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"OLD NASSAU"

"Old Nassau"
Edited and Published by
Wilford Seymour Conrow
i
NEW YORK CITY
This book is No./fl? of the Presentation Edition
limited to ioo copies each
signed by the composer of
"Old Nassau"
LJZ+Lfc
c
7
LIBRARY of CONGRESS
Two Copies Received
FEB 5 1906
^CopyriffM Entry
CLASS ST, XXC, No.
COPY A.
Copyright, 1905, by
Wilford Seymour Conrow
All rights reserved
Published November, 1905
The Autobiography
OF
KARL A. LANGLOTZ
HARLAN PAGE PECK
CLASS OF 1862
AND PRINCETON 1858-62
BY
JOSEPH L. MUNN
CLASS OF 1862
THE MINISTRY OF HARLAN PAGE PECK
BY
FREDERICK E. SHEARER, D.D.
CLASS OF 1862
ARRANGEMENTS OF THE "OLD NASSAU" MUSIC
BY
ERNEST TROW CARTER
CLASS OF 1888
PORTRAIT SKETCHES
BY
WILFORD SEYMOUR CONROW
CLASS OF 1901
FOREWORD
Already fifty classes of Princetonians have sung
"Old Nassau," and for years this song has been
held by them in a spirit of semi-sacred reverence
as a cherished inheritance from former days. That
it has had a large share in the development of the
charm of the atmosphere and the admired spirit
of Princeton, is unquestioned. A trip to Trenton
for the purpose of making a portrait sketch of
Mr. Karl A. Langlotz, interested the editor in the
genesis of "Old Nassau" and in the lives of the
men who gave it to Princeton.
'
This interest has
resulted in an effort to put the facts regarding
these subjects in a form dignified, as befitting
"
Old Nassau," and permanent, that their record
may be preserved in our Princeton world. This
being a book of sentiment, it seemed more fitting
that the text should be written, as far as possible,
by the men most closely identified with the song.
Mr. Langlotz contributes his autobiography and
a new arrangement of "Old Nassau" dated 1905.
The monograph on the early and undergraduate
ix
"OLD NASSAU"
life of the late Harlan Page Peck
'62,
and on the
Princeton of his day, has been written by Mr.
Joseph L. Munn, who, for forty years, was
Secretary of the class of 1862. Dr. Shearer's
Addendum sets forth the later life of his classmate
Peck, with whom he was intimately associated
for many years in the ministry of the Presbyterian
Church. And Mr. Ernest Trow Carter
'88,
has
included with his various arrangements of the
"Old Nassau" music (reprinted with the kind
permission of Messrs. G. Schirmer), a new one
called "The Glee Club Arrangement." This is
published for the first time in this book. The
editor's sincere thanks are extended to the above,
and to the many other Princetonians and friends
of Princeton who have helped him, especially to
Mr. Russell T. Mount
'02.
To do what honor
he may to Harlan Page Peck '62,
and to Karl A.
Langlotz, and to cause their names, as well as their
song, to be perpetuated, is the intent and hope
of the editor.
November, 1905.
ILLUSTRATIONS
PAGE
Karl A. Langlotz (photogravure).Drawing made
from life at Mr. Langlotz's home in Trenton, N. J.,
in October, 1904, by Wilford S. Conrow
'01
Frontispiece
Edgehill Grammar School.From the margin of the
"Map
of
Princeton, Mercer Co., N. J." surveyed
and published in 1852 by John Beran, City Survey-
or, Jersey City, N. J., and lithographed by Sarony
& Major, New York. Original in the possession
of Mr. W. C. C. Zapf 5
Faculty of Arts.From the Catalogue of the College
of New Jersey, 1858-59. Reproduced from the
copy in the library of Mr. Joseph L. Munn
'62
9
Replica of the Original Manuscript of the
"
Old
Nassau" Music.The original, written in pencil,
was given to the late Mr. W. C. Stitt, but could not
be found by his heirs among his papers. Mr. Lang-
lotz has endeavored to make an accurate replica of
this first draft of his
"
Old Nassau
"
music 12
Facsimile of the First Publication of "Old Nas-
sau" in Sheet Music Form.Published in 1859.
From the original in the possession of Mr.Lewis
W. Mudge
'62
14
Facsimile of Mr. Langlotz's 1905 Revision of his
"
Old Nassau" Music 20
Nassau Hall in 1905.From the photograph taken
especially for this book by Messrs. R. H. Rose &
Son, Princeton 25
Harlan Page Peck (photogravure).From portrait
sketch made by Wilford S. Conrow '01, from Mr.
Peck's Senior Class photograph in the album of
Mr. Joseph L. Munn,
'62
facing 29
xi
"OLD NASSAU"
PAGE
Nassau Hall in 1860.Reproduction from the col-
ored lithograph of the painting by Mr. F. Childs,
lithographed by Robertson, Seibert & Shearman,
New York, and published by McGinness & Smith.
From a copy in the possession of the editor 31
Autograph of Dr. Maclean.From the Autograph
Album of the late Mr. George W. Purnell '62, in
the possession of his daughter, Mrs. C. S. Gregor. . 32
Map of Princeton in 1859.Redrawn from Mr.
Beran's map of 1852 (see note on illustration
for
page
5),
and corrected for changes made to the year
1859 35
List of the Class of 1862 in Freshman Year.

