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Printed on donated paper that would otherwise have been summarily circular-filed.
Thanks Tammy and Van!

Please make copies on equally salvaged or recycled or alternative fiber paper.

Created in Microsoft (:-P) Word. Tablature is in MS (:-P) Excel. Converted to an Adobe pdf (but
this prevents printing on small sheets).

To print (only if you have to):
Cut stacks of 11 inch paper in half so you have two stacks of 5.5 x 8.5 paper.
Shuffle the stacks to mix up the various widths.
Print "odd only", flip stack and stick back in printer, print "even only/reversed".

Formatting statistics:
Most text is in Times New Roman, titles are in Comic Sans and Coronet.
The table of contents is in Lucida Sans.
Gro, Pra, ful, (O), and other such three character symbols are in 10 point font;
all other symbols are in 12 point font.
Width of 2/4 columns is 2.57, second column in from left is 1.86.
All your base are belong to us.
Width of 3/6 columns is 3.71. Rightmost column is 2.71.
Frames are 6.9 inches high and 4.7 inches wide, no border.
Frames are horizontally positioned 0.4 inches from spine to give room for plastic binder ring,
therefore horizontal position is 0.4 for maximum acreage in the printable space.
The drummer's shoes are dirty, to confuse.

Printings:
First Edition - May, 2001 5 copies
Second Edition - May, 2002 15 copies
Third Edition - June, 2003 40 copies





3"= M0$0*=

A revised fourth edition will likely include editorial and factual corrections, new rhythms that enter
my world or have been requested by friends, a second table of contents breaking the rhythm down by
region, or something, some geographical information about the Malinke region, maybe some songs,
better clave compilation pages, a couple of pages of favorite Dunun part compilations, and hopefully
i'll finish transcribing some of those pop rhythms that were started.





3=A"-1A,? I$0(( JK)0$ L*1-$1-2

Printed on donated paper that would otherwise have been summarily circular-filed.
Thanks Tammy and Van!

Please make copies on equally salvaged or recycled or alternative fiber paper.

Created in Microsoft (:-P) Word. Tablature is in MS (:-P) Excel. Converted to an Adobe pdf (but
this prevents printing on small sheets).

To print (only if you have to):
Cut stacks of 11 inch paper in half so you have two stacks of 5.5 x 8.5 paper.
Shuffle the stacks to mix up the various widths.
Print "odd only", flip stack and stick back in printer, print "even only/reversed".

Formatting statistics:
Most text is in Times New Roman, titles are in Comic Sans and Coronet.
The table of contents is in Lucida Sans.
Gro, Pra, ful, (O), and other such three character symbols are in 10 point font;
all other symbols are in 12 point font.
Width of 2/4 columns is 2.57, second column in from left is 1.86.
All your base are belong to us.
Width of 3/6 columns is 3.71. Rightmost column is 2.71.
Frames are 6.9 inches high and 4.7 inches wide, no border.
Frames are horizontally positioned 0.4 inches from spine to give room for plastic binder ring,
therefore horizontal position is 0.4 for maximum acreage in the printable space.
The drummer's shoes are dirty, to confuse.

Printings:
First Edition - May, 2001 5 copies
Second Edition - May, 2002 15 copies
Third Edition - June, 2003 40 copies





3"= M0$0*=

A revised fourth edition will likely include editorial and factual corrections, new rhythms that enter
my world or have been requested by friends, a second table of contents breaking the rhythm down by
region, or something, some geographical information about the Malinke region, maybe some songs,
better clave compilation pages, a couple of pages of favorite Dunun part compilations, and hopefully
i'll finish transcribing some of those pop rhythms that were started.


1
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2
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3
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3
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4
N-$*).0A$1)-

Here is an assemblage of miscellaneous information and drumming
patterns brought together from many sources including drum
classes or workshops, popular and not so popular music, internet
web sites, gatherings, books, and drum circles.

I put this material together for myself, so i could carry the rhythms
with me -- in the absence of a photographic memory. There will
come a day when i no longer need the book; each day i become
less dependent on it. And so shall you.

Wherever possible, the source of the rhythm is credited. If you are
the creator of a rhythm, or the person who did the work to bring a
traditional rhythm to print, and i neglected to note that, or
mistakenly credited someone else, i apologize. If it is any
consolation, this book is not for sale, or to be sold beyond the cost
of printing, if that.

It is a gift to the community to be shared with the community. It's
a good way to hand the rhythms to others, share the music, and
resources. If you have more than one copy, please pass your old
copy on to someone else so they can use it. If you have a hard or
soft copy of this book, and you wish to make a copy and give it to
someone else, please do not materially profit from it. If you decide
to print or copy it, please avoid using regular paper. There are
many companies selling 100% tree-free paper, made without using
chlorine. Please support this alterative type of paper, and avoid
cutting down the remaining 3% of our old growth forests.

This is not meant to be a comprehensive resource, just a smattering
of what the wind blows by. It reflects stuff i am learning or
playing around with, and so is not meant to be globally accurate.
My primary teacher likes tradition however, so a lot of it is
traditional.

If there is something you would like changed for a future edition of
the book, please do not hesitate to mention it to me.
4
N-$*).0A$1)-

Here is an assemblage of miscellaneous information and drumming
patterns brought together from many sources including drum
classes or workshops, popular and not so popular music, internet
web sites, gatherings, books, and drum circles.

I put this material together for myself, so i could carry the rhythms
with me -- in the absence of a photographic memory. There will
come a day when i no longer need the book; each day i become
less dependent on it. And so shall you.

Wherever possible, the source of the rhythm is credited. If you are
the creator of a rhythm, or the person who did the work to bring a
traditional rhythm to print, and i neglected to note that, or
mistakenly credited someone else, i apologize. If it is any
consolation, this book is not for sale, or to be sold beyond the cost
of printing, if that.

It is a gift to the community to be shared with the community. It's
a good way to hand the rhythms to others, share the music, and
resources. If you have more than one copy, please pass your old
copy on to someone else so they can use it. If you have a hard or
soft copy of this book, and you wish to make a copy and give it to
someone else, please do not materially profit from it. If you decide
to print or copy it, please avoid using regular paper. There are
many companies selling 100% tree-free paper, made without using
chlorine. Please support this alterative type of paper, and avoid
cutting down the remaining 3% of our old growth forests.

This is not meant to be a comprehensive resource, just a smattering
of what the wind blows by. It reflects stuff i am learning or
playing around with, and so is not meant to be globally accurate.
My primary teacher likes tradition however, so a lot of it is
traditional.

If there is something you would like changed for a future edition of
the book, please do not hesitate to mention it to me.
5
This book uses tablature for the rhythms. There is the possibility
of using either classical notation or tablature to convey the timing
and hand-strikes for patterns. But most beginners, particularly
those without musical training, find tablature easier to read than
classical notation (i know i do!), so, that's what's used here, even if
it might be inferior or unable to convey certain subtleties in some
cases. But the subtleties are why we need to seek out competent
teachers, and the subtleties are what we put into the music from
ourselves, not a book.

I know this all appears daunting at first. Many people have
glanced at it and said, "Oh, I can't read that stuff!". But you can.
Give it half an effort and you will see.

There are many different types of drums, and the "note" or hand-
strike symbols for them will vary. Some of these rhythms for
instance, are traditionally played on the Middle-Eastern doumbek
and various styles and sizes of South-American drums. Some are
from modern drum sets or electronic Goddess-knows-what noise
makers. Some are not for the drum at all; they are rhythms to
piano, guitar or a-cappella chants.

Most however, are for the African Djembe and Dunun.
All patterns use the "Gun, go, pa" notation system, since this is the
most popular right now in North America. There are a few rhythm
exercises for clapping, stepping, and singing.
5
This book uses tablature for the rhythms. There is the possibility
of using either classical notation or tablature to convey the timing
and hand-strikes for patterns. But most beginners, particularly
those without musical training, find tablature easier to read than
classical notation (i know i do!), so, that's what's used here, even if
it might be inferior or unable to convey certain subtleties in some
cases. But the subtleties are why we need to seek out competent
teachers, and the subtleties are what we put into the music from
ourselves, not a book.

I know this all appears daunting at first. Many people have
glanced at it and said, "Oh, I can't read that stuff!". But you can.
Give it half an effort and you will see.

There are many different types of drums, and the "note" or hand-
strike symbols for them will vary. Some of these rhythms for
instance, are traditionally played on the Middle-Eastern doumbek
and various styles and sizes of South-American drums. Some are
from modern drum sets or electronic Goddess-knows-what noise
makers. Some are not for the drum at all; they are rhythms to
piano, guitar or a-cappella chants.

Most however, are for the African Djembe and Dunun.
All patterns use the "Gun, go, pa" notation system, since this is the
most popular right now in North America. There are a few rhythm
exercises for clapping, stepping, and singing.
6
3*,.1$1)-

When i bought Mamady Keita's book, A Life for the Djembe, in it
he stated that everyone teaching a rhythm should know where the
rhythm came from and what it was used for. He also implores us
to help him keep the traditional rhythms alive.

So, for each traditional rhythm for which i have the information,
i've included the ethnic group and the geographical region from
which it is from. Mamady's book is a prime source of this
information and so is the most cited. Some rhythms include parts
which may or may not be traditional. The ones sourced from A
Life for the Djembe are most certainly traditional. Most from Alan
Tauber are likely traditional, though he likes to be creative and
teach rhythms in a way that facilitates learning.

Because most of the traditional rhythms are from the Malinke
inhabited region of western Africa, included below is a bit of
information about them. It is interesting to note that most
information comes from Christian sites who have a mission to
"reach" the Malinke. Maybe Christians need to be reached with
drumming? Anyway, keeping that in mind, the following may
only be partially true:

THE MALINKE are descendents of the great Mali Empire dating
back to 1240, and are part of the linguistic group of Mande
speakers from Senegal, Guinea, Mali and Gambia, the Niger-
Congo language family. Several Mandinka clans in the second
millennium created the Manding Empire. It grew in power in the
thirteenth century under the rule of Sundiata, the "lion king," who
unified the kingdom and began to conquer surrounding peoples
who laid the foundation for Malinke greatness and expansion into
the rest of West Africa. There are currently over three million
Malinke people concentrated mainly in the countries of Mali,
Guinea, Senegal and Ivory Coast. Due to European influences,
French is still the official language of the Malinke territory.

The Malinke are an agricultural people; the majority are
subsistence farmers. They hoe their fields by hand and few use
any type of fertilizer or irrigation. Rice and millet are important
6
3*,.1$1)-

When i bought Mamady Keita's book, A Life for the Djembe, in it
he stated that everyone teaching a rhythm should know where the
rhythm came from and what it was used for. He also implores us
to help him keep the traditional rhythms alive.

So, for each traditional rhythm for which i have the information,
i've included the ethnic group and the geographical region from
which it is from. Mamady's book is a prime source of this
information and so is the most cited. Some rhythms include parts
which may or may not be traditional. The ones sourced from A
Life for the Djembe are most certainly traditional. Most from Alan
Tauber are likely traditional, though he likes to be creative and
teach rhythms in a way that facilitates learning.

Because most of the traditional rhythms are from the Malinke
inhabited region of western Africa, included below is a bit of
information about them. It is interesting to note that most
information comes from Christian sites who have a mission to
"reach" the Malinke. Maybe Christians need to be reached with
drumming? Anyway, keeping that in mind, the following may
only be partially true:

THE MALINKE are descendents of the great Mali Empire dating
back to 1240, and are part of the linguistic group of Mande
speakers from Senegal, Guinea, Mali and Gambia, the Niger-
Congo language family. Several Mandinka clans in the second
millennium created the Manding Empire. It grew in power in the
thirteenth century under the rule of Sundiata, the "lion king," who
unified the kingdom and began to conquer surrounding peoples
who laid the foundation for Malinke greatness and expansion into
the rest of West Africa. There are currently over three million
Malinke people concentrated mainly in the countries of Mali,
Guinea, Senegal and Ivory Coast. Due to European influences,
French is still the official language of the Malinke territory.

The Malinke are an agricultural people; the majority are
subsistence farmers. They hoe their fields by hand and few use
any type of fertilizer or irrigation. Rice and millet are important
7
staple crops, along with peanuts and sorghum. Some of the men
have small part-time businesses to supplement their incomes.
They may keep goats, sheep, bees, and poultry. In addition, they
keep cattle for prestige, as bride-price payments or as sacrifices.
Men usually do the heavy farm work, while the women do both
domestic and farm chores. Women have the jobs of cooking,
cleaning, tending to the young children, and gathering forest
products. Men are usually responsible for hunting, fishing, and
holding leadership positions, such as chief, village elders or imams
(religious leaders).



In Southern Mali they are known for a great tradition of masked
dance. The Malinke have many elaborate ceremonies associated
with the different societies and initiation rites of their culture.
7
staple crops, along with peanuts and sorghum. Some of the men
have small part-time businesses to supplement their incomes.
They may keep goats, sheep, bees, and poultry. In addition, they
keep cattle for prestige, as bride-price payments or as sacrifices.
Men usually do the heavy farm work, while the women do both
domestic and farm chores. Women have the jobs of cooking,
cleaning, tending to the young children, and gathering forest
products. Men are usually responsible for hunting, fishing, and
holding leadership positions, such as chief, village elders or imams
(religious leaders).



In Southern Mali they are known for a great tradition of masked
dance. The Malinke have many elaborate ceremonies associated
with the different societies and initiation rites of their culture.
8
Both boys and girls are circumcised and initiated into puberty.
Men are initiated and advanced in their hierarchical society.
Women also have their own secret society.



There are three divisions within Malinke society: those who are
freeborn, the artisans, and the slaves. The freeborn class originally
consisted of Malinke nobility. Today, it consists of farmers,
merchants, Muslim clerics, and others. The artisan class includes
blacksmiths, leather workers, and griots (praise singers). Artisans
are revered for their expertise and craft secrets, which involve
spiritual rituals; therefore, they are looked upon with fear and awe.
Griots are important member of society because they are
responsible for passing down the oral traditions and cultural
heritage of the Malinke.

The Malinke are a patrilineal society, with the oldest male as the
leader of the lineage. A "minor lineage" consists of a man and his
immediate family, the smallest social unit. A "major lineage" is
made up of the houses of brothers and their families. The next
larger unit is the village settlement, which contains the houses of
men of the same clan name.
8
Both boys and girls are circumcised and initiated into puberty.
Men are initiated and advanced in their hierarchical society.
Women also have their own secret society.



There are three divisions within Malinke society: those who are
freeborn, the artisans, and the slaves. The freeborn class originally
consisted of Malinke nobility. Today, it consists of farmers,
merchants, Muslim clerics, and others. The artisan class includes
blacksmiths, leather workers, and griots (praise singers). Artisans
are revered for their expertise and craft secrets, which involve
spiritual rituals; therefore, they are looked upon with fear and awe.
Griots are important member of society because they are
responsible for passing down the oral traditions and cultural
heritage of the Malinke.

The Malinke are a patrilineal society, with the oldest male as the
leader of the lineage. A "minor lineage" consists of a man and his
immediate family, the smallest social unit. A "major lineage" is
made up of the houses of brothers and their families. The next
larger unit is the village settlement, which contains the houses of
men of the same clan name.
9
A palisade of wood or a wall of mud bricks surrounds every
compound in a Malinke village. Their houses are grouped
according to family ties, with each extended family occupying a
compound. A number of these compounds compose a village.
Each village has a chief who acts as judge over the village. He
handles disputes and helps the council of elders.

Most Malinke live in round huts with walls made of sun-dried
brick and roofs made of thatched grass. Some live in rectangular
building made of mud brick and roofs of tin. Many young,
unmarried men occupy separate bachelor quarters in the same
compound as their fathers.

Traditionally, parents arranged their daughters' marriages while the
girls were still infants. Today, marriages are still arranged, but not
as early. The groom is required to work for the bride's family both
before and after the wedding. He must also pay the girl's family a
"bride price." Traditionally a man's wife moves into her father-in-
law's compound upon marriage. Unlimited polygamy is permitted
among the Malinke, but the men rarely have more than three or
four wives due to the restrictions of Islamic law.

Islam is the Malinke's professed religion, brought to them in the
1860's by foreign merchants. The religion blended with the
Malinke's native religious practices that involved worshiping the
spirits, and today this blending of religions is still evident. It is not
uncommon for a Malinke to first pray in the village mosque and
then sacrifice a chicken to the "village spirit". Many people
consult marabous (holy men) for healing, protective charms or
insight into the future. They can also be consulted to put a curse
on an enemy. Educated Malinkes may conceal their belief in
magic, but there are very few which do not possess a charm or
amulet of some sort.
9
A palisade of wood or a wall of mud bricks surrounds every
compound in a Malinke village. Their houses are grouped
according to family ties, with each extended family occupying a
compound. A number of these compounds compose a village.
Each village has a chief who acts as judge over the village. He
handles disputes and helps the council of elders.

Most Malinke live in round huts with walls made of sun-dried
brick and roofs made of thatched grass. Some live in rectangular
building made of mud brick and roofs of tin. Many young,
unmarried men occupy separate bachelor quarters in the same
compound as their fathers.

Traditionally, parents arranged their daughters' marriages while the
girls were still infants. Today, marriages are still arranged, but not
as early. The groom is required to work for the bride's family both
before and after the wedding. He must also pay the girl's family a
"bride price." Traditionally a man's wife moves into her father-in-
law's compound upon marriage. Unlimited polygamy is permitted
among the Malinke, but the men rarely have more than three or
four wives due to the restrictions of Islamic law.

Islam is the Malinke's professed religion, brought to them in the
1860's by foreign merchants. The religion blended with the
Malinke's native religious practices that involved worshiping the
spirits, and today this blending of religions is still evident. It is not
uncommon for a Malinke to first pray in the village mosque and
then sacrifice a chicken to the "village spirit". Many people
consult marabous (holy men) for healing, protective charms or
insight into the future. They can also be consulted to put a curse
on an enemy. Educated Malinkes may conceal their belief in
magic, but there are very few which do not possess a charm or
amulet of some sort.
10
3,K?,$0*=

31%= I$*0A$0*= O)$,$1)-
When a rhythm is being notated, the first line indicates the overall
time structure. Here is an example:

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a

In this case, there will be four beats to each line (measure) of the
rhythm. Each beat is what is between the bold vertical lines and
numbered 1e+a,2e+a,3e+a, or 4e+a. Each take the same amount of
time, that is, they are evenly spaced just like the tick-tock of a
clock.

Since a lot can happen within beats, they are divided further into
sub-beats or pulses (that's the e+a part. in classical notation they
would be indicated as fractional notes.) Here, there are four sub-
beats to each beat. Just like a beat, each little sub-beat takes the
same amount of time as any other sub-beat.

People find it is useful to sing each sub-beat while clapping or
stomping a foot. They sing, "One, ee, and, ah, Two, ee, and, ah,
Three, ee, and, ah, Four, ee, and, ah", and clap or stomp once for
each word. The rhythm then just continues around circularly,
repeating itself over and over.

A particularly important thing to start learning right away, is that
different overall time structures all feel different. To emphasize
the feeling of a rhythm, and to help people start and end the cycle,
or know when to launch into other parts of a rhythm, the One
will often be accented, if only subtly.

That particular example was given first, because it is most familiar
to people of Western cultures. The structure of it is said to be
"in 4". While singing it, you get a sense of how it feels. It feels
like most every popular song on the radio.
10
3,K?,$0*=

31%= I$*0A$0*= O)$,$1)-
When a rhythm is being notated, the first line indicates the overall
time structure. Here is an example:

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a

In this case, there will be four beats to each line (measure) of the
rhythm. Each beat is what is between the bold vertical lines and
numbered 1e+a,2e+a,3e+a, or 4e+a. Each take the same amount of
time, that is, they are evenly spaced just like the tick-tock of a
clock.

