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Workpackage 4

Mapping exercise, needs analysis and gap analysis for obesity prevention tools

Status: final version, April 2014

COLOPHON

Title

Report HEPCOM needs analysis HEPCOM mapping exercise, needs analysis and gap analysis for obesity prevention tools

Authors Dietmar Goelitz 1 Peter Paulus 2 Janine Vervoordeldonk 3 Henriette Hansen 4 Goof Buijs 5

Acknowledgements

M.S. Carlsson (Aarhus University, Denmark), V. Simovska (Aarhus University, Denmark), S.V.

Vevatne (Bergen University College, Norway), N.G. Viig (Bergen University College, Norway),

  • C. Mont Castro (Business Solutions Europa, Belgium), G. Petito (Business Solutions Europa,

Belgium), J. Pavlic (Croatian National Institute of Public Health, Croatia), I. Pejnović Franelić

(Croatian National Institute of Public Health, Croatia), S. Musić Milanović (Croatian National

Institute of Public Health, Croatia), E. Bada (Institute of Child Health, Greece), K. Kapetaniou

(Institute of Child Health, Greece), A. Spinelli (National Institute of Health, Italy), V. Possenti

(National Institute of Health, Italy), E. Flaschberger (Ludwig Boltzmann Institute Health Promotion Research, Austria), L. Gugglberger, (Ludwig Boltzmann Institute Health Promotion Research, Austria), R.Felder-Puig (Ludwig Boltzmann Institute Health Promotion Research, Austria), A. Jociute (Mykolas Romeris University, Lithuania), G. Petronyte (Mykolas Romeris

University, Lithuania), C. Kelly (National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland), M. Molcho (National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland), J. Aagaard-Hansen (Steno Diabetes Centre Ltd., Denmark), M.L.Bruselius (Steno Diabetes Centre Ltd., Denmark), B. van der

Zanden (euPrevent EMR, the Netherlands), G.S. Carvalho (University of Minho, Portugal), R.B. Tracana (University of Minho, Portugal), C. Simar (University Blaise Pasal

Clermont-Ferrand 2, France), D. Jourdan (University Blaise Pasal Clermont-Ferrand 2, France),

  • E. Darlington (University Blaise Pasal Clermont-Ferrand 2, France), A. Schultz (University

College Syddenmark, Denmark), U. Pedersen (University Blaise Pasal Clermont-Ferrand 2,

France), C. Williams (University of Brighton, UK), N.S. Sherriff (University of Brighton, UK),

  • K. Tossavainen (University of Eastern Finland, Finland), M. Sormunen (University of Eastern

Finland, Finland)

Publication date April 2014 This report can be downloaded for free from the HEPCOM website: www.hepcom.eu

COLOPHON Title Report HEPCOM needs analysis HEPCOM mapping exercise, needs analysis and gap analysis for obesityw w w . h e p c o m . e u HEPCOM is supported by the European Union’s Health Programme (2008-2013). The views expressed are purely the authors’ own and do not reflect the views of the European Commission © CBO, 2014. No part of this publication may be reproduced, either in folio of digital form, without written permission. Requests concerning the reproduction of images or text should be addressed to: CBO – P.O. Box 20064 – 3502 LB Utrecht – The Netherlands – e-mail: info@cbo.nl Leuphana University, Lüneburg, Germany ibid CBO, Utrecht, the Netherlands South Denmark European Office, Brussels, Belgium CBO, Utrecht, the Netherlands " id="pdf-obj-1-70" src="pdf-obj-1-70.jpg">

HEPCOM is supported by the European Union’s Health Programme (2008-2013). The views expressed are purely the authors’ own and do not reflect the views of the European

Commission

© CBO, 2014. No part of this publication may be reproduced, either in folio of digital form, without written permission. Requests concerning the reproduction of images or text should be addressed to: CBO – P.O. Box 20064 – 3502 LB Utrecht – The Netherlands – e-mail:

1 Leuphana University, Lüneburg, Germany ibid 3 CBO, Utrecht, the Netherlands 4 South Denmark European Office, Brussels, Belgium

2

5 CBO, Utrecht, the Netherlands

Workpackage 4 Mapping exercise, needs analysis and gap analysis for obesity prevention tools Status: final version,
Workpackage 4 Mapping exercise, needs analysis and gap analysis for obesity prevention tools Status: final version,

Workpackage 4

Mapping exercise, needs analysis and gap analysis for obesity prevention tools

Status: final version, April 2014

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

1

Summary

............................................................................................................................

5

  • 2 Description and scope, aim and methods

...........................................................................

7

  • 3 Needs analysis for tools

....................................................................................................

  • 3.1 What tools do local communities apply and need?

..................................................

  • 3.2 Recommendations from local communities to the learning platform

......................

  • 3.3 Conclusion ................................................................................................................

13

13

20

21

  • 4 Mapping exercise: Description of tools for health promotion and prevention of overweight

................................................................................................................................

  • 4.1 Summary of identified tools in mapped projects

.....................................................

22

23

  • 4.2 Usability of the identified tools from all mapped projects for the communities’

needs and the HEPCOM learning platform

..........................................................................

  • 5 Gap analysis and consequences for the HEPCOM learning platform

.............................

  • 6 Appendix 1: Mapping of European level projects

...........................................................

  • 6.1 ...............................................................................................................

SHAPE UP

27

29

31

31

Young Minds

  • 6.2 ............................................................................................................

40

  • 6.3 Healthy Region .........................................................................................................

43

  • 6.4 PoHeFa .....................................................................................................................

45

  • 6.5 Healthy Children

......................................................................................................

48

HEPS

  • 6.6 ........................................................................................................................

52

6.7

6.8

Boys and Girls

..........................................................................................................

Active

.......................................................................................................................

58

62

6.9

IDEFICS

...................................................................................................................

65

  • 6.10 I.Family ....................................................................................................................

68

6.11

6.12

Energy

......................................................................................................................

Spotlight

...................................................................................................................

70

73

  • 6.13 Epode ........................................................................................................................

76

  • 6.14 .............................................................................................................

GRADIENT

81

  • 6.15 Drivers ......................................................................................................................

83

  • 6.16 .......................................................................................................................

HCSC

87

Equity Channel

  • 6.17 .........................................................................................................

  • 6.18 .....................................................................................................................

IMAGE

89

93

  • 6.19 ...............................................................................................................

TEENAGE

97

  • 6.20 European Portal for action in Health Inequalities

..................................................

Equity Channel

  • 6.21 .......................................................................................................

  • 6.22 .................................................................................................................

IMPALA

100

103

107

  • 6.23 Healthy Eco Life

....................................................................................................

  • 6.24 ...........................................................................................................

PERISCOPE

110

112

  • 6.25 EATWELL .............................................................................................................

115

  • 6.26 ...................................................................................................................

RICHIE

118

  • 6.27 ....................................................................................................................

MOVE

120

  • 6.28 ................................................................................................................

INFORM

123

  • 6.29 ................................................................................................................

HELENA

126

  • 6.30 HABEAT ................................................................................................................

128

Garden Project

  • 6.31 ........................................................................................................

Appendix 2: Needs analysis interview template

....................................................................

132

134

4

1 SUMMARY

1 SUMMARY The aim of this workpackage is to make a mapping exercise, as well as

The aim of this workpackage is to make a mapping exercise, as well as a needs and gap analysis of tools used in obesity prevention targeted at children and young people in local communities and schools. Currently applied tools and needs for tools were identified by interviewing stakeholders from 45 European communities in the 15 participating countries involved in the HEPCOM project.

The stakeholders included policy makers, decision makers, admini strative staff and practitioners working on the community level . The employed tools were then systematized and categorized by a management cycle which is derived from the commonly used public health action cycle. Subsequently, we identified existing tools at the community level that could be relevant in health promotion for obesity prevention. This was accomplished through an extensive mapping analysis of 32 EU- funded projects.

A gap analysis then built upon these findings in the previous analyses to reveal. The gap analysis revealed existing gaps for the needs of community health promotion and obesity prevention that are not met by existing tools. Overall, the analyses revealed that a wide variety of different tools are applied in the participating communities. The community partners expressed a need for these tools. At the same time, the individual tools were generally reported as being needed only by a small number of the community partners. The tools they asked for refl ect typical problems specific communities have concerning health promotion and obesity prevention (including financial and cultural needs, balance between autonomy and regulation).

Summarizing the recommendations of the community partners concerning a learning platform on the internet, they expressed a need for an easy to use platform with a knowledge data base. They are interested in good practices that can be adapted to their local community needs . They are also looking for networking possibilities. We therefore conclude that the HEPCOM community partners intend to work actively with the online learning platform.

An additional analysis reveal ed that the following tools are among the most needed:

  • 1. Specific evaluation tools: tools that are tailored to the particular needs in a community or generic tools which can be adapt ed to meet local needs

  • 2. A good practice database: Models of good p ractice that show practice-based evidence

  • 3. Tools that assist in seeking resources (finances, time or staff): t ools that help to identify and get support

  • 4. Tools that help develop common goals among partners: tools that help to create a shared vision and general aims in a consortium of partners from different background on a community level

  • 5. Tools for project management: tools that help to make d etailed planning or checklist of steps for interventions

  • 6. Tools that help to develop c ross- regional conceptual frameworks on the political level : tools to create a public management framework on health promotion and obesity prevention.

  • 7. Tools for active involvement of parents, children and adolescents: tool s that help initiate a participatory approach in health promotion and obesity prevention.

The mapping exercise on ongoing and completed EU funded projects that offer tools on health promotion used in obesity prevention show that a gap exists concerning the availability of the tools in some of the 13 country languages that are used within the HEPCOM project. To increase access to tools in a range of languages, it is recommended to link some selected national projects on the HEPCOM website.

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Another gap was found with regard to databases and special evaluation tools.

We recommend to structure the HEPCOM online learning platform like a toolbox which can help the partners in the 45 HEPCOM communities to choose tools that are most likely to meet their diverse and specifi c needs. HEPCOM partners are recommended to refer the HEPCOM approach in the following EU projects: SHAPE UP, IMAGE and HEPS. These projects use all -inclusive approaches to healthy communities.

The HEPCOM learning platform should include a search function that helps identify tools for the communities’ specific needs. In addition, a forum-like data base with good practices should be included.

