have a homeless
shelter currently, but has
needed one for some time,
said Nancy Webb, vice
chair of the board.
One of the founders
of our soup kitchen, this
was his dream, Webb
said. Norm has come
back again to help us ful-
fill Merle States dream of
a shelter. People are liv-
ing in their cars. We have
people living in tents. We
need to try and help out
where we can. Not only
feed the hungry, but shel-
ter them as well and help
them come out of home-
lessness. Thats our goal.
In the next five years,
Daily Bread Ministries
hopes to have 16 units,
West said. Four families is
only a dent, he said.
Were starting off with
four on the one shelter,
but then there will be
four more built under a
separate shelter, he said.
Were negotiating for
property next door.
The shelter, set to be op-
erational by February, still
needs more funding, West
said.
I dont want to beg for
money, but this money is
being used, he said. This
is going to impact the next
generation. When we bring
these families out of pov-
ertyTheir children are
not going to be in poverty.
You know what happens
in reverse.
Poverty is a generation-
al problem and perhaps we
can stop it, Webb said.
For more information or
to get involved with STEP,
go to greersoupkitchen.
Homeless shelter receives $10,000
MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN
Nancy Webb accepts a check from Skip Davenport on behalf of Daily Bread Ministries
Shelter to Empower People. The $10,000 check will aid in the construction of apartments
for homeless families.

PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
The Greer High School (then known as Davenport High) class of 1944 celebrates its 70th reunion last Thursday
at Greer First Baptist Church. This was the groups frst reunion in six years.
Class of 44 celebrates
70YEAR REUNION
Its been fun, Greer.
Ill be around
WASHINGTON CENTER
CELEBRATES FLAT STANLEY
The students in Mrs.
Sarah Tanners Wash-
ington Center Medical
Homebound class have
begun the school year by
listening to the book Flat
Stanley, by Jeff Brown and
making their own Flat
Stanley.
A very special Flat Stan-
ley felt doll has even been
made by one of the par-
ents to enrich learning.
Each students Flat Stan-
ley will be photographed
while on daily outings,
family trips and other ad-
ventures.
Many photographs fea-
turing Flat Stanley will be
collected and kept as class
memories on a special
timeline this year.
LANGSTON CHARTER
TO HOLD 201516 LOTTERY
Prospective par-
ents must attend one of
the three application ori-
entation meetings, as part
of the lottery application
process for the Langston
Charter Middle School
2015-16 lottery.
The meetings will be at 7
p.m. Sept. 30; 4 p.m. Oct.
11 and 7 p.m. Oct. 23. In
addition to attending a
meeting, parents must
submit a lottery applica-
tion, which will be avail-
able Oct. 1 at langston-
charter.org. The deadline
for all lottery applications
is 4 p.m. Nov. 3.
A lottery of all complete
applications will be held
at 5 p.m. Nov. 20 at the
school and is open to the
public. Parents of former
or current students with a
sibling planning to enroll
for next year must com-
plete the application pro-
cess before the deadline
of Nov. 3.
Call Celanie Martin, Reg-
istrar, at 286-9700 with
any questions.
WOFFORD ANNOUNCES
SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS
Ninety percent of Wof-
fords enrolled students
receive approximately $32
million in scholarships,
grants and loans each
year.
Each of the endowed
scholarship funds requires
that recipients demon-
strate outstanding charac-
ter, academic achievement,
and potential for contribu-
tion to society; some have
additional requirements
for eligibility.
The following local stu-
dents have been awarded
a Merit Scholarship to at-
tend Wofford College for
the 2014-15 academic
year.
Duncan
Tyreik Lyles, Byrnes
Alex Malsch, Saint Jo-
sephs Catholic School
Nimeshika Yatiyawela,
Byrnes
Greer
Bella Santoro, Riverside
William Smith, Riverside
Jake Brice, J.L. Mann
Maya Ward, Riverside
Lyman
Cierra Holcombe, By-
rnes
Taylor Owens, Byrnes
Taylors
Jesse Cabrera, Riverside
Joel Newland, Eastside
Wellford
Alyssa Ballenger, Byrnes
Arnesha Rector, Dor-
man
Brittney Tate, Byrnes
Wofford College, es-
tablished in 1854, is an
independent liberal arts
college of 1,650 students.
Wofford ranks 7th nation-
ally in the percentage of
undergraduates receiving
credit for study abroad.
Home to one of the na-
tions 283 Phi Beta Kappa
chapters, Woffords his-
toric 175-acre campus is
recognized as a national
arboretum. Wofford is af-
filiated with the United
Methodist Church
BJU NAMED 15TH BEST
VALUE COLLEGE IN NATION
Bob Jones University has
been named the 15th Best
Value College in the nation
by Educate to Career Col-
lege Ranking Index 2014
(ETC).
According to ETC, the
index analyzes the qual-
ity of students when they
enter a given college, the
total costs related to at-
tending the college and
the outcomes of the stu-
dents when they enter the
labor market.
The rankings results
are determined by which
schools did the best job
of improving the earnings
and attainment of quality
employment of their stu-
dents.
The ETC College Rank-
ings Index is comprised of
accredited 4-year colleges
with annual enrollments
greater than 1,000 stu-
dents.