Since a lot can happen within beats, they are divided further into
sub-beats or pulses (that's the e+a part. in classical notation they
would be indicated as fractional notes.) Here, there are four sub-
beats to each beat. Just like a beat, each little sub-beat takes the
same amount of time as any other sub-beat.

People find it is useful to sing each sub-beat while clapping or
stomping a foot. They sing, "One, ee, and, ah, Two, ee, and, ah,
Three, ee, and, ah, Four, ee, and, ah", and clap or stomp once for
each word. The rhythm then just continues around circularly,
repeating itself over and over.

A particularly important thing to start learning right away, is that
different overall time structures all feel different. To emphasize
the feeling of a rhythm, and to help people start and end the cycle,
or know when to launch into other parts of a rhythm, the One
will often be accented, if only subtly.

That particular example was given first, because it is most familiar
to people of Western cultures. The structure of it is said to be
"in 4". While singing it, you get a sense of how it feels. It feels
like most every popular song on the radio.
11
Here is an examples of another overall time structure:

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 +

This structure is said to be "in 6". It would be sung, One, and,
Two, and, Three, and...... When a rhythm in 6 is played, even if it
is very similar to a rhythm in 4, it will feel different. Overall time
structures can also be in 2,3,5,7,8 or more.

Sometimes rhythms in 4 are played on top of, or at the same time
as rhythms in 6. Both rhythms will start at the same time and end
at the same time, but the feelings overlap. They create a new
feeling, much like mixing two colors creates a third color.
Similarly rhythms can be played together to form 2 with 3, 4 with
5, 6 with 8, 9 with 16, etc.

Knowing what a rhythm feels like makes it easier to remember and
will be a good tool for playing in harmony with others.

Most simple rhythms can be notated in one line, but sometimes a
rhythm, or part of a solo, can take longer to repeat itself, and
covers two or more lines. The brackets, "[" and "]" on either side
of the pattern indicate where a part begins and ends before it
repeats.

While the different parts of a rhythm can be played over and over,
freestyle, with no definite schedule for changes or ending, there are
other times such as during solos when parts are played for a
specific number of times. In these cases, the number of times will
be indicated in the left margin.

Another trick to the solo notation, is that sometimes when there is
a lot of rests at the end of one part of a solo, you dont wait until
the end of that part to begin the next part. In that case, the
advanced beginning of the next part will be noted in a small font or
in italics or with an arrow.

More on the most common notation styles can be found here:
http://www.drums.org/djembefaq/v5d.htm
11
Here is an examples of another overall time structure:

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 +

This structure is said to be "in 6". It would be sung, One, and,
Two, and, Three, and...... When a rhythm in 6 is played, even if it
is very similar to a rhythm in 4, it will feel different. Overall time
structures can also be in 2,3,5,7,8 or more.

Sometimes rhythms in 4 are played on top of, or at the same time
as rhythms in 6. Both rhythms will start at the same time and end
at the same time, but the feelings overlap. They create a new
feeling, much like mixing two colors creates a third color.
Similarly rhythms can be played together to form 2 with 3, 4 with
5, 6 with 8, 9 with 16, etc.

Knowing what a rhythm feels like makes it easier to remember and
will be a good tool for playing in harmony with others.

Most simple rhythms can be notated in one line, but sometimes a
rhythm, or part of a solo, can take longer to repeat itself, and
covers two or more lines. The brackets, "[" and "]" on either side
of the pattern indicate where a part begins and ends before it
repeats.

While the different parts of a rhythm can be played over and over,
freestyle, with no definite schedule for changes or ending, there are
other times such as during solos when parts are played for a
specific number of times. In these cases, the number of times will
be indicated in the left margin.

Another trick to the solo notation, is that sometimes when there is
a lot of rests at the end of one part of a solo, you dont wait until
the end of that part to begin the next part. In that case, the
advanced beginning of the next part will be noted in a small font or
in italics or with an arrow.

More on the most common notation styles can be found here:
http://www.drums.org/djembefaq/v5d.htm
12
"O)$=P )* +,-.5I$*1G= O)$,$1)-
Typically, Djembe hand-strikes will be notated using the Gun, go,
pa or Gun, bi, pa system. There are also symbols for the
DunDun and clave/bell parts.

There are mainly four ways to hit the drum head. They are: bass,
tone, slap, and tap. I say mainly, because, of course there are
infinite variations. They can be modified as one wishes to create
different sounds; for instance, they can be hard or light; they can
be open or muffled. And by changing your hand slightly the
"voicing" can be altered. Playing drum is not just about rhythms, it
is about making the drum sing. But we have to start somewhere,
so.......

The main types of hand-strikes are as follows:

Bass - Hitting the center of the drum head with the whole hand.
Tone - Hitting with only half the hand nearer the edge to make a
muted pop. This is also called an open tone
Slap - Hitting in the same place as an open tone, but with just the
ends of your fingers. It will make a note like the tone but
higher.
Tap - Tapping or touching the drum lightly. This is can be used
to add dimension to a rhythm in place of leaving a rest, or it
can help the drummer keep time between beats.

The symbols for hand-strikes are described as follows:

Gn - Bass note with the dominant hand.
Dn - Bass with non-dominant hand
go - Tone note with the dominant hand. Sometimes called bi.
do - Tone with non-dominant hand. Sometimes called di.
pa - Slap with dominant hand. If muffled with left, then mp
ta - Slap with non-dominant hand
rt - dominant tap
lt - non-dominant tap
12
"O)$=P )* +,-.5I$*1G= O)$,$1)-
Typically, Djembe hand-strikes will be notated using the Gun, go,
pa or Gun, bi, pa system. There are also symbols for the
DunDun and clave/bell parts.

There are mainly four ways to hit the drum head. They are: bass,
tone, slap, and tap. I say mainly, because, of course there are
infinite variations. They can be modified as one wishes to create
different sounds; for instance, they can be hard or light; they can
be open or muffled. And by changing your hand slightly the
"voicing" can be altered. Playing drum is not just about rhythms, it
is about making the drum sing. But we have to start somewhere,
so.......

The main types of hand-strikes are as follows:

Bass - Hitting the center of the drum head with the whole hand.
Tone - Hitting with only half the hand nearer the edge to make a
muted pop. This is also called an open tone
Slap - Hitting in the same place as an open tone, but with just the
ends of your fingers. It will make a note like the tone but
higher.
Tap - Tapping or touching the drum lightly. This is can be used
to add dimension to a rhythm in place of leaving a rest, or it
can help the drummer keep time between beats.

The symbols for hand-strikes are described as follows:

Gn - Bass note with the dominant hand.
Dn - Bass with non-dominant hand
go - Tone note with the dominant hand. Sometimes called bi.
do - Tone with non-dominant hand. Sometimes called di.
pa - Slap with dominant hand. If muffled with left, then mp
ta - Slap with non-dominant hand
rt - dominant tap
lt - non-dominant tap
13
h - Muted bass made by dropping heal of hand near middle of
drum head and holding it down. If drumming right-handed,
this is most often done with the left hand.
ful - dropping the fingers of the left-hand down on the head so
now the entire hand rests on the drum head, as if you just
played a bass note. Often the combined h-ful (called a shu-
ffle) movement is a setup for muting the next note (often a
pa) made by the right hand.
mD - Muted bass note made by playing a regular Dn, but not
lifting your hand off the head afterward. Often an mD is a
setup for muting the next note(often an mp) made by the
right hand. If done with right hand this would be mG.
Gr - Pronounced "gro", a quick go & do two-handed tone,
hitting the drum at almost the same time, called a flam
Pr - Pronounced "pra", a quick pa & ta two-handed slap hitting
the drum at almost the same time, called a flam
O - bass note on the dunun
m - muted bass note on dunun (strk lightly, hold stick to head);
also notated (o)
x - clave/bell/glocke
s - shakere or assn. Since the shakere makes different sounds
when shook up or down, this symbol can be modified by a
u or d, that is, su or sd.
stk - stick strike on a wooden block or the side of a drum. Be
aware this can damage a drum, so make sure it's yours.

It might seem that simply alternating hand-strikes, left, right, left
right, etc. would be the simplest way to play a rhythm. Yet, the
notation specifies which hand must play certain beats, so
sometimes your hands will not be alternating.

There are a lot of reasons for this. One is that your muscles must
do different things for each sound, and since there is more time
between some notes than others to change position or get ready,
simply alternating hands may not give the best fluidity. And when
you need to switch between rhythm parts, you want to always be
ready to lead with the appropriate hand. So, rhythm notation is
often written with the perspective that certain quick moves are best
accomplished with the dominant hand. But, some drummers will
learn to play rhythms both left-handed and right-handed so they
13
h - Muted bass made by dropping heal of hand near middle of
drum head and holding it down. If drumming right-handed,
this is most often done with the left hand.
ful - dropping the fingers of the left-hand down on the head so
now the entire hand rests on the drum head, as if you just
played a bass note. Often the combined h-ful (called a shu-
ffle) movement is a setup for muting the next note (often a
pa) made by the right hand.
mD - Muted bass note made by playing a regular Dn, but not
lifting your hand off the head afterward. Often an mD is a
setup for muting the next note(often an mp) made by the
right hand. If done with right hand this would be mG.
Gr - Pronounced "gro", a quick go & do two-handed tone,
hitting the drum at almost the same time, called a flam
Pr - Pronounced "pra", a quick pa & ta two-handed slap hitting
the drum at almost the same time, called a flam
O - bass note on the dunun
m - muted bass note on dunun (strk lightly, hold stick to head);
also notated (o)
x - clave/bell/glocke
s - shakere or assn. Since the shakere makes different sounds
when shook up or down, this symbol can be modified by a
u or d, that is, su or sd.
stk - stick strike on a wooden block or the side of a drum. Be
aware this can damage a drum, so make sure it's yours.

It might seem that simply alternating hand-strikes, left, right, left
right, etc. would be the simplest way to play a rhythm. Yet, the
notation specifies which hand must play certain beats, so
sometimes your hands will not be alternating.

There are a lot of reasons for this. One is that your muscles must
do different things for each sound, and since there is more time
between some notes than others to change position or get ready,
simply alternating hands may not give the best fluidity. And when
you need to switch between rhythm parts, you want to always be
ready to lead with the appropriate hand. So, rhythm notation is
often written with the perspective that certain quick moves are best
accomplished with the dominant hand. But, some drummers will
learn to play rhythms both left-handed and right-handed so they
14
train themselves to be balanced. Some rhythms are more
interesting when played with taps in place of rests. In that case it
can be easier to alternate hands. Or not.

It's very important to follow what your teacher recommends
because if everyone in the class is using the same method it will be
easier to watch their hands and do what they do.

Ultimately, it may be that traditional handing has been worked out
generations ago and has the proper feel imbedded inside it.

There is more on the matter here:
http://tcd.freehosting.net/djembemande/handing.html

I cant possibly describe the subtleties behind all the hand-strikes,
rationalizations for the use of left and right hands, or finer points of
traditional rhythms. Nor can anyone in a book. This is why if you
really want to learn to play well, there is no substitute for a good
teacher.

N-&$*0%=-$&
The instrument to be played is listed to the left of each line of
notation. Some of these are not in the notation. They are just
listed for "someday....."

kk - Kankini: high African bass drum, usually with bell
sb - Sangban: middle African bass drum, usually with bell
DD - Dundunba: low African bass drum, usually with bell
Djm - Djembe (or Ashiko)
Og - Ogan: bell
As - Assn: shaker
Bu - Bula: high South American drum played with two thin
sticks in whipping motion
Sc - Seconde: middle South American conga drum
Mm - Maman: low South American conga drum
14
train themselves to be balanced. Some rhythms are more
interesting when played with taps in place of rests. In that case it
can be easier to alternate hands. Or not.

It's very important to follow what your teacher recommends
because if everyone in the class is using the same method it will be
easier to watch their hands and do what they do.

Ultimately, it may be that traditional handing has been worked out
generations ago and has the proper feel imbedded inside it.

There is more on the matter here:
http://tcd.freehosting.net/djembemande/handing.html

I cant possibly describe the subtleties behind all the hand-strikes,
rationalizations for the use of left and right hands, or finer points of
traditional rhythms. Nor can anyone in a book. This is why if you
really want to learn to play well, there is no substitute for a good
teacher.

N-&$*0%=-$&
The instrument to be played is listed to the left of each line of
notation. Some of these are not in the notation. They are just
listed for "someday....."

kk - Kankini: high African bass drum, usually with bell
sb - Sangban: middle African bass drum, usually with bell
DD - Dundunba: low African bass drum, usually with bell
Djm - Djembe (or Ashiko)
Og - Ogan: bell
As - Assn: shaker
Bu - Bula: high South American drum played with two thin
sticks in whipping motion
Sc - Seconde: middle South American conga drum
Mm - Maman: low South American conga drum
15
I12-,?QR*=,G

You may have noticed that one of the "instruments", listed to the
left of the first line in most every rhythm, is "Signal". The signal,
often called the "break", or "call", is not an instrument. It is a
rhythm that can be played on any instrument (though, the notation
is for djembe) to indicate when something about the rhythm is
changing, such as:

Start
Stop
Change drum part(s)
Change dance step
Begin solo
End solo
Speed up (new speed should match speed at which
break is played)
or even, "Be ready, a change is coming soon...."

Currently, most people in my neck of the woods -- including my
primary drum teacher -- call this part of a rhythm "the break"; it's
just convention. However, i have noticed that when a break is
played, most people will stop playing. This makes sense, because
in America, break means, "Stop what you are doing and take a
rest." In Mamady Keita's book A Life for the Djembe, he refers to
the break as the signal, and to me this makes much more sense,
since it is a way of signaling that something is going to happen.



15
I12-,?QR*=,G

You may have noticed that one of the "instruments", listed to the
left of the first line in most every rhythm, is "Signal". The signal,
often called the "break", or "call", is not an instrument. It is a
rhythm that can be played on any instrument (though, the notation
is for djembe) to indicate when something about the rhythm is
changing, such as:

Start
Stop
Change drum part(s)
Change dance step
Begin solo
End solo
Speed up (new speed should match speed at which
break is played)
or even, "Be ready, a change is coming soon...."

Currently, most people in my neck of the woods -- including my
primary drum teacher -- call this part of a rhythm "the break"; it's
just convention. However, i have noticed that when a break is
played, most people will stop playing. This makes sense, because
in America, break means, "Stop what you are doing and take a
rest." In Mamady Keita's book A Life for the Djembe, he refers to
the break as the signal, and to me this makes much more sense,
since it is a way of signaling that something is going to happen.



16
I022=&$=. R=21--=*S& !"#$"%&

Based on popularity at drum circles and the certain specific lessons
these rhythms teach, it is suggested beginners start by learning the
following:

Aconcon.........................................................20
Babatundi Olatunji Warmups ........................123
Bembe ............................................................29
Fanga..............................................................43
Funk ...............................................................44
Kakilambe......................................................48
Lamba ............................................................65
Lenjen ............................................................67

These are by no means the only rhythms easy enough for
beginners, and people of any skill level are encouraged to work on
any and all rhythms they have notation for. These suggestions
only apply to the djembe parts, not the dunun parts. For instance,
many find the dunun part to Bembe to be quite challenging.
16
I022=&$=. R=21--=*S& !"#$"%&

Based on popularity at drum circles and the certain specific lessons
these rhythms teach, it is suggested beginners start by learning the
following:

Aconcon .........................................................20
Babatundi Olatunji Warmups ........................123
Bembe ............................................................29
Fanga..............................................................43
Funk ...............................................................44
Kakilambe......................................................48
Lamba ............................................................65
Lenjen ............................................................67

These are by no means the only rhythms easy enough for
beginners, and people of any skill level are encouraged to work on
any and all rhythms they have notation for. These suggestions
only apply to the djembe parts, not the dunun parts. For instance,
many find the dunun part to Bembe to be quite challenging.
17
I)%= @=)@?=DDDDDDD

These are some people who have been very instrumental in my
education, who are sources for information in this book, or have
otherwise been a part of this adventure ('cause there are other
important people, like you!):

J?,- 3,0K=* and his teachers at The Drum Connection:
http:/www.drumconnection.com; 6)*H=- 3H) M=,$"=*& of the
Earth Drum Council: www.earthdrum.com; 6TD N%,-1#
http://www.circleskinandbone.com/; !=1-",*. ,-. F)*-=?1,
M?,$1&A"?=* (TA-KE-TI-NA Workshops): http://www.taketina.com;
E0?1= F)*=#; I$=>=- U)0.=-$ E)&& L*1A= ,-. I$=>= 3*)%K0?,G of the
Village Green Drum Collective: http://www.vgdrum.org. also, see
their not-for-money organization, Drummers Against Global
Warming: http://community.middlebury.edu/~trombula/dagw.htm;
J-.*=H +1??V http://www.justaddfire.com who runs the site where
these rhythms enjoy a web presence; the bus; Suzan and Jean who
contributed some transcriptions of things they found; Jane and
John with whom i practice once a week; and, my students, who
encourage me to learn.

And thanks to all the rest you who play drums with me!!!!

Oh, one more thing: if your drum is broken, in eastern MA you can
call The Drum Connection's 3)-# W*)&& in Westboro at
508.366.3683 -- he did a good job replacing the head on my drum.
If you attend any gathering where there may be drumming, ask
around for Rob or Conrad. Or, learn to fix it yourself by doing a
workshop with Stan Secrest (www.buildadrum.com) -- that was
fun.
17
I)%= @=)@?=DDDDDDD

These are some people who have been very instrumental in my
education, who are sources for information in this book, or have
otherwise been a part of this adventure ('cause there are other
important people, like you!):

J?,- 3,0K=* and his teachers at The Drum Connection:
http:/www.drumconnection.com; 6)*H=- 3H) M=,$"=*& of the
Earth Drum Council: www.earthdrum.com; 6TD N%,-1#
http://www.circleskinandbone.com/; !=1-",*. ,-. F)*-=?1,
M?,$1&A"?=* (TA-KE-TI-NA Workshops): http://www.taketina.com;
E0?1= F)*=#; I$=>=- U)0.=-$ E)&& L*1A= ,-. I$=>= 3*)%K0?,G of the
Village Green Drum Collective: http://www.vgdrum.org. also, see
their not-for-money organization, Drummers Against Global
Warming: http://community.middlebury.edu/~trombula/dagw.htm;
J-.*=H +1??V http://www.justaddfire.com who runs the site where
these rhythms enjoy a web presence; the bus; Suzan and Jean who
contributed some transcriptions of things they found; Jane and
John with whom i practice once a week; and, my students, who
encourage me to learn.

And thanks to all the rest you who play drums with me!!!!