6

2 DESCRIPTION AND SCOPE, AIM AND METHODS According to the European Commission, 22 million children i
  • 2 DESCRIPTION AND SCOPE, AIM AND METHODS

According to the European Commission, 22 million children i n the EU are considered overweight or obese and this number is still increasing 6 . Data indicates that overweight and obesity is more common in boys than in girls and that there is a social gradient, with children from lower socio-economic group at greater risk. Obese young people are at higher risk for developing serious health problems like poor glucose tolerance, hyperinsulinemia, pre-diabetes, type 2 diabetes, hypertension and asthma. Overweight and obesity in young people that persists into adulthood, i s associated with morbidity and increased risk of premature mortality, especially from coronary heart disease, arterio- sclerosis and certain types of cancer.

There are a wide range of behavioural, genetic, cultural, environmental and biological variables that act both independently and together to contribute to the development of overweight and obesity in children and adolescents. Given this fact, understanding the underlying factors, correlations and mechanisms whereby children and young people become overweight or obese is challenging. The prevalent ‘epidemics’ or obesogenic environments which place children’s physical and mental health at risk, may be seen as a key driver in the overweight epidemic. Children, especially girls, who grow up in deprived communities, e.g. with an abundance of cheap, nutritionally poor, high caloric foods and reduced opportunities to be physically active, are particularly vulnerable; they may experience ‘body judgementalism’ by the media and peers.

These factors are closely linked with environmental, social and economic deprivation. The causes and the underlying complex aetiology of obesity as well as the likelihood that unhealthy eating and physical activity habits developed in early childhood will lead to adverse effects in later life, has encouraged further support for effective and sustainable health promotion and prevention measures . These measures should start as early as possible in childhood, before health attitudes and behaviors have been established.

Therefore, measures in the area of health promotion and obesity prevention are needed and these measures should take place in childrens’ and young people´s primary living environments. The school setting together with the family forms the centre of childrens’ and adolescents’ living environments, for which already a considerable number of programmes on healthy eating and physical activity have been developed and implemented. The complex aetiology requires an integrated approach to programmes or initiatives which make use of multi -component multilevel measures interventions that address individual measures (e.g., knowledge, attitudes, and motivation) and environmental measures (e.g., creating facilities on school or community level that promote physical activity). Research indicates strong evidence that individual/environmental focused interventions have a posi tive effect, e.g. on dietary behaviour (fruit and vegetable intake), in children.

Finally, it is important to recognize the ‘health divide’. Research reveals that children and young people with socially disadvantaged backgrounds or children from certain immigrant backgrounds have a higher risk of being overweight or obese and also have disadvantaged positions in other domains of their lives. Poor health outcomes are found to be significantly associated with poor results at school , and socio-economic disadvantages have a significant impact both on health and educational outcomes 7 .

  • 6 http://cordis.europa.eu/projects/rcn/97996_en.html

  • 7 Pucher, K.K., Boot, N.M.W.M. & Vries, N.K. de (2013). Systematic review: School health promotion

interventions targeting physical activity and nutrition can improve academic performance in primary- and middle school children. Health Education, 113(5), 372-391.

7

Preventing childhood obesity and raising educational standards, particularly for disadvantaged children, have become an urgent public health and education challenge. It is not only an issue of health disparities, but also a social and educational issue. These factors create a vicious circle for overweight and obese children and adolescents, which can only be targeted by a more fundamental and integrated approach, focusing on the communities where children and young people live. To prevent obesity in children and young people, it is important to gain knowledge of these multilevel factors and to learn about relevant interventions that have proven to be effective.

Defining community-based initiatives

Community-based initiatives (CBIs) can be a powerful approach to combat childhood and adolescent obesity especially when combined with other setting-based approaches in the community. A CBI generally consists of a combination of strategies implemented at a local level that target the environment or the community’s capacity (instruments) or individuals directly (activities). CBIs are considered as good practice in obesity prevention policies, since obesity cannot be solved solely by an individual approach, but instead require a multi -sectoral response to create a healthy environment. This conceptualization of CBI is developed from the definition of WHO which states that ‘CBIs adopt a holistic approach to health paying equal significance to the physical, mental, social and spiritual well-being of individuals. CBI programmes represent integrated bottom up socioeconomic development models that rely on full community ownership and intersectoral collaboration’ 8 . The research in the HEPCOM project consists of three main activities:

  • 1. A needs analysis, focusing on what local communities need in relation to tools, methods and strategies in order t o work more strategically and systematically on promoting healthy eating and physical activity among children and young people. This resulted in an overview of the target groups’ knowledge, structural and networking needed to support them in their health promotion efforts around obesity. 45 local communities were identified within participating 15 EU member states, and at least 1/3 are defined as deprived areas. The identified local communities provided input to the research and will participate in carrying out the pilot projects using the HEPCOM online learning platform.

  • 2. A mapping exercise, which gathered good practice tools from completed and ongoing Public Health Programme and other European projects, working specifically with local communities and schools. The mapping exercise resulted in an overview of the patterns of success factors or barriers of interventions on community level. Relevant information was gathered about a) the strategic focus of the projects and the context in which they operate (social, cultural or political) b) the tools and methods they propose (strategic, planning or implementation level), c) the level of evidence, d) the evaluation methods and e) the quality assurance schemes.

  • 3. A GAP analysis reveal ed the differences between what i s identified as needed by those working in health promotion around obesity, and already existing resources and tools from Public Health Programmes and other European projects. That is, existing resources were identified that could be upscaled and implemented throughout Europe, and what areas have not yet been covered by completed and ongoing Public Health Programme and other European projects, and are therefore still missing.

8 (www.emro.who.int/cbi/cbi_introduction.htm).

8

Definition of tools and their usefulness for CBIs In the HEPCOM project, we define tools asg er T, Gesundheits p olitik. Eine s y stematische Einführung, 2. Aufl., Bern 2006 see http://pohefa.eu/Portals/27/The%20PoHeFa%20Method_final.pdf 9 " id="pdf-obj-8-2" src="pdf-obj-8-2.jpg">

Definition of tools and their usefulness for CBIs

In the HEPCOM project, we define tools as methods, guidelines, conceptual frameworks and templates that local communities apply in order to plan and structure their health promoting activities targeting children and young people. The general framework used in HEPCOM is the ‘health action cycle’. 9

.

The health action cycle proposes a continuous process of improvement for prevention measures and is associated with a more general management cycle. In the HEPCOM project, tools are categorized into five phases of the following management cycle:

  • 1 Policy development : t he decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programmes or procedures.

  • 2 Strategic planning: strategic planning is a well planned effort to produce fundamental decisions and actions that shape and guide what an organization is, what it does, and why it does it, with a focus on the future.

  • 3 Action planning: the development of an action plan which specifies the actions needed to address each of the above mentioned issues and to reach each of the associated goals, determine who will complete each action and according to which timeline.

  • 4 Implementation of interventions / health promoting activities: implementation involves all the steps needed to put prevention and health promotion interventions into place and make them available to the target group(s).

  • 5 Evaluation of interventions / health promoting activities: evaluation includes a set of tools that are used to measure the effectiveness of preventive or health promoting measures

This concrete operationalisation of the management cycle is taken from the PoHeFa project 10 . It is similar to the model of a process based quality management system but has an additional phase for action planning. The project management cycle for the HEPCOM project is described in Figure 1 below.

9 See National Academy of Science/Institute of Medicine, The Future of Public Health, Washington DC 1988 that is usable for many countries, see Rosenbrock R, Public Health als Soziale Innovation, Das Gesundheitswesen, Bd. 57, 3 (1995), S. 140-144; Rosenbrock R/Gerlinger T, Gesundheitspolitik. Eine systematische Einführung, 2. Aufl., Bern 2006 10 see http://pohefa.eu/Portals/27/The%20PoHeFa%20Method_final.pdf

9

Figure 1: Management cycle

source: PoHeFa project / ISO 9001:2008

Figure 1: Management cycle source: PoHeFa project / ISO 9001:2008 Methods The research in the HEPCOM

Methods

The research in the HEPCOM project consists of three main activities:

  • 1. A needs analysis, focusing on what local communities need in relation to tools,

methods and strategies in order to work more strategically and systematically on promoting healthy eating and physical activity among children and young people. This resulted in an overview of the target groups’ knowledge, structural and networking needed to support them in their health promotion efforts around obesity. 45 local communities were identified within participating 15 EU member states, and at least 1/3 are defined as deprived areas. The identified local communities provided input to the research and will participate in carrying out the pilot projects using the HEPCOM online learning platform.

  • 2. A mapping exercise, which gathered good practice tools from completed and

ongoing Public Health Programme and other European projects, working specifically with local communities and schools. The mapping exercise resulted in an overview of the patterns of success factors or barriers of interventions on community level. Relevant information was gathered about a) the strategic focus of the projects and the context in which they operate (social, cultural or political) b) the tools and methods they propose (strategic, planning or implementation level), c) the level of evidence, d) the evaluation methods and e) the quality assurance schemes.

  • 3. A GAP analysis revealed the differences between what is identified as needed by

those working in health promotion around obesity, and already existing resources and tools from Public Health Programmes and other European projects. That is, existing resources were identified that could be upscaled and implemented throughout Europe, and what areas have not yet been covered by completed and ongoing Public Health Programme and other European projects, and are therefore still missing.

HEPCOM will be carried out in 45 local communities in 15 European countries (see table

1).

10

Table 1: Countries and communities participating in the HEPCOM project with code numbers and typology Country

Table 1: Countries and communities participating in the HEPCOM project with code numbers and typology

Country

Community 1

Community 2

Community 3

Austria

1

Favoriten Vienna

2

Tulln

3

Brigittenau in Vienna

Belgium

4

Leopoldsburg

5

German speaking

6

Neerpelt

municipality

community of Belgium

municipality

(min of Health) Regional authority

Croatia

7

Hum Na Sutli

8

Babina Greda

9

Rab

district

Municipality (village)

Municipality (city)

Denmark

10

Copenhagen

11

Sønderborg

12

Vejle

France

13

Territoire Loire

14

Territoire Rhône

15

Territoire Allier

district

district

district

Finland

16

Kuopio, Kalevala

17

Kuopio, youth service

18

Kuopio, city council

school

   

city

city

city

Germany

19

Erkelenz

20

Hückelhoven

21

Übach-Palenberg

municipality

municipality

municipality

Greece

22

Filothei-Psychiko

23

Kaisariani

24

Daphni

municipality

municipality

municipality

Ireland

25

Galway city centre

26

Cork Healthy Cities

27

Galway Health

club, Gaelic Athletic

Forum

Services Executive (HSE)

Association

Health Promotion Unit

city

city

district

Italy

28

Southern Naples

29

Centre Naples

30

Rome

Local health unit

Local health unit

Local health unit

Lithuania

31

Kaunas district

32

Klaipeda city

33

Jurbarkas district

municipality (representatives from municipality, Educational centre and school)

municipality representatives from municipality, Public Health Bureau and school)

municipality (representatives from municipality, Youth council and school)

Netherlands

34

GGD Zuid Limburg

35

Gemeente Brunssum

36

BS Langeberg

region

municipality

School

Norway

37

Bergen

38

Lindaas

39

Hordaland

School (kindergarten)

District (schools)

District (public health

unit)

Portugal

40

Câmara Municipal de

41

Câmara Municipal de

42

Câmara Municipal de

Braga

Esposende

Seia

municipality

municipality

municipality

United Kingdom

43

Brighton & Hove City

44

Brighton & Hove

45

Brighton & Hove

Council

voluntary/community

Further Education

 

sector service providers

colleges 16-19 year olds

HEPCOM started with a needs analysis in order to get an overview of the needs among local communities and schools concerning interventions on reducing obesity among children and young people. The needs analysis interviews were carried out by HEPCOM partners from 15 countries in 45 local communities (of which at least 1/3 disadvantaged) in Europe (see table 1). An interview format was provided to the partners. Interviews (either individual of focusgroup interviews) were carried out on three levels:

policy/decision making, administrative level and practitioner level. Questions focused on: tools already applied in the communities, tools and support needed, how should the HEPCOM online learning platform look like, etc. This qualitative research is analysed and summarised in section 3.