The Index analyzes
publicly available data
for more than 1,200 col-
leges, representing 94%
of all students enrolled in
4-year colleges. The index
may be accessed at www.
educatetocareer.org
Some of the metrics
used in calculating the col-
lege rankings include:
Percentage of graduates
employed in occupations
which utilize their field of
study
Average salary earned
by recent graduates, by
school for each major cat-
egory (adjusted for region,
occupation and other vari-
ables)
Percentage of persons
employed within one year
of graduation (weighted
on an occupational trend
basis)
Major, weighted against
national norms
Number of years to
graduate
Tuition net cost
Loan default rates
A basket of input vari-
ables which norm students
to a common standard for
each major
WATSON NAMED TO COKER
COLLEGE DEANS LIST
Naomi Watson, of Tay-
lors, has been named to
the Spring 2014 Deans
List at Coker College for
earning a 3.75 or better
grade point average (on a
4.0 scale).
LYMAN STUDENT AWARDED
WOFFORD SCHOLARSHIP
Cierra Holcombe, of Ly-
man, has received a Merit
Scholarship to attend Wof-
ford College for the 2014-
15 academic year.
Holcombe, a member
of the class of 2018, is a
graduate of Byrnes High
School.
Ninety percent of Wof-
fords enrolled students
receive approximately $32
million in scholarships,
grants and loans each
year.
Each of the endowed
scholarship funds requires
that recipients demon-
strate outstanding charac-
ter, academic achievement,
and potential for contribu-
tion to society; some have
additional requirements
for eligibility.
SIMULATION TRAINING
SESSION AT TECH
The Simulation Technol-
ogies and Training (STAT)
Center at Greenville Tech-
nical College welcomes stu-
dents from all of the col-
leges 17 health programs,
giving them a chance to
practice and perfect skills
on human patient simula-
tors before they work with
real patients on the job.
Many of these students
have never encountered
the simulators before they
enter the center, and they
are often surprised by the
lifelike appearance and
reactions of these high-
tech teaching tools.
Last week, the center
welcomed a visitor who
is very familiar with hu-
man patient simulators. In
fact, he invented the first
simulator for transtho-
racic echocardiography to
incorporate virtual real-
ity technology while work-
ing for a company he co-
founded, VIMEDIX Virtual
Medical Imaging Training
Systems.
That company was ac-
quired by CAE Healthcare
in 2010, where Dr. Rob-
ert Amyot now serves as
president. He and a team
from CAE spent a few days
at the STAT Center, watch-
ing simulators produced
by CAE and other vendors
in action.
The STAT Center at
Greenville Technical Col-
lege recently celebrated
five years in operation.
During that time, the cen-
ter has hosted over 900
classes and more than
17,000 student visits.
The facility includes
eight lifelike environ-
ments including an out-
door scene, indoor scene,
emergency room, labor
and delivery area, neona-
tal resuscitation, standard
patient room, operating
room, and specialty room.
Dr. Amyot and his team
watched as the STAT
team ran scenarios with
students and performed
debriefing to help the stu-
dents understand what
they had done right and
how they could improve.
The CAE team brought a
new product, the Fidelis
Lucina birthing simula-
tor, to demonstrate. This
model can give birth and
also be used for other non-
birthing simulations, mak-
ing it more versatile than
previous models.
OUR SCHOOLS
The Greer Citizen
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2014 THE GREER CITIZEN B9
SCHOOL
NEWS
GREENVILLE COUNTY |
HIGHER EDUCATION |
ELEMENTARY
Thursday: Barbecue pork
sandwich, sweet Thai chili
chicken, brown rice, fruit and
vegetable bar.
Friday: Cheese pizza, Bruns-
wick stew, vegetation station,
steamed broccoli, assorted
fruit, assorted fresh fruit.
Monday: Roasted chicken
breast and thigh, baked
potato bar, whole grain roll,
vegetation station, South-
western chicken soup, lima
beans, assorted canned fruit,
assorted fresh fruit.
Tuesday: Teriyaki chicken,
chicken gumbo, brown rice,
fruit and vegetable bar,
Wednesday: Baked penne
with meatballs, whole grain
roll, turkey sandwich, lettuce
and tomato, vegetation
station, tomato basil soup,
steamed broccoli, assorted
canned fruit, fresh fruit.
MIDDLE
Thursday: Chicken Caesar
salad, barbecue pork sand-
wich, sweet Thai chili chicken,
brown rice, whole grain roll,
steamed carrots, steamed
peas, assorted fresh fruit, as-
sorted canned fruit.
Friday: Chef salad, meatball
sub, barbecue veggie burger,
whole grain roll, baked beans,
sweet potato bites, assorted
fresh fruit, assorted canned
fruit.
Monday: Mandarin chicken
salad, roasted barbecue
chicken, whole grain roll,
garden salad, lima beans,
assorted fresh fruit, assorted
canned fruit.
Tuesday: Grilled chicken
salad, teriyaki chicken, spicy
chicken, whole grain roll,
brown rice, steamed broccoli,
steamed carrots, assorted
fresh fruit, assorted canned
fruit.
Wednesday: Southwest
chicken salad, stuf shells,
chicken gumbo, brown rice,
whole grain roll, green beans,
vegetable medley, assorted
fresh fruit, assorted canned
fruit.
HIGH
Thursday: Chicken Caesar
salad, barbecue pork sand-
wich, sweet Thai chili chicken,
brown rice, whole grain roll,
steamed carrots, steamed
peas, assorted fresh fruit, as-
sorted canned fruit.