Oh, one more thing: if your drum is broken, in eastern MA you can
call The Drum Connection's 3)-# W*)&& in Westboro at
508.366.3683 -- he did a good job replacing the head on my drum.
If you attend any gathering where there may be drumming, ask
around for Rob or Conrad. Or, learn to fix it yourself by doing a
workshop with Stan Secrest (www.buildadrum.com) -- that was
fun.
18
U1-G&

Here's a bunch to amuse yourself with:

Rhythms:
http://www.justaddfire.com (this book on the web)
http://www.djembe.net/notation.shtml
or http://www.djembe.net/share/index.htm
http://members.tripod.lycos.nl/Wappages/ (www.wappages.info)
http://members.tripod.com/rhythm_planet/
http://www.geocities.com/Broadway/2413/music_rhythm.html
http://tcd.freehosting.net/djembemande/patterns.htm
http://www.newview.org/salem/rhythm.html
http://www.cse.ogi.edu/Drum/groove/
http://www.african-drumbeat.co.uk/almost3.htm
http://www.soundweaver.org/translib.html
http://www.dambe.org/rhythms.html (rhythm meanings, see also:
http://home.acceleration.net/clark/PaperVu/context.htm)
...and Dave Jolly has a great drum book for sale for $15:
http://www.picturedance.com/dave_personal_pages/rhythmbook.html
http://www.congajoy.com (a nicely written simple drum book)

Misc:
http://www.drumresource.net/
http://tcd.freehosting.net/djembemande/
http://www.dancinghands.com/lesson.cfm
http://users.erols.com/jaqui/
http://users.pandora.be/jv/htm-index.htm (for a rhythm program)
http://henrykellner.com/PercussionStudio/ (cool rhythm program)
http://www.drums.org/
http://www.drumconnection.com
http://www.animana.org/tab3/31_INTRO.shtml
http://www.ancient-future.com/links/rhythms.html (links)
http://www.rhythmweb.com (funny, you've got a lot of books here...)
http://www.alternativeculture.com/music/drumming.htm (lessons)
http://www.viviansrainbow.com/africanpercussion/notationmethods.htm
http://www.larkinam.com/MenComNet/Business/Retail/Larknet/ArtAfroAm
erPercussion - this is about the instruments
http://www.drumrhythms.com (lessons)
http://www.pragmasoft.be/mamady/index_e.html?rhythmweb (Mamady's)
http://www.djembe-play.de/Djembe-play/djembe-play.html

Drum components
http://pages.prodigy.net/djembe/Djembe.htm
http://www.africanrhythmtraders.com
http://www.mid-east.com/




18
U1-G&

Here's a bunch to amuse yourself with:

Rhythms:
http://www.justaddfire.com (this book on the web)
http://www.djembe.net/notation.shtml
or http://www.djembe.net/share/index.htm
http://members.tripod.lycos.nl/Wappages/ (www.wappages.info)
http://members.tripod.com/rhythm_planet/
http://www.geocities.com/Broadway/2413/music_rhythm.html
http://tcd.freehosting.net/djembemande/patterns.htm
http://www.newview.org/salem/rhythm.html
http://www.cse.ogi.edu/Drum/groove/
http://www.african-drumbeat.co.uk/almost3.htm
http://www.soundweaver.org/translib.html
http://www.dambe.org/rhythms.html (rhythm meanings, see also:
http://home.acceleration.net/clark/PaperVu/context.htm)
...and Dave Jolly has a great drum book for sale for $15:
http://www.picturedance.com/dave_personal_pages/rhythmbook.html
http://www.congajoy.com (a nicely written simple drum book)

Misc:
http://www.drumresource.net/
http://tcd.freehosting.net/djembemande/
http://www.dancinghands.com/lesson.cfm
http://users.erols.com/jaqui/
http://users.pandora.be/jv/htm-index.htm (for a rhythm program)
http://henrykellner.com/PercussionStudio/ (cool rhythm program)
http://www.drums.org/
http://www.drumconnection.com
http://www.animana.org/tab3/31_INTRO.shtml
http://www.ancient-future.com/links/rhythms.html (links)
http://www.rhythmweb.com (funny, you've got a lot of books here...)
http://www.alternativeculture.com/music/drumming.htm (lessons)
http://www.viviansrainbow.com/africanpercussion/notationmethods.htm
http://www.larkinam.com/MenComNet/Business/Retail/Larknet/ArtAfroAm
erPercussion - this is about the instruments
http://www.drumrhythms.com (lessons)
http://www.pragmasoft.be/mamady/index_e.html?rhythmweb (Mamady's)
http://www.djembe-play.de/Djembe-play/djembe-play.html

Drum components
http://pages.prodigy.net/djembe/Djembe.htm
http://www.africanrhythmtraders.com
http://www.mid-east.com/




19
30-1-2 , /*0%

Tuning a drum is intellectually very simple once you get the hang
of it. Then the most difficult part is physical. The figures below
tell you most of what you need to get started. First, unravel the
extra rope from where it is stored as shown in Figure 1. Next,
weave the rope over two vertical tension ropes as shown in
Figure 2. The easiest way to remember how the weave goes, is:
over two, under one, under two. Now, readjust the weave so that
section u is below bend A (as identified in Fig 2 but shown in
Fig 3), and the bend just before u is below bend A (not shown) and
push all of the rope down as low as it can go with your hands.
Once you are ready to pull the weave tight, stand up, stand the
drum up, and hold the extra rope in one hand, leaving a sagging
section about 4 inches off the ground. Step on the loop with one
foot and pull up with your hand. Pulling vertical to the ground
keeps the diamonds low. This will pull the two vertical ropes
together and should end up looking like Figure 4.

Things to remember: 1) Try and keep each weave level with the
others so that it looks nice. 2) If you have gone around the drum
more than five times, you might want to take out all the pulls and
tighten the verticals. 3) You can tell it is properly tuned if there is
no ringing and it's easy to differentiate between slap and tone. It is
best not to verify tuning through a base note. 4) Heads tighten and
loosen with humidity and temperature. If you tighten your head on
a very humid day, remember to loosen it after you are done playing
or you risk it tearing when the day dries out.


19
30-1-2 , /*0%

Tuning a drum is intellectually very simple once you get the hang
of it. Then the most difficult part is physical. The figures below
tell you most of what you need to get started. First, unravel the
extra rope from where it is stored as shown in Figure 1. Next,
weave the rope over two vertical tension ropes as shown in
Figure 2. The easiest way to remember how the weave goes, is:
over two, under one, under two. Now, readjust the weave so that
section u is below bend A (as identified in Fig 2 but shown in
Fig 3), and the bend just before u is below bend A (not shown) and
push all of the rope down as low as it can go with your hands.
Once you are ready to pull the weave tight, stand up, stand the
drum up, and hold the extra rope in one hand, leaving a sagging
section about 4 inches off the ground. Step on the loop with one
foot and pull up with your hand. Pulling vertical to the ground
keeps the diamonds low. This will pull the two vertical ropes
together and should end up looking like Figure 4.

Things to remember: 1) Try and keep each weave level with the
others so that it looks nice. 2) If you have gone around the drum
more than five times, you might want to take out all the pulls and
tighten the verticals. 3) You can tell it is properly tuned if there is
no ringing and it's easy to differentiate between slap and tone. It is
best not to verify tuning through a base note. 4) Heads tighten and
loosen with humidity and temperature. If you tighten your head on
a very humid day, remember to loosen it after you are done playing
or you risk it tearing when the day dries out.


20


"#$%#$% &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gr go do go do go do go
Djm #1 pa ta pa ta go do pa ta pa ta go do
Djm #2 Gn ta Gn ta Gn ta Gn ta
Djm #3 go do pa ta Gn go do pa ta Gn
x x x x x x x x x x
O O O O (o) O O O O (o)
x x x x x x
O O O O O O
x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
x x x x x x x
O O O O O O O
DD #3
DD #1
DD #2

Aconcon is an energetic harvest rhythm mostly danced by women in Senegal.













Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
20


"#$%#$% &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gr go do go do go do go
Djm #1 pa ta pa ta go do pa ta pa ta go do
Djm #2 Gn ta Gn ta Gn ta Gn ta
Djm #3 go do pa ta Gn go do pa ta Gn
x x x x x x x x x x
O O O O (o) O O O O (o)
x x x x x x
O O O O O O
x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
x x x x x x x
O O O O O O O
DD #3
DD #1
DD #2

Aconcon is an energetic harvest rhythm mostly danced by women in Senegal.













Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
21


"#$%#$% -$.$ /012 3 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gr go do go do go do go
pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
pa ta pa ta go do go do pa ta pa ta go do go do
pa ta pa ta pa ta Pr
pa ta pa ta pa ta Pr
pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
ta ta ta
ta pa ta pa ta Pr
#5 pa ta pa ta pa ta Gr
#6 do pa ta pa do pa ta pa
#7 pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
#8 Pr pa ta Pr pa ta Pr pa ta Pr pa ta
#9 go do pa ta go do pa ta
godogo
godogo godogo
godogo godogo godogo
godogo
#2
#1
#4
#3
g
godogo's in lines 4 and 5 are triplets





Composer: of parts - Alan Tauber, or arrangement - as suitable for class
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
21


"#$%#$% -$.$ /012 3 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gr go do go do go do go
pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
pa ta pa ta go do go do pa ta pa ta go do go do
pa ta pa ta pa ta Pr
pa ta pa ta pa ta Pr
pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
ta ta ta
ta pa ta pa ta Pr
#5 pa ta pa ta pa ta Gr
#6 do pa ta pa do pa ta pa
#7 pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
#8 Pr pa ta Pr pa ta Pr pa ta Pr pa ta
#9 go do pa ta go do pa ta
godogo
godogo godogo
godogo godogo godogo
godogo
#2
#1
#4
#3
g
godogo's in lines 4 and 5 are triplets





Composer: of parts - Alan Tauber, or arrangement - as suitable for class
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
22


"#$%#$% -$.$ /012 +&'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
triplet
#8 pa pa pa
pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa
O O O O O O
#9
DD
4
so
lo
triplet
ta ta ta
g
































Composer: of parts - Alan Tauber, of arrangement - as suitable for class
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
22


"#$%#$% -$.$ /012 +&'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
triplet
#8 pa pa pa
pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa
O O O O O O
#9
DD
4
so
lo
triplet
ta ta ta
g
































Composer: of parts - Alan Tauber, of arrangement - as suitable for class
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
23


"41 5 "6 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Air I am Fire I am
and Spi-rit I am Wa - ter Ea-rth

































Transcribed by me
Source: gatherings
23


"41 5 "6 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Air I am Fire I am
and Spi-rit I am Wa - ter Ea-rth

































Transcribed by me
Source: gatherings
24


"1068.09 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Djm #1 Gn go do pa go do Gn go do pa go do
shkr x x x x

Aramelay
Aramelay
Oh, oh, oh
Aramelay
Oh ya ya


1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Gn go do go do Gn go do go do
Gn go do go do Gn go do
#2 Djm


Aramelay
Aramelay
Aramelay
Oh ya ya

Here is the traditional Malinke djembe part that Susan plays all the time, placed in a
random spot in the book. Not part of Aramelay Sounds good on one drum.

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Gn pa ta Dn pa ta Gn go ta go do pa ta







Composer: traditional
Source: Julie Corey drum class (thanks Suzan and Jean)
24


"1068.09 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Djm #1 Gn go do pa go do Gn go do pa go do
shkr x x x x

Aramelay
Aramelay
Oh, oh, oh
Aramelay
Oh ya ya


1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Gn go do go do Gn go do go do
Gn go do go do Gn go do
#2 Djm


Aramelay
Aramelay
Aramelay
Oh ya ya

Here is the traditional Malinke djembe part that Susan plays all the time, placed in a
random spot in the book. Not part of Aramelay Sounds good on one drum.

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Gn pa ta Dn pa ta Gn go ta go do pa ta







Composer: traditional
Source: Julie Corey drum class (thanks Suzan and Jean)
25


"21$#429 :(;4<424$% &'(' = '(7)

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gro go do go pa go do go do go pa
go go ta pa Dn go do go do go Dn
go go ta pa Dn go do go do go do Gn Dn
DD? go ta go ta go do
go ta Dn Gn Dn Gn Dn
go ta go ta pa ta pa
Dn Gn Dn Gn Gn Dn Gn Dn
Djm #1


1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
pa ta pa ta pa Dn pa
Dn
















Transcribed by me, based on Atrocity Exhibition by Joy Division
Source: self, still working on this one
25


"21$#429 :(;4<424$% &'(' = '(7)

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gro go do go pa go do go do go pa
go go ta pa Dn go do go do go Dn
go go ta pa Dn go do go do go do Gn Dn
DD? go ta go ta go do
go ta Dn Gn Dn Gn Dn
go ta go ta pa ta pa
Dn Gn Dn Gn Gn Dn Gn Dn
Djm #1


1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
pa ta pa ta pa Dn pa
Dn
















Transcribed by me, based on Atrocity Exhibition by Joy Division
Source: self, still working on this one
26


?0@4 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Djm #1 go pa do do go do go pa pa Dn
O O O O O
O O O
O O
DD #2
DD #1
























Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
26


?0@4 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Djm #1 go pa do do go do go pa pa Dn
O O O O O
O O O
O O
DD #2
DD #1
























Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
27


?010 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gro go do go do go do go
Djm#1 Gn ta go do pa ta Gn ta go do pa ta
o o o o
O O O
O O O O O O O O O O O
m O O O
DD
DD #1
























Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
27


?010 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gro go do go do go do go
Djm#1 Gn ta go do pa ta Gn ta go do pa ta
o o o o
O O O
O O O O O O O O O O O
m O O O
DD
DD #1
























Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
28


?0.0%20 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gr go do go do go pa ta pa
Djm go do pa pa ta pa go do pa ta pa ta
o o o
O O O
DD























Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber Drum Connection
28


?0.0%20 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gr go do go do go pa ta pa
Djm go do pa pa ta pa go do pa ta pa ta
o o o
O O O
DD























Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber Drum Connection
29


?86<8 &A(+)

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 +
Signal Gro go do go do go do
Gn go do Gn go do
Gn go do go Gn * ta
Gn go go Gn go do
Gn go do go Gn pa ta
Gn Dn Gn Dn Gn Dn Gn
Gn do Gn do Gn do Gn do
Djm #3 go pa ta go pa ta go pa ta go pa ta
Djm#4a Gn go do pa Gn go do pa
Djm#4b pa Gn go do pa Gn go do
Djm #4c go do pa Gn go do pa Gn
Djm #5 Gn Dn go do go do Dn
Djm #6 Gn Dn pa Gn Dn Dn Dn
x x x x x x x
O O O
x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
DD #1
#1 Djm
#2 Djm

* when learning, it may help to slap your leg here
Part #4 is a round.
For those having trouble learning the DD part, note that djembe parts 5 and 6 when
played one-after-the-other match the DD part.


Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber Drum Connection
29


?86<8 &A(+)

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 +
Signal Gro go do go do go do
Gn go do Gn go do
Gn go do go Gn * ta
Gn go go Gn go do
Gn go do go Gn pa ta
Gn Dn Gn Dn Gn Dn Gn
Gn do Gn do Gn do Gn do
Djm #3 go pa ta go pa ta go pa ta go pa ta
Djm#4a Gn go do pa Gn go do pa
Djm#4b pa Gn go do pa Gn go do
Djm #4c go do pa Gn go do pa Gn
Djm #5 Gn Dn go do go do Dn
Djm #6 Gn Dn pa Gn Dn Dn Dn
x x x x x x x
O O O
x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
DD #1
#1 Djm
#2 Djm

* when learning, it may help to slap your leg here
Part #4 is a round.
For those having trouble learning the DD part, note that djembe parts 5 and 6 when
played one-after-the-other match the DD part.


Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber Drum Connection
30


?86<8 E8FF0 &A(+)

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 +
Djm#1 Gn ta ta ta ta ta ta
Djm#2 Gn Gn Gn ta ta ta ta ta
Djm#3 Gn ta Gn ta Gn ta Gn
bell x x x x x x x



























Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber Drum Connection
30


?86<8 E8FF0 &A(+)

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 +
Djm#1 Gn ta ta ta ta ta ta
Djm#2 Gn Gn Gn ta ta ta ta ta
Djm#3 Gn ta Gn ta Gn ta Gn
bell x x x x x x x



























Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber Drum Connection
31


G0.9/F$ &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gro go do go do go do go
Djm#1 Gn Dn Gn do Gn Dn Gn do
Djm#2 Gn Dn Dn Gn do Gn Dn Gn do
Djm#3 Gn do Gn do Gn do Gn do
x x (x) x x x x (x) x
O O O O O
DD#1























Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
31


G0.9/F$ &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gro go do go do go do go
Djm#1 Gn Dn Gn do Gn Dn Gn do
Djm#2 Gn Dn Dn Gn do Gn Dn Gn do
Djm#3 Gn do Gn do Gn do Gn do
x x (x) x x x x (x) x
O O O O O
DD#1























Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
32


G06<812$ &'(A)

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 +
Djm#1 Gn pa Dn go do Gn pa Dn go do
Djm#2 Dn go ta Gn do pa Gn
Djm#3 go ta pa do pa ta go ta pa do pa ta
x x x x x x x
(O) O O O
DD #1

hint: part #1 feels very fast against part #2. Part #3 looks easy, but adds quite a lot
to the rhythm.






















Composer: traditional
Source: Dave Jolly's rhythm book
http://www.picturedance.com/dave_personal_pages/rhythmbook.html
32


G06<812$ &'(A)

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 +
Djm#1 Gn pa Dn go do Gn pa Dn go do
Djm#2 Dn go ta Gn do pa Gn
Djm#3 go ta pa do pa ta go ta pa do pa ta
x x x x x x x
(O) O O O
DD #1

hint: part #1 feels very fast against part #2. Part #3 looks easy, but adds quite a lot
to the rhythm.






















Composer: traditional
Source: Dave Jolly's rhythm book
http://www.picturedance.com/dave_personal_pages/rhythmbook.html
33


G;4.H18% $I 2;8 J4K4%8 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Djm Gn Dn go Dn Gn pa Gn pa Gn Dn go Dn Gn pa Gn pa
We are the of the di-
We are the chil dren of lo ove
We are the of the di-
As we on the Ear th now plain work
chi - l - dr - n vine
chi - l - dr - n vine

Blessings to our Mother the Earth
Blessings to our Father the Sky
Blessings to our Children
As we work on the Earth plane now

I am a daughter of the Divine
I am a daughter of Love
I am a daughter of the Divine
As I work on the Earth plane now

Blessings to my Mother the Earth
Blessings to my Father the Sky
Blessings to my Children
As I work on the Earth plane now













A GDC favorite!
Composer: Mz. Imani - Words and Lyrics
Source: Mz. Imani drum class
33


G;4.H18% $I 2;8 J4K4%8 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Djm Gn Dn go Dn Gn pa Gn pa Gn Dn go Dn Gn pa Gn pa
We are the of the di-
We are the chil dren of lo ove
We are the of the di-
As we on the Ear th now plain work
chi - l - dr - n vine
chi - l - dr - n vine

Blessings to our Mother the Earth
Blessings to our Father the Sky
Blessings to our Children
As we work on the Earth plane now

I am a daughter of the Divine
I am a daughter of Love
I am a daughter of the Divine
As I work on the Earth plane now

Blessings to my Mother the Earth
Blessings to my Father the Sky
Blessings to my Children
As I work on the Earth plane now













A GDC favorite!
Composer: Mz. Imani - Words and Lyrics
Source: Mz. Imani drum class
34


G$%L$ &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal go do go do go do go go
Djm#1 go lt go lt go lt go lt go lt go lt
Djm#2 rt ta pa lt rt do go do rt ta pa lt rt do go do
O O O O O
DD


























Composer: Alan Tauber
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
34


G$%L$ &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal go do go do go do go go
Djm#1 go lt go lt go lt go lt go lt go lt
Djm#2 rt ta pa lt rt do go do rt ta pa lt rt do go do
O O O O O
DD


























Composer: Alan Tauber
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
35


JM0%F0 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gr go do go do go pa ta pa
Djm#1 pa ta ta pa go do pa Gn pa Dn go do
Djm#2 pa ta pa go do pa ta pa go do
Djm#3 go Dn go do go Dn go do
Djm#4 go Gn Dn Gn Dn pa ta Gn Dn
pa Dn go do Gn do go Dn
Gn Dn do go Gn Dn Gn do go
Gn Dn do go do Gn do go Gn do go
Djm#6 go do pa ta Dn pa ta go do pa ta Dn pa ta
Djm#7 do Gn do Gn do Gn Dn pa go
Djm#5

Djansa is a competition dance between young men. Today it is a popular rhythm
played at all traditional festivals.

There are so many parts to this one not because they necessarily are to be played all
at once but so they can be played individually with breaks in between. Sort of like a
semi solo. Generally, one line parts are played four times, and two line parts are
played only twice, or half as many times as the one line parts.