For the mapping exercise an update was made of EU wide community-based initiatives to reduce childhood obesity, which provides tools and learning aspects from other projects. For the mapping exercise a format was developed, including information on the intervention, theme, target group, methods, evaluation and a descri ption of available and accessible tools (or deliverables) that have been developed in the project. In order to collect all relevant interventions databases (eg. EC, WHO) were screened as well as relevant stakeholders (EU networks etc.) and all HEPCOM partn ers were consulted. 31

11

projects have been described in this mapping exercise and were divided into three categories. The first category contains all inclusive holistic projects that describe how to carry out a community or school -based prevention process in a health action cycle orientated way.The second category includes projects, which do not use a management cycle for all phases but rather focus initially on the political level and give political guidelines, recommendations and goals. The third category includes projects that mainly offer implementation and evaluation tools. All important EU wide community-based interventions have been described in the formats (see appendix 1).

Finally a GAP analyis was carried out to demonstrate potential missing links. Results on the needs for tools and support were analysed combined with the results of the already existing tools in Europe (the outcomes of the mapping exercise). Subsequently we described where already existing tools from European projects can cover missing links and where gaps still exist which need to be completed with new tools.

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3 NEEDS ANALYSIS FOR TOOLS Description of needs analysis interview and description of methodology (typology of
  • 3 NEEDS ANALYSIS FOR TOOLS

Description of needs analysis interview and description of methodology (typology of stakeholders, choosing of interview partners and communities)

The aim of the HEPCOM needs analysis is to learn which tools for health promotion and obesity prevention are applied and which are needed in a sample of 45 selected communities. The needs analysis interviews were carried out in 15 European countries, in three communities per country. Stakeholders are different partners from communities working for different kinds of institutions ranging from local policy representatives to school teachers.

Interviewers were given written instructions on how to approach community partners and for the interview 11 . The needs analysis focuses on the tools local authorities/stakeholders use to plan, structure, implement and evaluate their health promoting activities on promoting healthy eating and physical activity targeting children and young people. A community representative could express needs for tools on the policy and decision making level, the administrative level and the practitioner’s level.

The interviewed community partners were from different levels in the local community, including the political -strategic, administrative and practitioner level. The respondents were divided into the three following groups:

  • 1. Policy makers and decision makers: p oliticians, managers and executive staff who have the responsibility to create visions, missions, overall policies and strategies for health promoting activities targeting children and young people.

  • 2. Administrative staff: Civil servants working in public administration, health services etc., who are planning the overall health promoting activities targeting children and young people in the local community and who also make sure that an overall evaluation of the activities is carried out.

  • 3. Practitioners: staff who are employed by organisations that target citizens in the community – e.g. schools, health promoting centers, sports clubs, kindergartens – who have the responsibility to implement the activities.

The interviews were carried out in focus groups or individually with stakeholders from the different levels. At least one interview was carried out in each of the three local HEPCOM communities in the 15 European countries.

3.1 What tools do local communities apply and need?

The 15 HEPCOM partners who are responsible for organizing pilot projects in their own country summarized the results of their needs analysis interviews in a template 12 . These summaries are used for the following descriptions. The HEPCOM partners were asked to give a summary of their impressions from the needs analysis interviews. The summaries highlight the most prevalent needs and common problems from the perspective of the interviewers.

11 see Appendix 3: Needs analysis interview template 12 see Appendix 3: Needs analysis interview template, part 4b

13

Needs and challenges

One of the most common problems for the communities is defining a common strategy with internal and external partners. A typical example of this is the city of Kuopio in Finland. A school in Kupio experiments with cooperation and developing multisectoral work between the education and other sectors. In these cases, a tool for creating a common goal and strategy would be helpful .

Another example is presented by the HEPCOM partner from Croatia. Their interviews show that local partners are involved in many individual health promoting initiatives which are performed by many different partners. By combining separate initiatives, learning from each other and filling in each other’s gaps, much efficiency can be gained and limited resources can be combined in order to make sustainable progress in health promotion. There is a strong need for an integral and multilevel approach, as well as for knowledge sharing concerning best practices.

Other important tools for communities are tools for needs analysi s, participation, empowerment and involving adolescents and parents in projects as well as tools for data collection in these target groups, models of good practice and for standardization and evaluation.

In some cases, there is a need for tools that help identifying financial resources. One example comes from the HEPCOM partner in Greece currently experiencing a difficult economical situation. In all three local communities in Greece, there seems to be a lack of resources and of educated staff to run health promotion programmes locally using sustainable and well -structured methods. The economic and social crisis in Greece offers a challenge. There seems to be a need for tools for the empowerment / persuasion of professionals in schools and in the community, who are struggling daily with the impact of the economic crisis.

Another need expressed by the HEPCOM partner from Italy is a tool that helps to create a more positive climate for health promotion. The Italian interviewers made clear that a supportive climate or context for health promotion in Italy is still missing, so that health promotion initiatives and actions are essentially addressed by the good will of peop le working on it. In Italy, the National Health Care System does not include a specific service for health promotion; therefore, most of the work in this area is not officially recognized and there are no specifically allocated resources (human or economic). This creates a difficult context for local health promotion and obesity prevention initiatives to address the high prevalence of childhood overweight/obesity and ultimately creates an obstacle to implement health promotion interventions. In some communities in Italy there is a need to develop strategies for health promotion targeted at the immigrant population with cultural adaptation concerning healthy eating and physical activity.

Facilitating factors

One facilitating factor for health promotion in the local community is a positive focus and

motivation of the staff. The HEPCOM partner from Norway describes some typical positive expectations from their local partner communities. They are all eager to take part in the HEPCOM project, in anticipating that the web based learning platform will become a good and important tool for health promotion in their communities.

Another facilitating factor for health promotion in the local community is the existence of a highly structured national resource for health promotion as illustrated by the HEPCOM partner from England. In England an extensive obesity prevention programme has been running for more than 10 years in various forms as governments have changed. However, the national policy commitment to addressing obesity has been strong and has led to the implementation of a national family-based programme and campaign on healthy eating, activity and healthy living, Change4Life, which has been running for 4 years. Other activities include:

14

• National Child Measurement Programme – BMI measured in schools since 2006 of • every child

National Child Measurement Programme – BMI measured in schools since 2006 of

every child aged 4-5 and 10-11 years old Public Health England Obesity Knowledge and Intelligence team – interactive data

sets /maps / profiles of local areas using data on children and adults Detailed guidance on ‘tackling obesity across the local community

Obesity Learning Centre platform hosted by the National Forum (formerly the National Heart forum), a non-governmental organization, with case studies, new reports, etc.

Services in England are organized through a ‘market place’ commissioning process: the council writes a specification for the service which is then ‘put out to tender’ –different organizations submit bids to deliver the service (competitive tendering) and the council chooses and then monitors delivery of the contract. Most services around promoting healthy eating are provided by the not-for-profit /voluntary sector. These experiences are relevant for the HEPCOM learning platform; it helps to have a clear brand and statement about how the HEPCOM pilot is organized and funded.

In addition to the 45 qualitative interviews of the needs analysis, the sample of answers was also analyzed for the frequency of tools mentioned. Tools that were categorized as either applied or needed by the community partners were listed. Most of these tools are needed by the community partners. The tools were then further categorized by dividing

these into the five phases of the management cycle (see Figure 1). These categories are not meant to be mutually exclusive in this classification of tools. It means that some tool s can be classified into more than one category, but they were put in the most comprehensive category for this analysis. Overall, it can be stated that a variety of tools are mentioned by the community partners who were interviewed. In total, 97 tools were identified: 13 were classified as policy and decision tools; 30 as strategic planning tools; 17 as action planning tools; 25 as implementation tools and 22 tools were classified as evaluation tools. The tools support the process of health promotion and obesity prevention interventions. This implies that ideally a health promotion measure:

  • - is based on national standards on the policy level ;

  • - monitors indicators strategically on the strategic planni ng level ;

  • - identifies a target-based risk group on the action planning level ;

  • - provides information to the target group based on the recommendations for healthy eating on the implementation level ;

  • - has a national evaluation standard on the evaluation level that can be used to assess and improve the success of the health promotion measure.

The table 2 below contains a list of the overall tools mentioned by the HEPCOM community partners, and listed following the five phases of the management cycle.