Friday: Chef salad, meatball
sub, barbecue veggie burger,
whole grain roll, baked beans,
sweet potato bites, assorted
fresh fruit, assorted canned
fruit.
Monday: Mandarin chicken
salad, roasted barbecue
chicken, whole grain roll,
garden salad, lima beans,
assorted fresh fruit, assorted
canned fruit.
Tuesday: Grilled chicken
salad, teriyaki chicken, spicy
chicken, whole grain roll,
brown rice, steamed broccoli,
steamed carrots, assorted
fresh fruit, assorted canned
fruit.
Wednesday: Southwest
chicken salad, stuf shells,
chicken gumbo, brown rice,
whole grain roll, green beans,
vegetable medley, assorted
fresh fruit, assorted canned
fruit.
LUNCH
MENUS
GREENVILLE COUNTY |

$
$
$
$
O
ne Itemat Regular Price
Coupon Coupon
COUPON FOR IN-STORE OR ONLINE USE!
Cash Value 1/10.
Coupon
Code:
Offer good for one item at regular price only.
One coupon per customer per day. Must present coupon at time of purchase.
Offer is not valid with any other coupon, discount or previous purchase.
Excludes CRICUT products, Tim Holtz Vagabond Machine, Silhouette CAMEO Machine,
candy, helium tanks, gift cards, custom orders, special orders, labor, rentals or class fees.
A single cut of fabric or trim by the yard equals one item.
Online fabric & trim discount is limited to 10 yards, single cut.
TAYLORS
Wade Hampton Blvd & Fairview Road
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
Riverside Middle students recently celebrated College Day by wearing their school colors. Staf participated as well, and
it brought about discussions about college plans. Pictured are sixth grade students and teachers, sixth grade Assistant
Principal Cindy Bush and school Principal Kate Malone.
PHOTO | SUBMITTED
Chandler Creek Elementarys new assistant principal, Leah
Staford, center, works with students, Destiny Austin and
Dalal Achkar.
LITTLE THEATRE TO STAGE
LEGALLY BLONDE MUSICAL
Tickets go on sale Sept.
1 for Greenville Little
Theatres production of
Legally Blonde: The Musi-
cal.
An Upstate premiere
of the Broadway hit fea-
tures music and lyrics
by Laurence OKeefe and
Nell Benjamin. Harvards
beloved blonde takes the
stage by pink storm in this
fun, upbeat musical about
self-discovery. Based on
the adored movie, Legally
Blonde stays true to form
with a peppy score and a
playful book.
Legally Blonde runs
September 19-20, 25-27,
and Oct. 2-4 at 8 p.m.; and
September 21 and 28 at 3
p.m.
For more information,
visit greenvillelittlethe-
atre.org or call the box
office at 233-6238. The
Greenville Little Theatre is
located at 444 College St.
in Greenville.
ROCK AND ROLL REUNION
CONCERT SET FOR SEPT. 19
Rock and Roll Reunion
is scheduled for Sept. 19
in the City of Greer am-
phitheater. The band will
play from 7-8 p.m. and 9-
10 p.m.
The first ever Greer Idol
Reunion will be held dur-
ing intermission.
LAKE ROBINSON JURIED
ART COMPETITION BEGINS
Friends of Lake Robin-
son invite you to submit
your best two-dimensional
art capturing the beauty of
Lake Robinson and vie for
a chance to receive a cash
prize ($100 first place, $50
second place, $25 third
place).
This years juror is Geor-
gia Harrison, a local paint-
er and retired art teacher
who currently teaches
painting for the OLLI pro-
gram at Furman Univer-
sity.
The competition is
opened to the general pub-
lic regardless of age. Limit
two entries per artist.
Art is to be of Lake Rob-
inson environs and must
be original art. All entries
must be submitted via .jpg
file no later than Septem-
ber 13, 2014.
Selected art will be dis-
played at Lake Robinson
Day of Celebration to be
held Oct. 12 at the Verne
Smith Park.
Visit www.lakerobinson.
org for details and to en-
ter.
GCAC TAKING DONATIONS
OF TOOLS, COSTUMES
GCAC is accepting used
dance shoes and costumes.
We will repurpose them or
give them to someone to
use.
We are also in need of
working power tools and
handheld tools (to be used
in the construction of sets)
such as drills, saws, ham-
mers, screwdrivers, etc.
Please contact GCAC su-
pervisor Robin Byouk at
848-5383 or artscouncil@
cityofgreer.org. A receipt
can be provided. GCAC is
a 501(c)(3).
SHREK THE MUSICAL!
TICKETS ON SALE SEPT. 15
Tickets go on sale Sept.
15 for the Greer Childrens
Theatre production of
Shrek the Musical!
Everyones favorite ogre
is back in the hilarious
stage spectacle based on
the Oscar-winning smash
hit film.
Based on the Dream-
Works Animation film,
Shrek The Musical is a
TONY Award-winning
fairy tale adventure fea-
turing all new songs from
Jeanine Tesori (Thorough-
ly Modern Millie, Caroline
or Change) and a sidesplit-
ting book by David Lind-
say-Abaire. Shrek brings
all the beloved characters
you know from the film to
life on stage, and proves
theres more to the story
than meets the ears.
Once upon a time, there
was a little ogre named
Shrek And thus begins
the tale of an unlikely
hero who finds himself
on a life-changing journey
alongside a wisecracking
Donkey and a feisty prin-
cess who resists her res-
cue.