Composer: traditional, Kassounke, Mali, Kayes Region, arrangement and some
lines added by Alan Tauber. .
Source: Djm #1,#2 from Mamady Keita,
#3-7 Alan Tauber Drum Connection
Djm #7 simply mirrors the dunun part #1.
35


JM0%F0 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gr go do go do go pa ta pa
Djm#1 pa ta ta pa go do pa Gn pa Dn go do
Djm#2 pa ta pa go do pa ta pa go do
Djm#3 go Dn go do go Dn go do
Djm#4 go Gn Dn Gn Dn pa ta Gn Dn
pa Dn go do Gn do go Dn
Gn Dn do go Gn Dn Gn do go
Gn Dn do go do Gn do go Gn do go
Djm#6 go do pa ta Dn pa ta go do pa ta Dn pa ta
Djm#7 do Gn do Gn do Gn Dn pa go
Djm#5

Djansa is a competition dance between young men. Today it is a popular rhythm
played at all traditional festivals.

There are so many parts to this one not because they necessarily are to be played all
at once but so they can be played individually with breaks in between. Sort of like a
semi solo. Generally, one line parts are played four times, and two line parts are
played only twice, or half as many times as the one line parts.





Composer: traditional, Kassounke, Mali, Kayes Region, arrangement and some
lines added by Alan Tauber. .
Source: Djm #1,#2 from Mamady Keita,
#3-7 Alan Tauber Drum Connection
Djm #7 simply mirrors the dunun part #1.
36


JM0%F0 -$.$ &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Gn ta pa ta go do pa ta Gn ta pa ta go do pa ta
Gn ta pa ta go do pa ta Gn ta pa ta go do pa ta
#2 pa ta Dn pa ta pa Dn 4x
#3 pa ta go do pa ta pa go do 2x
pa ta do go ta go do pa do go ta go do pa Dn
pa ta Dn pa ta pa Dn
pa ta pa pa pa pa Dn
pa ta Dn pa ta pa Dn
pa ta pa pa pa pa 1x
go do pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta 4x
go do pa ta pa ta pa ta go do pa ta pa ta pa ta 2x
go do pa ta go do pa ta 1x
Pr Gn ta Gn ta Pr Gn ta Gn ta
Pr Gn ta Pr Gn ta Pr Gn ta Gn ta
Gn go do go do go do pa ta pa ta
go do go do go do go do go do
tapata tapata
3x
tapata tapata tapata tapata
#5
tapata tapata
#8 2x
#7
2x
1x
2x
#1
#4
#6


#9 ta ta ta ta pa 4x patapa patapa patapa patapa

Hints: patapa's are triplets, ta's are spaced evenly, isolated ta's are on 1+,2e, 3,3a, take a class, i'm not
sure about this one, myself.
#10 go do pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta 6x



Composer: #1-6 Mamady Keita, #7-10 are added by Alan Tauber
Source: Alan Tauber Drum Connection, and Calamari
36


JM0%F0 -$.$ &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Gn ta pa ta go do pa ta Gn ta pa ta go do pa ta
Gn ta pa ta go do pa ta Gn ta pa ta go do pa ta
#2 pa ta Dn pa ta pa Dn 4x
#3 pa ta go do pa ta pa go do 2x
pa ta do go ta go do pa do go ta go do pa Dn
pa ta Dn pa ta pa Dn
pa ta pa pa pa pa Dn
pa ta Dn pa ta pa Dn
pa ta pa pa pa pa 1x
go do pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta 4x
go do pa ta pa ta pa ta go do pa ta pa ta pa ta 2x
go do pa ta go do pa ta 1x
Pr Gn ta Gn ta Pr Gn ta Gn ta
Pr Gn ta Pr Gn ta Pr Gn ta Gn ta
Gn go do go do go do pa ta pa ta
go do go do go do go do go do
tapata tapata
3x
tapata tapata tapata tapata
#5
tapata tapata
#8 2x
#7
2x
1x
2x
#1
#4
#6


#9 ta ta ta ta pa 4x patapa patapa patapa patapa

Hints: patapa's are triplets, ta's are spaced evenly, isolated ta's are on 1+,2e, 3,3a, take a class, i'm not
sure about this one, myself.
#10 go do pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta 6x



Composer: #1-6 Mamady Keita, #7-10 are added by Alan Tauber
Source: Alan Tauber Drum Connection, and Calamari
37


JM0%F0 &HN%N%O '(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
x x x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
x x x x x x x x x
O O O (O) O
x x x x x x x x x
(O) (O) O
x x x x x x x x x
(O) O O O O
x x x x x x x x
(O) O
x x x x x x x x x
(O) O O O O O
x x x x x x x x
O O O
x x x x x x x x x
O O O O O
kk
DD #2
#1 DD
DD #3
sb








Composer: traditional, Kassounke, Mali, Kayes Region
Source: kk,sb,DD#1 from Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe
DD#2 from Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
DD#3 from www.soundweaver.org
37


JM0%F0 &HN%N%O '(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
x x x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
x x x x x x x x x
O O O (O) O
x x x x x x x x x
(O) (O) O
x x x x x x x x x
(O) O O O O
x x x x x x x x
(O) O
x x x x x x x x x
(O) O O O O O
x x x x x x x x
O O O
x x x x x x x x x
O O O O O
kk
DD #2
#1 DD
DD #3
sb








Composer: traditional, Kassounke, Mali, Kayes Region
Source: kk,sb,DD#1 from Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe
DD#2 from Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
DD#3 from www.soundweaver.org
38


JM86<8 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gro go do go do go do go
Djm#1 pa ta pa go do pa ta pa go do
Djm#2 Dn go do pa Dn go do pa
Djm#3 Gn ta ta go do go go do
x x x x x x
O O O O O
X
O O O O O O O
DD #2
DD #1

















Composer: Traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
38


JM86<8 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gro go do go do go do go
Djm#1 pa ta pa go do pa ta pa go do
Djm#2 Dn go do pa Dn go do pa
Djm#3 Gn ta ta go do go go do
x x x x x x
O O O O O
X
O O O O O O O
DD #2
DD #1

















Composer: Traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
39


JM86<8 -$.$ &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
go do go do go ta go do go do go ta
pa ta pa ta pa ta go do go
Pr Pr go do go
Pr pa ta pa Gro Gro
#3 4x Pr Gr Gr Pr Gr Gr
End 1x Pr
#1 2x
#2 2x





















Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
39


JM86<8 -$.$ &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
go do go do go ta go do go do go ta
pa ta pa ta pa ta go do go
Pr Pr go do go
Pr pa ta pa Gro Gro
#3 4x Pr Gr Gr Pr Gr Gr
End 1x Pr
#1 2x
#2 2x





















Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
40


J$N%J$N%<0 &A(+)

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 +
Signal Gro go do go do go do
Djm#1 pa go ta pa go ta
Djm#2 pa pa ta go do pa pa ta go do
Djm#3 Gn do go Dn go do Gn do go Dn go do
Djm#4 Gn go ta Gn go ta
Djm#5 pa ta go do pa ta go do
Djm#6 go do pa ta pa ta go do pa ta pa ta
x x x x x x x
O O O O O O O
x x x x x x
O
x x x x x x x
O O O O
DD #2
DD #1









Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
40


J$N%J$N%<0 &A(+)

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 +
Signal Gro go do go do go do
Djm#1 pa go ta pa go ta
Djm#2 pa pa ta go do pa pa ta go do
Djm#3 Gn do go Dn go do Gn do go Dn go do
Djm#4 Gn go ta Gn go ta
Djm#5 pa ta go do pa ta go do
Djm#6 go do pa ta pa ta go do pa ta pa ta
x x x x x x x
O O O O O O O
x x x x x x
O
x x x x x x x
O O O O
DD #2
DD #1









Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
41


J$N%J$N%<0 -$.$ &A(+)


1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 +
Signal Gr go do go do go do
#1 Pr pa ta Pr pa ta
pa ta pa pa ta pa pa ta
#2 go do pa ta pa ta go do pa ta pa ta
#3 pa ta pa ta pa ta
#4 pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta




















Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
41


J$N%J$N%<0 -$.$ &A(+)


1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 +
Signal Gr go do go do go do
#1 Pr pa ta Pr pa ta
pa ta pa pa ta pa pa ta
#2 go do pa ta pa ta go do pa ta pa ta
#3 pa ta pa ta pa ta
#4 pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta




















Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
42


P;8 :#.8#24#F &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Djm #1 go ta ta go ta ta go ta go
go ta ta go ta go ta ta

































Composer: The Eclectics
Source: transcribed from an Eclectics album.
42


P;8 :#.8#24#F &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Djm #1 go ta ta go ta ta go ta go
go ta ta go ta go ta ta

































Composer: The Eclectics
Source: transcribed from an Eclectics album.
43


Q0%L0 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gr go do go do go do go
Djm#1 Gn go go do Gn Gn go do
Djm#2 Gn Dn Gn Dn go do Gn Dn Gn go do
Djm#3 pa ta go do go do go do
Djm#4 Dn go do Gn Gn Dn go do Gn
Djm#5 Gn Dn Gn go do Gn Gn Gn go do
Djm#6 Gn Gn Dn go do Gn Gn Gn Dn go do
x x *x x x *x
O O O
or
x x *x x x x x *x x
O O O
with *x being optional
x x x x x x x x
O (o) O O (o)
DD O O O O O O O o o O
DD #1
DD
DD #2

Fanga Alafia Ash Ash (2x)
Ash Ash Ash Ash
Fanga Alafia Ash Ash

Repeat, but instead of Fanga use Ikabo and Eleba (or Elegua)

Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection, and
http://www.djembe.net/share/Fanga.htm, and
http://www.newview.org/salem/rhythm.html
43


Q0%L0 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gr go do go do go do go
Djm#1 Gn go go do Gn Gn go do
Djm#2 Gn Dn Gn Dn go do Gn Dn Gn go do
Djm#3 pa ta go do go do go do
Djm#4 Dn go do Gn Gn Dn go do Gn
Djm#5 Gn Dn Gn go do Gn Gn Gn go do
Djm#6 Gn Gn Dn go do Gn Gn Gn Dn go do
x x *x x x *x
O O O
or
x x *x x x x x *x x
O O O
with *x being optional
x x x x x x x x
O (o) O O (o)
DD O O O O O O O o o O
DD #1
DD
DD #2

Fanga Alafia Ash Ash (2x)
Ash Ash Ash Ash
Fanga Alafia Ash Ash

Repeat, but instead of Fanga use Ikabo and Eleba (or Elegua)

Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection, and
http://www.djembe.net/share/Fanga.htm, and
http://www.newview.org/salem/rhythm.html
44


QN%@ &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gr go do go do go do go
Djm#1 Gn t t t pa t t Dn t t Gn t pa t go do
Dn lm pa Dn go do do lm pa 3x
Dn lm pa Dn go do go Dn Dn Gn 1x
t t go do t t go do t t go do t t go do
t t go do do t do t do t do t do go
Djm#4 Gn Gn pa Dn Gn pa go do
Djm#5 Gn Gn pa Dn Gn Gn pa go do
Djm#6 Gn Dn Gn Dn pa Dn Gn pa go do
x x (x) (x)
O O O
x x x x x x
O O O O
x x x x x x x x x x x x
O O O O O
x x x x
O O O O
Djm
Djm
DD
b
e
g
n
r
s
#2
#3
DD #3
DD
DD
#1
#2

Originally played on the streets of New York City in the early seventies.
Djembe part #1 does not need to be played with touches, but it adds a lot of flair.


Composer:
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
44


QN%@ &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gr go do go do go do go
Djm#1 Gn t t t pa t t Dn t t Gn t pa t go do
Dn lm pa Dn go do do lm pa 3x
Dn lm pa Dn go do go Dn Dn Gn 1x
t t go do t t go do t t go do t t go do
t t go do do t do t do t do t do go
Djm#4 Gn Gn pa Dn Gn pa go do
Djm#5 Gn Gn pa Dn Gn Gn pa go do
Djm#6 Gn Dn Gn Dn pa Dn Gn pa go do
x x (x) (x)
O O O
x x x x x x
O O O O
x x x x x x x x x x x x
O O O O O
x x x x
O O O O
Djm
Djm
DD
b
e
g
n
r
s
#2
#3
DD #3
DD
DD
#1
#2

Originally played on the streets of New York City in the early seventies.
Djembe part #1 does not need to be played with touches, but it adds a lot of flair.


Composer:
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
45


R010%L8H$% &'(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
Signal Gr go do go do go do
Gn ta ta ta ta
Gn ta go do ta go do ta ta
Djm#2 pa go ta pa go ta
Djm#3 pa ta go do pa ta go do
x x x x x x x x
O O O O
x x x x x x x x
O (O) O (O) O
x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
x x x x x x x x
O O O
kk
Djm#1
sb
DD

The dance of the shoemakers, who, in earlier times formed their own caste.









Composer: traditional, Bambara, Mali
Source: Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe
45


R010%L8H$% &'(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
Signal Gr go do go do go do
Gn ta ta ta ta
Gn ta go do ta go do ta ta
Djm#2 pa go ta pa go ta
Djm#3 pa ta go do pa ta go do
x x x x x x x x
O O O O
x x x x x x x x
O (O) O (O) O
x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
x x x x x x x x
O O O
kk
Djm#1
sb
DD

The dance of the shoemakers, who, in earlier times formed their own caste.









Composer: traditional, Bambara, Mali
Source: Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe
46


RN0 RN0%#$ &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Pr Pr ta pa ta Pr
h ful Gn h ful go
h ful Gn h ful go
h ful Gn h ful m m
m Gn go
go ful go lt rt lt
go ful go lt rt lt
go ful go lt Gn
rt rt lt rt Gn ful
pa ta ta pa ta ta
pa ta pa ta ta
Stx x x x x x x x x x x x
x x x
- x x
X X X x x
X x x X x x
x x x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
c
l
a
v
e
Djm#1
Djm#3
Djm#2
B
e
l
l
DD





Composer: Traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
46


RN0 RN0%#$ &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Pr Pr ta pa ta Pr
h ful Gn h ful go
h ful Gn h ful go
h ful Gn h ful m m
m Gn go
go ful go lt rt lt
go ful go lt rt lt
go ful go lt Gn
rt rt lt rt Gn ful
pa ta ta pa ta ta
pa ta pa ta ta
Stx x x x x x x x x x x x
x x x
- x x
X X X x x
X x x X x x
x x x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
c
l
a
v
e
Djm#1
Djm#3
Djm#2
B
e
l
l
DD





Composer: Traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
47


S4%L$ &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Djm #1 Gn Gn Gn Gn go do go do go
Djm #2 Gn Gn Gn pa Gn Gn Gn pa
Djm all Gn Gn Gn Gn Gn Gn Gn Gn Gn pa
to end
clave x x x x x x x x x x x x























Composer: Unknown
Source: Julie Corey
47


S4%L$ &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Djm #1 Gn Gn Gn Gn go do go do go
Djm #2 Gn Gn Gn pa Gn Gn Gn pa
Djm all Gn Gn Gn Gn Gn Gn Gn Gn Gn pa
to end
clave x x x x x x x x x x x x























Composer: Unknown
Source: Julie Corey
48


T0@4.06<8 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gro go do go do go do go
Djm #1 go do do go Gn go go Gn Dn
Djm #2 Dn go do pa Dn go do pa
Djm #3 Dn do go do ta pa Dn do go do ta pa
Djm #2 Gn Gn Gn ta pa
Gn ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
x x x x x
O O O
x *x x *x x x *x
O
*x are optional
DD
Kakilambe in 4x4 time was taught to Americans decades ago when African
drumming was first introduced to the West. At the time, it was not expected that
Americans would be able to easily learn Kakilambe in the traditional time
signature, 4x3.







Composer: Ibrahim
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection; and Larry Morris Rhythm Catalogue
48


T0@4.06<8 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gro go do go do go do go
Djm #1 go do do go Gn go go Gn Dn
Djm #2 Dn go do pa Dn go do pa
Djm #3 Dn do go do ta pa Dn do go do ta pa
Djm #2 Gn Gn Gn ta pa
Gn ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
x x x x x
O O O
x *x x *x x x *x
O
*x are optional
DD
Kakilambe in 4x4 time was taught to Americans decades ago when African
drumming was first introduced to the West. At the time, it was not expected that
Americans would be able to easily learn Kakilambe in the traditional time
signature, 4x3.







Composer: Ibrahim
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection; and Larry Morris Rhythm Catalogue
49


T0@4.06<8 -$.$ &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
#1 go do go do go do go do go do go do
#2 pa go do go do go do
#3 go do go do go do go do go do go do
#4 pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
#5 pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
#6 go do go do go do go do go do go do
#7 pa go do go do go do go do
#8 go do go do go do go do go do go do
x x x x x x
O O O O
x x x x x x x
O O O O
b
g
n
r
s
DD
DD








Composer:
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
49


T0@4.06<8 -$.$ &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
#1 go do go do go do go do go do go do
#2 pa go do go do go do
#3 go do go do go do go do go do go do
#4 pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
#5 pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
#6 go do go do go do go do go do go do
#7 pa go do go do go do go do
#8 go do go do go do go do go do go do
x x x x x x
O O O O
x x x x x x x
O O O O
b
g
n
r
s
DD
DD








Composer:
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
50


T0@4.06<8 &'(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
Signal do go do go do go
Djm#1 Gn go ta Gn go ta
Djm#2 Gn go ta Gn do go do pa
Djm#3 Dn go do pa Dn go do pa
Djm#4 pa ta go do pa Dn go do
Gn Gn Gn pa ta pa ta
Gn ta ta ta
godogo
3
#5 Djm

Kakilambe is an important mask of the Baga. The spirit of Kakilambe appears only
once a year and is a protector against evil spirits. He appears to make important
revelations about the present and future. It is played loud and fast until the
messages are communicated to the priest, then slow and soft while the priest tells
what has been received, and also tells the people what sacrifices each should make.













Composer: traditional, Baga, West (lower) Guinea, Boke Region
Source: Signal and djm #1, #2 from Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe,
#3, 4, and 5 are from Alan Tauber Drum Connection
50


T0@4.06<8 &'(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
Signal do go do go do go
Djm#1 Gn go ta Gn go ta
Djm#2 Gn go ta Gn do go do pa
Djm#3 Dn go do pa Dn go do pa
Djm#4 pa ta go do pa Dn go do
Gn Gn Gn pa ta pa ta
Gn ta ta ta
godogo
3
#5 Djm

Kakilambe is an important mask of the Baga. The spirit of Kakilambe appears only
once a year and is a protector against evil spirits. He appears to make important
revelations about the present and future. It is played loud and fast until the
messages are communicated to the priest, then slow and soft while the priest tells
what has been received, and also tells the people what sacrifices each should make.