Table 2: List of tools mentioned by HEPCOM community partners

Policy and decision making tools

Legislation and regulations

National / regional programme, law, health profile or curriculum

Policy development

Concepts and strategies

Scientific health model

Local city corporate plan

WHO Healthy cities framework

Health marketing strategy

Addressing social health inequalities

Positive approach to health

Networks and cooperation

Engagement with commercial sector (e.g. catering, food manufacture) (PPS)

15

City steering group for health issues

Cooperation with local health network

Presence of official community representative for partnership building

Activities

Interventions tackling obesogenic environment

Facilities/data

National level information center

Strategic planning tools

Strategies/policies

Local or institutional food policy

Obesity tackling strategy

Networking

University cooperation or scientific advisory board

School network

Common goal and / or cooperation with external partners

Princ iples

Participation and empowerment

User friendliness and economy of tools

Cross-disciplinary

Resources

Providing resources (economical, staff, time, infrastructure)

Engagement of all professionals in institution (e.g. school)

Resource assessment (e.g. financial, staff)

Data

Local obesity or health indicators database and / or monitoring

National level guidance or information material

Local or target group needs analysis

Statistics and database (general)

Evidence base for long term effects of interventions

Evidence based / evaluated intervention or guideline

Community or school health profile

School data base (academic success, absenteeism, available physical activities)

Activities

Anti stigmatization tool

Informational material

Analysis of cultural eating habits

Focus group

Guidelines/tools

Model for planning evaluation of aims

Health assessment tool

Guideline comparison for Europe database

Project management

Health promotion quality assessment tool

Benchmarking tool value for money

Literature review

Action planning tools

Strategies

School strategy and / or programme and / or curriculum

City / community / region strategy / programme / plan

Structured multi year plan

Databases

16

Good practice examples or database Case study database Planning steps Data-based target group identification Detailed planning

Good practice examples or database

Case study database

Planning steps

Data-based target group identification

Detailed planning or checklist of steps for intervention

Networks

Networking

Establishing of partnerships and / or cooperations

Training

Confidentiality and sensitivity training for practitioners

Guidance for creation of own tools

Inter-institutional training

Materials

Kick off documents

Checklists

Worksheets

Templates for documentation and activities / protocols

Creativity tool for creating new actions

Implementation tools

Activities/Materials/Interventions

Workshops

Health day or excursion or activity in

Training for case managers

Non obesity specific mental health programme

Quizzes

Life expectancy calculator

Online guide for children / adolescents

Training material for teachers

Games

Interactive tools

Youtube video clips

Canteen pricing for steering food choices

Age group specific activities

Discount for physical activity resources

Previously applied activities

Guidelines/principles/goals

Recommendations for healthy eating and / or physical activity

Professional program / guidelines (e.g. inclusive parent training)

Health advocates or coordinators or multiplicators

Involvement of parents (e.g. Rotterdam parental contract)

Self-awareness promotion for children / adolescents

Integrating HEP into curricula (e.g. economics, geography)

Benchmark for practitioner`s level of training

Formative adaptability to suit local resources

Practical guidance / application

Sustainability measures

Evaluation tools

Standards and methods

National evaluation standards or health issues assessment

External evaluation

Pre-Post-Long Term evaluation

Self-evaluation

Local interventions evaluation framework

Evaluation of schools and / or school initiatives

17

Organizational learning / health action cycle

Participation in research study (e.g. HBSC)

Multi-informant perspective on health (e.g. well being school staff - children)

Medical checks (e.g., at school, from physicians etc.)

Physical activity tests

Mixed methods

Audit

Materials

Documentation

Questionnaire

Target population specific, low threshold tool

WHO Health economics assessment tool

Forum for sharing intervention experiences

Guidance on budget for evaluation and dissemination

Specific evaluation tools

Dissemination tools

The first outcome for the HEPCOM needs analysis is that overall, a large number and variety of tools are applied or needed in the partner communities. This result is similar across a variety of partners with different backgrounds, from their type of profession and their educational background.

The following description refers to frequencies with which tools were mentioned in the needs analysis interviews as applied or needed. A tool can be selected up to 132 times (=3 levels * 44 communities; because one community interview was not yet conducted when analyzing the data).

  • 13 tools were categorized as policy and decision making tools. The most

frequently mentioned tool is a ‘national /regional programme, law, health profile or curriculum’ tool (mentioned 34 times). The second most frequently mentioned tool is a ‘scientific health model’ and a ‘cooperation with local health network’ tool (mentioned 6 times each). The most frequently mentioned tool was still reported to be used by

relatively few community partners. This means that on average, the community tools on the policy level are not used frequently.

  • 30 tools were categorized as strategic planning tools. The most frequently

mentioned tool is a ‘local obesity or health indicators database and/or monitoring’ tool, referring to the actual collection of data in a community (refer red to16 times). The second most frequently mentioned tool is a ‘l ocal or target group needs analysis’ tool (11 times). The third most frequently mentioned tool for strategic planning is a ‘providing resources (economical, staff, time, infrastructure)’ tool. This means that the interview partners are able to provide resources for health promotion activities. Since the frequency at which the tools were reported as being utilized is rather small, even for the most frequently applied tools, tools on the strategic planning level are not very frequently used.

  • 17 tools were categorized as action planning tools. The two most frequently

mentioned tools are ‘school strategy and/or program and/or curri culum’ tools and ‘city/community/ region strategy/programme/plan’ tools (each mentioned 13 times). The second most frequently mentioned tool is ‘good practice examples or database’ tool (7 times). Again, the low frequency at which the tools were referred to indicates that these tools are not used frequently across the HEPCOM communities that were interviewed .

  • 25 tools were classified as implementation tools. Most frequently mentioned is a

‘professional programme / guidelines’ tool (mentioned 9 times). The tool that was second most frequently mentioned was ’recommendations for eating and / or physical activity’ tool ( 5 times). Again, the low frequency at which the tools were reported as being used

18

indicate that the implementation tools are not often used or viewed as being needed by the

indicate that the implementation tools are not often used or viewed as being needed by the community partners.

21 tools were categorized as evaluation tools. The most frequently named tools are ‘national evaluation standards or health issues assessment’ tools and ‘questionnaire’ tools (mentioned 7 times each). The next two most frequently mentioned tools are ’documentation’ and ’medical checks (e. g. at school, from physicians etc.)’ tools (4 times each). This indicates that tools for evaluation are not used frequently.

Another finding for the needs analysis refers to the evaluation tool ‘organizational learning / health action cycle’ that structures the process of organizational development in a problem solving framework. This tool was used by only 2 community partners. Another observation refers to the use of databases. The application of this tool is indicated by mentioning the strategic planning tool no. 1 (Local obesity or health indicators database and / or monitoring). Such a database can be used to report on indicators like the BMI in a local community. This implies that such measurements are taken. The use of this tool was only mentioned 16 times. These types of tool s seem to be very well suited for identifying target groups and the evaluation of interventions.

The main conclusion from the description of tools that are applied by community partners is that the tools are not used very often in the HEPCOM communities that take part in the project. The most frequently mentioned tool, ‘national / regional program, law, health profile or curriculum’, is only applied by a small number of communities. A local community that uses a tool for each phase of the management circle is rare.

Regarding the frequency of tools that were mentioned as needed, we find a similar picture as that of the applied tools.

The tools reported as most frequently needed are ‘specific evaluation tools’ (mentioned 18 times).

The second most frequently needed tool s are the ‘g ood practice examples or database’ tools.

The third most frequently needed tools are ‘providing resources – economical, staff, time, infrastructure)’ as wel l as a ‘common goal with internal or external partners’ tools (both from the category strategic planning and referred to 11 times each).

The ‘d etailed planning or checklist of steps for intervention’ tool was mentioned 11 times for the category action planning. Also, there i s a relatively high need for a ‘national / regional program / law / health profile or curriculum’ tool (mentioned 9 times); it is the fourth most frequently needed tool.

In conclusion, in general, the HEPCOM community partners express needs for tools in health promotion and obesity prevention among children and young people in a rather low frequency and with typical specific problems from the local communities (e.g., financial needs, cultural needs, balance between autonomy and regulation etc.) . They also reported needing a large variety of tools. It is also true for tools that are already applied on community level by the interviewed partners. First of all, this indicates that there is a great vari ation between communities. At the same time, most communities are prepared to use preventive measures following a systematic public health management cycle approach.

19

3.2 Recommendations from local communities to the learning platform

Summarizing the recommendations made by the HEPCOM community partners concerning the platform, two types can be distinguished: more general and more specific content-related recommendations.

A general recommendation refers to the HEPCOM learning platform having an appealing lay-out. It should also spell out why it makes sense for the user to go on line and use the platform. The term ‘obesity’ should not be overly mentioned, because it focuses on the ill-health spectrum too much and embodies a pathogenetic perspective.

The HEPCOM platform website should also be transparent relating to different and changing values and norms concerning obesity and prevention of obesity which underlies all information on the website of the platform. Further, it should contain tools for evaluation. Other more general recommendations focus on the presentation of information on the platform. Information should be easil y accessi ble and easy to read, brief and concise. There should be a database with local, national and international references (‘knowledge data base’). It should also have a ‘news section’ with a synthesis of news and an e-mail alert service, as well as a ‘question and answering system’. The platform should integrate a section for each of the participating countries an d this part should be in the country language. This section should also contain documents of relevant national legislation and poli cy, and programmes, etc., available in the country languages. The platform should also include a search function with key-words that are recognizable for different countries. It should also be possible to print out presented tools and the background documents.

More content-related recommendations refer to the need for a section on ‘models of good practice’. This should not onl y present models from western European countries but also from mid- and eastern European countries. Sometimes differences between the different regions in Europe are too great to enable learning from each other. The models should be presented in a way that is easy to read and should contain ready-to-use material s (e.g. integrating audio, video etc. material). There should also be information on evaluation and cost-benefit analyses, etc., of these models of good practice.

The HEPCOM platform website should also include a section for tools on how to carry out health promotion and obesity prevention initiatives at a community level related to a project management action cycle. Tools are mentioned for different target groups at community level. For example, evaluation and participation tools should be age-adjusted for children and adolescents. The presentation of the tools should be brief, concise and easy accessi ble and usable (‘user-friendly’). This also means that they should be easily transferable to the local situation of the communities in the different participating countries (e.g., ‘how to create a questionnaire’; ‘easy-to-use approaches). This relates to recommendations for a section with methodological guidelines and/or tools involving new research approaches, links to publications, projects etc. In this case, it might be useful to create different sections and entry points for different partners in the different communities.

It is also recommended to support networking through the platform website. To create a ‘community of practice’ there should be a kind of ‘virtual forum’ where exchange of experiences and discussion with partners is possible. Links to social networks should also be integrated. The partners’ website address or email contact should be accessible on the platform website.

20

Finally, the platform should have a training section giving partners access to, e.g., e- learning modules

Finally, the platform should have a training section giving partners access to, e.g., e- learning modules to develop their competences in obesity prevention of children and young people at community level.

To summarize the community partners’ wishes, their general recommendation was for an easy-to-use learning platform with a knowledge data base; this indicates that partners have an interest in actively adapting good practices to address their local community needs. They are also interested in networking possibilities.