Throw in a short tem-
pered bad guy, a cookie
with an attitude, and over
a dozen other fairy tale
misfits, and youve got
the kind of mess that calls
for a real hero. Luckily,
theres one on hand...and
his name is Shrek.
Show times are Oct. 17-
19 and 24-26. Friday and
Saturday at 7 p.m. Sunday
at 2 p.m. at the J. Harley
Bonds Career Center, 505
N. Main St.
Tickets are $15 for
adults, $12 for students
and seniors, and $7 for
children under 5. They can
be purchased at greercul-
turalarts.com.
CULTURAL ARTS TO HOLD
ALADDIN JR. AUDITIONS
Aladdin Jr. auditions
will be held Monday, Nov.
3, and Wednesday Nov. 5,
from 6-8 p.m. at the Tryon
Recreation Center, 226
Oakland Ave. in Greer.
Callbacks are Thursday,
Nov. 6, from 6:30-9 p.m.
Cast minimum age is 6
to senior in high school.
Please bring a non-re-
turnable photograph.
Wear dance shoes and
comfortable clothes. You
will be asked to learn a
simple dance.
Prepare 16 bars from a
song similar to those in
Aladdin. Please bring your
own accompaniment or
sing a cappella.
Auditions are on a first
come first seen basis. So
bring a book or something
to occupy your time while
waiting your turn.
The cast list will be post-
ed on greerculturalarts.
com on Tuesday, Nov. 11,
by 5 p.m.
The mandatory parent
/cast meeting will be held
on Nov. 13.
Email Robin at artscoun-
cil@cityofgreer.org for
more information.
GREER OPRY HOUSE HOLDS
LINE DANCING
Classic Country Band
with Ed Burrell at 8 p.m.
Admission is $9. Free line
dancing from 6:30-7:30
p.m. each Saturday night.
STOMPING GROUNDS HAS
JAM, CELTIC SESSIONS
Stomping Grounds hosts
Old Time Jam with Bob
Buckingham, every first
and third Tuesday of the
month. Buckingham in-
vites anyone who has a
banjo, guitar, bass, fiddle,
etc. to come and jam from
7-9 p.m.
Even if you dont play,
come listen to this group
SEE EVENTS | B12
ENTERTAINMENT
The Greer Citizen
B10 THE GREER CITIZEN WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2014
DVD previews
COUCH THEATER |


THINGS
TO DO
Zac Efron in Neighbors
By Sam Struckhof
NEW RELEASES
FOR WEEK OF SEPT. 22
PICKS OF THE WEEK
Neighbors (R) -
- A young couple with a
bouncing baby daughter
(Seth Rogen and Rose By-
rne) lose their suburban
serenity when a rowdy
fraternity -- led by ma-
niacal, shirtless party-boy
Zac Efron -- takes over the
house next door. At first,
the hip mom and dad try
to be cool and party with
the frat boys, but then
quickly realize that they
cant possibly keep up
with the non-stop party
machine. Logical forms of
mediation soon fly out the
window, pitting the par-
ents against the partiers in
an escalating prank-war.
Rogen fits perfectly
into his role, as audiences
have seen him transition
from shiftless slacker to
reformed-but-still-casual
adulthood. Byrne is the
real surprise in the film,
displaying comedic chops
not seen since Brides-
maids. There are flashes
of clever humor, but most
of the gags are the shock-
ing and gross-out kind.
The Rover (R) -- Ban-
dits steal a mans car,
leaving him stranded in a
scorching wasteland. The
victim, Eric (Guy Pearce),
now has a bandit leaders
younger brother (Robert
Pattinson) and a plan to
get his car back. Its 10
years after the collapse of
society, and the Australian
outback isnt a good place
to wander around ... and
an even worse place to
make friends.
Director David Michod
plays his cards close to
the vest. Details about the
fall of society are scarce,
leaving a lot of that story-
telling to the barren set-
ting and the desperation
on the faces of the char-
acters. Pattinson delivers
a strong performance as
a lost, dimwitted young
man carrying a lot of loss
behind his eyes.
The Signal (PG-13) -
- Three college kids on a
road trip to California re-
ceive a message from NO-
MAD, a mysterious hacker
who challenges them to
come find him. Nic, Jo-
nah and Hailey (Brenton
Thwaites, Beau Knapp, Ol-
ivia Cooke) follow the trail
to a dusty corner of Ne-
vada, and then everything
changes. The trio is sepa-
rated, and Nic wakes up
in a strange facility where
he is interrogated by a
dead-pan man in a hazmat
suit (Laurence Fishburne).
From there, its a slowly
unraveling mystery with
science-fiction elements
creeping into the picture.
The final twists may not
be enough for some audi-
ences, but its an interest-
ing flick for a low-budget,
sci-fi headscratcher.
Very Good Girls (R) --
The friendship of two teen
girls is tested by romantic
rivalry when they become
interested in the same boy.
Lilly (Dakota Fanning) and
Gerri (Elizabeth Olsen) are
determined to lose their
virginity the summer be-
fore they start college, but
not in an American Pie
kind of way -- this movie
takes the pledge a bit more
seriously. Enter David
(Robert Boyd Holbrook), an
ice-cream-vending blond
with a knack for photogra-
phy. A love triangle forms,
and feelings get hurt. This
drama probably wont feel
authentic to younger audi-
ences, and may just bore
more mature crowds.