Showing the name of Harlan Page Peck. Repro-


duced from the College Catalogue, 1858-59 40
Facsimile of Part of Mr. Peck's Triennial Letter
to Mr. Munn, Secretary of the Class of 1862.
Original in the possession of Mr. Joseph L.
Munn
'62
42
Pages from the Nassau Literary Magazine for
March, 1859.From the copy in the library of 43
Mr. Joseph L. Munn
'62
"
Old Nassau."Reproduction of the first publication
of the poem. From Mr. Munn's copy of the Nas-
sau Literary Magazine for March, 1859 44
Facsimile of the Title Page of "Songs of Old
Nassau."Original in possession of Mr. Joseph
L. Munn
'62
46
Facsimile of "Old Nassau" in "Songs of Old
Nassau."From Mr. Munn's copy 47
Nassau Hall, Commencement Day, 1904.From
photograph by 11. H. Rose & Son, Princeton 67
Xll
AUTOBIOGRAPHY
OF
KARL A. LANGLOTZ
AUTOBIOGRAPHY
OF
KARL A. LANGLOTZ
ITH considerable hesitancy
I attempt to give a correct
account of my life. I am
able to remember certain ex-
periences, but having never
kept a diary, I can not al-
ways vouch for accuracy as
to dates. Therefore I beg that my readers will be
lenient toward my attempt, remembering that
I must go back seventy years.
MY
father was a musician at the Court of Saxe-
Meiningen and teacher of the piano to the
Duke, who was then Crown Prince. There were
four daughters in my father's family when I was
born on June 20, 1834. Being the first boy, great
1
"OLD NASSAU"
things were expected of me. I do not know, but
imagine, that my father decided to make a musi-
cian of me upon first hearing the brilliance of my
vocal powers. Having only four sisters for my
playmates, it was natural that I should fall in with
their games and amusements, such as playing with
dolls and sewing. Seeing this, my father became
very much disturbed, and decided to take a boy
into the house, so that I might learn boys' ways.
In that I showed sufficient aptness. I remember
distinctly that on breaking one of our neigh-
bors' windows I was not punished, but was given
a great ovation. Dolls were dropped. And soon
my companion and I were introduced into school
life.
From that time on I was taught the piano
by my father, and the violin at first by Professor
Mahr, and later by Professor Sulot. In due time
I entered the Gymnasium Bernhardinum, where
I stayed until I was eighteen. At that time
my oldest sister, who had come to America
to live, and was giving splendid accounts of the
life there, advised me to leave the Gymnasium,
devote my entire time to music, and join her in
that country. At that early period, when the in-
tercourse between the United States and Germany
KARL A. LANGLOTZ
was in its infancy, the most absurd reports about
the former were spread about,and believed implicit-
ly by the older Germans. Therefore my father
was strongly opposed to my going. But at last
with many misgivings, he gave his consent.
About 1851 I was sent to Weimar where Liszt
was Capellmeister, and Joachim, Concertmeister;
and under these two I gained my ideas of music.
I had the privilege of playing in the orchestra,
when Wagner himself conducted, in the first pro-
duction of "Lohengrin," which was given at
Weimar. When I was thought sufficiently
trained, the question of my going to America
came up again. I was then nineteen years of
age, and hence only one year before conscription
would claim me. I applied to the police for a
passport to make a journey to America to visit
my sister, but was told it would be impossible
for me to make the trip there, and back, in the
year. Then I asked for a passport to Hamburg,
and it was given me. So, accompanied by my
father, I left home for that place. Hamburg
being a free city, my home police could not pre-
vent my going on board ship. My father's
parting advice was, to be very careful when I
landed about going out in the evening; to be
3
"OLD NASSAU"
sure to walk in the middle of the streets, as the
sidewalks were not safe on account of the many
trap doors which might give way at any moment,
and engulf an innocent stranger in a cellar from
which he would never return.
After a sail of seven weeks, I arrived in New
York in the year 1853. Of course, having left
my native country in such a manner, I was an
exile until I should have become a naturalized
citizen of the United States. In the meantime
my parents died, so that I had no desire to
return.
I had studied some English in Germany by
myself, but I found that I could neither speak
nor understand it. At my request my sister found
me a boarding house where I had for my room-
mate an American who was very talkative. He
and I would go to our room, and make ourselves
comfortable each on his own bed, smoking my
cigars. Then he would start in to talk, stopping
only when out of breath, when I would chime
in with a "yes" or "no," the only English words
I had at my command. Very soon, however, my
ear became sufficiently cultivated to understand
him perfectly, and I frequently interpreted his
words to our landlady. One great mistake in
4
KARL A. LANGLOTZ
studying a language is to feed the brain without
training the ear.
I lived in Philadelphia for two years, engaged
chiefly in teaching music or concert playing.
During my stay in that city I met, and on January
10, 1856, married Miss Emma Rae. Among
Edgehill Grammar School
my pupils were the daughters of a Rev. Mr.
Helm, then the head of a Young Ladies' Seminary.
After this had closed, he took charge of the Edge-
hill Grammar School for boys at Princeton.
Wishing me to continue teaching his daughters,
he procured me, as an inducement, twelve pupils
from among his boys, and so persuaded me to
move to Princeton.
"OLD NASSAU"
To Princeton, then, I came with my wife on the
day after our wedding, January 11, 1856. At
that time Princeton was only a little country
village, quaint and picturesque, where knowledge
and learning were sold for a consideration. The
Camden & Amboy R. R. ran just back of the
Canal, and from there hacks carried the pas-
sengers to the town, up Canal Street to Mercer,
and thence to Nassau Street. On arrival we
took two rooms in the Nassau Hotel, the only
one that kept open the year round. We had the
best rooms the house afforded, which was, to be
sure, some comfort to our pride. But we were
not greatly pleased with our quarters, owing to
the quality and quantity of the furniture. In
our parlor was a sofa with three ancient claw
feet; two bricks took the place of the fourth,
so that the sofa could be used as a rocking chair as
well. Two chairs and a two-legged table propped
against the wall completed the equipment.
However, our rooms were almost opposite the
gate of the campus, and we could thus see all
that was going on. As life in Princeton was
quiet and monotonous, my wife and I used to
amuse ourselves by looking out of the windows
watching the students. We could see them at
6
KARL A. LANGLOTZ
the sound of the college bell going to prayers,
attendance at which was compulsory; then to
two recitations in the morning, and another in
the afternoon; and again to prayers in the evening.
The first year in Princeton was very pros-
perous for Mr. Helm. But unfortunately the
second year (1856-57) only twenty-five of
the seventy-five boys returned to the school,
and among the missing were ten of my pupils.
This left me with only the four children of Mr.
Helm and two of the school boys. The outlook
at that time seemed gloomy. I had made a few
friends among the college students, and when
calling on one of them, I found him fencing with
a friend of his. It happened that they differed
on some points, and having learned to handle
the foils in the Gymnasium, I showed them what
they needed. They were so delighted that they
urged me to take a class in fencing, saying that
there were a number of them who wished to learn.
Of course I did not refuse, for it seemed as if
Providence had sent me this opportunity. In
a few days I had a class of fifty students who con-
tinued for the year. Of these, to my regret, I can
remember but twoa Mr. Fuller and J. Dundas
Lippincott. I think that with my fencing class I
7
"OLD NASSAU"
may lay claim to the honor of being the first, or
among the first, to introduce athletics into Prince-
ton College life. Athletics, such as football or
baseball, were not then known. At that time
there was not even a gymnasium. And a cane
spree I never saw until some years afterwards.
After the work of the day, the students needed
some physical exercise, which took the form of
walks. The men, many of whom were South-
erners, mingled much more with the families of
the town than at present. The streets of Prince-
ton were practically deserted by young ladies
until about a quarter after five in the afternoon,
when all the young people took their recreation
together.
In the meantime I was becoming better known
in Princeton. About a year after the Edgehill
School began to fail, Dr. Maclean, President of
the College, engaged my services as a tutor or
German teacher at a salary of $300 per year.
This was in the fall of 1857. As the study of that
language was entirely voluntary, the classes at
the beginning of the session were generously
attended. But as it involved extra time to
attend class and to prepare the lessons, the men
would drop off until my class of forty members
KARL A. LANGLOTZ
would be reduced to ten or so faithful ones. As
the class was so irregular, I can recall but three
namesHutchinson, Howell and Evans. Three
recitations a day all the week excepting Saturday,
when there were but two, Chapel attendance
morning and afternoon, and Sunday morning
services, at which the Professors took turns in
preaching, this constituted the order of my days.
COLLEGE Of NEW JERSEY.
FACULTY OF ARTS.
Rev JOHN MACLEAN, D. D.. LL. D.,
President
JOSEPH HENRY, M. D LL. D.,
KtntrUQd Professor of Nat'u-al Pbliosopi r.
STEPHEN ALEXANDER, LL. D.,
Professor of Hecuuictl PuUosopb/ Mil Astronomy.
Rev. MATTHEW B. HOPE, M. D., D D.,
Professor of BellesJ/etlros ud Polities Ecososs/.
Rev JAMES C. MOFFAT, D. D.,
Professor of Greek.
Rev LYMAN H. ATWATER, D. D.,
Professor or MmUl ud Mors! Philosophy.
ARNOLD GOTOT. LL. D.,
Pfofosur of Oology ud Physiol Geogrr.r.
GEO. MUSGRAVE GIGER. A.M.,
Professor of Latin.
Rev. JOHN T. DOFFIELD. A. M.,
Profewor of lUtbenutici.
COLLEGE OF NEW JERSEY 5
J. STILLWELL 3CHANCK, a. m:, m. d.,
Professor of Cbeauilrj- ud Lecturer wi Zeoiogj.
Rbt. WILLIAM A. DOD. AM..
Lecturer on I be Pine Arte
HENRY C. CAMERON, AM,
Adjunct Profenor of Greek
HENRY M. BAIRD, A.M.,
Tutor Id Greek, tnt. Teacher of Preach.
JAMES McDOUGALL, Jb . A. M .
Tutor iu MslteJnsUos,
DANIEL S. GREGORY. A. B,
Tutor in Belles Lettres.
GERSHOM H. NMMO. A.B.
Btgtslet.
CARL LANGLOTZ
Tescber of Gercaso.
From the College Catalogue, 1858-9.
My musical efforts were all private engagements
between the students and myself. To be sure,
9
"OLD NASSAU"
I very frequently played the Chapel organ, but
not for remuneration. Myfirst undertaking in the
musical line in the College was the forming of a
class of about thirty, known as "The Nassau
Maennerchor." We gave a number of concerts
in the town and nearby places. The members
whose names I can bring to mind were F. B.
Dorrance, E. Turner, John A. Gammon, J. F.
Joline, A. G. Hoyt, E. E. Green, J. P. Hutchinson,
J. C. Owens, W. H. Miller and E. A. Van Wagenen.
We met for three years in what was known as
Philosophical Hall. I think the breaking up of
our organization came about in this way. We
were asked to furnish the music for a Junior
Speaking Contest which was to be held in the
Chapel. Dr. Maclean asked me what we were
to sing. The book we used was called "The
Arion Glee Book,'* and our selections were taken
from it. I answered, "A glee called 'The Valse,'
another 'Kiss Me,' etc., etc.", all being parti-
cularly well sung by the class. But the good
Doctor thought they were entirely out of the
question, and wanted to know if we could not sing
"Jesus, Lover of My Soul" to one tune, and some
other hymns to the other airs, as that would be
more suitable music for the Chapel. Upon my say-
10
KARL A. LANGLOTZ
ing that that was impossible, we were not allowed
to sing.
Meanwhile had come the time for "Old Nassau."
During the winter and spring of the year 1859,
some of the seniors and tutors used to meet with
me in a little old house on William Street, just
east of the college grounds, where we would smoke
and sing college songs over our glass of beer.
When "Old Nassau" was written, we tried to sing
it to the air of "Auld Lang Syne," but found this
utterly unsuitable. Mr. W. C. Stitt, one of the
company (probably then a tutor in the college, as
he received his degree of M.A. the following
Commencement), suggested that I should write
original music to the words. I agreed, thinking
the proposal and my agreement would vanish
like the smoke from our pipes. I took the words,
however, promising to compose the music some-
time, and then thought no more about it. But
my memory was strengthened from day to day
by Stitt, who requested it for "to-morrow."
That day was long dawning. At last his deter-
mination brought me up to the mark. I was living
in a house opposite the large entrance leading into
the Park of the late Judge Field, now owned
by Professor Allan Marquand. There I was sitting
11
OLD NASSAU"
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Replica or the Original Manuscript of the "Old Nassau" Music