Composer: traditional, Baga, West (lower) Guinea, Boke Region
Source: Signal and djm #1, #2 from Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe,
#3, 4, and 5 are from Alan Tauber Drum Connection
51


T0@4.06<8 -$.$ &A(+)

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 +
#1 Pra pa ta pa go do pa ta
#2 pa ta pa ta pa ta
pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
#3




























Composer: traditional, Baga, West (lower) Guinea, Boke Region
Source: Alan Tauber Drum Connection
51


T0@4.06<8 -$.$ &A(+)

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 +
#1 Pra pa ta pa go do pa ta
#2 pa ta pa ta pa ta
pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
#3




























Composer: traditional, Baga, West (lower) Guinea, Boke Region
Source: Alan Tauber Drum Connection
52


T0@4.06<8 &HN%N%O '(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
x x x x x x x x
O O (O) O O (O)
x x x x x x x x
(O) O O (O) O O
x x x x x x x
O O O O
x x x x x x x
O O
x x x x
O O O
x x x
O
DD
DD
v
a
r
i
a
t
i
o
n
kk
sb
















Composer: traditional, Baga, West (lower) Guinea, Boke Region
Source: kk, sb, DD from Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe, DD variation from
Alan Tauber - Drum Connection
52


T0@4.06<8 &HN%N%O '(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
x x x x x x x x
O O (O) O O (O)
x x x x x x x x
(O) O O (O) O O
x x x x x x x
O O O O
x x x x x x x
O O
x x x x
O O O
x x x
O
DD
DD
v
a
r
i
a
t
i
o
n
kk
sb
















Composer: traditional, Baga, West (lower) Guinea, Boke Region
Source: kk, sb, DD from Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe, DD variation from
Alan Tauber - Drum Connection
53


T0F;.460; &D(+)

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 + 7 + 8 + 9 +
Gn go do go go do Gn go do Gn Gn Gn
Gn go do go go do Gn go do Gn Gn Gn
Gn go do go go do Gn go do Gn Gn Gn
Gn go Gn go do go
Gn t Gn t t t
Gn t Gn t t t
Gn t t t Gn t t t
Gn t t t Gn t tr pa


















Middle Eastern

Composer:
Source: Framingham Drum Circle
53


T0F;.460; &D(+)

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 + 7 + 8 + 9 +
Gn go do go go do Gn go do Gn Gn Gn
Gn go do go go do Gn go do Gn Gn Gn
Gn go do go go do Gn go do Gn Gn Gn
Gn go Gn go do go
Gn t Gn t t t
Gn t Gn t t t
Gn t t t Gn t t t
Gn t t t Gn t tr pa


















Middle Eastern

Composer:
Source: Framingham Drum Circle
54


T0FF0 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gr go do do do go pa ta pa
Djm#1 go do pa ta pa ta pa go do pa ta Gn pa ta
Djm#2 pa ta pa go do pa Gn ta pa go do
Djm#3 pa ta pa Dn pa go do pa Dn
Djm#4 pa ta pa go do pa Gn Dn pa go do
Djm#5 pa ta pa go do pa ta pa go do

Kassa (granary) is a rhythm for the farmers, played during work in the fields and
during the harvest. Girls will sing for the farmers and drummer will drum for them
all day long.

















Composer: traditional, Malinke, Northeast Guinea
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
54


T0FF0 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gr go do do do go pa ta pa
Djm#1 go do pa ta pa ta pa go do pa ta Gn pa ta
Djm#2 pa ta pa go do pa Gn ta pa go do
Djm#3 pa ta pa Dn pa go do pa Dn
Djm#4 pa ta pa go do pa Gn Dn pa go do
Djm#5 pa ta pa go do pa ta pa go do

Kassa (granary) is a rhythm for the farmers, played during work in the fields and
during the harvest. Girls will sing for the farmers and drummer will drum for them
all day long.

















Composer: traditional, Malinke, Northeast Guinea
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
55


T0FF0 "110%L868%2 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Gn
Dn Gn
Dn Gn
Dn Gn Dn Gn Dn Gn Gn Dn
Gn Gn
Pr Pr Pr pa ta pa pa ta
go do go do go go do go do go ta pa
go do go do go go do go do go Dn Gn 4x
Pr Pr Pr Pr
pa Dn pa Dn pa Dn pa Dn 2x
Gr pa
go do go do go go do go do go
Gr pa
go do go do go Pr go do go do go 2x
pa Dn pa Dn
pa Dn pa Dn 2x
#6 repeat line #4
#7 Pr Pr 2x
#5
(continues on next page)
godogodogodogodogodogodogo
godogodogodogodogodogodogo
#1
#2
#3
#4

55


T0FF0 "110%L868%2 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Gn
Dn Gn
Dn Gn
Dn Gn Dn Gn Dn Gn Gn Dn
Gn Gn
Pr Pr Pr pa ta pa pa ta
go do go do go go do go do go ta pa
go do go do go go do go do go Dn Gn 4x
Pr Pr Pr Pr
pa Dn pa Dn pa Dn pa Dn 2x
Gr pa
go do go do go go do go do go
Gr pa
go do go do go Pr go do go do go 2x
pa Dn pa Dn
pa Dn pa Dn 2x
#6 repeat line #4
#7 Pr Pr 2x
#5
(continues on next page)
godogodogodogodogodogodogo
godogodogodogodogodogodogo
#1
#2
#3
#4

56


T0FF0 "110%L868%2 &#$%2)

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Pr Gn Pr Dn
Pr Gn Pr Dn 2x
#9 pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
#10 go do go do go do go do
Brk pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
then go into rhythm
other part to arrangement
pa ta go do pa ta pa pa ta
go do pa ta pa pa ta go do pa ta pa 2x
x
o
x
o pa ta go do pa ta pa pa ta
go do pa ta pa pa ta go do pa ta pa 2x
#3
a
l
l x
o
x
o go do go pa ta pa 2x
#3
a
l
l x
o
x
o
x
o
x
o 2x
Brk pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
#8
#2
#1
l
o
n
e

d
j
m
a
l
l






Composer: Alan Tauber
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
56


T0FF0 "110%L868%2 &#$%2)

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Pr Gn Pr Dn
Pr Gn Pr Dn 2x
#9 pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
#10 go do go do go do go do
Brk pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
then go into rhythm
other part to arrangement
pa ta go do pa ta pa pa ta
go do pa ta pa pa ta go do pa ta pa 2x
x
o
x
o pa ta go do pa ta pa pa ta
go do pa ta pa pa ta go do pa ta pa 2x
#3
a
l
l x
o
x
o go do go pa ta pa 2x
#3
a
l
l x
o
x
o
x
o
x
o 2x
Brk pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
#8
#2
#1
l
o
n
e

d
j
m
a
l
l






Composer: Alan Tauber
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
57


T0FF0 &HN%N%O '(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
x x x x x x x x x x
O O (O) (O) O O (O) O
x x x x x x x x x x
(O) O (O) O O (O)
x x x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O O
x x x x x x
O O O O O O O O O O
x x x x x x x x
O O
x x x x x x x x x
O O O O
x x x x x
O O O O O
DD #1
kk
sb
DD #4
DD #5
DD #2
DD #3











Composer: traditional, Malinke, Northeast Guinea
Source: kk, sb, DD#1 from Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe,
DD#2-5 from Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
57


T0FF0 &HN%N%O '(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
x x x x x x x x x x
O O (O) (O) O O (O) O
x x x x x x x x x x
(O) O (O) O O (O)
x x x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O O
x x x x x x
O O O O O O O O O O
x x x x x x x x
O O
x x x x x x x x x
O O O O
x x x x x
O O O O O
DD #1
kk
sb
DD #4
DD #5
DD #2
DD #3











Composer: traditional, Malinke, Northeast Guinea
Source: kk, sb, DD#1 from Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe,
DD#2-5 from Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
58


T$%@$<0 &7(7)





























Konkoba was played to accompany farmers during their work in the field or too
honor a powerful and rich farmer (sic).

Composer: traditional, Malinke, Northeast Guinea
Source: Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe, There is also a complete
arrangement for a second version at
http://members.tripod.lycos.nl/wappages/kondun.html.
1 + a 2 + a 3 + a
Gro go do go do go
do
go do pa pa pa
go do pa Dn pa Dn pa
do pa go do pa
go do pa go
x x x x x x
O O O
x x x x x x
O O O
x x x x x x
O O (O)
x x x x x x
O O (O)
x x x x x
x x x x x
O O O
Djm#2
Signal
Djm#1
sb
DD
kk
58


T$%@$<0 &7(7)





























Konkoba was played to accompany farmers during their work in the field or too
honor a powerful and rich farmer (sic).

Composer: traditional, Malinke, Northeast Guinea
Source: Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe, There is also a complete
arrangement for a second version at
http://members.tripod.lycos.nl/wappages/kondun.html.
1 + a 2 + a 3 + a
Gro go do go do go
do
go do pa pa pa
go do pa Dn pa Dn pa
do pa go do pa
go do pa go
x x x x x x
O O O
x x x x x x
O O O
x x x x x x
O O (O)
x x x x x x
O O (O)
x x x x x
x x x x x
O O O
Djm#2
Signal
Djm#1
sb
DD
kk
59


T$28<0 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal go do pa do go ta go do pa go do go do
Djm#1 pa lt rt ta pa lt pa Dn rt ta pa lt Gn Dn
Djm#2 pa ta Gn ta pa ta go do pa ta Gn ta pa ta go do
x
O O O O O O O O O
O o o o o
x
O o o o o O o o o o
O o o o o O O o o o o
DD #1
#2 DD
or in 12
1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
Djm#1 go ta go ta pa
Djm#2 go do ta pa go do





Composer: Traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
and http://home.rhein-zeitung.de/~wtower/djembe/rhythmen/
and Mousa Traori - Mali Foli (CD of traditional African rhythms)
59


T$28<0 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal go do pa do go ta go do pa go do go do
Djm#1 pa lt rt ta pa lt pa Dn rt ta pa lt Gn Dn
Djm#2 pa ta Gn ta pa ta go do pa ta Gn ta pa ta go do
x
O O O O O O O O O
O o o o o
x
O o o o o O o o o o
O o o o o O O o o o o
DD #1
#2 DD
or in 12
1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
Djm#1 go ta go ta pa
Djm#2 go do ta pa go do





Composer: Traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
and http://home.rhein-zeitung.de/~wtower/djembe/rhythmen/
and Mousa Traori - Mali Foli (CD of traditional African rhythms)
60


T$28<0 -$.$ &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
go do pa do go ta go do pa
pa pa Pr
go do pa do go ta go do pa go do go do
pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta go do go do
pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta go do go do
go do pa do go ta go do pa Gr
Pr
patapatapata
patapatapata
godogodogodo




















Composer: Traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
60


T$28<0 -$.$ &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
go do pa do go ta go do pa
pa pa Pr
go do pa do go ta go do pa go do go do
pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta go do go do
pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta go do go do
go do pa do go ta go do pa Gr
Pr
patapatapata
patapatapata
godogodogodo




















Composer: Traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
61


TN@N &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gr go do go do go pa ta pa
Djm#1 Dn go do pa Dn go do pa
Djm#2 go do ta go do pa go do ta go do pa
Djm#3 Bg go do Gn ta pa Bg go do Gn ta pa
go go do Pr pa pa ta pa
Gn go do pa Gn go do Gr
Djm#5 Dn Dn go do go do go
Djm#4

A popular rhythm played at all sorts of festivals, including full moon celebrations.
It is a woman's dance performed in a circle.














Composer: Djm #1,#2 are traditional, Manian, Forest Guinea and Ivory Coast,
Djm #3, #4 are composed by Mamady Keita.
Source: Djm#1-4 from Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe
Djembe #5 from http://www.drumrhythms.com
61


TN@N &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gr go do go do go pa ta pa
Djm#1 Dn go do pa Dn go do pa
Djm#2 go do ta go do pa go do ta go do pa
Djm#3 Bg go do Gn ta pa Bg go do Gn ta pa
go go do Pr pa pa ta pa
Gn go do pa Gn go do Gr
Djm#5 Dn Dn go do go do go
Djm#4

A popular rhythm played at all sorts of festivals, including full moon celebrations.
It is a woman's dance performed in a circle.














Composer: Djm #1,#2 are traditional, Manian, Forest Guinea and Ivory Coast,
Djm #3, #4 are composed by Mamady Keita.
Source: Djm#1-4 from Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe
Djembe #5 from http://www.drumrhythms.com
62



TN@N -$.$ &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
go ta pa ta go ta pa ta go ta pa
ta go do go do go
go ta pa ta go ta pa ta go ta pa
ta do go do go do go






























Composer: Alan Tauber
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
62



TN@N -$.$ &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
go ta pa ta go ta pa ta go ta pa
ta go do go do go
go ta pa ta go ta pa ta go ta pa
ta do go do go do go






























Composer: Alan Tauber
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
63


TN@N &HN%N%O '(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O O O
x x x x x x x x x x
O (O) O O (O) O
x x x x x x x x x
O O O
x x x x x x x x x
O O
x x x x x x
O m O O m O
x x x x x x
O O O O m O
x x x x x x x x x
O O O
DD #3
DD #2
DD #1
kk
sb

A popular rhythm played at all sorts of festivals, including full moon celebrations.
It is a woman's dance performed in a circle.








Composer: traditional, Manian, Forest Guinea and Ivory Coast
Source: Djm#1-4, DD#1, from Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe
dunun #3 from http://www.drumrhythms.com
63


TN@N &HN%N%O '(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O O O
x x x x x x x x x x
O (O) O O (O) O
x x x x x x x x x
O O O
x x x x x x x x x
O O
x x x x x x
O m O O m O
x x x x x x
O O O O m O
x x x x x x x x x
O O O
DD #3
DD #2
DD #1
kk
sb

A popular rhythm played at all sorts of festivals, including full moon celebrations.
It is a woman's dance performed in a circle.








Composer: traditional, Manian, Forest Guinea and Ivory Coast
Source: Djm#1-4, DD#1, from Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe
dunun #3 from http://www.drumrhythms.com
64



U0 V9$ VN@4F09 &A(+)

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 +
Signal Gr go do go do go do
Djm#1 go do go do pa go do go ta Dn
Djm#2 go do pa Dn go do pa Dn
x x x x x x x
O O (O) O O
x x x x x x x x
O O O O
x x x x x x x x
O O O
O O O O O
x x x x
O O O O
DD
4
so
lo
DD #1
DD #2














Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber Drum Connection
64



U0 V9$ VN@4F09 &A(+)

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 +
Signal Gr go do go do go do
Djm#1 go do go do pa go do go ta Dn
Djm#2 go do pa Dn go do pa Dn
x x x x x x x
O O (O) O O
x x x x x x x x
O O O O
x x x x x x x x
O O O
O O O O O
x x x x
O O O O
DD
4
so
lo
DD #1
DD #2














Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber Drum Connection
65


U06<0 &'(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
Gr go do go do
go do go
Djm#1 Gn pa ta go do pa ta
Djm#2 pa Dn pa go do
x x x x
O O O
x x x x
O O O O
O O
x x x x x
O O O
x
O
O O O O
Signal
DD #1
DD #3
DD #2
t
w
i
c
e
o
n
c
e








Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber Drum Connection
Dunun #3 is one Jeanette uses.
65


U06<0 &'(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
Gr go do go do
go do go
Djm#1 Gn pa ta go do pa ta
Djm#2 pa Dn pa go do
x x x x
O O O
x x x x
O O O O
O O
x x x x x
O O O
x
O
O O O O
Signal
DD #1
DD #3
DD #2
t
w
i
c
e
o
n
c
e








Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber Drum Connection
Dunun #3 is one Jeanette uses.
66



U06<0 -$.$ &'(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
Pr Pr Pr
Pr
go do go do Pr
Pr
pa ta pa ta pa
ta pa ta pa ta
pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta Pr
Pr pa ta
#4 4x pa ta pa ta pa ta
#5 4x ta* pa ta pa ta pa ta pa
*the first time only, hit Gun here
#3 2x
#1 2x
#2 4x














Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber Drum Connection
66



U06<0 -$.$ &'(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
Pr Pr Pr
Pr
go do go do Pr
Pr
pa ta pa ta pa
ta pa ta pa ta
pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta Pr
Pr pa ta
#4 4x pa ta pa ta pa ta
#5 4x ta* pa ta pa ta pa ta pa
*the first time only, hit Gun here
#3 2x
#1 2x
#2 4x














Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber Drum Connection
67


U8%M8% &A(+)

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 +
Signal Gr go do go do go do
Djm#1 Gn Gn go do do go do
Djm#2 Gn Gn go do Gn Gn go do
x x x x x x
O O
x x x x x x
O O O O
DD #1
DD #2

This is a good rhythm to learn transitions using signals and practice counting.

Play the signal first, transitioning into the rhythm, play part #1 8 times, then play the
signal, then play part #2 8 times, play the signal, then go into solo.


















Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber Drum Connection
67


U8%M8% &A(+)

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 +
Signal Gr go do go do go do
Djm#1 Gn Gn go do do go do
Djm#2 Gn Gn go do Gn Gn go do
x x x x x x
O O
x x x x x x
O O O O
DD #1
DD #2

This is a good rhythm to learn transitions using signals and practice counting.

Play the signal first, transitioning into the rhythm, play part #1 8 times, then play the
signal, then play part #2 8 times, play the signal, then go into solo.


















Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber Drum Connection
68


U8%M8% -$.$ &A(+)

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 +
#1 4x Pr pa ta (Gn) pa ta pa
#2 4x pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
#3 4x pa ta pa ta pa ta
#4 4x Pr pa ta Pr pa ta
pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
Gn ta pa Gn ta pa Gn ta
Gn ta pa pa Gn ta pa ta
Gn ta pa ta pa Gn ta pa ta pa
#7 4x pa ta pa pa ta pa pa ta pa
x x x x x x
O O
#5 2x
DD
4
so
lo
#6 1x










Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber Drum Connection
68


U8%M8% -$.$ &A(+)

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 +
#1 4x Pr pa ta (Gn) pa ta pa
#2 4x pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
#3 4x pa ta pa ta pa ta
#4 4x Pr pa ta Pr pa ta
pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
Gn ta pa Gn ta pa Gn ta
Gn ta pa pa Gn ta pa ta
Gn ta pa ta pa Gn ta pa ta pa
#7 4x pa ta pa pa ta pa pa ta pa
x x x x x x
O O
#5 2x
DD
4
so
lo
#6 1x










Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber Drum Connection
69


W0@1N &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gr go do go do go ta pa ta
Djm#1 Gn ta go do Gn ta go do
Djm#2 go pa do go ta pa do
Djm#3 Gn do do Gn ta Gn do Gn ta
Djm#4 pa ta go do pa ta ta go do


Yankadi and Makru together are a dance and rhythm for seduction. Boys and girls
dance in a row opposite each other to Yankadi, then Makru begins and they pair off.
Makru is played about twice as fast as Yankadi.

Rhythm has a swing-feel to it (not present in notation).
















Composer: traditional, Susu, Southwest Guinea
Source: Djm #1,#2,#3 from Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe
#4 from Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
69


W0@1N &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gr go do go do go ta pa ta
Djm#1 Gn ta go do Gn ta go do
Djm#2 go pa do go ta pa do
Djm#3 Gn do do Gn ta Gn do Gn ta
Djm#4 pa ta go do pa ta ta go do


Yankadi and Makru together are a dance and rhythm for seduction. Boys and girls
dance in a row opposite each other to Yankadi, then Makru begins and they pair off.
Makru is played about twice as fast as Yankadi.

Rhythm has a swing-feel to it (not present in notation).
