TV RELEASES
Modern Family: Season
5
Scandal: Season 3
Daniel Boone: The Com-
plete Series
Rating: 7.5 out of 10
Run time: 77 minutes
Rated: G
I
f you love animals
or nature, youll be
in heaven watching
Bears, the latest offer-
ing from Disneys new
documentary production
company. Fast-moving,
heartwarming and beauti-
fully shot, its a gripping
look at Americas most
majestic land animal in
Americas grandest wil-
derness.
Directed by Alastair
Fothergill and Keith Schol-
ey (the same team that
made the 2011 Disneyna-
ture predecessor, African
Cats), the film follows an
adult grizzly named Sky
and her two cubs, Amber
and Scout, through their
first year of life. Skys
goals are simple, but not
easy find food and keep
the two cubs alive. With
larger bears and other
opportunistic preda-
tors lurking nearby, the
mother must use every bit
of her wit, courage and
patience to get the family
to next winter.
The best reason to see
Bears is its breathtaking
cinematography. From
the grandiose helicopter
shots to the slow-motion
captures of bears chomp-
ing salmon in mid-air, it is
a beautiful film to watch.
The character develop-
ment is also superb, as
Fothergill and Scholey do
a good job illustrating the
different personalities of
the two cubs. Amber is
timid and clingy, while
Scout is more of a free
spirit occasionally a
little too independent for
his own good.
Even the predators, a
wolf named Tikaani and
two alpha grizzlies named
Chinook and Magnus, are
intimately captured and
sensitively portrayed.
The tales natural tension
is also carefully balanced
by lighter, more humor-
ous moments involving
the two cubs learning to
swim, hunt, climb and
play.
Bears is such a plea-
sure to watch that its
easy to forget its a G-
rated Disney flick target-
ed primarily towards kids.
As such, its frustratingly
simplistic at times and
suffers from a heavy dose
of goofiness. Narrator
John C. Reillys voice-over
jokes are corny as they
come, though thats more
the writers fault than his.
Like, African Cats,
Bears does a good job
humanizing some of the
worlds most awe-inspir-
ing apex predators. Like
lions, grizzlies can kill a
human in a matter of sec-
onds, but their impressive
physical prowess takes a
backseat here to the very
same emotions of wander,
love and fear with which
most viewers can identify.
Its a sweeping docu-
mentary, adventure, and
family movie all rolled
into one.
LOCKE
Rating: 6 out of 10
Run time: 84 minutes
Rated: R for language and
adult themes
One of these days,
Thomas Hardy will prob-
ably win an Academy
award. In the meantime,
he seems to be honing his
talents in intense low-
budget dramas like this
one. In this tight novelty
of a film, the actor plays
Ivan Locke, a British
construction company big
wig with a loving family
and calm, logical demean-
or.
The foundation hes
worked his whole life
to build comes crashing
down when he learns a
woman he knocked up
is giving birth to his son
that evening. As he races
the two hours down the
interstate en route to the
delivery room, his damage
control talents are put to
the test. For 90 minutes,
he must juggle panicked
calls from his wife, sons,
work mates and baby
mama.
The entire movie takes
place inside Ivans BMW,
heightening its suffo-
cating, claustrophobic
feel. Writer/director
Stephen Knight (who did
the superior 2007 flick
Eastern Promises) keeps
the story zipping along in
real time, while the score
and dizzying cinema-
tography accentuate the
protagonists psychologi-
cal unraveling.
Few actors could carry it
all off the way Hardy does
here, in a performance
that students should
study for years to come.
The principal weakness
of Locke is that its
more character study than
actual story, and its hard
to care too much about
characters we hear but
never see. The repeated
rants that Ivan directs
towards his dead father
are more absurd than
revealing, putting a dent
in the films credibility.
But those flaws aside,
this is a worthy minimal-
ist showcase for Hardy,
who proves once again
hes one of Englands top
actors.
Bears is both breathtaking and heartwarming
PHOTO | COURTESY WALT DISNEY PRODUCTIONS
Directed by Alastair Fothergill and Keith Scholey (the same team that made the 2011 Disneynature predecessor, African
Cats), Bears follows an adult grizzly named Sky and her two cubs, Amber and Scout, through their frst year of life.
PHOTO | COURTESY SHOEBOX FILMS
Locke is a worthy minimalist showcase for Thomas Hardy,
who proves once again hes one of Englands top actors.
DVD
REVIEWS
WILLIAM
BUCHHEIT

BY DANA BLOCK
THE BOLD AND
THE BEAUTIFUL
Feeling pressured to de-
liver the kind of sketches
that Ridge was anticipat-
ing, Caroline interrogated
him about what was really
going on. Maya shameless-
ly threw herself at an unin-
terested Rick. Brooke and
Katie made a conscious
effort to get their relation-
ship back on track. Bill told
Liam about Wyatts latest
scheme. Maya grew suspi-
cious of Ridge and Caro-
lines shared time. Charlie
learned that Quinn was in
Paris at the same time that
Liam and Ivy were there.
Bill gave Quinn the benefit
of the doubt regarding her
reasoning for pushing Ivy
into the Seine river. Pam
and Charlie dug up more
dirt on Quinn. Wait to See:
Hope considers starting a
family with Wyatt.