12
KARL A. LANGLOTZ
on my front porch smoking my peaceful pipe,
when the energetic Stitt arrived on the scene, and
asked me in an off-hand way if I had anything
particular to do that afternoon. I answered "No."
Immediately he produced pencil and music-paper
saying, "Here is the 'To-morrow' so long prom-
ised. Here is
'
Old Nassau.' Now do as you prom-
ised, and put the music to it." I did write
the music then and there, with Stitt standing
guard over me. When it was at last finished, I
handed it to him thinking I would never hear of
it again. With a smile and a
"
Thank you," he left
me.
I have no recollection of hearing my music to
"Old Nassau" until long years afterwards. I
did not know of any editorial mention of my name
in connection with this music in the Nassau
Literary Magazine for March 1859. Nor did I
hear either of the publication that same spring
of the "College Glee Book" containing my music
to "Old Nassau," or of the publication later in
the year of the song in sheet music form. It was
only after coming to Trenton that I picked up
a College Song Book and saw my music on the
first page. Let me here express my heartiest thanks
to the students of Princeton, who, by rendering
13
"OLD NASSAU"
it in a masterful manner and with exceeding
enthusiasm, have given it a name and worth I little
dreamed of when I wrote it.
I-*-. P. f?Js
"OLD NASSAU'.'
Facsimilk of thk First Publication of ''Old Nassau"
in Shket Music Form
For nine more years until Commencement
1868I continued to teach German in the college.
During that time we had a "Musical Club" of
about fifty voices, which proved a great success.
During my last year as instructor in the college
14
KARL A. LANGLOTZ
(1867-68), a friend of mine, Captain A. Edmund
Veyer, taught French. In 1868 Dr. Maclean
resigned, and Dr. James McCosh was elected
to the presidency. The chair of Modern Lan-
guages was about to be formed. Dr. McCosh
told me that it was much better to have the
languages taught by natives, and that the in-
tention was to have this chair of Modern Lan-
guages divided between two, the salary being
divided also. But about that time Captain Veyer
died. General Joseph Karge was called to fill
the professorship, and my services on the teaching
staff of the college terminated.
In the fall of 1868 I entered the Theological
Seminary, from which I was graduated in 1871.
Previous to that my
t
wife died, leaving me with
four small children, three boysKarl A. Jr.,
Clifton A. and Rae Langlotzand one daughter,
Emma E. Langlotz. During my Seminary terms
I formed a Philharmonic Society of about one
hundred and forty members. We met in the
Seminary Chapel for two years and then dis-
banded. In 1872 I married Miss Virginia I.
Dunn, daughter of Dr. Jared I. Dunn, and two
years later moved to Trenton. Here I have lived
and have been teaching music ever since. My
15
'OLD NASSAU"
second wife died October 2, 1902, leaving one
daughter, now Virginia I. Kirk.
This must end my sketch. What is before me,
I shall know hereafter. I close with kindest
regards for all Princetonians, and with thanks
to them for their appreciation of my" Old Nassau."
16
'OLD NASSAU'
17
"OLD NASSAU"
By Harlan Page Peck
'62
Tune every heart and every voice
!
Bid every care withdraw:
Let all with one accord rejoice
In praise of "Old Nassau!"
Chorus : In praise of
"
Old Nassau," my boys,
Hurrah ! Hurrah ! Hurrah
!
Her sons will give, while they shall
live,
Three cheers for
"
Old Nassau."
Let music rule the fleeting hour

Her mantle round us draw;


And thrill each heart with all her pow'r,
In praise of "Old Nassau!"
Cho. : In praise, etc.
No flow'ry chaplet would we twine
To wither and decay;
The gems that sparkle in her crown
Shall never pass away!
Cho. : Shall never pass, etc.
18
"OLD NASSAU"
Their sheen forever shall impart
A zeal beyond compare;
And fire each ardent, youthful heart,
To boldly do and dare!
Cho. : To boldly do, etc.
No earthly honors we bequeath,
For Truth is her great law
;
And Virtue's amaranthine wreath,
Shall speak for "Old Nassau!"
Cho. : Shall speak, etc.
And when these walls in dust are laid,
With reverence and awe,
Another throng shall breathe our song,
In praise of "Old Nassau!"
Cho. : In praise, etc.
Till then with joy our songs we'll bring,
And while a breath we draw,
We'll all unite to shout and sing

Long life to "Old Nassau!"


Cho. : Long life, etc.
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19
"OLD NASSAU
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20
'OLD NASSAU"
For Mixed Voices
Words by H. P. Peck
'62.
Animoso.
Music by Carl Langlotz.
Arr. by Ernest Carter '88.
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Let all with one ac cord re - joice, In praise of "Old Nas
And thrill each heart with all her pow'r, In praise of "Old Nas
An - oth er throng shall breathe onr song, In praise of "Old Nas
We'll all u - nite to shout and sing, Long life to "Old Nas
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-fTT-t
san."
sau."
san."
san."
I
CHORUS. Piu presto.
r-3
^S^
'$E*
1-2-3. In praise of " Old Nas - sau," my boys, Hur rah ! bar - rah ! hnr
4. Long- life to "Old Nas - san," my boys, Hur - rah! hur - rah ! hur
^F
rah!
rah!
9-itgg=
ifcfa*
molto rit. ad finem.
feg
m
1
t
^m\
Her
t U I V
I
V I
song will give, while they shall live, Three cheei-s for "Old Nas
w
~ ~ J
*
5t
H
r=r
1
7

[
V
N. B.This arrangement a very similar in general effect to the original of Mr. Langlotz, bnt is written a whole tone lower in order to bring the
melody within easy reach of medium voices.
Rt permission or 0. Schikxib.
21
"OLD NASSAU"
*
For Mixed or Male Voices
I
Words by H. P. Peck *6a.
Animoso.
I TE.NOE.
Music by Karl A. Langloti.
Arr. by Ernest Carter '88.