3.3 Conclusion

The analyses of applied and needed tools on health promotion and obesity prevention among children and young people in communities at the community level revealed that the most needed tools. These are:

  • 1. Specific evaluation tools: Tools that are tailored to the particular needs of a specific community;

  • 2. A good practice database: Models of good practice which show evidence of being practice-based;

  • 3. Providing resources (financial, time, staff): Tools that help plan, identify and encourage support;

  • 4. Common goals with partners: Tools that help create a shared vision and general aims in a consortium of different partners at the community level ;

  • 5. Detailed planning or checklist of steps for intervention: Tools for project management;

  • 6. Cross-regional conceptual frameworks at political level: Tools to create a public management framework relating to health promotion and prevention of obesity;

  • 7. Active involvement of parents, children and adolescents: Tools for initiating a participatory approach in health promotion and prevention of obesity.

The community partners also expressed needs for a question and answer system and a large database for models of g ood practice. Community partners also expressed a wish for tools in the community’s native language, tools targeted for the eastern European participating countries and tools for different target groups at the community level, such as participation tools; this underpins the need for a ‘virtual forum’ with the opportunity to exchange experiences and discussion.

It is not feasible to cluster countries or communities further into groups with reference to their need for specific tools. Instead , communities seem to apply and need a wide variety of tools. The needs for specific tools are diverse, while simultaneously, specific needs are limited and often distinctive to a particular community. Since the specific situation of the community and country determines what is needed, it is recommended that the HEPCOM l earning platform focuses on tools explaining the ‘how’ of prevention and health promotion as opposed to tools explaining what to do.

21

  • 4 MAPPING EXERCISE: DESCRIPTION OF TOOLS FOR HEALTH PROMOTION AND PREVENTION OF OVERWEIGHT

The mapping exercise documents in Appendix 1 contain information on the tools of current and completed EU financed projects. They are categorised and rated in terms of the 5 phases of the health action cycle or management cycle; that is, if they offer any tool s in one of the 5 tools classification phases of the health action cycle or management cycle. An overview on the mapped projects can be found below in the Summary of identified tools in mapped projects.

22

4.1 Summary of identified tools in mapped projects Table 2: Main focus of identified tools Poli-http://www.shapeupeurope. net School and community level based all inclusive X X X X X X Database: Some X ca; some tools in case studies included en · de · es · fr · it · prevention tool more languages Young Minds Website Database: case defunct stories for 2 Young www.euro.who.int/ data/a School level based X X X X X X X implementing the en Minds __ ssets/pdf_file/0016/111355/ prevention Young Minds E85627.pdf approach in schools en and some of them 3 Healthy Region www.healthyregions.eu Toolbox for regional level strategic decision makers implementing health strategies X X X Database with good practice examples are translated into the languages of the participating partners 4 PoHeFa www.pohefa.eu Policy, health and family X X X X en, de, dk, fin, it learning The website and the Underpriviledged community material is mainly in Healthy 5 Children www.healthy-childen.eu approach for families; community health ambassador training X X X X en, but material is translated into dan, it, es, Croatian and Norwegian. General and school based 6 HEPS www.hepseurope.eu instruments to advocate for, assess and develop programmes for healthy eating and physical activity X X X X X X Database: some case studies; HEPS quality X checklist was de, en, fr, gr, nl, pl, rus, (including general guidelines and teacher training module) adapted by EU prevent for communal settings 7 Boys and Girls www.boysandgirlslabs.eu Information on healthy X en, da, nl, de, it, pl lifestyle for 15-18 years and es 23 " id="pdf-obj-22-2" src="pdf-obj-22-2.jpg">

4.1 Summary of identified tools in mapped projects

Table 2: Main focus of identified tools

       

Poli-

Stra-

 

Im-

 

Ma-

     

cy

te-

Ac-

tion

ple-

Eva-

na-

Data

No.

Project

 

Website

Characterization of tools

and

deci-

gic

plan-

plan-

ning

men-

ta-

lua-

tion

ge-

ment

base

Remark

Languages

 

sion

ning

tion

cycle

 
  • 1 SHAPE UP

 

net

 

School and community level

based all inclusive

X

 
  • X X

X

X

 

X

 

Database: Some

  • X ca; some tools in

case studies included

en · de · es · fr · it ·

 

prevention tool

more languages

     

Young Minds Website

                 

Database: case

 

defunct

stories for

  • 2 Young

School level based

X

  • X X

X

X

X

  • X implementing the

en

Minds

__

prevention

Young Minds

 

approach in schools

                       

en and some of them

  • 3 Healthy

Region

   

Toolbox for regional level

strategic decision makers

implementing health

strategies

X

  • X X

Database with good

practice examples

are translated into

the languages of the

participating

partners

 
  • 4 PoHeFa

   

Policy, health and family

X

 
  • X X

X

       

en, de, dk, fin, it

learning

                       

The website and the

Underpriviledged community

material is mainly in

Healthy

  • 5 Children

   

approach for families;

community health

ambassador training

X

  • X X

X

en, but material is

translated into dan,

it, es, Croatian and

 

Norwegian.

     

General and school based

                 
  • 6 HEPS

   

instruments to advocate for,

assess and develop

programmes for healthy

eating and physical activity

X

  • X X

X

X

X

Database: some

case studies;

HEPS quality

  • X checklist was

de, en, fr, gr, nl, pl,

rus,

 

(including general guidelines

and teacher training

module)

adapted by EU

prevent for

communal settings

 
  • 7 Boys and

Girls

   

Information on healthy

     

X

       

en, da, nl, de, it, pl

lifestyle for 15-18 years

and es

23

Bulgarian, es, Catalan, Czech, Serbian, en, Albanian, it, Information on healthy Macedonian, 8 Active www.myfriendboo.com lifestyle
Bulgarian, es, Catalan,
Czech, Serbian, en,
Albanian, it,
Information on healthy
Macedonian,
8
Active
www.myfriendboo.com
lifestyle for children 5-8
X
nl/Flemish, pl, ro,
years
Slovak, Ukrainian,
Valencian, Vietnamese
and fr
Information material
for parents and
www.idefics.eu
Life-style change for
da, en, Estonian, de,
9
IDEFICS
X
kindergarden and
www.ideficsstudy.eu/
children
Greek, it, es, sv
primary school
teachers
Life-style change in families,
10
I.Family
www.ifamilystudy.eu
(X)
en
tools not available yet
nl, da, en, de, Greek,
www.projectenergy.eu/flash.
Energy balance
11
Energy
X
Norwegian, hu,
html
measurement for children
Slovene, es
The project focuses on adults.
It is included since the project
www.spotlightproject.eu/
will yield integrated
Information not
12
Spotlight
www.vu.nl/nl/index.asp
implementation approaches.
available
The developed instruments
are not yet available.
Overall process tool for
www.epode-european-
13
Epode
prevention of childhood
X
X X
X X
en
network.com/
obesity
Gradient Evaluation
Framework web-based tool for
www.gradient-
policy makers to evaluate the
X
X
en
evaluation.eu/
impact of policy action on the
health gradient
14
GRADIENT
Information on Gradient
Evaluation Framework for
policy makers
en, other information
health-gradient.eu/other-
X
was not available on
research/gradient/
the website
The Right Start to a Healthy
Life handbook contains
information for policy makers

24

eurohealthnet.eu/research/d 15 Drivers X X Case study database The website is in en rivers Community-based and
eurohealthnet.eu/research/d 15 Drivers X X Case study database The website is in en rivers Community-based and
eurohealthnet.eu/research/d
15
Drivers
X
X
Case study database
The website is in en
rivers
Community-based and
16
HCSC
www.hcsc.eu
school-based physical
X
The website is in en
activity intervention
Information on Gradient
Evaluation Framework for
Password is needed
www.equitychannel.net/tool
policy makers to evaluate the
X
for access to GEF
En
s#part-1
tool
impact of policy action on the
Equity
17
health gradient
Channel
www.equitychannel.net/get-
involved
Community
En
community.equitychannel.net/
Overall process tool for
18
IMAGE
www.image-project.eu
X
X
X
X
X
En
prevention of diabetes
type 2
The project website is
Usability of tools
19
TEENAGE
Policy recommendations
X
En
defunct.
doubtful
The majority of the
information is in en,
but there is also
Information on health
www.health-inequalities.eu/
information in other
inequalities
languages (policies,
national projects
European
etc…).
Portal for
www.health-
action in
inequalities.eu/HEALTHEQUI
20
Policy database
X
X
Health
TY/EN/policies/policy_datab
Inequa-
ase/
lities
www.health-
Good practice database,
inequalities.eu/HEALTHEQUI
contains search function for
X
TY/EN/projects/good_practic
obesity prevention
e_database/
www.health-
inequalities.eu/HEALTHEQUI
Toolkits
TY/EN/tools/toolkits/
Equity
en
21
Action
Policy recommendations and
22
IMPALA
www.impala-eu.org
best practice for physical
X
X
Czech, fr, de, pt
activity infrastructures.

25

 

Healthy

  • 23 Eco Life

The project website is

defunct.

Description of national and

             

Best practice

compendium

 

international best practice

projects

X

en, cr

   

The project website is

                   

defunct.

See instead

Information material for

PERI-

  • 24 SCOPE

kindergardens containing

information for children.

X

en, da, pl

41

     

Policy recommendations and

                 
  • 25 EATWELL

www.eatwellproject.eu

policy evaluation; cost

X

X

da, nl, en, fr, it, pl

effective analysis

     

Health indicators database

                 
  • 26 RICHIE

Scientific literature search

for health indicators

X

(X)

Database for

identifying indicators

en and additional

European languages

                     

Database: Good

 
  • 27 MOVE

Information on community

based enhancement of

physical activity

X

(X)

practice examples

for enhancing

physical activity

en (links to local

projects in Europe)

                       

Tips for children and parents

  • 28 INFORM

(nutritional guidance, active

families)

X

de, it

     

International fitness scale

                 
  • 29 HELENA

for evaluation purposes

X

en

     

Scientific information on

                 
  • 30 HabEat

http://www.habeat.eu/

learning eating habits in

children

X

da, nl, en, fr, Greek,

pt

     

Project is indirectly suitable

               

de, es, da, Latvian

and en

  • 31 Garden Project

for awareness-raising for

healthy eating and for

X

HEPCOM

 

26

4.2 Usability of the identified tools from all mapped projects for the communities’ needs and the

4.2 Usability of the identified tools from all mapped projects for the communities’ needs and the HEPCOM learning platform

The mapping exercise allowed the projects to be divided into three categories. The first category contains all inclusive holistic projects that describe how to carry out a community or school -based prevention process in a health action cycle orientated way. Projects belonging to this category are more recent projects, including SHAPE UP, Young Minds, PoHeFa, Healthy Children, HEPS, IMAGE and EPODE. The second category includes projects like Healthy Regions, HEPS, Drivers, GRADIENT, IMPALA and EATWELL, which do not use a management cycle for all phases but rather focus initially on the political level and give political guidelines, recommendations and goals. The third category includes projects that mainly offer implementation and evaluation tools. According to the scheme of needed tools introduced above, these projects can be allocated to the main analysis of identified needs as follows:

  • 1. Specific evaluation tools: The most gaps exist in this area. SHAPE UP and the PoHeFa project are tools for general information on designing self-evaluation and give concrete examples. Various documents, questionnaires and tools are available for sp ecific evaluation purposes across the mapped projects and will have to be judged by users of the learning platform for specific content and usefulness.

