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River Cities Reader Vol. 21 No.

. 865 September 18 - October 1, 2014 2 Business Politics Arts Culture Now You Know RiverCitiesReader.com
River Cities Reader Vol. 21 No. 865 September 18 - October 1, 2014 3 Business Politics Arts Culture Now You Know RiverCitiesReader.com
by Kathleen McCarthy
km@rcreader.com
T
he next generation of top-down central plan-
ning for a federal K-12 education curricu-
lum, Common Core, is now in full swing in
Iowa and Illinois public and private school systems.
Despite the rhetoric that claims otherwise, the
Common Core standards are not (1) international-
ly benchmarked, (2) based upon scientific research
that is documented and peer-reviewed, (3) created
by the nations governors, state school officials, and
legislatures with full transparency, or (4) owned by
American taxpayers.
The Common Core curriculum is entirely
experimental, with no evidence or history of
efficacy whatsoever. Nearly all the supporting
data for Common Core comes from reports
written by its sponsors the National Governors
Association (NGA) and the Council of Chief State
School Officials (CCSSO) and lacks any true
objectivity. This is of particular note considering
that all the K-12 education models previously used
in American education not only adhered to best
practices supported by decades of proven scientific
research but also underwent continual refinement
based upon the latest scientific revelations in
learning processes. In other words, it evolved under
great scrutiny.
The three primary authors are David Coleman,
Susan Pimental, and Jason Zimba, founders of
Student Achievement Partners. None of these
authors has a background in any of the academic
disciplines they wrote standards for. In a speech
before the Learning Institute in 2011, Coleman
admitted: We were a collection of unqualified
people who were involved in developing the
common standards (RCReader.com/y/core1). He
likened their collaboration to a group at a bar with
a napkin.
The result is that Common Core is turning
nearly every classroom in America into one
gigantic experiment. The teachers themselves
are unprepared to teach the new Common
Core curriculum and must undergo extensive
retraining at enormous taxpayer expense. Because
Common Core is being implemented in 45 states,
an entire generation is in jeopardy if the system
proves the failure many predict it will be. For a
well-rounded critique based on scholastic studies
(versus pure rhetoric claiming rigorous standards)
that informs the debate about the deficiencies
abundant in Common Core, read Common Core
State Standards: An Example of Data-Less Decision
Making by Christopher H. Tienken (RCReader.
com/y/core2).
Common Core was not created by our nations
governors. Nor was its creation a public process
that included the input of school districts and/or
legislatures. Any proponent who claims otherwise
is untruthful. Neither of the two central non-
governmental organizations (NGOs) overseeing
Common Cores development the NGA and
the CCSSO is an elected body, and both are
lobbying organizations. The Bill & Melinda Gates
Foundation provided more than $1 billion for
Common Cores development and promotion.
Funding recipients include the Thomas Fordham
Institute, Achieve Inc., the U.S. Chamber of
Commerce, the U.S. Department of Education, the
Foundation for Excellence in Education (Jeb Bush),
the American Federation of Teachers, and smaller
organizations that promote Common Core. The
exhaustive list of recipients demonstrates a highly
bipartisan, albeit progressive, participation.
The entire Common Core curriculum is
copyrighted under private ownership that engages
in public/private partnerships with governments
(both United States and United Nations) in an
extremely close for-profit alliance of big business
and big government to control all textbooks,
materials, and testing/assessments for K-12.
According to Sandra Stotsky, the only academic
for language arts on the 30-member validation
committee for Common Core, members were
required to sign confidentiality agreements for
the Common Core standards review so that
anything they learned, discussed, or decided
could not be disclosed discrediting any claim
of an open and transparent process. (See Building
the Machine: A Movie About the Common Core
at CommonCoreMovie.com.) Stotsky will speak
about Common Core on October 18 at 6 p.m.
at Five Points Washington (360 North Wilmer
Road, Washington, Illinois). This presentation is
sponsored by the Heartland Against Common
Core and is free and open to the public.
Once again, follow the money, because this
rewrite of all textbooks, training materials, and
testing assessments in America is amounting to
billions in profits, all controlled by a handful of
private owners and special interests who developed
this boondoggle. And because Common Core
is privately owned, it provides cover against the
oppositions claims that it is a federal curriculum,
which is specifically prohibited by law (RCReader.
com/y/core3).