-#-i-
if
am:
*
r-*

,-
I Bass,
j
m
- -
1. Tone ev - 'ry heart and ev - 'ry voice, Bid ev - 'ry care with - draw;
2. Let mn - sic rule the fleet - ing hoar Her man

tie round us draw;
3. And when these walls in dost are laid, With rev . er ence and awe,
4. Till then with joy onr songs we'll bring, And while a breath we draw,
H'Tkn'ob. 'N
\^
^=^
=ZT
II Bass. V
:E^
*=
with one ac - cord re - joice, In
-
praise
each heart with all her pow'r, In praise
er throng shall breathe our song, In praise
n - nite to shout and sing, Long life
v
i* *
4
V^
*f
ot
of
of
to
'Old Nas
- sau."
'Old Nas
-
san."
'Old Nas
-
san."
'Old Nas - san."
I
f

^C
ffi
r
IS
CHORUS.
Pin presto.
-fc

L
1-2-3. Id praise of " Old Nas - sau," my boys, Hur rah ! hur
4. Long life to "Old Nas - sau," my boys, Eur - rah! hur
l-*-E-
fi /
*=F^
P * f
t
T^
rah ! hur - rah I
rah! bur rah!
s
4=i=t
SEt
molto rit. adfinem.
^^
1
^t=Z-
Her_ sons will give, while they shall live. Three cheers for "01
m
f g $
i
Nas - sau!*
bs
f-
g
i r'l
jrr^
fl
* For Mule Voice-
s,
pitch in B>, or A.
9 [ V
By permission of o. soaiuszs. r
f
22
"OLD NASSAU"
For Male Voices
Words by H. P. Peck
'62
Animoso.
(As sung by Musurgia.)
PS
z-jH &eee
Music by Karl. A Lanclotz.
Ait. by Ernest Carter '88.

^^m
? ?

ev 'ry heart and ev - 'ry voice, Bid ev -


'ry care with -draw;
ma - sie rule the fleet - ing hoar

Her man
-
tie round ns draw;
when these walls in dost are laid, With rev
-
er - ence and awe,
then with joy onr songs we'll bring, And while a breath we draw,
-
-
- >
SuL
S^feEpI
-#-t-
-sc
-*a-
.iti

v- *
s

tm*~
r
&
, ' 4
f
. tet % m

....
t

-fa~
Trfft
Let
And
An -
We'll
1
^v:
'
1

r
1
all
thrill
oth .
all
-)
V
with
each
er
Q
P *(P

v v

one ac
-
heart with
throne; shall
nite to
cord re joice, In
all her pow'r, In
breathe onr song, In
shout and sing, Long
m m m
'
1
praise
praise
praise
life
1

1~
of
of
of
to
pL_

lr~
"Old
"Old
"Old
"Old
IS
-m

Nas

Nas .
Nas

Mas
-
san.'
san.'
san.'
san.'
1
-4*
^?-r-

-}~.

I
1~
--*

J
M

^
r-

-j
s-l-ft

m 9
j
"
1 v
"
t
^ 1 1
"
in

V *
r
*>
1 V



s&*
CHORUS
/ Piu presto.
|3EE^Ef=fc=jfc
J* -r-
E3
SU
* (- ^ '
I

my boys, Hnr rah


!
I-2---3. In praise of "Old Nas - san,"
4. Long life to "Old Nas - san," my boys, Hnr - rah
/ !
hnr - rah ! hnr
hnr - rah 1 hnr
x:
ran!
rah!
-=^r
p-ft

-
molto ritard ad finem.

:3e*
*
*-*-
*=*
S
=s
II
3
s
*vL>
Her sons will give, while they shall live, Three cheers for Old Nas san!
molto ritard ad finem.
-=ZZ W
.
4 " *
*
- - - I
!* *
is
1
fcfc
-e-
*=l=*
^
4c
by feratoUoa of a. etsuftuts.
23
"OLD NASSAU"
Glee Club Arrangement
Words by H. P. Peck '6j.
Animoso.
I Tenor 1 1HUH. i
Music by Karl. A Langlotz.
Arr. by Ernest Carter '88.
&
II Tenob.
1. Tone ev
2. Let mu
3. And when
4. Till then
I Bass.
'

'

i
j
-r
. 'ry heart and ev 'ry voice, Bid ev
sic rule the fleet ing hour Her man
these walls in dust are laid, With rev
with joy our songs we'll bring, And while
S^f
s
'ry care with - drawj
tie round us draw;
er ence and awe,
a breath we draw,
I N N .N
- I N s is I
^rH?i^f-*^