  • 2. A good practice database: This tool exists in the form of case study descriptions in different projects, for example in the HEPS project. With its collection of projects up to 2013, the Healthy Eco Life project gives an overview on good practice projects. The Equity channel project refers to health inequalities and has a good practice database in English with a project description for healthy eating and physical activity. Still, this project includes very limited information on obesity prevention.

  • 3. A gap exists in a more practice-oriented, systematized tool that collects such good practices from different ki nds of practiti oners like teachers and nurses, e.g., for single case interventions with obese children. Since a database such as the one described above does not seem to exist on a European level, this can be identified as a gap that needs to be filled with a high priority, using the information that can be retrieved from the Equity channel project.

  • 4. Planning of providing resources: IMAGE

  • 5. Common goals with partners: SHAPE UP, HEPS

  • 6. Detailed planning or checklist of steps for intervention: SHAPE UP, IMAGE, HEPS

  • 7. Trans- regional (or generic) conceptual frameworks on the political level: Healthy cities (WHO)

  • 8. Active involvement from parents and children and adolescents: SHAPE UP

This means it might be useful to structure the learning process on the HEPCOM learning platform in two phases: introduction to IMAGE, SHAPE UP and HEPS as best practice models and then searching for specific tools according to the community partners individual needs. In relation to a conceptual background such as from IMAGE, SHAPE UP and HEPS, community partners implementing a CBI should ask themselves:

  • 1. What are the national / cross- regional levels’ frameworks and what are the goals of communities and their partners?

27

2.

How can resources be assigned (staff, infrastructure and time) and how can the target population data be collected and monitored on a repeated basis?

  • 3. Where is the best practice information to be found and what action will be taken? How can our own best practice be documented?

  • 4. How will the action be implemented?

  • 5. What special evaluation tools do we need?

A website structure that links the identified projects to these questions might be helpful for identifying the relevant tools for a specific community. For example , the HEPS project is a holistic, i.e., a multi-level and multi -target group orientated programme. One focus of HEPS is on schools, but other levels like political planning are also considered, e.g. , within the HEPS advocacy guide. The tools for schools have an overweight -tackling strategy on an organisational development approach for schools. It is based on a management cycle / health action cycle for organisational overweight -prevention measures. Three case studies show how HEPS was implemented in schools. Still, HEPS is missing a database. To conduct an evaluation with actual BMI data, a user would have to further search the HEPCOM website. This is also true for specific approaches for the involvement of parents. Specific documentation templates are also available.

The informational material ‘HEPS guidelines’ exists in different languages for teachers. It contains a set of principles on healthy eating and physical activity and is intended to support organizations working at the national or regional level. The HEPS advocacy guide supports experts and organisations to advocate for national school policy to promot e healthy eating and physical activity.

The HEPS quality checklist can be used for strategic planning, implementing and evaluating of any measures for overweight prevention in schools. It can help assess the quality of school -based programmes in this specific field. Furthermore, the HEPS quality checklist has been adapted to the specific needs and requirements of communities and can be accessed on the webpage of EUprevent, a cross-border health promotion project within the Euregio Maas -Rhine region (www.euprevent.eu). HEPS does not contain specific tools for the impact evaluation. A tool to assess available resources (financial, time and staff) is also missing. The HEPS inventory tool can be used as an inspiration for setting up an inventory with good practice examples and intervention programmes. Schools can find useful hints on making an inventory of national or regional programmes within the HEPS inventory tool.

28

5 GAP ANALYSIS AND CONSEQUENCES FOR THE HEPCOM LEARNING PLATFORM In the above example, we find
  • 5 GAP ANALYSIS AND CONSEQUENCES FOR THE HEPCOM LEARNING PLATFORM

In the above example, we find typical gaps that were already mentioned as needs by the community partners. However, HEPS might be only partially useful for a community that wants to allocate resources, involve parents and evaluate the effects of a social marketing campaign in terms of BMI change.

Following a comparison of the need for tools with already existing tools in completed and current EU-funded projects, gaps between the two were identified. The gap analysis l ed to the conclusion that specialized, flexible, easy-to-make and easy-to-use evaluation tools are missing. Another gap is the need for these tools in the 13 EU languages that are used in the HEPCOM project. For the HEPCOM learning platform, this means that a selection of links to national projects will be needed. The HEPCOM learning platform can support the local communities, especially by providing a link to a general cross regional / national framework that collects regional / national goals, and allows an integration of the community approach into the national framework. This might not be relevant for all HEPCOM communities, but it should be made explicit that the possibility of connecting with such a framework can be helpful for local communities.

Since a main focus of the identified tools is on the English language, in relation to partners needs it seems important for the HEPCOM learning platform to link to the national projects that are named in the report by Bemelmans et al, (2011 13 ). For example, they name the EPODE project in France. These authors recommend one ‘uses thi s report as a practical toolkit’ (p. 50). They answer important questions, e.g., regarding the structure of implementing a CBI or an evaluation that the HEPCOM community partners might also have.

HEPCOM community partners should compare their own approach with SHAPE UP, IMAGE and HEPS. These are all-inclusive approaches to healthy communities and search the HEPCOM learning platform for tools that might fit their individual needs.

The description of the local communities’ needs for tools compared to already available tools indicates two main problems that limit the usability of those tools that are available: one problem results from the specific needs of the communities. They ask for tools in their own language or for specific tools for the evaluation of their particular projects, etc. Another problem of applicability follows from tools that are more general , project tools that often have detailed instructions, examples and recommendations as strict guidelines. On a daily basi s, at community level , the implementation fidelity of these kinds of projects cannot always be guaranteed. It can happen that neither the specific nor general tools that are available fit the needs of the projects that operate in a specific setting, in a particular community. This can be considered to be a gap that has to be filled by enabling communities to develop new and innovative tools.

This means that optimally the learning platform should have a function for users to devel op their own projects; such a function would need to be made from templates and a single case database that contains more specific information than the good practice database of the Equity channel project’s good practice database .

The templates should document the management cycle. On the level of policy and decision-making tools, a recommendation should be made for working on common goals with partners. On the level of strategic planning and action -planning tools, an easil y usable, accessible, interactive multi -language forum is missing. This is a gap the HEPCOM learning platform could address. On the level of implementation tools, there are

13 http://ec.europa.eu/health/nutrition_physical_activity/docs/report_cbis_childhood_obesity_en.pdf

29

informational material s to be chosen from and referred to, sometimes in the form of a video or web-video for children and adolescents.

To test the predictions of the provided needs analysis, one single interview, namely the interview of the Velje community, was inspected for need ed tools and gaps in relation to existing projects. This interview could not be included in the previous descriptions.

The community Velje in Denmark has a regional health profile. The community intends to support schools as part of their community pilot project. The tools they use are an IT- based system and a scientific health model as well as different collaborations with external partners. They need:

  • - Tools for planning and implementing interventions;

  • - Tools that emphasise the interdisciplinary dimension;

  • - Evaluation tools;

  • - Tools for systemising knowledge;

  • - Tools for involving students.

These needs can be partly satisfied by using the HEPS tools, but it is doubtful whether evaluation needs of this community can be supported by the HEPS tools. Although this is just one single case with a rather highly structured national context, it is consistent with the typical needs described in the needs analysis for the other 44 communities. The above suggested principles of initially recommending all comprehensive approaches like HEPS to community partners and then looking for more specific tools, might work well with this community. In a second step, the community of Velje would look for more specific tools for the community’s special evaluation needs.

To conclude, it seems very helpful and supportive for community practice of obesity prevention and health promotion of children and young adults to develop a website based meta-tool. This meta-tool would guide the activities of community partners in a systematic way and provide them with relevant tools for action in the different phases of project-management. Also, it seems useful to connect the HEPCOM website explicitly with an empowerment strategy and to offer self-help. One possible example is the development of low-threshold evaluation tools. Partners might profit more from a project when they learn to u se basic evaluation techniques for creating an appropriate tool for their situation.

The development of virtual web-based workshops, where the community partners meet with partners from other communities that work on similar prevention and health promotion strategies and share their experiences with applying tools, could be very helpful. All in all, the two most important existing gaps seem to be a useful multimedia tool with a forum and a database for health promotion and obesity prevention best practices in the country languages that contains easily accessible material as well as a guideline for producing specific evaluation tools.

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6 APPENDIX 1: MAPPING OF EUROPEAN LEVEL PROJECTS 6.1 SHAPE UP Question Description Title of EU
  • 6 APPENDIX 1: MAPPING OF EUROPEAN LEVEL PROJECTS

6.1

SHAPE UP

Question

Description

Title of EU Project

SHAPE UP: Towards a European school network to impact the determinants of child obesity at the community level

Main and

The fundamental premise of Shape Up was that promoting good habits

specific

for a healthier life among adolescents requires new messages to

objective(s) of

convey a broader vision of sound nutrition and regular physical

the project

exercise.

Shape Up aims to:

  • - Bring together the principle of health education, prevention and promotion in an integrated programme,

  • - Promote health and wellbeing;

  • - Tackle social and environmental health determinants;

  • - Involve schools and local communities in constructive dialogue and action planning concerning health education and promotion;

  • - Enhance children’s and young people’s competences to carry out health promoting action and bring about positive changes;

  • - Undertake health-promoting action at the local level, initiated through schools by children and adolescents, in collaboration with local stakeholders.

  • - Empower a European network of schools and local actors in all the Member States.

Theoretical

The fundamental premise of Shape Up was that healthier eating and

background of

regular physical activity are keys to prevent childhood obesity and

the project

promote health and wellbeing of children and young people. However, healthy diet and physical activity are influenced in more efficient and sustainable ways by addressing their determinants on school, family, community and broader societal level, rather than solely on an individual behaviour level. In addition to a holistic and broad concept of health, encompassing lifestyle and living conditions, the main characteristics of SU methodological approach include:

31

 
  • - Genuine participation by children and young people (ownership)

  • - The IVAC (investigation-vision-action-change) pedagogical approach

  • - School -community collaboration

 
  • - Cross-cultural collaboration

IVAC: Investigating (I) deals with pupils’ common perceptions of health problems. Pupils must be actively involved in choosing the health topic and they need to explore the reasons why this issue is important to them. Vision (V) deals with the development of creative ideas, perceptions and scenarios about their future life and the society in which they are growing up. In the action and change (A+C) pupils build possible actions connected to the implementation of some of the visions that have been created.