Composer: traditional, Susu, Southwest Guinea
Source: Djm #1,#2,#3 from Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe
#4 from Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
70


W0@1N &HN%N%O '(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
x x x x
O O O O O O O O
x x x x x x x x
(O) O (O) O
x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
x x x x x
O O O O O
x x x x x x
O O O O O O
x x x x x x x x
O O O O (O) O O O (O)
x x x x x x
O O O O O
x x x x x x x x
O O O O O
x x x x x x x
O O
DD #1
kk
sb
sb #2
DD #3
DD #5
DD #2
DD #4



Composer: traditional, Susu, Southwest Guinea
Source: kk,sb,DD#1 from Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe
DD#2-5, sb#2 from Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
70


W0@1N &HN%N%O '(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
x x x x
O O O O O O O O
x x x x x x x x
(O) O (O) O
x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
x x x x x
O O O O O
x x x x x x
O O O O O O
x x x x x x x x
O O O O (O) O O O (O)
x x x x x x
O O O O O
x x x x x x x x
O O O O O
x x x x x x x
O O
DD #1
kk
sb
sb #2
DD #3
DD #5
DD #2
DD #4



Composer: traditional, Susu, Southwest Guinea
Source: kk,sb,DD#1 from Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe
DD#2-5, sb#2 from Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
71


W0H0% &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gr go do go do go do go
Djm#1 Gn go do Dn pa Gn go do Dn pa
Djm#2 pa Dn pa ta go do pa Dn pa ta go do
Djm#3 Gn do do Gn Gn Dn Gn
x x x x x x x x x x
O O O (O) O O O (O)
x x x x x x x x x x
O O O O
x x x x x x x x x x
(O) O O O O O O O
x x x x x x x x x x
(O) O O O O O O O
x x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O O (O)
x x x x
O O O O O O
DD
v
a
r
#
2
kk
sb
DD
DD
v
a
r
#
1




Composer: traditional (except var#2 is Alan Tauber's creation)
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
71


W0H0% &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gr go do go do go do go
Djm#1 Gn go do Dn pa Gn go do Dn pa
Djm#2 pa Dn pa ta go do pa Dn pa ta go do
Djm#3 Gn do do Gn Gn Dn Gn
x x x x x x x x x x
O O O (O) O O O (O)
x x x x x x x x x x
O O O O
x x x x x x x x x x
(O) O O O O O O O
x x x x x x x x x x
(O) O O O O O O O
x x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O O (O)
x x x x
O O O O O O
DD
v
a
r
#
2
kk
sb
DD
DD
v
a
r
#
1




Composer: traditional (except var#2 is Alan Tauber's creation)
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
72


W0H0% -$.$ &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gr go do go do go do go
Djm#1 Gn ta pa do go ta pa do go ta pa ta Dn pa ta
go do do go Dn pa Dn go do do
go do do go Dn pa Dn pa Dn
Djm#3 go h pa pa go Dn Gn Dn
pa ta pa ta
go do go do go
go do do go Dn pa Pra do do do
go do do go Dn pa Pra pa Dn
Pra Gn Dn Gn Pra Pra
Pra Gn Dn Gn Pra Pra Pra
Gn ta pa do go ta pa do go ta pa ta Dn pa ta
Gn ta pa do go ta pa do go ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
Djm#7
Djm#2
Djm#4
Djm#5
Djm#6

From the Maninke ethnic group in Kankaba region of Mali. Played at the end of a
harvest celebration and as a welcome dance at festivals






Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
72


W0H0% -$.$ &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gr go do go do go do go
Djm#1 Gn ta pa do go ta pa do go ta pa ta Dn pa ta
go do do go Dn pa Dn go do do
go do do go Dn pa Dn pa Dn
Djm#3 go h pa pa go Dn Gn Dn
pa ta pa ta
go do go do go
go do do go Dn pa Pra do do do
go do do go Dn pa Pra pa Dn
Pra Gn Dn Gn Pra Pra
Pra Gn Dn Gn Pra Pra Pra
Gn ta pa do go ta pa do go ta pa ta Dn pa ta
Gn ta pa do go ta pa do go ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
Djm#7
Djm#2
Djm#4
Djm#5
Djm#6

From the Maninke ethnic group in Kankaba region of Mali. Played at the end of a
harvest celebration and as a welcome dance at festivals






Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
73


W010@0H$% &'(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
Sig #1 do go do go do go
Sig #2 Pr go do go do go do go
Djm #1 go ta pa ta go ta Gn ta
Djm #2 ta go ta Gn ta go ta Gn
Djm #3 Gn do go Dn Gn do go Dn
Djm #4 Gn ta go do pa ta Gn ta go do pa ta
x x x x x x x x
O O O O
x x x x x x x x
O (O) O O (O)
x x x x x x x
O (O) (O) O O O
x x x x x x x x
(O) O O (O) O O
kk #2
DD
godogo
kk #1
sb

The actual name of this rhythm is Marakafoli. The dance is called Marakadon.




Composer: traditional, Maraka, Mali, Kayes Region
Source: Sig #1, Djm#1,#2 and kk#1,sb,DD from Mamady Keita - A Life for the
Djembe, Sig #2, Djm #3,#4, and kk#2 from
http://members.tripod.lycos.nl/Wappages/marakadn.html
73


W010@0H$% &'(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
Sig #1 do go do go do go
Sig #2 Pr go do go do go do go
Djm #1 go ta pa ta go ta Gn ta
Djm #2 ta go ta Gn ta go ta Gn
Djm #3 Gn do go Dn Gn do go Dn
Djm #4 Gn ta go do pa ta Gn ta go do pa ta
x x x x x x x x
O O O O
x x x x x x x x
O (O) O O (O)
x x x x x x x
O (O) (O) O O O
x x x x x x x x
(O) O O (O) O O
kk #2
DD
godogo
kk #1
sb

The actual name of this rhythm is Marakafoli. The dance is called Marakadon.




Composer: traditional, Maraka, Mali, Kayes Region
Source: Sig #1, Djm#1,#2 and kk#1,sb,DD from Mamady Keita - A Life for the
Djembe, Sig #2, Djm #3,#4, and kk#2 from
http://members.tripod.lycos.nl/Wappages/marakadn.html
74


W010@0H$% -$.$ &'(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
go do go do
go do go do pa
go do go do
go do go do
Gr pa Gr pa
go do go do pa
go do pa go do pa
go do go do
#1
#2
2x





















Composer:
Source: http://members.tripod.lycos.nl/Wappages/marakadn.html
74


W010@0H$% -$.$ &'(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
go do go do
go do go do pa
go do go do
go do go do
Gr pa Gr pa
go do go do pa
go do pa go do pa
go do go do
#1
#2
2x





















Composer:
Source: http://members.tripod.lycos.nl/Wappages/marakadn.html
75


W8.4%@0H$% &'(7)

1 trip let 2 trip let 3 trip let 4 trip let
Signal Gro go do go do go do
Djm#1 pa pa ta ta pa pa Dn go do
Djm#2 pa do pa do pa do pa do
Djm#3 pa pa Dn do pa pa Dn go do
x x
O O O O
DD
























Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
75


W8.4%@0H$% &'(7)

1 trip let 2 trip let 3 trip let 4 trip let
Signal Gro go do go do go do
Djm#1 pa pa ta ta pa pa Dn go do
Djm#2 pa do pa do pa do pa do
Djm#3 pa pa Dn do pa pa Dn go do
x x
O O O O
DD
























Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
76


W8%H40%4 &RN4%80%O '(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
Signal Gro go do go do go do
Djm#1 pa go ta pa go ta
Djm#2 pa ta go do pa ta go do
Djm#3 pa Dn pa Dn pa go do
Djm#4 pa do pa (Dn) pa do pa (Dn)
Djm#5 do pa go do pa go
Djm#6 go do go do go do pa do

A rhythm and dance for the virgins; the girls from age six to thirteen. A woman
who was once a Mendiani organizes the dancers and initiates them into the secrets
of the Mendiani. The dance is very acrobatic and choreographed, and the girls
perform this for several hours.










Composer: traditional, Malinke, Northeast Guinea
Source: Djm #1, #2 from Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe, other parts from
Alan Tauber Drum Connection and
http://stud1.tuwien.ac.at/~e8725865/htmls/rhythm_list.html and
http://members.tripod.lycos.nl/Wappages/mendiani.html
76


W8%H40%4 &RN4%80%O '(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
Signal Gro go do go do go do
Djm#1 pa go ta pa go ta
Djm#2 pa ta go do pa ta go do
Djm#3 pa Dn pa Dn pa go do
Djm#4 pa do pa (Dn) pa do pa (Dn)
Djm#5 do pa go do pa go
Djm#6 go do go do go do pa do

A rhythm and dance for the virgins; the girls from age six to thirteen. A woman
who was once a Mendiani organizes the dancers and initiates them into the secrets
of the Mendiani. The dance is very acrobatic and choreographed, and the girls
perform this for several hours.










Composer: traditional, Malinke, Northeast Guinea
Source: Djm #1, #2 from Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe, other parts from
Alan Tauber Drum Connection and
http://stud1.tuwien.ac.at/~e8725865/htmls/rhythm_list.html and
http://members.tripod.lycos.nl/Wappages/mendiani.html
77


W8%H40%4 &RN4%80%O HN%N%O '(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
x x x x x x x x
O O O O
x x x x x x x x
O O (O) O O
x x x x x x x x
O O O O
DD
kk
sb



























Composer: traditional, Malike, Northeast Guinea
Source: Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe
77


W8%H40%4 &RN4%80%O HN%N%O '(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
x x x x x x x x
O O O O
x x x x x x x x
O O (O) O O
x x x x x x x x
O O O O
DD
kk
sb



























Composer: traditional, Malike, Northeast Guinea
Source: Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe
78


W8%H40%4 &-8%8L0.8F8O A(+)

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 +
Signal Gro go do go do go do
Djm#1 pa do pa Dn pa do pa Dn
Djm#2 pa ta go do pa ta go do
Djm#3 pa do go do pa do go


W8%H40%4 -$.$ &-8%8L0.8F8 A(+)

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 +
ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa
ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa
go do pa ta go do
pa ta go do pa ta
#2
#1















Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber Drum Connection
78


W8%H40%4 &-8%8L0.8F8O A(+)

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 +
Signal Gro go do go do go do
Djm#1 pa do pa Dn pa do pa Dn
Djm#2 pa ta go do pa ta go do
Djm#3 pa do go do pa do go


W8%H40%4 -$.$ &-8%8L0.8F8 A(+)

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 +
ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa
ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa
go do pa ta go do
pa ta go do pa ta
#2
#1















Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber Drum Connection
79


W8%H48%4 &-8%8L0.8F8O HN%N%O '(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
x x x x x x
O O o o O O
x x x x x x x x
O O O O
x x x x x x x
O O o o o O O
x x x x x x x
O O O O
o o o o
O O O O O O O O
o o o o
O O O O O O
x x x x x x x
O O O
x x x x x x x
O O O O O
O O O O O O O
DD #3
DD #4
DD #5
DD #6
DD #1
DD #2





Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber Drum Connection and
http://stud1.tuwien.ac.at/~e8725865/htmls/rhythm_list.html and
http://members.tripod.lycos.nl/Wappages/mendiani.html
79


W8%H48%4 &-8%8L0.8F8O HN%N%O '(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
x x x x x x
O O o o O O
x x x x x x x x
O O O O
x x x x x x x
O O o o o O O
x x x x x x x
O O O O
o o o o
O O O O O O O O
o o o o
O O O O O O
x x x x x x x
O O O
x x x x x x x
O O O O O
O O O O O O O
DD #3
DD #4
DD #5
DD #6
DD #1
DD #2





Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber Drum Connection and
http://stud1.tuwien.ac.at/~e8725865/htmls/rhythm_list.html and
http://members.tripod.lycos.nl/Wappages/mendiani.html
80


W9F2819 X;92;6 &A(+)

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 +
Sig #1 Gr pa do go do pa Dn Dn Dn
Djm#1 ta mp mp pa ta Pr pa
Djm#2 go ta go ta go do pa go do pa
Djm#3 go ta go do pa go ta go do pa
x x x x x x x
O (O) (O) o o o
DD




















Composer: traditional
Source: can't remember
80


W9F2819 X;92;6 &A(+)

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 +
Sig #1 Gr pa do go do pa Dn Dn Dn
Djm#1 ta mp mp pa ta Pr pa
Djm#2 go ta go ta go do pa go do pa
Djm#3 go ta go do pa go ta go do pa
x x x x x x x
O (O) (O) o o o
DD




















Composer: traditional
Source: can't remember
81


X8I.8#24$% &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Djm #2 Gn do go do pa Dn go do pa























Composer: Tool
Source: self transcribed from the album Lateralus
81


X8I.8#24$% &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Djm #2 Gn do go do pa Dn go do pa























Composer: Tool
Source: self transcribed from the album Lateralus
82


X;N6<0 &"I14#0% K3) &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gro go do go do go do go
mp mp mp Dn Gn
mp Gn Dn Gn Dn Gn Dn Dn Gn
Djm #2 Gn go do pa Gn go do pa
O O O O O O
x x x x x x
O O O O
x x x x x x
O O O O
x x x x x x x
O O O O O O O
x x x x x x
O O O O O O
x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
DD #1
Djm #1
b
e
g
n
r
s
DD
DD #2
DD
#1
a







Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
82


X;N6<0 &"I14#0% K3) &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gro go do go do go do go
mp mp mp Dn Gn
mp Gn Dn Gn Dn Gn Dn Dn Gn
Djm #2 Gn go do pa Gn go do pa
O O O O O O
x x x x x x
O O O O
x x x x x x
O O O O
x x x x x x x
O O O O O O O
x x x x x x
O O O O O O
x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
DD #1
Djm #1
b
e
g
n
r
s
DD
DD #2
DD
#1
a







Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
83


X;N6<0 &"I14#0% K+) &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Djm #1 Gn do Gn Dn pa Dn
Djm #2 Gn go do Gn Gn go do
Djm #3 Gn go do Gn go do
x x x x x x x x x
O O o O O o
DD




















Composer: traditional
Source: S.H.A.R.E.
83


X;N6<0 &"I14#0% K+) &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Djm #1 Gn do Gn Dn pa Dn
Djm #2 Gn go do Gn Gn go do
Djm #3 Gn go do Gn go do
x x x x x x x x x
O O o O O o
DD




















Composer: traditional
Source: S.H.A.R.E.
84


XN6<0 &?10Y4.40%O '(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Djm#1 h ful Gn h ful go go h ful Gn h ful go do
Djm#2 go t t Gn t t Gn do go do
Djm#3 h ful pa t h ful go go h ful pa t h ful go go
Djmv#1 Gn t t Dn t t Gn t Gn do go
Djmv#2 (Gn) t t Dn Gn t go t (Gn) t t Dn Gn t t t
Djmv#3 go t t t Gnt t t t Gn t t do go t go t
DD
b
e
g
O (o) (o) O O (o) (o) O
alternate hitting left head then right head
x x x x x
O O O (O)
x x x x x
O O O O O (O)
Bell #1 x x x x x x x x x x
Bell #2 x x x x x x x x
clv x x x x x
tmbao h t pa t h t go go h t pa t h t go go
1x
DD 3x






Composer: Traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
84


XN6<0 &?10Y4.40%O '(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Djm#1 h ful Gn h ful go go h ful Gn h ful go do
Djm#2 go t t Gn t t Gn do go do
Djm#3 h ful pa t h ful go go h ful pa t h ful go go
Djmv#1 Gn t t Dn t t Gn t Gn do go
Djmv#2 (Gn) t t Dn Gn t go t (Gn) t t Dn Gn t t t
Djmv#3 go t t t Gnt t t t Gn t t do go t go t
DD
b
e
g
O (o) (o) O O (o) (o) O
alternate hitting left head then right head
x x x x x
O O O (O)
x x x x x
O O O O O (O)
Bell #1 x x x x x x x x x x
Bell #2 x x x x x x x x
clv x x x x x
tmbao h t pa t h t go go h t pa t h t go go
1x
DD 3x






Composer: Traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
85


-0<01 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Dn pa Dn pa Dn
pa
Djm#1 pa ta Gn go do pa ta Gn go do
Djm#2 pa ta Gn do go do pa ta Gn do go do
O O O O O
O
DD



















Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
85


-0<01 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Dn pa Dn pa Dn
pa
Djm#1 pa ta Gn go do pa ta Gn go do
Djm#2 pa ta Gn do go do pa ta Gn do go do
O O O O O
O
DD



















Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
86


-06<0 &"I14#0%O '(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gro go do go do go do go
pa pa go ta ta do do go
pa pa go ta ta do go go do
pa pa go ta ta do go go
Gn do go Gn do go
Gn do go Gn do go do go
x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O O O
X X x X X x x x
O O O O O O O O
O O O O
O O O O O O
Djm
Djm#2
#1
DD
b
e
g
n
r
s
DD #2
DD #1










Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
86


-06<0 &"I14#0%O '(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gro go do go do go do go
pa pa go ta ta do do go
pa pa go ta ta do go go do
pa pa go ta ta do go go
Gn do go Gn do go
Gn do go Gn do go do go
x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O O O
X X x X X x x x
O O O O O O O O
O O O O
O O O O O O
Djm
Djm#2
#1
DD
b
e
g
n
r
s
DD #2
DD #1










Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
87


-06<0 &?10Y4.40%O '(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
go t go t pa t pa do go do go do t ta pa do
go do go do go t t do go do go do t ta pa do
go go do go pa ta go do t do t ta t ta
go do go do go pa ta go do t do t ta t ta
Djm
v
#
1
go t pa t t do t do t ta pa t t do t do
Djm
v
#
2
go t pa t t do t do t ta t t t do t do
sd su sd su sd su sd su sd su sd su
x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
O O O O O
Shkr
DD #1
DD #2
Djm#1
Djm#2













Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
87


-06<0 &?10Y4.40%O '(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
go t go t pa t pa do go do go do t ta pa do
go do go do go t t do go do go do t ta pa do
go go do go pa ta go do t do t ta t ta
go do go do go pa ta go do t do t ta t ta
Djm
v
#
1
go t pa t t do t do t ta pa t t do t do
Djm
v
#
2
go t pa t t do t do t ta t t t do t do
sd su sd su sd su sd su sd su sd su
x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
O O O O O
Shkr
DD #1
DD #2
Djm#1
Djm#2













Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
88


-06<0 -$.$ &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
#1 go do go do go go do go do go ta pa do
go go do go pa ta go do do ta ta
go do go do go pa ta go do do ta ta
#3 go pa do do ta pa do do
#4 go pa do do ta pa go do do
#5 go pa do do ta pa go do go do
#6
*braces indicate triplets
go do go go do go
#2
go do go go do go




















Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
88


-06<0 -$.$ &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
#1 go do go do go go do go do go ta pa do
go go do go pa ta go do do ta ta
go do go do go pa ta go do do ta ta
#3 go pa do do ta pa do do
#4 go pa do do ta pa go do do
#5 go pa do do ta pa go do go do
#6
*braces indicate triplets
go do go go do go
#2
go do go go do go




















Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
89


-;4@$ &V4L8140%O '(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Djm #1 go do Gn Dn go do Gn Dn
Djm #2 Gn Dn go Dn Gn do
Djm #3 Gn pa ta Gn pa ta Gn pa ta go do
Djm #4 go go do do go pa pa ta ta pa
hi x x x x x x x x
lo X X X X X X X X
x x x x x x x x x x
x x x x x
a
g
o
g
o
Clave
Bell














Composer: traditional
Source: Larry Morris Rhythm Catalogue
89


-;4@$ &V4L8140%O '(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Djm #1 go do Gn Dn go do Gn Dn
Djm #2 Gn Dn go Dn Gn do
Djm #3 Gn pa ta Gn pa ta Gn pa ta go do
Djm #4 go go do do go pa pa ta ta pa
hi x x x x x x x x
lo X X X X X X X X
x x x x x x x x x x
x x x x x
a
g
o
g
o
Clave
Bell














Composer: traditional
Source: Larry Morris Rhythm Catalogue
90


-4%28 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Sigk#1 Gr go do go do go do go
Gr go do go do Pr pa ta pa ta
pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
Djm#1 go do pa Dn pa Dn pa Dn pa
Djm#2 pa do go do pa do go do pa do go do pa do go do
Djm#3 pa do go lh pa do go
Djm#4 Gn Dn go do go Gn Dn
Djm#5 Gn go do go do go do go do
Djm#6 pa Dn Gn go do Dn Gn lh
O O (o) o o (o) o o O
Sig#2
DD #1











Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
90


-4%28 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Sigk#1 Gr go do go do go do go
Gr go do go do Pr pa ta pa ta
pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
Djm#1 go do pa Dn pa Dn pa Dn pa
Djm#2 pa do go do pa do go do pa do go do pa do go do
Djm#3 pa do go lh pa do go
Djm#4 Gn Dn go do go Gn Dn
Djm#5 Gn go do go do go do go do
Djm#6 pa Dn Gn go do Dn Gn lh
O O (o) o o (o) o o O
Sig#2
DD #1











Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
91


-$I0 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gro go do go do go pa ta pa
Djm#1 go do pa ta pa go do ta Gn pa
Djm#2 pa ta pa go do pa ta pa go do
Djm#3 Dn go do pa Dn go do pa
Djm#4 Gn ta Gn do go do Gn ta Gn do go do
x x x x x x x x x x
O O (O) O O (O)
x x x x x x x x x
O O (O) O O (O) O
x x x x x x x x x
O O O O O
x x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O O O
DD #2
kk
sb
DD #1

In the language of the Malinke, Sofa means "warrior". It was played to support the
brave strong men on horseback going into combat, and praise them when they
returned. Originally played on a stringed instrument called a bolon.