DAYS OF OUR LIVES
Despite trying to ignore
her feelings for Aiden,
Hope had a romantic fan-
tasy about him. Eve plot-
ted to break up JJ and
Paige. Kate feared that EJ
and Sami would get back
together. Much to Hopes
dismay, Aiden and Ni-
cole shared a bond. Paige
was a little uneasy when
JJ hinted that he would
like to be more intimate
with her. Jennifer was
hurt when Daniel wasnt
quite as ready to reconcile
as she thought. Theresa
was horrified by Kristens
news. Will attempted to
patch things up with Sami.
EJ and Clyde had a tense
confrontation. Brady and
Marlena waited anxiously
to see if the experimental
drug would bring John
back to them. Kristen
snapped when Theresa re-
vealed that she and Brady
slept together. Wait to
See: Eve sabotages JJ and
Paiges college party.
GENERAL HOSPITAL
Julian tried to win back
Alexis, but Alexis had her
sights set on another man.
Jordan hoped to convince
Ava to name the mob boss.
Sabrina slowly started to
plot her revenge. Sam and
Patrick changed their in-
vestigative strategy after
learning that Luke might
have been involved in the
accident. Nina pressured
Rosalie to help bring down
the next person on her list.
Lulu and Maxie each found
themselves in serious dan-
ger. TJ wanted to know
the identity of Shawns
mystery woman. Anna re-
luctantly worked with Ob-
recht to get to the truth.
Rosalie overheard some
secret information while
joining Michael, Kiki and
Morgan for pizza. Wait to
See: Sonny and Carly remi-
nisce about Jason.
THE YOUNG AND
THE RESTLESS
Victor threatened Dr.
Cutler for his lack of prog-
ress with Phyllis. Chelsea
had a dream about Adam.
Mariah asked Kevin to
help her leave Genoa City.
Sharon noticed the tension
between Hilary and Devon.
Christine threw a tension-
filled surprise party for
Paul. Nikki found a drink-
ing buddy in a sketchy
woman named Maureen.
Victor was evasive with
Nikki about where he had
been lately. Jack assured
Kelly that he was over his
feelings for Phyllis. Vic-
toria told her father that
Ashley was back in town
working at Jabot. Maureen
discovered Nikkis real
identity after seeing her
picture in a newspaper.
Malcolm surprised every-
one by coming to town
to visit Neil. Wait to See:
Dylan makes a rash deci-
sion.
DEAR DR. ROACH: I
am 26 years old, 6 feet, 3
inches tall and weigh 290
pounds. About two years
ago, I had chest pain and
palpitations. I saw a cardi-
ologist, who performed an
echocardiogram. It showed
mild LVH and mild pulmo-
nary hypertension. I had
multiple EKGs, and my
doctor says I have a clean
bill of health. Are any of
the symptoms I have dan-
gerous, or am I overreact-
ing? -- J.A.
ANSWER: Chest pain
and palpitations -- such as
pounding, racing or flut-
tering heart -- are common
concerns that occasionally
represent serious heart
disease but often dont.
Its estimated that the av-
erage person has 500 or
so abnormal heartbeats a
day, and these can be felt
as palpitations. Chest pain
should raise the concern
for angina caused by heart
blockages, but that would
be extremely unusual in a
26-year-old.
The concern I have in
hearing about your echo
results is that they could
represent obstructive
sleep apnea. Left ventricu-
lar hypertrophy (LVH) is
the hearts response to
chronic stress, especially
to elevated blood pres-
sure, which is common in
sleep apnea. Pulmonary
hypertension has many
causes, but in someone
very overweight (your
body mass index, BMI, is
36.2, where obese is de-
fined as over 30), I have
to be concerned about
chronic low oxygen to the
lungs. There are many
people with sleep apnea
who arent diagnosed. I
would recommend a sleep
study. Certainly I recom-
mend careful checking of
your blood pressure, and
weight loss.
Heart disease remains
our No. 1 killer. The book-
let on clogged heart ar-
teries explains why they
happen and what can be
done to prevent clogging.
Readers can obtain a copy
by writing: Dr. Roach -
- No. 101W, Box 536475,
Orlando, FL 32853-6475.
Enclose a check or money
order (no cash) for $4.75
U.S./$6 Canada with the
recipients printed name
and address. Please allow
four weeks for delivery.
***
DEAR DR. ROACH: From
a blood test, how can I tell
if I am an insulin-depen-
dent Type 2 diabetic? For
instance, what would my
insulin or glucose read-
ings have to be? Secondly,
at what point would I have
to start taking medica-
tions? -- E.
ANSWER: Diabetes is
diagnosed with any of the
following: hemoglobin
A1c of 6.5 percent or high-
er; fasting blood sugar of
126 or higher; blood sugar
during a glucose toler-
ance test of 200 or greater
at two hours; or random
glucose of 200 or greater
in someone with classic
symptoms. In Type 1 dia-
betes, insulin levels are
very low, while in Type 2
they are normal or high.
Not everybody with dia-
betes needs medication.
Many people with Type 2
diabetes can be well-con-
trolled just with dietary
modification and often
weight loss, and almost ev-
erybody with diabetes can
improve with a better diet.
Medications usually are
given if the A1c is much
greater than 7 percent and
if diet, exercise and weight
loss efforts have been so
far inadequate.
