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Saturday
August 23. 2014
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SOMEONE TO KNOW
Washington Irving
Elementary^ Cafeteria
Manager Johnnie
Campbell recently
received Level 3
Certification from the
School Nutrition
Association Certification
Program.
She is the
first
cafeteria
manager to
achieve this
certification
based on the standards of
practice and Indicators in
the Keys to Excellence in
School Food and
Nutrition Programs that
define nationally
accepted standards for
quality programs.
"We are so proud of
Johnnie," said
Washington Irving
principal Susie Dougherty.
"For cafeteria workers
this is the equivalent to a
teacher passing their
National Board
Certification. I believe AJ.
Legere, who recently
retired, is the only other
person in the district to
ever attain this." (Legere
was a child nutrition
assistant supervisor.)
Among requirements
for receiving this
certification, the applicant
must have nine college
credits and must have
three college credits in
Food
Safety/Sanitation/Food
Science/Microbiology and
three college credits in**4
Nutrition/Feeding
Children with Special
Needs/Community
Nutrition and
Administration or
Communications/
Marketing.
"This is really good
because she is investing in
her future, and it also
shows her commitment
to her job in serving the
district's students," said
Dan Lindsey, child
nutrition director.
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CALENDAR.............. C2
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OPINION................ A4
POLICE REPORT....... A2
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THREE SECTIONS
34 PAGES
VOLUME NO. 125, NO. 68
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MARK SCHLACHTENHAUFEN | THE EDMOND SUN
Participants march Friday afternoon through the UCO campus on their way to a public forum. The events
were a response to the Aug. 9 shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo., by a police officer.
Students march for justice
Ferguson, Mo., chants
echo on UCO campus
BY MARK SCHLACHTENHAUFEN
THE EDMOND SUN
Speaking to students during
Friday’s forum, a reaction to
recent events in Ferguson. Mo.,
Myron Pope spoke frankly about
personal experiences he’s had as
an African-American.
Pope, the University of Central
Oklahoma’s vice president for
Student Affairs, told students fill­
ing the Nigh University Center
room he had a recent conversa­
tion with a woman who asked
him if he realized he is the high­
est-ranking African-American on
the campus.
Pope told her he
hadn’t considered it
from that perspective.
"She said, ‘You real­
ize that with great
power comes great
responsibility.’ And
one of the things 1
realized was that my
role here is a very important one,”
Pope said. “And on a daily basis
I’m constantly thinking about
how can we help our students be
successful. Because I know that
success is going to be a game-
changer.”
Addressing students after a
march around campus, Pope said
perceptions lead to stereotypes,
which lead to prejudice, which
leads to discrimination.
MARK SCHLACHTENHAUFEN | THE EDMOND SUN
Students chant "Don't shoot!" during Friday's march through the UCO
campus.
Pope
"I can’t tell you the number of
times that even with my suit and
tie on there’s a perception of me,”
Pope said. “I can’t tell you the
number of times I’ve had the
same experiences that you have.”
Pope said he has a Ph.D., but
when he’s dressed down and goes
to a mall, he's seen a lady clutch
her purse a little tighter when she
saw him coming. Pope said it’s
crucial for students to complete
their education so they can con­
tinue to go out and make a differ­
ence in the world.
Stevie Johnson, coordinator of
UCO’s Office of Diversity and
Inclusion, said the university
wanted to use the event to inform
and empower students.
“Many students don’t know that
civil rights reforms were devel­
oped by people their age, and we
hope to inspire our students to
work for change in our communi­
ties,” Johnson said previously.
As the march progressed Friday,
chants like “What do we want?
Justice! When do we want it.
Now!” and “No justice, no peace,”
words that have been heard in
Ferguson, echoed on the UCO
campus. Civil unrest and protests
have followed the police shooting
of Michael Brown, a young
African-American man in who
lived in the St. Louis suburb. The
violent death and the lack of
information initially from the
Ferguson Police Department
caused long-simmering emotions
to boil over into a national debate
on the use of police force, particu­
larly toward black men in
SEE MARCH | A3
Paul Ryan brings book tour to Edmond
BY JAMES COBURN
THE EDMOND SUN
Political enthusiasts in Edmond
can prepare for a book signing tour
Monday by Congressman Paul
Ryan. Tlie Wisconsin Republican is
coming to Edmond for a visit to
Best of Books.