Composer: traditional, Malinke, Northeast Guinea
Source: Djm #1,#2 from Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe
Djm #3,#4 and DD#2 from Alan Tauber - The Drum Connection
91


-$I0 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gro go do go do go pa ta pa
Djm#1 go do pa ta pa go do ta Gn pa
Djm#2 pa ta pa go do pa ta pa go do
Djm#3 Dn go do pa Dn go do pa
Djm#4 Gn ta Gn do go do Gn ta Gn do go do
x x x x x x x x x x
O O (O) O O (O)
x x x x x x x x x
O O (O) O O (O) O
x x x x x x x x x
O O O O O
x x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O O O
DD #2
kk
sb
DD #1

In the language of the Malinke, Sofa means "warrior". It was played to support the
brave strong men on horseback going into combat, and praise them when they
returned. Originally played on a stringed instrument called a bolon.




Composer: traditional, Malinke, Northeast Guinea
Source: Djm #1,#2 from Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe
Djm #3,#4 and DD#2 from Alan Tauber - The Drum Connection
92


-$@$ &'(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
Signal go do go go do go
Djm#1 pa go ta pa go ta
Djm#2 pa pa ta go do pa pa ta go do
Djm#3 go do go ta pa Dn go do go ta pa Dn
Djm#4 pa ta go do go ta ta go do
Djm#5 Gn go Gn Dn go
Djm#6 pa go do pa go do
go do Gn Dn Gn Dn
go do pa Gn Dn
Dn go do Gn Dn Gn
Dn Gn Dn Gn
godogodo
Djm#8
Djm#7

Upon the announcement of initiation and circumcision, boys go from village to
village to notify relatives about the event. When they arrive in the village, Soko is
played and frequently the children are invited to spend the night. When the boys
come home from their trip, Soli is played. (Mamady Keita)








Composer: traditional
Source: Signal and Djm #1, #2 from Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe, Djm
#3-8 from Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
92


-$@$ &'(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
Signal go do go go do go
Djm#1 pa go ta pa go ta
Djm#2 pa pa ta go do pa pa ta go do
Djm#3 go do go ta pa Dn go do go ta pa Dn
Djm#4 pa ta go do go ta ta go do
Djm#5 Gn go Gn Dn go
Djm#6 pa go do pa go do
go do Gn Dn Gn Dn
go do pa Gn Dn
Dn go do Gn Dn Gn
Dn Gn Dn Gn
godogodo
Djm#8
Djm#7

Upon the announcement of initiation and circumcision, boys go from village to
village to notify relatives about the event. When they arrive in the village, Soko is
played and frequently the children are invited to spend the night. When the boys
come home from their trip, Soli is played. (Mamady Keita)








Composer: traditional
Source: Signal and Djm #1, #2 from Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe, Djm
#3-8 from Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
93


-$@$ &HN%N%O '(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
x x x x x x x x
(O) O O (O) O O
x x x x x x x x
(O) (O) O O O O
x x x x x x x x
(O) (O) (O) O O
x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
x x x x x x x x
O O O O
DD #1
sb
kk #1

kk#1 and DD#1 were taught at Alan Tauber's Intermediate Dunun workshop.



















Composer: traditional
Source: Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe
93


-$@$ &HN%N%O '(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
x x x x x x x x
(O) O O (O) O O
x x x x x x x x
(O) (O) O O O O
x x x x x x x x
(O) (O) (O) O O
x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
x x x x x x x x
O O O O
DD #1
sb
kk #1

kk#1 and DD#1 were taught at Alan Tauber's Intermediate Dunun workshop.



















Composer: traditional
Source: Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe
94


-$@$ &HN%N% &#$%2*)O '(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
x x x x x x x x
(O) O O (O) O O
x x x x x x x x
O (O) O O (O)
x x x x x x x
O (O) (O) O O O
x x x x x x x x
(O) (O) O O O O
x x x x x x x x
(O) (O) (O) O O
x x x x x x x x
O (O) O O O O O
x x x x x x x x
O (O) (O) O O O
DD #5
kk #2
DD #2
DD #4
DD #3














Composer: Traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
94


-$@$ &HN%N% &#$%2*)O '(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
x x x x x x x x
(O) O O (O) O O
x x x x x x x x
O (O) O O (O)
x x x x x x x
O (O) (O) O O O
x x x x x x x x
(O) (O) O O O O
x x x x x x x x
(O) (O) (O) O O
x x x x x x x x
O (O) O O O O O
x x x x x x x x
O (O) (O) O O O
DD #5
kk #2
DD #2
DD #4
DD #3














Composer: Traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
95


-$@$ -$.$ &'(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
Pr pa ta pa godogota godogota
ta ta ta
Pr Gn ta pa ta Pr Gn Dn Dn
pata pata pata pata pa pa
x1 pata pata pata pata pa ta pa ta
Djm x4 Gn Dn Gn ta pa ta
Djm x4 Gn ta pa Dn Gn ta pa Dn
Gn ta pa ta pa ta pa
Dn pa ta pa ta pa ta
Djm x4 godogodo godogodo pata pata pata pata
Djm x4 go do pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
pa pa pa
ta ta
Djm x2
x2
Djm x2
pa
Djm
















Composer: Traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
95


-$@$ -$.$ &'(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
Pr pa ta pa godogota godogota
ta ta ta
Pr Gn ta pa ta Pr Gn Dn Dn
pata pata pata pata pa pa
x1 pata pata pata pata pa ta pa ta
Djm x4 Gn Dn Gn ta pa ta
Djm x4 Gn ta pa Dn Gn ta pa Dn
Gn ta pa ta pa ta pa
Dn pa ta pa ta pa ta
Djm x4 godogodo godogodo pata pata pata pata
Djm x4 go do pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
pa pa pa
ta ta
Djm x2
x2
Djm x2
pa
Djm
















Composer: Traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
96


-$.4 &F.$Z [ '(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gro go do go do go ta pa ta
Djm#1 Gn go do pa go do Gn ta pa
Djm#2 pa ta pa go do pa Gn ta pa go do
x x x x x x x x x x
O O O O
x x x x x x x x
O O O (O) O
x x x x x x x x x
O
x x x x x x x x x
O O
DD
kk
sb

Accompanies rituals of initiation and circumcision. Began once elders decided it
was time for the children's initiation, but not everyday until a week before the ritual;
the night before the ritual it is played all night. Without an impending ritual, this
rhythm is never played. Soli-slow or Soli-fast depends on which song is sung.










Composer: traditional , Malinke ethnic group, Guinea.
Source: Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe
96


-$.4 &F.$Z [ '(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gro go do go do go ta pa ta
Djm#1 Gn go do pa go do Gn ta pa
Djm#2 pa ta pa go do pa Gn ta pa go do
x x x x x x x x x x
O O O O
x x x x x x x x
O O O (O) O
x x x x x x x x x
O
x x x x x x x x x
O O
DD
kk
sb

Accompanies rituals of initiation and circumcision. Began once elders decided it
was time for the children's initiation, but not everyday until a week before the ritual;
the night before the ritual it is played all night. Without an impending ritual, this
rhythm is never played. Soli-slow or Soli-fast depends on which song is sung.










Composer: traditional , Malinke ethnic group, Guinea.
Source: Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe
97


-$.4 &I0F2 [ '(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
Signal Gro go do go do go do
Djm#1 pa go ta pa go ta
Djm#2 pa pa go do pa pa go do
Djm#3 pa ta go do pa ta go do
Djm#4 (Gn) pa go ta (Gn) pa go ta
x x x x x x x x
O O O O
x x x x x x x
O (O) (O) O
x x x x x x x x
O O O O O
kk
DD
sb

Accompanies rituals of initiation and circumcision. Began once elders decided it
was time for the children's initiation, but not everyday until a week before the ritual;
the night before the ritual it is played all night. Without an impending ritual, this
rhythm is never played. Soli-slow or Soli-fast depends on which song is sung.








Composer: traditional Malinke ethnic group, Guinea.
Source: Djm #1,#2 from Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe, Djm #3,#4 from
Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
97


-$.4 &I0F2 [ '(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
Signal Gro go do go do go do
Djm#1 pa go ta pa go ta
Djm#2 pa pa go do pa pa go do
Djm#3 pa ta go do pa ta go do
Djm#4 (Gn) pa go ta (Gn) pa go ta
x x x x x x x x
O O O O
x x x x x x x
O (O) (O) O
x x x x x x x x
O O O O O
kk
DD
sb

Accompanies rituals of initiation and circumcision. Began once elders decided it
was time for the children's initiation, but not everyday until a week before the ritual;
the night before the ritual it is played all night. Without an impending ritual, this
rhythm is never played. Soli-slow or Soli-fast depends on which song is sung.








Composer: traditional Malinke ethnic group, Guinea.
Source: Djm #1,#2 from Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe, Djm #3,#4 from
Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
98


-$.4 -$.$ &'(7)

1 trip let 2 trip let 3 trip let 4 trip let
Signal Gro go do go do go do
#1 4x pa ta pa ta pa ta pa
ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
#2 4x go do pa ta go do
pa ta go do pa ta
#3 1x pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
#4 2x pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta

















Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
98


-$.4 -$.$ &'(7)

1 trip let 2 trip let 3 trip let 4 trip let
Signal Gro go do go do go do
#1 4x pa ta pa ta pa ta pa
ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
#2 4x go do pa ta go do
pa ta go do pa ta
#3 1x pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
#4 2x pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta

















Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
99


-/4H81 \8< &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Djmk#1 pa ta pa ta pa ta
Djm#1 go do go do go go ta go ta
Djm#2 go do go go do go do go go do go
Djm#3 go go go ta go ta
Djm#4
x x x x x x x x
O O O
O O O
DD #1
DD #2




still working on this one











Transcribed by me
Source: Based on Joan Osborn song
99


-/4H81 \8< &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Djmk#1 pa ta pa ta pa ta
Djm#1 go do go do go go ta go ta
Djm#2 go do go go do go do go go do go
Djm#3 go go go ta go ta
Djm#4
x x x x x x x x
O O O
O O O
DD #1
DD #2




still working on this one











Transcribed by me
Source: Based on Joan Osborn song
100


-N%N &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gro go do go do go ta pa ta
Djm#1 go pa ta pa do go pa ta pa do
Djm#2 go do pa ta Gn ta go do pa ta Gn ta
Djm#3 pa pa ta go do pa pa ta go do
Djm#4 pa pa ta go do pa pa ta go do
Djm#5 Gn do go do Gn Gn Dn
Djm#6 do ta pa Dn pa do go ta pa Dn pa go
x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
x x x x x x x
O (o) o o O O O
DD #1
DD #2











Composer: traditional
Source: Djm #1 and DD #1 Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
Remainder from http://www.djembe.net/share/index.htm
100


-N%N &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gro go do go do go ta pa ta
Djm#1 go pa ta pa do go pa ta pa do
Djm#2 go do pa ta Gn ta go do pa ta Gn ta
Djm#3 pa pa ta go do pa pa ta go do
Djm#4 pa pa ta go do pa pa ta go do
Djm#5 Gn do go do Gn Gn Dn
Djm#6 do ta pa Dn pa do go ta pa Dn pa go
x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
x x x x x x x
O (o) o o O O O
DD #1
DD #2











Composer: traditional
Source: Djm #1 and DD #1 Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
Remainder from http://www.djembe.net/share/index.htm
101


-N%N -$.$ &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
#1a
#1b go do
Pr pa ta Pr pa ta
2x pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
#2a
#2b Pr
Pr pa ta Pr Pr pa ta Pr
Pr pa ta Pr pa ta Pr pa ta Pr
#4 4x pa ta Gr go do go do
Pr ta ta pa ta pa ta
Pr ta Pr
#6 4x pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta Pr pa ta
patapa tapata
patapa patapa
patapa tapata
ta pa ta
Pr 1x
pa ta pa ta go do go do
Pr pa ta Pr
#3 2x
#5 2x













Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
101


-N%N -$.$ &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
#1a
#1b go do
Pr pa ta Pr pa ta
2x pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta
#2a
#2b Pr
Pr pa ta Pr Pr pa ta Pr
Pr pa ta Pr pa ta Pr pa ta Pr
#4 4x pa ta Gr go do go do
Pr ta ta pa ta pa ta
Pr ta Pr
#6 4x pa ta pa ta pa ta pa ta Pr pa ta
patapa tapata
patapa patapa
patapa tapata
ta pa ta
Pr 1x
pa ta pa ta go do go do
Pr pa ta Pr
#3 2x
#5 2x













Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
102


P0060 &HN%N% $%.9O A(C)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
x x x x x x x x x
O O O O O
x x x x x x
(O) (O) (O) (O)
x x x x x x x x x
O O (O) (O) O O
x x x x x
(O) (O) (O) (O)
x x x x x x x x
O O O O
x x x x x x x x
O O
x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
x x x x x x x x
O O
kk
DD
2
x





t
h
e
n







2
x
sb
2
x





t
h
e
n







2
x

this rhythm means, " to walk like the people of Hamanah " and the
movements depict this.







Composer: traditional, Mandiana, Kankan, Upper Guinea
Source: Attempted "by ear" transcription of a Famoudou Konate introduced rhythm
The kk and DD are right, but the sb is off somewhere
102


P0060 &HN%N% $%.9O A(C)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
x x x x x x x x x
O O O O O
x x x x x x
(O) (O) (O) (O)
x x x x x x x x x
O O (O) (O) O O
x x x x x
(O) (O) (O) (O)
x x x x x x x x
O O O O
x x x x x x x x
O O
x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
x x x x x x x x
O O
kk
DD
2
x





t
h
e
n







2
x
sb
2
x





t
h
e
n







2
x

this rhythm means, " to walk like the people of Hamanah " and the
movements depict this.







Composer: traditional, Mandiana, Kankan, Upper Guinea
Source: Attempted "by ear" transcription of a Famoudou Konate introduced rhythm
The kk and DD are right, but the sb is off somewhere
103


P464%4 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal go do pa do go do go do
pa pa ta pa ta
Djm#1 ta pa ta pa ta go do pa
o o o o
O O
DD




























Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
103


P464%4 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal go do pa do go do go do
pa pa ta pa ta
Djm#1 ta pa ta pa ta go do pa
o o o o
O O
DD




























Composer: traditional
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
104


P414<0 &'(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
Signal do go do go do pa
Djm#1 Gn ta go ta Gn ta Gn ta
Djm#2 Gn do pa Gn do pa
Djm#3 Gn pa Dn go do Gn ta Dn go do
x x x x x x x x
O O (O) O O (O)
x x x x x x x x
(O) O (O) O
x x x x x x x x
O O O
x x x x x x x x
O o O O o
3
godogo
DD
kk
sb
DD
#2
#1

The meaning of Tiriba has changed many times, with three phases identifiable.
First it was played for the great dancer Tiriba and his performance group; then, it
grew to a rhythm played for initiation of the girls; finally, it has become a popular
favorite at all festivals where people dance.






Composer: traditional, Landuma, West Guinea, Boke and Boffa Regions
Source: Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe and Alan Tauber The Drum
Connection (DD#2 from Alan Tauber)
104


P414<0 &'(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
Signal do go do go do pa
Djm#1 Gn ta go ta Gn ta Gn ta
Djm#2 Gn do pa Gn do pa
Djm#3 Gn pa Dn go do Gn ta Dn go do
x x x x x x x x
O O (O) O O (O)
x x x x x x x x
(O) O (O) O
x x x x x x x x
O O O
x x x x x x x x
O o O O o
3
godogo
DD
kk
sb
DD
#2
#1

The meaning of Tiriba has changed many times, with three phases identifiable.
First it was played for the great dancer Tiriba and his performance group; then, it
grew to a rhythm played for initiation of the girls; finally, it has become a popular
favorite at all festivals where people dance.






Composer: traditional, Landuma, West Guinea, Boke and Boffa Regions
Source: Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe and Alan Tauber The Drum
Connection (DD#2 from Alan Tauber)
105


P$1$ &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gro go do go do go pa ta pa
Entrnc pa Dn pa pa pa Dn pa pa
Djm#1 go do Dn pa pa pa Dn pa pa
Djm#2 pa ta pa go do pa ta pa go do
Djm#3 Gn go do pa Gn go do pa
Gn Dn pa ta pa Gn Dn Gn Dn
Gn Dn Gn go do pa
Djm#5 Gn Dn go do go Gn Dn
Djm#4

Played after the boys' circumcision. Originally played on a wassamba, rather than
djembe.















Composer: traditional Melinke in Siguiri, Guinea
Source: Signal, Entrance, Djm #1,#2 from Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe,
Djm #3-5 from Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
105


P$1$ &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gro go do go do go pa ta pa
Entrnc pa Dn pa pa pa Dn pa pa
Djm#1 go do Dn pa pa pa Dn pa pa
Djm#2 pa ta pa go do pa ta pa go do
Djm#3 Gn go do pa Gn go do pa
Gn Dn pa ta pa Gn Dn Gn Dn
Gn Dn Gn go do pa
Djm#5 Gn Dn go do go Gn Dn
Djm#4

Played after the boys' circumcision. Originally played on a wassamba, rather than
djembe.















Composer: traditional Melinke in Siguiri, Guinea
Source: Signal, Entrance, Djm #1,#2 from Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe,
Djm #3-5 from Alan Tauber The Drum Connection
106


P$1$ &HN%N%O '(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
x x x x x x x x x x
O O (O) O O (O)
x x x x x x x x x
O O (O) (O) (O) O O
x x x x x x x x x
O O (O) (O) (O) (O) (O)
x x x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
x x x x x x x x x
O O
kk
DD
sb





















Composer: traditional Melinke in Siguiri, Guinea (boys rite of passage)
Source: Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe
106


P$1$ &HN%N%O '(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
x x x x x x x x x x
O O (O) O O (O)
x x x x x x x x x
O O (O) (O) (O) O O
x x x x x x x x x
O O (O) (O) (O) (O) (O)
x x x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
x x x x x x x x x
O O
kk
DD
sb





















Composer: traditional Melinke in Siguiri, Guinea (boys rite of passage)
Source: Mamady Keita - A Life for the Djembe
107


]%[%068H X$N%H &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Djm #1 pa go do Gn t go m pa go do Gn t go m
Djm #2 go m pa go do Gn t go m pa go do Gn t
Djm #3 Gn t go m pa go do Gn t go m pa go do

It is possible these words go with this rhythm:

Time is precious Speak to the Stones
Time is precious Listen to the Air
Time is precious Transform with Fire
Let the water wash thru your body
Let the water wash thru your brain

Time is precious Speak to the Stones
Time is precious Listen to the Air
Time is precious Transform with Fire
Time is precious Dance for the Earth












Source: Imani
107


]%[%068H X$N%H &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Djm #1 pa go do Gn t go m pa go do Gn t go m
Djm #2 go m pa go do Gn t go m pa go do Gn t
Djm #3 Gn t go m pa go do Gn t go m pa go do

It is possible these words go with this rhythm:

Time is precious Speak to the Stones
Time is precious Listen to the Air
Time is precious Transform with Fire
Let the water wash thru your body
Let the water wash thru your brain

Time is precious Speak to the Stones
Time is precious Listen to the Air
Time is precious Transform with Fire
Time is precious Dance for the Earth












Source: Imani
108


^$4#8F

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6
+ 7 + 8 + 9 + 10 + 11 +
Djm go do go do Gn go do Gn
pa ta go Dn go do Gn
DD (O) (O) (O)





Still working on this one















Composer: Glen Valez (transcribed by me)
Source: Rhythms of the Chakras
108


^$4#8F

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6
+ 7 + 8 + 9 + 10 + 11 +
Djm go do go do Gn go do Gn
pa ta go Dn go do Gn
DD (O) (O) (O)





Still working on this one















Composer: Glen Valez (transcribed by me)
Source: Rhythms of the Chakras
109


E0%@0H4 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gro go do go do go pa ta pa
Djm#1 Gn pa ta Gn go do Gn ta Gn go do
Djm#2 Gn go do Gro Gro pa ta
x x x x x x x x x
(O) O O (O) O O
x x x x x x x x x x
(O) O O (O) O O
x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O O O
or if played on the djembe
#1 Gn Dn Gn do go rt Dn Gn do go
#2 Dn Gn Dn Gn Dn Gn Dn Gn
kk
DD
sb

Yankadi and Makru together are a dance and rhythm for seduction. Boys and girls
dance in a row opposite each other to Yankadi, then Makru begins and they pair off.
Makru is played about twice as fast as Yankadi.