g-^-t
S

I
;
,
|-J- .
*
A .
^'fl
TZl

Let all with one ac - cord re - joice, In praise of "Old Nas


-
san."
And thrill each heart with all her pow'r, In praise of "Old Nas
san."
An oth er throng shall breathe our song, In praise of "Old Nas
san."
A'e'll all u - nite to shout and sing, Long life to "Old Nas
san."
_^ - l L
* "*
^^
=h
r-
3E
1*2
.Mzi
lm=\
*=
U^
m
CHORUS.
Piu presto.
ag^s^^^^^
S^EJE
:^
1-2-3. In praise of " Old Nas - sau," my boys, Hur - rah ! hnr - rah ! hnr
4. Long life to " Old Nas - sau," my boys, Hnr - rah ! hnr rab ! hnr
A. - * 1 V
rah!
rah!
^m
:t
I
molto rit. ad finem.
^3k
^
|ilp:p*I!g*
F=H=g
5fe
^m
Ber
B
sons will give, while they shall live, Three cheers for "Old Nas - sau!"
I
zr<r-
X--
Mt**-
i j.
i u i k
N. B.Melody is II Tenor, eicept where, a* indicated, it passes temporarily to I Tenor.
By permission of 0. Scirsunt.
r
?
fej=5^i
24
"OLD NASSAU
Nassau Hall in 1905
25
HARLAN PAGE PECK
Class of 1862
And Princeton 1858-62
JOSEPH L. MUNN
Class of 1862
27
W. S.CONROW.
%&rUi^
$%>c4t
HARLAN PAGE PECK
Class of 1862
And Princeton 1858-62
HE College of New Jersey,
popularly known as Princeton
College, during the time of
residence there of the class
graduating in 1862, had in at-
tendance rather less than one
quarter the number of stu-
dents now enrolled in Princeton University.
The catalogue for 1858-9 shows 298 members, of
which 104 were from the Southern States. The
catalogue for 1861-2, which came out after the
beginning of the Civil War, showed a total of 221
students remaining in attendance, of whom fourteen
were from Maryland, two from Virginia, one from
Alabama and one from Louisiana. The Class of
1862 lost something like two-fifths of its member-
ship in a period of three weeks at the outbreak of
the war.
29
"OLD NASSAU"
In its buildings and equipment, the College was
quite as far below the University of the present
day,as was the College membership compared with
the present enrollment. Nassau Street, passing
in front of the campus, was built up on the north
side with a line of small buildings, mostly wooden,
some of which still survive. At the corner of
College Avenue, then known as Woodhull Street,
stood an old tavern called the City Hotel; and in
the middle of Nassau Street, just east of the point
where College Avenue intersects it, stood an old
shack known as the Market, where country pro-
duce and other eatables were sold. Prospect,
now the President's house, was then the residence
of the Potter family. It was acquired for the
College in the time of Dr. McCosh.
The front campus, between Nassau Street and
Nassau Hall, is more nearly as it then was than
any other part of the College grounds. The old
elms and other trees were there, and one of the
Class of 1862 now visiting Princeton may lie under
them, as he did in his college days, and looking
toward the Dean's house may see very little that
was not then to be seen. Old North looks very
much as it did, except for the lions which flank
the steps. The house now occupied by the Dean
30
HARLAN PAGE PECK
VSmrwr SLM33MT HLViffi,
'nmciTOK
Nassau Hall iw I860
31
"OLD NASSAU"
was then the President's house. It was the resi-
dence of Dr. John Maclean, whom Dr. Charles
Hodge once called the "best loved man in Amer-
ica." The affection which the college boys of
those days had for this old man is one of the most
prominent among college memories, and this
affection was reciprocal, for all the students
were like sons to him.
Autograph of Dr. Maclean
Three parallel paths crossed the front campus
leading from Nassau Street, where an iron fence
was pierced by three gates. The central path led
straight to the steps of Old North. The western
path, located where it is now, as may be known
by the great age of the trees that flank it, led past
the President's house. The eastern walk passed
a house, similar in size and appearance to the
President's, which was at that time occupied by
Dr. Lyman H. Atwater.
32
HARLAN PAGE PECK
Immediately in the rear of the President's
house was a building which still remains, and is
now occupied by the College Offices. It had once
been used as the library, and as a place for the
meetings of Clio and Whig Halls. In the
time of the Class of
'62,
it was known as the Reci-
tation Building. The recitation rooms for the
Sophomores and Freshmen were on the lower floor
or partial basement of the building. The floor
above was divided into two rooms, fitted up with
se^ts arranged in concentric semi-circles rising
rapidly to the rear. These were used as the prin-
cipal recitation rooms of the Senior and Junior
classes. The Recitation Building had its counter-
part, called Philosophical Hall, at the other end
of Old North, and behind Dr. Atwater's house.
There Dr. Stephen Alexander lectured on astron-
omy and higher mathematics; Dr. Schanck gave
some elementary instruction in chemistry; and
Dr. Arnold Guyot sometimes met his classes in
physical geography. Arranged about the one
large room, to which the steps led, were a number
of cases of scientific instruments and equipment
belonging to the College. Dr. Joseph Henry's
original batteries and wires, with which he dis-
covered the possibility of transmitting electrical
33
"OLD NASSAU"
energy through a mile or more of wire, were still
on exhibition there, guarded by a life-sized man-
ikin in a glass case. The lower or basement floor
was occupied with a miscellaneous assortment of
second-hand furniture, over which Dennis, one of
the College servants, presided. For in those days
a student leaving college sold out his room to some
newcomer selected by himself, who thereupon
began the occupancy of the room without much
regard to the faculty. Or else he sold his be-
longings to Dennis for about ten per cent, of their
value, and the newcomer bought in turn from
him, paying certainly not less than their full worth.
Thus the front campus, with its three parallel
walks, the houses of the President and Dr. At-
water, the Recitation Building and Philosophical
Hall, and North College, gave the impression of
studied symmetry.
Due south of the Recitation Building stood Dr.
Hope's house, which seems to have been usually
assigned to the Professor of Belles Lettres. After
Dr. Hope's death, in our time, it was occupied
by his successor, Dr. Mcllvaine. The site is now
covered by Reunion Hall.
The south campus, surrounding the cannon, was
also symmetrical in its arrangement. It was
34
HARLAN PAGE PECK
Map ok Princeton in 1859
35
"OLD NASSAU"
bounded by West College, which still remains;
East College, identical with West in appearance
and size, and now torn down to make room for
the University Library; the Hall buildings at the
south, which were on the site of the present Whig
and Clio Halls, although of wood and smaller;
and the rear of Old North as now. At the east
end of North College stood the College Chapel.
The location of these buildings is shown by the
map on the preceding page.
The only other College building of our time
was an old rambling wooden affair at the south-
east corner of Woodhull and William Streets,
called the "Old Refectory/' This was divided
into a number of dormitory rooms, with a hall
reserved for the meetings of the Philadelphian
Society. A plan of feeding the students in com-
mons had been abandoned before our time, and
the present series of Upper Class Clubs had not
been initiated. The students either obtained
table-board at private boarding-houses in town, or
organized themselves into eating club similar to
those now in vogue in the two lower classes. These
clubs were named with an appropriateness or
grotesqueness emulated by the Sophomore clubs
of the present day. A considerable number of
36
HARLAN PAGE PECK
the Class of
'62
belonged to the Hickory Club,
which maintained its existence until the end of
our college course. Such clubs generally had a
dining and a reception room in some house on
Nassau Street.
North, East and West Colleges were the dor-
mitories, and accommodated most of the students
of that day. The rear extension of Nassau Hall
was completed and fitted up during our time for
the College Library. The dormitory rooms were
cared for by three or four janitors, Dennis, the
furniture dealer, having charge of the three floors
of the east end of North College. This, it may
be remarked, was the only building which was
nominally warmed by hot air ducts from furnaces
in the basement; these sometimes worked, some-
times overworked, and sometimes refused to work.
Most of the rooms in East and West Colleges
were fitted up with grates for coal, which was
kept in large boxes in the hallways. When the
grates proved inefficient, the student had recourse
to stoves.
Ordinary repairs, such as replacing broken
windows, were made by a servant known as the
College carpenter, whom the boys called Old
Steve. Whenever he appeared on the campus, he
37
"OLD NASSAU"
was followed by the clamor of students needing to
have repairing done, all of which he at oncepromised
to make in the course of the next half hour, and as
promptly forgot. Another College servant whomwe
all remember very well was a young colored man,
whose principal duty it was to take care of the
philosophical lecture room, and to wait on Dr.
Alexander, who called him Alfred. The students
styled him Buck, Assistant Professor of Natural
Philosophy. He was a very successful manipu-