The good news is that the law does forbid the
federal government from making compulsory or
unduly influencing a national curriculum. This
purview belongs to the states alone. Which begs
the question: How did this national curriculum get
implemented?
The Obama administration allocated $4.35 billion
to the Department of Education to be portioned
out to states in Race to the Top grants. The grants
mandated that states agree to advance Obamas
education reforms, which included re-evaluations of
Continued On Page 12
WORDS FROM THE EDITOR
Common Core Curricula Have Core Problems
River Cities Reader Vol. 21 No. 865 September 18 - October 1, 2014 4 Business Politics Arts Culture Now You Know RiverCitiesReader.com
River Cities Reader Vol. 21 No. 865 September 18 - October 1, 2014 5 Business Politics Arts Culture Now You Know RiverCitiesReader.com
Democrats Learning from GOP
with Message, Timing
by Rich Miller
CapitolFax.com
ILLINOIS POLITICS
T
he Illinois House Democrats launched
their direct-mail and TV program weeks
earlier than the House Republicans in an
attempt to knock GOP candidates down before
they even had a chance to stand up.
The mail started going out not long after the
mid-August Illinois State Fair. Four years ago,
during a national Republican tidal wave, the
House Republicans preemptively
launched their advertising
program in mid-September,
catching the Democrats off-guard.
The Republicans won a few seats
they might not have picked off
had they started at the usual time.
The Democrats learned a valuable
lesson, raised a ton of money,
and began their mail and TV
programs even earlier.
As a result, the Republicans
who dont have much money
have been buried by hundreds
of thousands of dollars in early Democratic
advertising.
And the Democrats have also beaten the
Republicans to the punch when it comes to
parroting the message track used by the
current leader in the governors race, Republican
Bruce Rauner.
Rauners been running his Shake Up
Springfield ads all year. Hes spent millions
building his anti-incumbent, outsider message
of term limits, tax cuts, and property-tax freezes.
But if you look at what the Democrats
are doing everywhere in the state, the long-
entrenched super-majority party is running ads
very similar to Rauners. They are, in one GOP
operatives view, protecting their members by
portraying Republican challengers as tax-loving
incumbents and tying them to the dysfunction.
Mel Thillens in charge of our tax dollars is
as reckless as a bull in a china shop, blares the
headline on a recent House Democratic mailer
that attacks the suburban Republican.
Mel Thillens never met a tax increase he
didnt like, the mailer claims on the other side,
noting that Thillens voted to raise property
taxes by almost 50 percent and voted for deficit
spending.
Representative Marty Moylan (D-Des
Plaines) is fighting against unfair property-tax
hikes by pushing legislation to cap them, the
mailer continues. A concurrently running cable-
TV ad presses home the same message: Thillens
loves tax hikes and deficit spending.
Politicians get enough perks when they
retire, another pro-Moylan mailer states. They
shouldnt get free health care, too.
The mailer notes that Moylan opted out of
the legislative pension system and sponsored
legislation to get rid of health care for retired
politicians. Marty Moylan will fight to make
sure our tax dollars are spent on our priorities,
not perks for politicians.
The Republicans have a positive piece in
mailboxes pointing out that Thillens helps
run a multi-million-dollar family business and
explaining why he wants to work 60 hours a
week as a state representative.
In the age of Rauners $18
watch and an intense anti-
Springfield mentality, Thillens
message track is decidedly tone-
deaf compared to Moylans.
Suggesting your candidate
is a millionaire and claiming
he cant wait to dive into the
business of Springfield probably
isnt a good idea.
As a result, Moylan is doing
almost as well as Rauner in the
55th House District, according
to a new Capitol Fax/We Ask
America poll.
The poll of 334 likely voters taken September
10 found Moylan was leading Thillens 48-39.
Rauner was ahead of Governor Pat Quinn 52-39
in the district. The poll had a margin of error of
5.4 percent.
The early and expensive independent-
outsider messaging has attracted significant
Republican support for Moylan. Hes getting
19 percent of self-identified Republicans,
compared to Thillens 9 percent of Democrats.