Composer: traditional, Susu, Southwest Guinea
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection, verified by Mamady Keita - A Life
for the Djembe.
109


E0%@0H4 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Signal Gro go do go do go pa ta pa
Djm#1 Gn pa ta Gn go do Gn ta Gn go do
Djm#2 Gn go do Gro Gro pa ta
x x x x x x x x x
(O) O O (O) O O
x x x x x x x x x x
(O) O O (O) O O
x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O O O
or if played on the djembe
#1 Gn Dn Gn do go rt Dn Gn do go
#2 Dn Gn Dn Gn Dn Gn Dn Gn
kk
DD
sb

Yankadi and Makru together are a dance and rhythm for seduction. Boys and girls
dance in a row opposite each other to Yankadi, then Makru begins and they pair off.
Makru is played about twice as fast as Yankadi.









Composer: traditional, Susu, Southwest Guinea
Source: Alan Tauber The Drum Connection, verified by Mamady Keita - A Life
for the Djembe.
110


E8%K$N &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Son x x x x x
Clave x x x x x x x x x x x
Salidor Dn Dn go Dn Gn Dn go
go Dn Gn Dn Gn Dn Gn Dn
go lt rt lh rh lt rt lh rh lt rt lh rh lt rt lh
Tres Golpe
Tres Golpe

This is one of those rhythms that forms a basis for many other rhythms.

The son (clave), is a typical 2-3 pattern. If it is played with a dunun, emphasis is on
the bold x (3a).

In the Salidor, all Duns are played quietly. Only the bold go and bold Gun are
emphasized.

Two versions of Tres Golpe are offered. The first is a more beginner method. In
either, only the go is emphasised. The touches and heel hits are played like
shu-fuls -- first the heel of your hand hits then you touch the head with your finger
tips.












Composer: Traditional
Source: Jesse Seymour February Fire 2003
110


E8%K$N &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Son x x x x x
Clave x x x x x x x x x x x
Salidor Dn Dn go Dn Gn Dn go
go Dn Gn Dn Gn Dn Gn Dn
go lt rt lh rh lt rt lh rh lt rt lh rh lt rt lh
Tres Golpe
Tres Golpe

This is one of those rhythms that forms a basis for many other rhythms.

The son (clave), is a typical 2-3 pattern. If it is played with a dunun, emphasis is on
the bold x (3a).

In the Salidor, all Duns are played quietly. Only the bold go and bold Gun are
emphasized.

Two versions of Tres Golpe are offered. The first is a more beginner method. In
either, only the go is emphasised. The touches and heel hits are played like
shu-fuls -- first the heel of your hand hits then you touch the head with your finger
tips.












Composer: Traditional
Source: Jesse Seymour February Fire 2003
111


'_A X;92;6 <0F8H $% E8%K8.$N I1$6 `0424

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
Gn go do Gn go do
x x x
x x x x
x x x x x x x x
x x x x x x x
O O
DD #2 O O
DD #1
Stick
Djm
Shaker
Bula






















Composer: Morwen Two Feathers
Source: Morwen Two Feathers Earth Drum Council
111


'_A X;92;6 <0F8H $% E8%K8.$N I1$6 `0424

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
Gn go do Gn go do
x x x
x x x x
x x x x x x x x
x x x x x x x
O O
DD #2 O O
DD #1
Stick
Djm
Shaker
Bula






















Composer: Morwen Two Feathers
Source: Morwen Two Feathers Earth Drum Council
112


]%@%$Z% G10%8F X;92;6 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Djm#1 go go ta go go ta go go ta go ta go ta
Gn Gn do Gn Gn do Gn Gn do Gn do Gn do


1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
Djm#2 Gn Gn Dn Gn Dn go
go do do do pa pa ta pa
ta go go do go do
pa pa ta pa ta go
go do go do pa ta pa ta
pa go go do go do





















Transcribed by me based on unknown Cranes song on unknown album
Source: self
112


]%@%$Z% G10%8F X;92;6 &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Djm#1 go go ta go go ta go go ta go ta go ta
Gn Gn do Gn Gn do Gn Gn do Gn do Gn do


1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
Djm#2 Gn Gn Dn Gn Dn go
go do do do pa pa ta pa
ta go go do go do
pa pa ta pa ta go
go do go do pa ta pa ta
pa go go do go do





















Transcribed by me based on unknown Cranes song on unknown album
Source: self
113


a8/0N.8 &'(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
s s s s
x x x x x x x
R L R L R R L R L R L R
mD mp mp Gn do go mD mp mp Gn do go
Gn go go stk stk Gn go do stk stk
Seconde
Maman
Asson
Ogan
Bula











Assn: shaker
Ogan: bell
Bula: high drum, two sticks played L=left and R=right
Seconde: middle "conga" drum. The most important notes are the repeating pair of
open tones.
Maman: Low "conga" drum. One hand plays bass; the other hand plays on the side
of the drum using a stick.

Composer: Traditional Haitian Vodun
Source: Bonnie Devlin
Transcribed: Jim Salem http://www.newview.org/salem/
113


a8/0N.8 &'(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
s s s s
x x x x x x x
R L R L R R L R L R L R
mD mp mp Gn do go mD mp mp Gn do go
Gn go go stk stk Gn go do stk stk
Seconde
Maman
Asson
Ogan
Bula











Assn: shaker
Ogan: bell
Bula: high drum, two sticks played L=left and R=right
Seconde: middle "conga" drum. The most important notes are the repeating pair of
open tones.
Maman: Low "conga" drum. One hand plays bass; the other hand plays on the side
of the drum using a stick.

Composer: Traditional Haitian Vodun
Source: Bonnie Devlin
Transcribed: Jim Salem http://www.newview.org/salem/
114



G.0K8 /012F 4% A

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 +
x x x x x x x
or x x x x x x x
kaki x x x x x x x
x x x x x x x
x x x x x x
or x x x x x x x
x x x x x x x
x x x x x x x x
Lenj x x x x x x
Mendi x x x x x x
or x x x x x x x
x x x x x x x x
or x x x x x x x x
s
t
d
D
u
n
d
u
n
b
a
N
y
o
S
o
k
o

114



G.0K8 /012F 4% A

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 +
x x x x x x x
or x x x x x x x
kaki x x x x x x x
x x x x x x x
x x x x x x
or x x x x x x x
x x x x x x x
x x x x x x x x
Lenj x x x x x x
Mendi x x x x x x
or x x x x x x x
x x x x x x x x
or x x x x x x x x
s
t
d
D
u
n
d
u
n
b
a
N
y
o
S
o
k
o

115


G.0K8 /012F 4% '

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
x x x x x
or x x x x x
x x x x x
or x x x x x
Braz x x x x x
x x x x x x x
x x x x x x x
Calyp x x (x) x x x x (x) x
x x x x x x x x x
or x x x x x x x x x x
Djemb x x x x x x
x x x x x x
or x x x x x x x x x x x x
or x x x x
Kaki x x x x x x x
x2 x x x x x x x x
x x x x x x x x x
x x x x x
F
u
n
k
x1 K
a
s
s
a
S
o
n
R
h
u
m
b
a
A
c
o
n
c
o
n
D
j
a
n
s
a

115


G.0K8 /012F 4% '

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
x x x x x
or x x x x x
x x x x x
or x x x x x
Braz x x x x x
x x x x x x x
x x x x x x x
Calyp x x (x) x x x x (x) x
x x x x x x x x x
or x x x x x x x x x x
Djemb x x x x x x
x x x x x x
or x x x x x x x x x x x x
or x x x x
Kaki x x x x x x x
x2 x x x x x x x x
x x x x x x x x x
x x x x x
F
u
n
k
x1 K
a
s
s
a
S
o
n
R
h
u
m
b
a
A
c
o
n
c
o
n
D
j
a
n
s
a

116


G.0K8 /012F 4% ' &#$%2b)

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
x x x x x x x x x x
or x x x x x x x x x x
or x x x x x x x x x x
x x x x x x x x x
Samba x x x x x x x
Sunu x x x x x x x
x x x x x x x x x x
or x x x x x x x x x
or x x x x x x x x x x
x x x x x x x x x x
x x x x x
or x x x x x x x x
or x x x x x x x x
M
a
d
a
n
M
a
c
r
u
T
o
r
o


116


G.0K8 /012F 4% ' &#$%2b)

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
x x x x x x x x x x
or x x x x x x x x x x
or x x x x x x x x x x
x x x x x x x x x
Samba x x x x x x x
Sunu x x x x x x x
x x x x x x x x x x
or x x x x x x x x x
or x x x x x x x x x x
x x x x x x x x x x
x x x x x
or x x x x x x x x
or x x x x x x x x
M
a
d
a
n
M
a
c
r
u
T
o
r
o


117



G.0K8 /012F 4% 64F#8..0%8$NF 2468 F4LF

The Grudge (4x5)
1 e + a o 2 e + a o 3 e + a o 4 e + a o
x x x x x x x x x x x x x
























Would like to include Jane's Addition's Three Days.

Composer: Tool
Source: Lateralus

Still working on this one
117



G.0K8 /012F 4% 64F#8..0%8$NF 2468 F4LF

The Grudge (4x5)
1 e + a o 2 e + a o 3 e + a o 4 e + a o
x x x x x x x x x x x x x
























Would like to include Jane's Addition's Three Days.

Composer: Tool
Source: Lateralus

Still working on this one
118


Q0K$1428 JN%N% c012F &'(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
x x x x x x x
O O O
x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
x x x x x x x
(O) O O O
x x x x x x
O O O O
x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
x x x x x x x
O O O O O O O
x x x x x x
O
x x x x x x x x
(O) (O) O O O O
x x x x x x x x
(O) (O) (O) O O
x x x x x x x x
O O O
x x x x x x x x x
O O O O O
x x x x x x
(O) (O) (O) (O)
B
e
m
b
e
C
a
m
b
e
r
t
3x
1x
S
o
k
o
D
o
u
n
d
o
u
n
b
a
3
/
2
6
/
4
T
a
a
m
a
T
i
r
i
b
a


118


Q0K$1428 JN%N% c012F &'(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
x x x x x x x
O O O
x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
x x x x x x x
(O) O O O
x x x x x x
O O O O
x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
x x x x x x x
O O O O O O O
x x x x x x
O
x x x x x x x x
(O) (O) O O O O
x x x x x x x x
(O) (O) (O) O O
x x x x x x x x
O O O
x x x x x x x x x
O O O O O
x x x x x x
(O) (O) (O) (O)
B
e
m
b
e
C
a
m
b
e
r
t
3x
1x
S
o
k
o
D
o
u
n
d
o
u
n
b
a
3
/
2
6
/
4
T
a
a
m
a
T
i
r
i
b
a


119


Q0K$1428 JN%N% c012F &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
x x x x x x x x x
O O O (O) O
x x x x x x x x x
(O) (O) O
x x x x x x x x x
(O) O O O O
x x x x x x
O O O O
x x x x x x x x x x x x
O O O O O
x x x x x x x x
O (o) O O (o)
x x x x x x x x x x
(O) O O O O O O O
x x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O O (O)
x x x x x x x x
O O O O O
x x x x x x x
O O
#2
F
u
n
k
F
a
n
g
a
#1
D
j
a
n
s
a
s
b
D
D
M
a
k
r
u
M
a
d
a
n

119


Q0K$1428 JN%N% c012F &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
x x x x x x x x x
O O O (O) O
x x x x x x x x x
(O) (O) O
x x x x x x x x x
(O) O O O O
x x x x x x
O O O O
x x x x x x x x x x x x
O O O O O
x x x x x x x x
O (o) O O (o)
x x x x x x x x x x
(O) O O O O O O O
x x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O O (O)
x x x x x x x x
O O O O O
x x x x x x x
O O
#2
F
u
n
k
F
a
n
g
a
#1
D
j
a
n
s
a
s
b
D
D
M
a
k
r
u
M
a
d
a
n

120


Q0K$1428 JN%N% c012F &'('O #$%2)

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
x x x x x
O O O (O)
x x x x x
O O O O O (O)
x x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O O O
x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
S
u
n
u
3x
1x
B
r
a
z

R
h
u
m
b
a
S
o
f
a

120


Q0K$1428 JN%N% c012F &'('O #$%2)

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
x x x x x
O O O (O)
x x x x x
O O O O O (O)
x x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O O O
x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
S
u
n
u
3x
1x
B
r
a
z

R
h
u
m
b
a
S
o
f
a

121


?8L4%%81F JN%N% c012F &'(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
x x x x x x x
O O O
x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
x x x x
O O O
x x x x
O O O O
O O
x x x x x x
O O
x x x x x x
O O O O
L
a
m
b
a
2x
1x
#2
L
e
n
j
e
n
B
e
m
b
e
#1


121


?8L4%%81F JN%N% c012F &'(7)

1 + a 2 + a 3 + a 4 + a
x x x x x x x
O O O
x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
x x x x
O O O
x x x x
O O O O
O O
x x x x x x
O O
x x x x x x
O O O O
L
a
m
b
a
2x
1x
#2
L
e
n
j
e
n
B
e
m
b
e
#1


122


?8L4%%81F JN%N% c012F &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
x x x x x x x
O O O O O O O
x x *x x x *x
O O O
or
x x *x x x x x *x x
O O O
with *x being optional
x x (x) (x)
O O O
x x x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
x x x x x
O O O
x *x x *x x x *x
O
x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O O O S
a
m
b
a
A
c
o
n
c
o
n
#1
G
u
a
G
u
a
K
a
k
i
l
a
m
b
e
#2
F
a
n
g
a
F
u
n
k


122


?8L4%%81F JN%N% c012F &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
x x x x x x x
O O O O O O O
x x *x x x *x
O O O
or
x x *x x x x x *x x
O O O
with *x being optional
x x (x) (x)
O O O
x x x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O
x x x x x
O O O
x *x x *x x x *x
O
x x x x x x x x
O O O O O O O O S
a
m
b
a
A
c
o
n
c
o
n
#1
G
u
a
G
u
a
K
a
k
i
l
a
m
b
e
#2
F
a
n
g
a
F
u
n
k


123


?0<02NH4 d.02N%M4 c10#24#8 X;92;6F &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Gn Dn Gn Dn
Gn Dn go do Gn Dn
Gn Dn go do Gn Dn go do
Gn Dn go do Gn Dn
Gn Dn go do pa ta
Gn Dn go do pa ta
Gn Dn go do Gn Dn go do
Gn Dn go do pa ta
Gn Dn go do Gn Dn pa
Gn Dn go do Gn Dn pa
Gn Dn go do Gn Dn Gn do go Dn
Gn Dn go do Gn Dn pa
#1 4x
#2 4x
#3 2x
#4 2x
















Composer: Babatundi Olatunji (may he drum in peace)
Source: Imani
123


?0<02NH4 d.02N%M4 c10#24#8 X;92;6F &'(')

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Gn Dn Gn Dn
Gn Dn go do Gn Dn
Gn Dn go do Gn Dn go do
Gn Dn go do Gn Dn
Gn Dn go do pa ta
Gn Dn go do pa ta
Gn Dn go do Gn Dn go do
Gn Dn go do pa ta
Gn Dn go do Gn Dn pa
Gn Dn go do Gn Dn pa
Gn Dn go do Gn Dn Gn do go Dn
Gn Dn go do Gn Dn pa
#1 4x
#2 4x
#3 2x
#4 2x
















Composer: Babatundi Olatunji (may he drum in peace)
Source: Imani
124


G;0%2F
Spirit of the Wind
1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
spi rit of the wind car ry me
spi rit of the wind car ry me h o m e
spi rit of the wind car ry me h o m e to my
s e l f
Composer: unknown
Source: June Schreiber

Mother I Feel You
1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Mo ther I feel you un der my feet
Mo ther I feel your hea---rt be----at
Composer: unknown
Source: Twilight Covening, Luna sings it loudest!

Blood of the Ancients
1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
The blo od of cients Runs thruour veins
Forms change butherivr of life re mains
this bracket indicates a triplet
theAn






Composer: unknown
Source: Twilight Covening
124


G;0%2F
Spirit of the Wind
1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
spi rit of the wind car ry me
spi rit of the wind car ry me h o m e
spi rit of the wind car ry me h o m e to my
s e l f
Composer: unknown
Source: June Schreiber

Mother I Feel You
1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Mo ther I feel you un der my feet
Mo ther I feel your hea---rt be----at
Composer: unknown
Source: Twilight Covening, Luna sings it loudest!

Blood of the Ancients
1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
The blo od of cients Runs thruour veins
Forms change butherivr of life re mains
this bracket indicates a triplet
theAn






Composer: unknown
Source: Twilight Covening
125


P0[T8[P4[V0 :(81#4F8F

ga ma la ta ke ga ma la ta ke
c c c c c
s s s s s s
ga ma la ga ma la ga ma la ga ma la
c c c c c c c
s s s s s s
ga ma la ga ma la ta ke ta ke ga ma la ga ma la ta ke
c c c c c c
s s s s s s s s s s s
ga ma la ta ke ga ma la ta ke
c c c c c c
sr sl sr sl sr sl
















Composer: Reinhardt Flatishler
Source: Reinhardt Flatishler Class
125


P0[T8[P4[V0 :(81#4F8F

ga ma la ta ke ga ma la ta ke
c c c c c
s s s s s s
ga ma la ga ma la ga ma la ga ma la
c c c c c c c
s s s s s s
ga ma la ga ma la ta ke ta ke ga ma la ga ma la ta ke
c c c c c c
s s s s s s s s s s s
ga ma la ta ke ga ma la ta ke
c c c c c c
sr sl sr sl sr sl
















Composer: Reinhardt Flatishler
Source: Reinhardt Flatishler Class
126


-4.8%#8 4% A

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 +
Softly
Gently
Spirit
Air #2
Air #1



















Composer: Transcribed from a John Cage non-instrumental
Source: self
126


-4.8%#8 4% A

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 +
Softly
Gently
Spirit
Air #2
Air #1



















Composer: Transcribed from a John Cage non-instrumental
Source: self
127



-4.8%#8 4% '

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Quiet
Shh
Listen
N
i
g
h
t

#2
N
i
g
h
t

#1





















Composer: Transcribed from John Cage non-instrumental
Source: self
127



-4.8%#8 4% '

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Quiet
Shh
Listen
N
i
g
h
t

#2
N
i
g
h
t

#1





















Composer: Transcribed from John Cage non-instrumental
Source: self
128


W$18 -4.8%#8 4% A

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 +
Still
Deep
Hush
Gas#2
Gas#1



















Composer: Transcribed from a John Cage non-instrumental
Source: self
128


W$18 -4.8%#8 4% A

1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 + 6 +
Still
Deep
Hush
Gas#2
Gas#1



















Composer: Transcribed from a John Cage non-instrumental
Source: self
129



W$18 -4.8%#8 4% '

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Calm
Hmm
Slow
G
l
a
s
s
#2
G
l
a
s
s
#1





















Composer: Transcribed from John Cage non-instrumental
Source: self
129



W$18 -4.8%#8 4% '

1 e + a 2 e + a 3 e + a 4 e + a
Calm
Hmm
Slow
G
l
a
s
s
#2
G
l
a
s
s
#1





















Composer: Transcribed from John Cage non-instrumental
Source: self
130
!"#$% !"#$% !"#$% !"#$%
130
!"#$% !"#$% !"#$% !"#$%
131










J&"=X
131










J&"=X