The 2012 Republican vice presi­
dent nominee is author of the book
“The Way Forward,” published by
Hachette Book Group. Ryan will be
signing books at 4 p.m. Monday at
Best of Books, 1313 E. Danforth
Road.
“I don’t like the direction the
country Ls headed. I think millions
of Americans agree with that,” said
Ryan, the House Budget
Committee chairman.
As an elected leader, Ryan
believes he has an obligation to
express how he would do things
PU L
in \\
differently, he
said. His aim
is not to sim­
ply criticize
the liberal
establish­
ment, but
propose alter­
natives, Ryan
said Friday
afternoon to
The Edmond
Sun
"What I try to describe are the
shortcomings of the liberal progres­
sive philosophy that’s governing
Washington, D.C., and our federal
government today,” Ryan contin­
ued.
Ryan said his book describes how
the U.S. would benefit by the
restoration of the country’s found­
ing principals. He wrote the book to
describe what solutions and poli-
cies would look like if those found­
ing principles are applied to gov­
ernment.
He also wanted to describe the
necessity of building a majority
conservative coalition across the 50
states in order to win national elec­
tions, Ryan said of "The Way
Forward.”
"Having the experience of run­
ning on a national ticket has taught
me a lot of what it would take to
win a national election,” Ryan said.
“And so I try to describe what I
basically refer to as lull spectrum
conservatism that is inspirational,
inclusive, principled and hopefully
capable of winning a majority of
Americans’ hearts, minds and
votes, so we can win the kind of
election we need to win, in order to
have the kinds of reforms passed to
SEE RYAN | A3
KK1L0CAL
MY BUSI NESS. MY BANK.
noff IIU
races stroll
to finish
line
Analysts say
elections lack
excitement
BY JAMES COBURN
THE EDMOND SUN
Tuesday’s winners of the
primary runoff for the 5th
Congressional District will
spark the political tone for
both the Democrat and
Republican candidates as
they move forward to the
Nov. 4 general election.
Republicans will choose
either Corporation
Commissioner Patrice
Douglas or former state
Sen. Steve Russell. Either
retired University of
Central Oklahoma
Professor Tom Guild or
state Sen. A1 McAffrey will
be the choice of
Democrats.
Russell and Douglas
have spent the last week
receiving endorsements
and consolidating their
base of supporters. On
Friday, Douglas cam­
paigned with U.S. Reps.
Ann Wagner, R-Mo., and
Diane Black, R-Tenn. The
Russell campaign recently
announced the endorse­
ment of Oklahoma’s 1st
District Congressman Jim
Bridenstine.
According to the
Oklahoma Department of
Commerce, Oklahoma's
5th Congressional District
has 377,005 male regis­
tered voters. Female voters
in the district total
394,347.
How those voters will
cast their ballots remains
to be seen. Polls will be
open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Tuesday.
INTENSIVE GRASSROOTS
CAMPAIGN
Neva Hill, a political
analyst with Neva Hill &
Co., described the Douglas
and Russell campaigns as
sedate.
“There really haven’t
been any prolonged fire­
works," Hill said. “No one
candidate has really
caught fire with the broad­
er primary electorate.”
Republicans are confi­
dent their nominee will
succeed James Lankford as
the 5th District represen­
tative, Hill said.
Both Douglas and
Russell have strong
r£sum£s and solid
Republican credentials,
Hill said. Republicans will
unquestionably unite to
focus on a victory on Nov.
4, she added.
Not many people would
swim a flooding river to
vote for their candidate
this cycle, Hill said.
Republican voters will
choose a candidate who
mirrors their overall
beliefs, she said.
“For more than two
decades, every mid-term
election has had a major
issue at the forefront of the
SEE RUNOFF | A3
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