lator of the few mechanical appliances in use for
the illustrations in Physics, and would quietly
arrange the apparatus while Dr. Alexander
lectured. Larry, a fireman, who attended to the
furnaces beneath Old North, a dwarfish and
squalid figure, occasionally emerged into day-
light. He is chiefly remembered from his
famous comment on the occasion when the
Rutgers students "scooped" the small cannon.
Larry remarked that if he had been there, and
"seen them adoin
9
it, they would all have walked
out
of
the campus dead corpses."
Athletic recreations in our time consisted in a
sort of football, played with a large round rubber
ball, and with fifty or more students on each side.
One of the rules of the game was that no one
38
HARLAN PAGE PECK
should touch the ball with his hands, except when
it went out of bounds. The play can well be
described as a "shindy." The season was Sep-
tember and October. As has been shown in the
book on Princeton Athletics, baseball was organ-
ized at Princeton, first as the Baseball Club of
the Class of 1862, and later as the Princeton Base-
ball Club, to which members of other classes were
admitted. This became an established college
sport, with the playing rules that then prevailed
in professional clubs. The pitcher then pitched
the ball, and was not allowed to throw it. There
were no such things as balls and strikes, the batter
waiting until he got a ball that suited him. A
Cricket Club was also organized in our time, and
divided the interest with baseball. When we
entered Princeton there was no gymnasium. But
during our course a wooden apology for one was
erected very nearly on the site of what is now
called the Old Gym. There were also some brick
walls for handball on a field in the rear of West
College, between the present sites of Alexander
and Witherspoon Halls.
The form of hazing most prevalent was smoking
out the Freshmen. Attempts were made to rush
them,not as organized Class against Class, but
39
OLD NASSAU
in small groups, which had a tendency to make
the Freshmen keep together whenever they ap-
peared. So-called Horn Sprees were occasionally
indulged in, with an amount of clamor at least
equal to that of the Freshmen at the Sophomore-
Freshmen baseball games of to-day. And there
were other reliefs from the monotony of the class-
room which might as well be forgotten. There
were boys in those days as now. There was as
much freshness in proportion to numbers. And
the Sophs had the same domineering spirit as now.
l-< > COLLEGE OF NEW JER8ET
FRESHMEN.
1
**** aWILRXCB.
MX
Li... mii. H. ATWATIX Princeton. Dr. A l water'.
WlLLI.X B.A.OWIS. Newark. IN |
IViluax H BAriax. Kingetoo, Mr. Vandrvcntcr's
J.xks K O.VLir HiiDlio
!!
l..r. L. 1.. 28 W
K.oi. o Paybox Brewti:a Newark. Mr Wilbur'.
K. SVXOLII Bc'TkEK. Brooklyn. N. Y II W
WaLTCM iilll KK,
JOHX CHAMBER!.!*.
Chicago. III..
Cooo Creek. Oil..
Mr.. Butler's
20 E
J.JUJ. C0ALE.
John C. t'oiaaax.
Saudy Hook. 114.. fi Refectory
OCOEOB COXDIT. Newark.
GlOHW H. DlLVOHTII. Now Loudon. Pa.,
JoSRrM U DuxXAT LnnraaterC. H..S C., 21 W
W. B. DuXLAr, Lancaster C H . 3, C-, 21 W
C, 1 DlBlllSON. Vaioo Co.. HiM.. 40 N
S. M FlKLKY Philadelphia. 1 W
F.I.LIS B. ftUKMAK. J.I.. U'oodbridgo. Mr. Hunt'.
JuHX ClhPBS. Willow Creek. III.. 3 W
J.anO Gmx,
B. Havxb HiXAOAX.
JOHV Jo.VBS,
Long Hr.m li.
Marion C. H. 8. C.
North Wale..
13 N
Mi. Mount'.
in w
' HOIVARI. klKO.
WILLIAM W Kxo,
Fort Duncan, Texas.
Newtown. I.. I..
19 F.
16 N
I. ms. Laii,
J Lisn McAtkc.
Memphis, Tenn.,
Hager.town.Md..
Mr. Davis-
Mr. McVeigh's
Al'Gmi-a Macdosai...
AicmBAi.e Uclxrvu,
I'rinceton. Re
Marion C. H.. 6. C.
. Dr. Mucdouald'a
Mr. Mount's
Alexasobx Mams, Jk..
William D. Meiisho*
T S. iu..>.
New Orleans, li
Plainsborough . Mr
Coateaellle. Pa..
Mr. Hunt's
Asron 1.. lireen'a
COLLEGE OF NEW JERSEY 15
N.Mt. nsrmmci. KOOX.
Aluakp : P Koui New Orlenu.. La. Mr. McVeigh's
I.MV.sW MtTDOI, Brooklyn. L. L, 11 w
Joseph 1. Mix*. Urange, CI N
TaoxAsStisLTOv Nesbitt. H.gcra; , Mil., Mr Mount'.
S.M Peaiu-e. MartoniUto. P.. Mr. Martin >
H P Fi:,i. Alden, N. V 7 RaTel tory
S. U PlxvixOTOX, Ja. Newark, N
C. W Pxmnj, Jackson, kiln., Mr McVeigh.
Eowasd It. Powr. Sooth Hampton, N. Y.. Mr. Lane'.
C. W Rxxixgtos. Alden, N Y.. : Refectory
N G. ElOOBLT Baltimore, ktj. 10 E
Charles 11 Robksts. Kanawha Salines, Va.. 11
H. H ttoarxsox. Newark. i \r
Ha-kuy Lots BaiiraoN, Brooklyn. N Y . 2J W
8amukl II rVnnruAH.. Newark, l a
WlLWX M S~riT Washington City 10 s
(lijiar 1. r.n.on. Alden, N Y.. 1 P.efectory
William W TrT. Brooklyn, I,. I.. 21 W
Jobs Vax Dot*, Princeton. Mr A Vaa Payn's
W. B. Vav Dl-rx. Princeton. Mr A Van Doyn'e
D. L. VlUB, Washington City
Cbarlbs E. Webhtkr, Mauch Chunk, Pa.. UN
w. Pom IVoobwaud, BloHton, S. C. Mr. Mount's
CoAkutsi-:. Youxa Princeton. Rev leorg. Youig'.
From the College Catalogue, 1858-tf
40
HARLAN PAGE PECK
Harlan Page Peck entered the Class of 1862
with its matriculation in College, on the 12th day
of August, 1858. For in those days the College
year was divided into two terms, one of which
began early in August, and ended about the 20th
of December. The other began in January and
terminated with the annual Commencement.
Thus there were two vacations of six weeks each,
one in summer, another in winter. In response to
the circular sent out three years after graduation,
he wrote to the Class Secretary from Chicago,
giving a brief outline of his life to that date. He
was born April 5, 1837, in the town of Alden, Erie
County, New York. His father, Nelson Peck,
was a physician practicing in that place until
1849, when he removed to Chemung, McHenry
County, Illinois. His father was killed in 1855 by
the accidental discharge of his gun while hunting.
His mother had died when he was but eighteen
months old. In the autumn of 1856, he entered
the Academy of the Old School Presbyterian
Church at Bethany, New York, and remained
there nearly a year. In the fall of
'57
he entered
Genesee Academy in charge of the Rev.
James Inglis, and was graduated in June, 1858.
He was admitted to College in August of that
41
"OLD NASSAU"
_
r
-^<L_ /i%2-,
^o flfrX
/^J. ^-_
Facsimile of Part of Mb. Peck's Triennial
Letter to Mr. Munn, Secretary of the Class or 1808.
year. Immediately upon graduation he returned
to Illinois, and in September of 1862, took charge
of the public school in Belvidere of that State,
where he remained until April, 1863. In that
year he entered the Presbyterian Theological
Seminary of the Northwest at Chicago, where he
was at the time of writing. Peck was therefore
42
HARLAN PAGE PECK
more than twenty-one years old when he entered
College, with an appearance of maturity that fully
justified his years. He was grave and quiet, not
interested in athletic sports, and was prominent
principally because of his verse. Everybody
knew him of course, for in those days each student
knew almost everybody in College, whether in his
class or not.
About the middle of our Freshman year, the
Nassau Literary Magazine, known to us as the
Lit, seems to have offered a prize for a college
song. I do not find evidences of the way in which
this was offered. Possibly it was by posting a
tfbitors for tjje Current Session
CL ASS OF 13S5
UARCH.
C. B. MORRIS. X. J
APKH,
IRA P. CURE. N. V.
HAT. SUSEI D DAVIS; Pi.
smss.
THE0D0R1C C. LTOS. liJa
C0HT8NTS.
Prize Essay,
My Orphan Hove,
College Politics,
Mabttn- Luther,
The Neophyte Skater,
Buxid History,
Byron and Wordsworth,
"Tete D'Armee."
National Associations.
Prize Song,
The Oatb or Galileo
The Mount Vernon Papers.
Man no Creator
My Old Meerschaum,
The Mathematical Monthly,
Editor's Table,
Page 103
207
208
212
217
210
224
229
230
236
237
239
244
247
249
231
*
;iieti*rf
w
CHART.TO B. MOBEIS. BDITOB.
Vol. JJX MARCH, 1859.
WAR AND HUMAN PROGRESS.
prize essay: by a, etxbett busseil, of NEW YORK.
By human progress we understand the continual advancing
of mankind to higher states of individual and social capacity.
Simple subsistence by the chase gives way to tho culture of the
earth ; and
"
agriculture is the foundation of manufactures; since
the productions of nature are the materials of art."*
The history of the world presents a grand illustration of this
progress. Century after century has witnessed a gradual develop-
ment of human forces, which have combined, and are combining
still, to exemplify the same onward law Progress is the corner-
stone of science ; and science is at once the glory and the proof of
progress. A nation's greatness is in its advancement ; and civil-
ization marks the true grandeur of all nations. Progress is the
great truth written by God in history, nature, and the .human
soul. Revelation -sanctifies this triple statute ; and girt about with
a divine power, man goes forth " conquering and to conquer."
At the risk of repetition, let us make a fair statement of our
question. That man has made great progress is the clear testi-
mony of history and experience. It is equally clear that bloody
and inhuman wars have desecrated humanity, in its successive
Oibtou
43
"OLD NASSAU'
236 Old Nassau." [Mabcii 1868.] The OalK of Galileo.
is in this respect that associations are powerful as national. The
government and the individual should be like the parts of an
ancient templewhile the grand dome covers and protects, the
pillars should be so joined to it as to be its support and its strength.
'OLD NASSAU."
PRIZE SONG BY B. P. PECK, 1C. T.
Am