And the two are so far splitting the
conservative-leaning independent vote, which
made up 46 percent of the polls voter sample.
That can also be seen as a sign of trouble
for Moylan, however. If Republican voters
come home and independents break heavily
against the incumbent Moylan, this thing could
tighten up. The House Democrats messaging is
designed to prevent that from happening.
Of course, this is just one poll a snapshot
in time thats open to interpretation. The House
Democrats say their polling shows them in the
drivers seat in the district, and the Republicans
actually liked the We Ask America results.
But a poll taken near the beginning of the
huge Democratic paid-media onslaught found
Moylan ahead 47-33, with Rauner leading
51-36.
That poll was done by respected national
pollster Fabrizio Lee on behalf of WLS Radio
talk-show host Dan Profts political fund. The
live-caller survey of 300 likely voters was taken
the week of August 25 and had a margin of
error of 5.5 percent. The House Democrats
much preferred those numbers.
Rich Miller also publishes Capitol Fax (a daily
political newsletter) and CapitolFax.com.
Republicans
have been buried
by hundreds of
thousands of
dollars in early
Democratic
advertising.
(563) 355.3606
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River Cities Reader Vol. 21 No. 865 September 18 - October 1, 2014 6 Business Politics Arts Culture Now You Know RiverCitiesReader.com
Winners and Favorites from the River Cities Readers 2014 Short-Fiction Contest
Im with the Banned!
O
ur challenged-books-themed Im
with the Banned! short-fiction
contest drew 52 entries, and were
pleased to present 13 of our favorite stories
here. Authors were required to include one
of 20 prompts from frequently banned or
challenged books (the full list is at RCRead-
er.com/y/fiction) and were limited to 250
words beyond that.
Nine additional favorite short stories can
be found at RCReader.com/y/2014fiction.
Well also be hosting a reading of
winning and favorite entries at 7 p.m. on
Thursday, September 25, at the Bettendorf
Public Library (2950 Learning Campus
Drive). We hope to see you there to help
celebrate Banned Books Week!
Summer Visit
Aunt Bridgie graces our kitchen table.
Long legs crossed at the ankles. Silky robe
belted at her narrow waist. Her auburn hair,
shot with silver, is captured in a clasp at the
nape of her neck.
Today she took me golfing. Striding to
the first tee, ignoring the attention she
aroused A woman! Wearing trousers!
she inhaled deeply and announced,
Exercise and fresh air. Natures tonics.
Never married, Aunt Bridgie does
whatever she pleases.
Tonight Dad serves a plate of soda
crackers and, for Aunt Bridgie, a glass of
warm milk. Leveling her keen, brown-eyed
gaze across the table at me, she raises her
glass as if in benediction.
Normally, after supper, our kitchen is
retired for the evening. If Mother hears a
cupboard being opened, its always, Whats
going on out there?
Mothers senses are sharp as a cats. I
never get away with anything. Not striking
a match: Are you trying to burn down
the house? Not reading under the covers:
Turn off that flashlight, and go to sleep.
Not riding my brothers bicycle: Youll
break your neck. Mothers are all slightly
insane.
But Mother cant interfere with her aunts
evening ritual. Im luxuriating in this new
freedom, as if Ive gotten something over on
Mother.
Then, from her perch in the den, Mother
re-establishes authority: Kathleen, its past
your bedtime.
Aunt Bridgie offers a sympathetic smile. I
stand and kiss her cheek.
Sleep tight, Kit. She hugs my waist.
Well scale new mountains tomorrow.
Maureen McGreevey, Le Claire, Iowa
Made In Heaven
This is a weird first date, I know, I said.
Shelly laughed and took my arm.
No! Its great. I love weddings. And I like
large parties. Theyre so intimate. At small
parties there isnt any privacy. She snuggled
up. I dont know anybody here. Except
you.
Alone in a crowd. I like it. Now we
were through the double doors, into the
reception hall. And check out the buffet.
She nodded. I know! And a champagne
fountain! Shall we?
Allow me, Madam. I filled two plastic
flutes.
She tasted. Mmm. Not bad. Where do
we sit?
I fidgeted. Not sure. Could we circulate
a little?
Okay.