Target groups

Children and young people aged 4 to 16 years

Immediate

-

Short

term

-

Long

term

What is the theme of the project

Healthy habits promotion and competence-development

 

Shape

Up

is

based

on

an

implementation framework that

Activities in the project and methodology

complements and reinforces existing health education and health promotion policies. In each city, SU counts on a local coordinator (LC - in charge of activating community links) and a local facilitator (LF- in charge of training in and with schools). A local promoting group (city officials, facilitators and other stakeholders) coordinates in every city the interaction between all stakeholders. Shape Up activists (students and teachers) lead the participatory process in schools and at the city’s level and guarantee a maximum impact in the whole population.

Shape Up’s methodology is built on the research and experience obtained through the European Network of Health Promoting Schools.

This methodology creates conditions under which practitioners working with children can develop and test “theories of practice”.

The relevance of the methodology:

 

32

- Treats children as legi timate partners involving adult stakeholders as essential and necessary participants. -General information: A booklet to implement the Shape Up accessible tools project (or deli verables) that have been developed in the project This document has been created to present the Shape Up project to local authorities and communities and to provide an overall view of all the aspects of the project, including the methodology, organisation, role of each partner, local activities, and the local and European framework to be used with the project. Available in: en · de · es · fr · it · ca http://www.shapeupeurope.net/files/media/media32.pdf METHODS AND RESOURCES Methodological Guidebook The aim of the guidebook is to describe and discuss the main concepts, ideas and values underpinning the Shape Up approach to influencing the determinants of childhood obesity and to provide practical support, guidance and inspiration to the teachers, local facilitators, local coordinators, and all other participants in Shape Up. Also available in: et · de · cs · da · el · es · fr · it · hu · mt · nl · pl · pt · fi · sv · ca http://www.shapeupeurope.net/index.php?page=project_materials&pr oject_theme=23 TRAINING TOOLS http://www.shapeupeurope.net/index.php?page=project_materials&pr oject_theme=24 eTraining strategy tool The purpose of the Shape Up eTraining tool is to transfer the Shape Up Project and to help you to apply and test its materials by yourself with friends, colleagues and - at the bottom line - with children and young people in school and community settings. Please activate the 33 " id="pdf-obj-32-2" src="pdf-obj-32-2.jpg">
 
  • - Treats children as legi timate partners involving adult stakeholders as essential and necessary participants.

  • - Allows greater cultural and socio-economic sensiti vity.

Participatory scheme: IVAC (Investigation-Vision-Action-Change).

According to this scheme, all activities will be focused on developing ways of supporting, facilitating and guiding children in investigating the issues related to eating and movement from a number of different perspectives, develop visions and dreams about possible and plan and take action to bring about.

Description of

PROJECT PRESENTATION

 

available and

accessible tools

(or deli verables) that have been developed in the project

This document has been created to present the Shape Up project to local authorities and communities and to provide an overall view of all the aspects of the project, including the methodology, organisation, role of each partner, local activities, and the local and European framework to be used with the project.

Available in:

en ·de · es · fr · it · ca

 

METHODS AND RESOURCES

 

The aim of the guidebook is to describe and discuss the main

concepts, ideas and values underpinning the Shape Up approach to influencing the determinants of childhood obesity and to provide practical support, guidance and inspiration to the teachers, local facilitators, local coordinators, and all other participants in Shape Up.

Also available in:

et · de · cs · da · el

· es · fr · it · hu · mt

· nl

· pl

· pt ·

fi

· sv · ca

TRAINING TOOLS

 

The purpose of the Shape Up eTraining tool is to transfer the Shape Up Project and to help you to apply and test its materials by yourself with friends, colleagues and - at the bottom line - with children and

young people in school and community settings. Please activate the

33

 

PowerPoint presentation mode in order to have access to all the links provided in this eTraining strategy tool.

Available in English

The Investigation-Vision-Action-Change (IVAC) model provides a framework for the development of health promotion strategies that ensure that the insights and knowledge built up by pupils during the project are action-orientated and interdisciplinary and, therefore,

conducive to the development of action competence ... Also available in:

et · de · cs · el · es · fr · it · lv · hu · mt · fi · ca

Shape Up Europe Global Project Timeline

Also available in:

et · de · cs · el · es · fr · it · lv · hu · mt · fi · ca

The purpose of this Shape Up phase is to establish a dialogue about Shape Up´s overall topic: eating and body movement in relation to health and wellbeing.

Available in English

All these tools are available in English Can 'Shape Up' pupils - guided by teachers and other Shape Up adults - bring about changes in health-related living conditions? What do pupils learn by initiating these kinds of changes?

Roger Hart developed a model, the Ladder of participation, w hich

contains eight steps, each step representing increasing degrees of pupil participation and different forms of cooperation with adults.

In the Investigation phase, the topics and issues selected in the previous phase are investigated in depth. Pupils should, with the help of the teacher, come up with ideas as to what they want to do and

how (i.e. methods of investigation).

A tip for involving parents and others.

The Vision phase that follows the Investigation phase aims to develop alternative solutions to the problems selected and investigated.

Documenting and evaluating neighborhood living.

An essential part of the Shape Up strategy is the creation of

34

opportunities for contact and communication between the children and adolescents involved in the project and theTools: Tips on listening This skill is essential for both local coordinators and facilitators ... Tools: Process planning session for the Shape Up promoting group (SUPG) Process planning allows people to work together to determine the most suitable public participation process for their particular situation. It is particularly useful to hold sessions at an early stage in any community planning initiative and then again at periodic intervals ... Tools: Local investigation / community profiling Community profiling involves building up a picture of the nature, needs and resources of a community with the active participation of that community. It is a useful first-stage in any community planning process to establish a context upon which there is broad consensus ... Tools: How to build a collaborative Shape Up promoting group (SUPG) Choosing the team members, building the team and creating a collaborative community process. Tools: How to create an initial strategic plan - Briefing workshop One of the first steps for the promoting group is to define a preliminary strategic plan for the Shape Up project ... Tools: Brainstorming Brainstorming can be an effective way of generating plenty of ideas on a specific issue and then determining which idea, or group of ideas, constitutes the best solution ... Tools: Glossary Some activities for community participation process Also available in: et · de · cs · el · es · fr · it · lv · hu · mt · fi · ca Evaluation output analysis Lessons learnt “Shape Up: a School Community Approach to Influencing the Determinants of Childhood Overweight and Obesity, Lessons Lea rnt” is a report written by the Danish School of Education (researchers Assoc Prof. Venka Simovska and Prof Bjarne Bruun Jensen).The purpose of this report is to provide a synthesis of the project overall evaluation documentation, with a view to systematically reviewing and discussing the lessons learnt, and to suggest recommendations concerning future practice and policy in the area of preventing childhood overweight and obesity. Available in En g lish http://www.shapeupeurope.net/index.php?page=project_materials&pr oject_theme=35 35 " id="pdf-obj-34-2" src="pdf-obj-34-2.jpg">
 

opportunities for contact and communication between the children and adolescents involved in the project and the universe of human resources available locally and beyond ...

This skill is essential for both local coordinators and facilitators ...

Process planning allows people to work together to determine the most suitable public participation process for their particular situation. It is particularly useful to hold sessions at an early stage in any community planning initiative and then again at periodic intervals ...

Community profiling involves building up a picture of the nature, needs and resources of a community with the active participation of that community. It is a useful first-stage in any community planning process to establish a context upon which there is broad consensus ...

Choosing the team members, building the team and creating a collaborative community process.

One of the first steps for the promoting group is to define a

preliminary strategic plan for the Shape Up project ...

Brainstorming can be an effective way of generating plenty of ideas on a specific issue and then determining which idea, or group of ideas, constitutes the best solution ...

Some activities for community participation process

Also available in:

et · de · cs · el · es · fr · it · lv · hu · mt · fi · ca Evaluation output analysis

“Shape Up: a School Community Approach to Influencing the Determinants of Childhood Overweight and Obesity, Lessons Lea rnt” is a report written by the Danish School of Education (researchers Assoc Prof. Venka Simovska and Prof Bjarne Bruun Jensen).The purpose of this report is to provide a synthesis of the project overall evaluation documentation, with a view to systematically reviewing and discussing the lessons learnt, and to suggest recommendations concerning future practice and policy in the area of preventing childhood overweight and obesity.

Available in English

35

 

Evaluation tools

 

Local Evaluation Kit Baseline survey & Guidance

This toolkit has been produced to assist local coordinators and other local actors in building portfolios for the local evaluation of the Shape Up project. The resources contained within this toolkit are designed to allow local co-ordinators and local actors to gather data on the perceptions of Shape Up participants and the outcomes of project activities.

Project progress template

 

This template has been produced to help the project local coordinators and facilitators to report on project development in the city.

Baseline survey & Guidance

 

This survey was used to measure the impact of the Shape Up project

on student’s ability and willingness to take action on the issues which they consider important.

In which

The website and the material are mainly in English, but some material

languages are

is translated to other European languages: et · de · cs · da · el · es · fr

the tools

· it · hu · mt · nl

· pl

· pt · fi

· sv · ca

(the methodological guidebook)

available

 

What is the format

PDF

Where and how have the tools been tested

The Shape Up tools were used in different phases of the project implementation (eg: in the development-phase the methodological guidebook was used, during implementation the training tools were used, and in the evaluation-phase the evaluation tools were used).

Evaluation of

The Shape Up project included a test -phase of 24 months, where 20

tools

local communities from 20 countries were offered coaching processes based on the tools and methodology of the project. Besides this initial training, during the whole project implementation, there were several meetings held, where a space was dedicated to training.

Coordinator of

P.A.U. Education - www.paueducation.com

 

the project

 

P.A.U. Education is a private company based in Barcelona, Spain, founded in 1995 with a staff of more than 50 people from 20 different countries working with public and private organisations on a European and international level.

Their projects are based on participatory educational schemes, community-building processes and innovative contents. They contribute to increasing, in an ethical manner, the quantitative and qualitative impact of our clients’ social responsibility actions and communication strategies. These strategies usually focus on the interest of the individuals they care for, the societies they are part of

and the institutions they represent.