" Avid Lang Syne."


Trai every harp and every voice I
Bid every care withdraw
:
Let all with one accord rejoice
In praise of "
Old Nassau I
"
Caoacs : In praise of " Old Nassau, " my boys.
Hurrah t Hurrah 1 Hurrah t
Her eons will give, while they ahall live.
Three cheers for
"
Old Nassau
"
Let music rule the fleeting hour

Her mantle round us draw


;
And thrill each heart with all her pow'r,
In praise of " Old Nassau I
"
Gao : In praise, Ac.
No flow'ry cbaplet would we twine
To wither and decay
;
The gems that sparkle in her crown
Shall never pass away t
Cho : Shall never pass, Ac.
Their sheen forever shall impart
A real beyond compare ;
And fire each ardent, youthful heart.
To boldly do and daro I
Cho: To boldly do, Ac.
No earthly honors we bequeath.
For Truth is ber great Law
;
And Virtue's amaranthine wreath,
Shall speak for "
Old Nassau I
"
Cho: Shall speak. Ac
And when those walls in dust are laid.
With reverence and awe,
Another throng shall breathe our song.
In praise of "
Old Nassau"
Cao: In praise of, Ac.
Till then with joy our songs we 'U bring.
And whilo a breath wo draw.
We 11 all unito to shout and sing

Long life to " Old Nassau t


"
Cho: Long life, Ac.
Trince-tox, /W. 1359.
THE OATH OF GALILEO. ,
The precise form of the oath, by which Galileo was forced to
abjure the principles of the Copernican system, is, perhaps, not
generally known. It is occasionally presented in a few detached
traces, the whole end of which is to mislead the judgment in pass-
ing its sentence apon the men, at whose instigation he was thus
compelled to abandon his belief. The oath itself is a living record
of the dark age in which it was written, as well as of the trials to
which the men of science at that period were subjected. It is
peculiar not only for its length, but also for its division into three
distinct parts; the recital of each of which'was made solemnly im-
pressive by the pomp and parade of the Romish Cardinals.
Not only do its singular forms of expression, and the importance
which attaches to the oath in. an historical point of view, fully
entitle it to a publication in the Nassau Literary, but it is eminently
appropriate also that a Magazine which is the exponent, in one
sense, of an Institution of teaming, should be the first, in this
country at least, of giving to its readers an account of the hard-
ships with which the philosophers of former time were necessitated
to grapple. It was originally written in modern' Latin, and has
been literally translated into English from the text of J. B. Rio-
cioli. Should the article fail to please as a literary production, its
novelty must be the apology for its publication. Besides the copy
44
HARLAN PAGE PECK
notice on the Bulletin Elm, where so much of the
advertising of our time was done. The Bulletin
Elm was a large tree, the largest in the campus
grounds, which stood just in front of the east end
of North College at the intersection of the walks,
quite convenient for those going to or coming out
of Chapel, which was near by. In the Nassau
Lit for March 1859, appears" ' Old Nassau.' Prize
Song by H. P. Peck, N. Y. Air

'Auld Lang
Syne.'" At the end of the verses is the date
"Princeton, Feb,
1859"
Thus the date of the
writing of "Old Nassau" is fixed. The song as
composed contained seven verses, and is repro-
duced in this book. The verses ordinarily used
are the first, second, sixth and seventh, which
are sung as they were written with the exception
of a single word. "Harp" in the first line of the
poem, was afterwards changed to "heart." I
well remember that we sang the words to the air
of "Auld Lang Syne," and it was some time before
the music written for it by Mr. Langlotz entirely
superseded the earlier air. About the beginning
of 1859, Andrew J. Hetrick undertook the col-
lection of a suitable variety of songs for use in the
College of New Jersey. The book was published
by M. W. Dodd of New York, and copyrighted
45
"OLD NASSAU
<>4& . *- 'Mu/rv^ 46vf
SONGS
Of
OLD N A SS A
D
tnn
Oft!**
*b< r1 "* nlUot <n ermta.\ no* yo prto
MtUt, wtw* * M(M Alt,
NEW YORK.
PUBLISHED BY M W DODD.
lot BROADWAY.
IBM
46
HARLAN PAGE PECK
OLD NASSAU.
WoEoi r BL P. FECK, '81 Memo 1 CAW, LA50LOTZ.
Tuaa cr - rj harp and
p'^t
w. Bid ert . rj owe with-
fly
J 1
*t'
UtiU wilhoi e e-oH rfr^ow. In praUo of old Km
ml Id pimla* ofold Jfuwo. myboyvHomhl harrhj ha
3 .. tttt.ttttrrtz
OLD NASSAU
8T D. P PECK, '61
Tune every harp and every voice I
Bid every carg withdraw
Let all with one accord rejoice
In praise of Old Nassau !
ChorusIn praise of Old Nassau, my boys,
Hurrah ! hurrah ' hurrah I
Her sons will give, while they shall Liv
Three cheers for Old Nsmau.
Let music rule the fleeting hour

Her mautle round us draw


;
And thrill each heart with all her power,
Id praise of Old Nassau !
ChorusIn praise, tc.
No flowerv chaplet would we twins
To wither and decay;
The gems that sparkle in her crown
Shall never pass away 1
ChorusShall never pass, tc
Their sheen forever shall impart
A zeal beyond compare ;
And fire each ardent, youthful heart,
To boldly do and dare I
Chorus-To boldly do, Ate
No earthly honors we bequeath.
Pot Truth is ber great law
,
Arid Virtue's amaranthine wTeath
Shall speak for Old Nassau
'
ChorusShall speak, &c
Facsimile of "Old Nassau" in "Songs of Old Nassau.
"
(The last two verses appeared od the next page.)
by him in 1859; and Hetrick's preface is dated
April 11th of that year. And this, the first Prince-
ton song book, contains "Old Nassau" with the
words by Peck, and the music by Langlotz. I
think none of us, not even the author of the words
or the composer of the music, had at that time
any notion that for forty-five years that song
would be sung as Princeton's benediction, at
every College parting and in every important
intercollegiate game, in victory and in defeat;
47
"OLD NASSAU"
or that its words were so well adapted to express
the spirit of the sons of Old Nassau.
Peck was a prolific verse writer, and, as I think,
of greater merit than the average college poet.
In the thirty-two numbers of the Lit, published
while he was in College, there appear at least
twenty-seven of his metrical compositions. These
are almost invariably in a serious vein; very few
are especially ambitious. They relate to quiet
topics inspired by the memories of his earlier life,
such as the "Home on the Hill;" and a few others
suggested by his College life, and current events.
Two or three of them have special reference to
war times, and are full of earnestness and serious
patriotism. Taken altogether they remain still
worth reading, at all events by his classmates,
and will recall our College days as perhaps no
prose can do. I am able to identify these pieces
now for the reason that having been one of the
editors of the Lit, I made notes on the index
pages of my copies, from time to time, of the dif-
ferent authors. Peck wrote over various signa-
tures, one of which was "Abel Darno," another
the initials "X. E. P.," and a third "Noel Draab."
Peck was the author of the Class Song of
'62,
and
of the Class Poem. The latter is a somewhat
4S
HARLAN PAGE PECK
elaborate composition in several different metrical
forms and composed of 555 lines, nearly the length
of the first book of Homer's Iliad, which it does
not resemble.
I trust that these reminiscences may prove
interesting to those of my own time, and perhaps,
to some extent, to others who have rejoiced "in
praise of Old Nassau."
<^x"-v
*g
&
49
ADDENDUM
THE MINISTRY
OF
HARLAN PAGE PECK
During his course in McCormick Theological
Seminary, Mr. Harlan Page Peck was licensed to
preach the Gospel as a probationer for the holy
ministry by the Presbytery of Chicago, and the
next year was ordained and installed as Pastor of
the Church at Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, in the
bounds of the Presbytery of Winnebago. He re-
mained there two years, adding meanwhile more
than ten per cent, to the membership of the Church.
While in the Seminary, he had married. In
1868 he was invited to become Stated Supply
of the Church at Marengo, Illinois, and chiefly
in order that his wife might be nearer the home
of her parents and her friends in Chicago, he
embraced the opportunity. In the first year of
his labors the membership of the Church increased
more than twenty-five per cent.
Two years later he was called to the Church in
Lincoln, Nebraska, then a growing city. There
he labored nearly four years among a devoted people
with much success. He went to a Church of
about fifty members; in the first year thirty-nine
53
"OLD NASSAU"
were added, the next year forty-nine, and about
half as many in the third year. The Church rose
to a commanding position, and he was greatly
respected and esteemed both by the resident pop-
ulation and the distinguished men in official po-
sitions of the commonwealth.
In 1875 he accepted the call to become the Stated
Supply of the Church of Fairmount, a suburb of
St. Louis, and during his year there, the member-
ship of the Church increased about one-fifth.
The next year there came a call from the Church
in Salem, Oregon. He accepted it, and soon
became influential in the city and the State.
In the first year of his ministry the increase of
membership was more than one-third of the total
communicants, and the next year nearly as many
more were added. His congregation included
many of the most cultured men and women of the
city.
About 1880, Mr. Peck was married a second
time in San Francisco, California. The following
year he became the Stated Supply of the Church
of Merced, one of the flourishing towns of the
San Joaquin valley, California, and took his letter
to the Presbytery of Sacramento. In Merced
his work was also successful, as it had been in
other places. More than twenty-five per cent,
were added to the membership in the first year,
and the congregation increased greatly.
54
THE MINISTRY OF HARLAN PAGE PECK
From Merced he removed to a small town in
southern California. He went in 1883 to the
Klicitat Country, a sparsely settled region of
what is now the south central part of the State
of Washington. It is probable that he expected
to settle somewhere in the vicinity of a beautiful
and picturesque place called Sedalia, in a new
home on Government land. But soon after his
arrival there, he died, and the place of his sepul-
ture is unknown.
It must ever be a matter of regret to those who
knew him at Princeton and there united with him
in the gladness of
"
Old Nassau," and who were
warranted in prophesying a brilliant future for
him, that he came to his grave before the fullness
of his time. But he lived and died exhibiting
"
The splendour of a spirit without blame."
Y*
'&
55
NOTES
NOTES
Page 37, line 6.
Mr. Peck, while in College, roomed during his
Freshman year in 7 Refectory ; Sophomore year in
20 West College; and Junior and Senior years in
15 East College.
Page 13, line 16.
Prize Song.We are gratified to present to our readers
this new feature in College literature, not only on account
of its own merits, for it is weaned and will take care of itself,
but because we hope it will not be left by the future editors
to wend a lonely way through life, and its gray hairs be
brought in sorrow to the grave through want of a com-
panion. Let others follow it, and then the time will soon
come when "Old Nassau's" sonswould that there were
daughters tooroused to healthy rivalry, will emulate and
provoke each other to noble strife.
The music for this song has been written by Mr. Langlotz.
The thanks of every true son of the College, as well as every
lover of music, are due to him for his kindness and trouble.
We presume it would give him much pleasure to hear his
music make the welkin ring.