In addition, medication
often can be stopped with
better control through life-
style. Insulin-dependent
Type 2 means just that
-- insulin is being used,
along with lifestyle and
often non-insulin medica-
tions.
Except in very rare in-
stances, everyone with
Type 1 diabetes needs in-
sulin.
Dr. Roach regrets that
he is unable to answer in-
dividual letters, but will
incorporate them in the
column whenever pos-
sible. Readers may email
questions to ToYourGood-
Health@med.cornell.edu.
To view and order health
pamphlets, visit www.rb-
mamall.com, or write to
P.O. Box 536475, Orlando,
FL 32853-6475.
OUT ON A LIMB by Gary Kopervas |
AMBER WAVES by Dave T. Phipps |
RFD by Mike Marland |
THE SPATS by Jef Pickering |
SOAP UPDATES


TO YOUR
GOOD HEALTH
KEITH
ROACH, M.D.
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2014 FUN AND GAMES THE GREER CITIZEN B11
Heart palpitations
due to sleep apnea?
Lauralee Bell stars as
Christine on The Young
and The Restless



B12 THE GREER CITIZEN LIVING HERE WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2014
kpples Blueberries
Blackberries Peaches
Vegetables at 6umpetitive Prices
0uring the seasun we freeze berries fur sale
after the harvest. This saves yuu the truuble
uf putting them up and assures yuu uf high
quality berries thruugh the winter munths.
Tu insure freshness uf uther pruducts uut
uf seasun, we buy at state farmer`s
markets in 6ulumbia and ksheville.
VlSlT BB Bk0Sl0E STkk0
Hunday - Saturday
1:3 a.m. - 6: p.m.
Ne cluse un Sunday tu attend church
6ume see us and sit a spell un uur
frunt purch. Ne have a rucking chair
just yuur size. lf yuu are in a hurry, we`ll
give yuu a rain check un the rucker.
3Z Taylur Buad 6reer
(Hidway between Hemurial 0rive and wy 14)
43-1Z6
LET BS BE BB 6kkE6Tlk
T k6`S kPPLE VkLLE!
309 Northview Drive
848-1935
ANNIVERSARY |
MILESTONES
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Earl Edwards
Celebrate 68th anniversary
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas
Earl Edwards, of Blue
Ridge, celebrated their
68th wedding anniversary
on August 31. They were
married August 31, 1946,
at Washington Baptist
Church parsonage.
The couple has three
children, Betty Fisher,
Donald Edwards, and Tim
Edwards; seven grandchil-
dren; and 12 great-grand-
children.
They are members
of Pleasant Hill Baptist
Church.
Mrs. Edwards is the for-
mer Forest Edwards, of
Blue Ridge.
DEAR PAWS CORNER:
Both my dogs and my cat
are terrified by thunder-
storms, and they run, hide
under furniture, and howl
and yowl until the storm
passes. How can I stop
this behavior?
DEAR FRUSTRATED:
Fear and anxiety during
storms is a very common
issue among dogs and
cats, and not one that can
be easily or fully resolved.
However, there are steps
you can take to ease their
fear.
Keep an eye on weather
forecasts: note if a storm
is forecast, and what time
its likely to reach your
area.
About 30 minutes to
an hour before a storm
strikes (or as soon as pos-
sible ahead of the storm),
place your pets in a desig-
nated safe room -- one
that has their bedding,
toys, water and no large
furniture. If possible, it
shouldnt have a window;
if it does, put up heavy
curtains to block the light
from lightning flashes,
and add weather strip-
ping to reduce rattling. (A
closet or bathroom may
work, too.)
For the first few storms,
sit in the room with them.
Be very calm, and speak
in a calm voice. Cuddle
with your pets, feed them
a few treats if they dont
whine, and if they show
interest in their toys, play
with them.
Once theyre less fearful
using the safe room, re-
duce the time you spend
with them during storms.
Give them a treat when
the storm is over.
Dont treat storm-re-
lated anxiety as a disci-
plinary issue. Its an issue
of your pets needing to
feel secure from external
threats. If the method
above doesnt lessen
the issue, speak to their
veterinarian about other
ways to ease their anxiety.
KAYLA
Animal ID: 23674764
Breed:Retriever, Labrador /
Hound
Age: 3 months 14 days
Gender: Female
Color: Black
Spayed: No
To adopt: (864) 467-3950
Located at: Greenville
Animal Care Services,
328 Furman Hall Road, Greenville, SC, 29609
Email:petpr@greenvillecounty.org
PET OF THE WEEK |

Storm-proofing
anxious pets
FROM B8
be, Owens said. There
have been a lot of changes.
There was discipline then
in school. Most of us ad-
hered to it.
Owens recalls there be-
ing a lot more foot traffic
in the 1940s.
There were no bus
routes, so you would see
a lot of kids walking every
morning, he said. There
just werent that many
cars available either in the
40s. It was completely dif-
ferent from today.
Classmate Polly Wade
agreed, saying she used to
live in what seemed like
the middle of nowhere.
I thought we lived out
in the boondocks, but now
its right in the city, Wade
said. There was a peach
orchard right where I lived
[near Memorial Drive] and
I walked. There were dirt
roads and it seemed like it
was really out in the boon-
docks.
The instruction was dif-
ferent then, too.
The instruction was a
bit different, Owens said.
We didnt have many
things to choose from be-
cause you had a bunch of
core subjects and thats
what you took. There
werent electives like they
have today.