 

36

Other partners in the project The <a href=Danish School of Education / DPU (Denmark) is a distinctive and leading research institution within the fields of education, learning and competence development. Its aim is to boost the quality of Danish research and teaching in the field of education. ABCittà ( Italy) presents itself as an urban futures laboratory. It is a social cooperative made up of a group of professionals with different skills and knowledge, as well as experts in participatory design and planning processes, covering a variety of fields: the promotion of children’s rights, childhood and youth culture, human and social science, sustainable development, management and organisation of complex systems, urban planning and urban design, and educational and developmental psychology. Schulen ans Netz e.V. (Germany) is a voluntary, non-profit organisation, founded by the F ederal Ministry of Education and Research and Deutsche Telekom AG. The objective is to firmly anchor new media and the Internet in everyday teaching. Against the backdrop of lifelong learning, the organisation develops practically orientated implementation strategies of education-policy topics to foster lasting change in school education. The projects of Schulen ans Netz provide innovative Internet-based education models (content and platforms) to support teachers and students in the everyday, self- responsi ble and critical -minded use of new media. The Centre for Educational Studies is located in the Institute for Learning at the University of Hull. As well as providing training for teachers, the Centre for Educational Studies has an internationally recognised reputation for research, most notably in the area of health and schools. Evaluations include National Healthy School Standard Schemes (Devon, Liverpool), “Eat Well Do Well” an evaluation of the free healthy school -meal scheme (Hull) and the National College of School Leadership, school business managers professional development programme (UK). Contact person Claudia Alsina claudia.alsina@paueducation.com for further information Project Website http://www.shapeupeurope.net/ and / or links to relevant material that Handbook can be linked to Available in: the HEPCOM en · de · es · fr · it · ca learning htt p ://www.sha p eu p euro p e.net/files/media/media32.pdf platform. Methodological Guidebook Available in: et · de · cs · da · el · es · fr · it · hu · mt · nl · pl · pt · fi · sv · ca 37 " id="pdf-obj-36-2" src="pdf-obj-36-2.jpg">

Other partners in the project

The Danish School of Education / DPU (Denmark) is a distinctive and leading research institution within the fields of education, learning and competence development. Its aim is to boost the quality of Danish research and teaching in the field of education.

ABCittà (Italy) presents itself as an urban futures laboratory. It is a social cooperative made up of a group of professionals with different skills and knowledge, as well as experts in participatory design and planning processes, covering a variety of fields: the promotion of children’s rights, childhood and youth culture, human and social science, sustainable development, management and organisation of complex systems, urban planning and urban design, and educational and developmental psychology.

Schulen ans Netz e.V. (Germany) is a voluntary, non-profit organisation, founded by the F ederal Ministry of Education and Research and Deutsche Telekom AG. The objective is to firmly anchor new media and the Internet in everyday teaching. Against the backdrop of lifelong learning, the organisation develops practically orientated implementation strategies of education-policy topics to foster lasting change in school education. The projects of Schulen ans Netz provide innovative Internet-based education models (content and platforms) to support teachers and students in the everyday, self- responsi ble and critical -minded use of new media.

The Centre for Educational Studies is located in the Institute for Learning at the University of Hull. As well as providing training for teachers, the Centre for Educational Studies has an internationally recognised reputation for research, most notably in the area of health and schools. Evaluations include National Healthy School Standard Schemes (Devon, Liverpool), “Eat Well Do Well” an evaluation of the free healthy school -meal scheme (Hull) and the National College of School Leadership, school business managers professional development programme (UK).

Contact person

 

for further

 

information

Project Website

and / or links to relevant material that

Handbook

can be linked to

Available in:

the HEPCOM

en ·de · es · fr · it · ca

learning

 

platform.

Available in:

et · de · cs · da · el · es · fr · it · hu · mt · nl

· pl

· pt ·

fi

· sv · ca

37

6.2 Young Minds

Question

Description

Title of EU Project

Young Minds exploring links between culture, health and the environment

Main and specific objective(s) of the project

The main objective is to develop, explore and document democratic (participatory and action-oriented) health education and health promoti on in schools.

The specific objective to research the interplay of the participatory and action-orientated educational approach with the use of ICT and cross-cultural collaboration; facilitating the articulation of young people’s voices with regard to different health issues. To demonstrate how schools and students can be genuinely and actively involved in these processes. To test the hypothesis that the educational approach 1) stimulates and encourages student empowerment and action competence and 2) will be a valuable contribution to the development of national and international action plans in health and the environment that integrate the concerns young people have themselves.

Theoretical background of the project

The theoretical framework reflects three key concepts: the democratic approach to health education and promotion; student participation and action; and the IVAC (investigation–vision–

action–change) approach to structuring school projects in this area. The main principles of the approach build on key elements that reflect the Conference Resolution from the first conference of the European Network of Health Promoting Schools in 1997. Since then, several projects within the European Network of Health Promoting Schools have been based on these ideas and the resolution as a whole, and have attempted to demonstrate the benefits and potential of working with participatory approaches in school health education and promotion. Young Minds builds on the following key elements inspired by the resolution; student participation, action and change orientation, cross- cultural collaboration, using information and communication technology.

Target groups

Short term: The projects target-group consisted of primary and

Immediate

lower secondary school students in the age-range 12-16, as well

  • - Short term

as their teachers.

Long term: politicians and decision-makers who can benefit by

  • - Long term

extending their knowledge of the young generations´ voice concerning health-promotion.

What is the theme of the project

Democratic paradigm of health-education. The democratic approach to health-education and promotion builds on a broader concept of health embracing life-quality, absence of disease, living conditions as well as lifestyle. General planning and implementation of health-promoting activities towards children and

young people.

40

Activities in the The Young Minds activities: project and methodology The project was initiated in 2000

Activities in the

The Young Minds activities:

project and methodology

The project was initiated in 2000 and there have been several phases of the project since then.

The Young Minds approach was used as a way of involving young Europeans in the process leading up to WHO’ s Fourth Ministerial Conference on Environmental and Health:

  • - Young People and Alcohol took place in Stockholm February

2000

  • - Education and Health in Partnerships took place in Egmont aan Zee, Netherlands September 2002

  • - The Future of our Children took place in Budapest on 23-24 June 2004.

Methodology:

The concepts and ideas have been put into operation through the Investigation, Visions, Action and Change (IVAC) approach which implies that students and teachers in various countries should go through several phases in working with environmental and health problems. Together, teachers and students should chose and investigate a problem and develop their visions for the future an d finally, try to take action to initiate change and move closer to their visions.

This is an Internet-based project involving eight schools.

The IVAC approach was used as a process consisting of a planning - phase, a phase with class work and cross-cultural collaboration via the Internet and finally, participation at the conference in Budapest.

Description of available and accessible tools (or deliverables) that have been

Young Minds tool is a platform for young people supporting them in tackling action at global and local levels, through an approach, focusing on genuine involvement, based on democratic and participatory methods and the use of interactive communication tools.

developed in the project

The tool enables young people from all parts of the European region to communicate and exchange experience in various areas related to health.

The website: Young-minds.net

The link no longer works.

In which languages are the tools available

The tool is described in English

What is the format

A website and a number of books and reports

41

Where and how have the tools been tested

The tools have been tested in the Young Minds process 2000 -2004

Evaluation of tools

Young Minds has been self-evaluated and published in a book:

Simovska, v. Jensen, BB. Young-minds.net / lessons learned – student participation, action and cross-cultural collaboration in a virtual classroom , Copenhagen, Danish University of Education Press, 2003.

Coordinator of the project

Project Coordinator; Venka Simovska, Denmark Project Manager; Bjarne Bruun Jensen, Denmark (The Danish University of Education)

Local coordinators in participating countries

Other partners in the project

WHO Europe

Contact person for further information

Venka Simovska was the Danish contact person. However, the project is closed down, and the contact persons are probably no longer active.

Project Website and / or links to relevant material that can be linked to the HEPCOM learning platform.

Links to the tool: http://www.young-minds.net The link no longer works.

42

6.3 Healthy Region

6.3 Healthy Region Question Description Title of EU Project Healthy Regions – When well-being creates economic
 

Question

Description

Title of EU Project

Healthy Regions – When well-being creates economic growth

Main and specific objective(s) of the project

The main objective of this project is to put health on the political agenda of regions in Europe, thus addressing the need to assist regions in looking at public health and prevention i nitiatives in a more strategic way. It will develop and implement a new concept for “Healthy Regions”, which shows how a pro- active, preventive, holistic, democratic and mainstreamed focus on health and well - being at regional level can be an economic and social growth factor. The project will present practical methodologies that can assist regions to look at public health and prevention initiatives more strategically, and become “Healthy Regions” with the best foundations for reaching the Lisbon strategy goals.

The specific objective is to develop, test and implement good practice methodologies that can assist regions to become “Healthy Regions” with the best foundations for reaching the Lisbon strategy goals, through an exchange of good experiences and practices among the participating European regions and action -learning on regional and local level.

Target groups

On the political level, the project target group consists of the

Immediate

regional strategic decision-makers within regional and local health authorities. Through the development of good practice

-

Short term

methodologies and guidelines, the objective is to make decision - makers aware of the possibilities of behaving proactively in terms

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of preventing health problems, hence in a longer perspective, to encourage an effective use of resources, a healthy population, health equality and economic growth.

On the practical level, the target group consists of health professionals and other stakeholders, such as school teachers,

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Long term

adult teachers, public-health visitors, health-care personnel, health consultants, business consultants, HR managers, business consultants, youth leaders and other regional actors who are in contact with representatives from the target group on the individual level. Through the pilot projects, representatives from this target group will be more aware of how they can participate actively to establish the regional health strategy on a practical level.

 

On an individual level, the end-users are the general public and citizens, e.g. parents, children, teenagers, workers, socially excluded people who, through the pilot projects that support the regional health strategy, will receive different kinds of health training and information. Through the pilot projects, the individual will be more aware about how he or she can engage themselves and participate actively so as to create better health, either within

their family, workplace and / or school.

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Description of

Mapping of health competences

available and accessible tools (or deliverables) that have been

  • - Which competencies are available internally in the organization in order to execute assignments related to health promotion

developed in the project

Dialogue tool

  • - A tool to initiate a broad strategic stakeholder discussion about how the regional or local authority understands and wants to work with health promotion.

Scenario Planning Manual

  • - How to use scenario planning in health-promotion

Traffic Light Matrix

  • - How to assess the importance of health and health- promotion in rel ation to regional growth, employment and innovation.

In which languages are the tools available

English, and some of them are translated into the participating languages of the partners

What is the format

Website that functions as an archive

Where and how have the tools been