Editor's Table, Nassau


Literary Magazine, March 1859.
59
"OLD NASSAU"
Page 45, line%l.
College Glee Book.It is well known in and around
College, that a collection of Original College Songs is to be
issued in a book form, edited by one of our own number.
As we have not seen this book, we know nothing of its
merits, but surely great praise is due to the public spirit
and energy of its editor and contributors. Its publication
is awaited with interest as well as curiosity.

Editor's
Table, Nassau Literary Magazine, March 1859.
Page 45, line 25.
The following are excerpts from the more inter-
esting parts of Mr. Hetrick's Preface to his
"
Songs of Old Nassau."

# * *
jn tne grst place> since the founding of this
institution, no collection of our songs has been made, and,
in fact, there has not existed sufficient material for such a
collection, had anyone been willing to undertake so pleasant
a task. This last fact may not be a little surprising to those
who know that Nassau music extends as far back as the
year 1763, when a song, composed for the occasion, was
sung by the graduating class of that year, at the time of
their taking the Bachelor's degree. This song, or opera
rather, was called the "Military Glory of Great Britain,"
and was published in pamphlet form, with music to the
choruses. * * *
60
NOTES
From the year 1763, down to the present, no songs, as
far as I can learn, have appeared on the programme of our
public exercises, with the exception of the Ode and Hymn
that were sung at the first centennial celebration of the
College in 1847, and of the parting odes that have been com-
posed, for some years past, by some member of the Senior
Class, and sung in the chapel on class-day. In addition
to the above, I have been able to find but two student songs
that were written here and sung generally. There has been,
however, quite a number of "jovial strains" and "hearty
choruses" floating among the different classes from year to
year, but they are not original with us, and are not of such
a character as to reflect credit on our College. * * *
The days we spend at college, we are told by graduates,
are the most pleasant of our lives. If this be true with
respect to those institutions, where music is not much
cultivated, in how much higher a sense must it be true with
respect to those in which
"
music rules the hour." It is to
be hoped, then, that henceforth singing will be a distinctive
feature in all our public exercises, that more glee-clubs will
be formed, and that all, whenever collected, whether they
can sing or not, will join in the hearty song, that thus the
enthusiastic song-spirit, which so marks the student-life in
Germany, and makes it, in truth, the heyday of their exist-
ence, may be infused into us.
Andrew J. Hetrick.
Nassau Hall, April 11th, 1859.
61
"OLD NASSAU"
Page 29, line 16.
The spirit of the undergraduates during the
trying months which immediately preceded the
beginning of the active hostilities of the Civil
War, is shown by the letters in contemporary
Autograph Albums. In such books it was then
the custom for a man, before leaving Princeton,
to ask his classmates and friends, both in College
and in the town, to sign their names under such
sentiments as they may choose to write. It
is from the Autograph Album of the late George
W. Purnell '62,
of Snow Hill, Maryland, that
the following examples have been taken. When
these were written, Mr. Purnell, then in his
Junior year, had already left College, run the
blockade and enlisted in the Confederate Army.
May 15th,
'61.
Dear Purnell:
I regret the necessity which urges me thus prematurely
to consign to the autographic proof-sheets of friendship and
esteem, my final parting and farewell. The civil and sec-
tional agitation which requires your departure is certainly
lamentable; but do not, in your devotion to what you may
esteem the nobler and truer cause, neglect to accord to your
Northern classmates, feelings towards you of cordial and
devoted interest.
62
NOTES
May "Dame Fortune" bestow her favors profusely upon
your life and condition, and never induce you to disregard as
Your friend and classmate,
H. H. Robinson of N. J.
Class
'62,
Room 7 West.
Dear George:
* * * *
The final issue appears to have come. Already we are in
a condition almost unparalleled in our national history,and
the clouds are gathering thicker and darker. I hope and
believe we will be all right yet, and ere long feel that we are
free. It is with much regret that I think of leaving Old
Nassau, whose shades I once so much loved.*
* *
*
Whether in war or peace you have my best wishes and
warmest regards.
Your classmate, fellow Whig and true friend,
E. G. McClure,
Class 1862, Tenn.
April 20, 1861.
Dear Purnell:
This little world called College is now in a furore of ex-
citement, and autographs have been thrown off with a
rapidity that does not give the writer time to express his
sorrowful feelings at parting with so many friends, especially
in view of the uncertainty of what awaits us and our country.
Your sincere friend and classmate,
CD. Roberts,
Room
2, East, Virginia.
F. C. S.
63
"OLD NASSAU"
Dear Purnell:
It is indeed an occasion for sadness when one is compelled
to say Good-bye to so many of his classmates a year before
our class graduates, for our number is now greatly decreased
and we therefore cannot spare you.
Jno. Cochran.
Class
'62,
Newton, N. J.
Dear Purnell:
Fight for the 17th Reg't and the good old State of Mary-
land. Your friend,
H. A. Steinecke, Md.
1861.
Dear Purnell:
Though I much regret your leaving, and the causes, I
can give you a hearty
"
God bless you " as you take leave
of your college friends. Ever remember me as
Sincerely your friend and classmate,
S. H. Pennington, Jr.,
Class 1862, of New Jersey.
Room 25 East.
F. C. S.
Mr. Peck wrote letters in the Autograph Al-
bums of many of his classmates and friends. The
editor has seen several of these, in each of which
was an original poem showing the natural gravity
and the religious bent of Mr. Peck's mind. He
was a member of Clio Hall, and, as was then the
custom, wrote with his signature the initials
"F. C. S." (Fellow of the Cliosophic Society).
64
NOTES
Page 40, line 3.
Dear George:
I remember the first time we met. It was on the night
of our "Soph horn-spree" when you, Mclntyre and myself
were chased through the fields back of the Gymnasium by
some of the Faculty, with our faces blackened up to prevent
detection. * * *
Your sincere friend,
George A. Branner,
Class
'62.
Mossy Creek, Tenn.
From the Autograph Album o) George W. Purnell
'62.
Page
30, line 24.
Nassau Hall, in those days, was very generally
called "Old North" or "North College."
65
OLD NASSAU'
eOPYRIQHTeO BY . H. flOSI A SON
Nassau Hall, Commencement Day, 1004
FES. 5 1906
I i ! 1 1 II I

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