You usually read the
Bible in schoolthe teach-
er did, he said. Thats
something you cant do
today.
Athletics have also
changed through the
years.
The athletic equipment
we had was primitive com-
pared to what they have
today, he said. We had
a good basketball team
because all the mills had
YMCAs that fed into Greer
High School.
Owens played football.
He joked that he was too
small, but played any-
way.
At that time, the war
was going on and all the
big boys had gone into
the service, he said. The
little fellas were still there,
but it was fun.
The class graduated dur-
ing a time of war and con-
flict.
The Korean conflict
came along and some of
us were in World Wart II,
he said. I was in the Navy,
but I got in on the tail end
of it.
Talking to his classmates
last Thursday, Owens said
it would be the last re-
union for a while.
We had a good class,
he said.
billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
REUNION: Remembering and celebrating 70 years
FROM B10
of musical folks. For more
information, call Bob at
423-5576.
Stomping Grounds
now has a Celtic Ses-
sion 7-9 p.m. every other
Wednesday. This is an
open session to Irish/
Scottish folk music and
anyone can participate.
Please call Alan Dillman
for more information at
828-329-2640.
PALMETTO STATESMEN
HOW THE WEST WAS SUNG
The Palmetto Statesmen
Chorus will present its
50th annual show entitled
How The West Was Sung
on September 13 at 7 p.m.
at the Fine Arts Center,
150 E. Main St., Duncan.
Gold medalist quartet Vo-
cal Spectrum will be the
featured guest.
Vocal Spectrum was the
Barbershop Harmony Soci-
etys international cham-
pion in 2006 and contin-
ues to actively represent
the barbershop style both
in concert and recording.
The Statesmen Chorus
and Quartets have chosen
familiar tunes from the
old west set in a scripted
performance. In chaps and
hats, the chorus will sing
Happy Trails, How The
West Was Won, Ragtime
Cowboy Joe and many
more. Chapter quartets
will offer Dont Fence
Me In, Shenandoah, The
Yall Come Back Saloon,
and Ridin Down The
Canyon.
One Accord quartet,
always well received on
stage, will open the show
after intermission.
Tickets are $20 each and
are available at 877-1352,
by email at robertlee10@
bellsouth.net or at www.
palmettostatesmen.org.
Remaining tickets will be
sold at the door.
Men who sing are invited
to attend Chapter meet-
ings at Duncan United
Methodist Church, 139 W.
Main St., Duncan, Mondays
at 7 p.m. or call 322-0165.
JOHN MONTGOMERY
TO SPEAK AT USC UPSTATE
The George Dean John-
son, Jr. College of Business
and Economics at the Uni-
versity of South Carolina
Upstate welcomes guest
speaker, John Montgom-
ery, to their Wells Fargo
Speaker Series Sept. 16.
Montgomery, who serves
as the vice president of
real estate for Pacolet
Milliken, will speak from
12 to 1 p.m. in the BMW
Classroom at the George,
160 E. Saint John St. in
downtown Spartanburg.
Tickets are $10 (includes
a boxed lunch) and must
be purchased in advance
at uscupstate.edu/wells-
fargo.
Montgomery is respon-
sible for developing stra-
tegic initiatives to reposi-
tion existing and acquire
new properties for future
development at Pacolet
Milliken. Before joining
Pacolet Milliken in 2009,
Montgomery was Spartan-
burg Market Executive at
Carolina First Bank, the
largest South Carolina-
based commercial bank.
He also served the bank
previously as a vice presi-
dent of Corporate Lend-
ing.
Montgomery received
his Bachelor of Arts de-
gree from The University
of the South in Sewanee,
Tennessee, with a major
in European History and a
minor in Spanish. In 2009,
he was awarded a Master
of Science degree in Real
Estate Development from
Columbia University in
New York. He is chair of
the USC Upstate Capital
Development Foundation
Board, a member of the
board of trustees of Con-
verse College, a member
of the board of directors
of Glenn Springs Acad-
emy, a member of the
board of directors of the
Spartanburg Chamber of
Commerce. In 2011 he was
elected as commissioner
of public works for Spar-
tanburg County. Mont-
gomery and his wife live
in Spartanburg and have
three children.
For more information,
contact Bea Walters Smith
at 503-5235 or bwsmith@
uscupstate.edu.
FURMAN ANNOUNCES
SOUND QUALITY SERIES
The Furman University
Music Department has an-
nounced its Sound Quality
Series of concerts for the
2014-2015 season.
The Sound Quality Con-
cert Series is open to the
public. It is sponsored by
the Furman Music Depart-
ment and Partners in the
Arts. Tickets are $12 for
adults, $10 for seniors,
and $5 for students. Sea-
son tickets are available.
Opening the season
is young organ virtuoso
Ahreum Han Congdon
who will perform 8 p.m.,
Sept. 15 in Daniel Memo-
rial Chapel on the Furman
University campus.
Originally from Seoul,
South Korea, Ahreum be-
gan her organ studies as a
high school student here in
Greenville with Ed Dunbar
at Bob Jones University.
A featured recitalist at
the 2012 National conven-
tion of the American Guild
of Organists in Nashville,
Tenn., Ahreum has ap-
peared as both a solo re-
citalist and as a concerto
soloist throughout the
United States and abroad.
A reception follows her
performance.
EVENTS: Concerts, business speakers
PAWS CORNER |