We strolled, sipped, chatted. Temporized.
People nodded, smiled. Men were ogling
Shelly. I didnt blame them. She was
beautiful, bright, witty. I didnt have to work
hard at conversation. But on our second lap
of the party, she seemed pensive. I refilled
our glasses. When I returned to her, she was
smiling crookedly, one eyebrow lifted a bit.
You bastard.
I raised a brow of my own. Moi?
Vous. Were crashing this party, arent
we?
Whatever do you mean?
Dont bullshit me! You dont know a
living Christian soul here!
I raised my glass. Guilty. She threw back
her head and laughed. Her neck was lovely.
Shall we eat?
Wed better. Do we dare sit down?
Sure. The trick is not to hurry.
You sure know how to show a gal a good
time.
Glad you think so. Theres this big
funeral Wednesday ... .
Mary Cartter, Davenport
Second Prize
Harold
I am by nature an inward man, he said
silently into the disconnected phone. Most
of Harolds conversations were of the silent
kind. None of the people around him would
understand why he wanted to speak to his
dead wife on the telephone. Harold much
preferred to speak to her in person, but
Heaven did not allow for that.
He certainly took notice of the strange
looks given by the nurses when they saw
him in his room, with the receiver of an old
rotary phone to his ear. He was sure that
they thought he was crazy; full of old-age
dementia. But the truth was: That phone
connected him to the other side. It was the
only way to hear her sweet, beautiful, albeit
dead voice on the other side. She was, after
all, the only one who ever understood his
hermit-like tendencies.
Its time for your medicine, Harold,
said the night-shift nurse, waltzing into his
room, adorning a tray on her arm. Harold
held up a finger of pause; he wasnt ready.
But the nurse reached for his frail, wrinkled
hand and placed two white pills in his palm.
Now take them, or I will call the doctor,
she said firmly.
As Harold slowly placed the pills in his
mouth, a tear rolled down his cheek. The
pills always made her sweet voice fade from
the phone. He swallowed, and he cried
inside as he listened to the line go quiet,
and felt the loneliness creep in again. He
inwardly longed for the other side.
Molly Roland, Moline
Opal
Her mother lived long enough to birth
the litter. I dont know what complications
caused her to die, but we were gifted five
orphaned Saint Bernard puppies, Opal
being the runt.
She wasnt breathing when she was born,
so my father brought her to his lips and
breathed tiny puffs of air into her nose and
gently rubbed her back. Miraculously, she
began to move her head back and forth,
trembling in a confused effort to get her
bearings.
I wanted to hold her so badly, but my
mother said she was too little and she
needed to get bigger, if she gets bigger,
my father added. He was always good at
making sure I had a good understanding
not all fairy tales have happy endings.
She did get bigger, and she never left
my side. She was three when she ran after
me while I took off on my bike toward a
July afternoon of adventure. I thought she
wasnt gonna make it when the little Chevy
screeched to a halt followed by a dull thud.
She ended up losing a leg, but otherwise
made a full recovery.
Now, seven years later, I am leaving for
college. She has since gone blind and has
bad arthritic hips. I just finished packing
and nudged her out of my side of my twin
bed. I lay down as she readjusts, her tail
slapping my face. I pet her as she gets
comfortable again. To have her in bed with
me, breathing on me, her hair in my mouth,
I count that as something of a miracle.
Edmond Henry, Moline
Fourth Prize
Ramblings of a
Grumpy Snow Person
Ha! That jolly happy soul stuff is a fairy
tale. What kid today would even know what
a corn-cob pipe is? Or lumps of coals for
eyes?
Today my nose is a giant carrot shoved
through from the back of my head to a
place in the front (yeah, another frozen
fairy tale). And my crooked mouth is
made from red Lego blocks; my eyes are
two mismatched sea shells left over from
a summer vacation to the beach. Added
insult a Twins baseball cap on top of my
snowy head. Heres a news flash it is not
going to make me dance around.
No, the kids have a different plan for me.
I am their sworn enemy. I am Godzilla one
day, Big Foot another. I am pelted, punched,
and pushed. I am aware that each kid in
the neighborhood is thinking: Every time
I conjure up a rock, I throw it. At me, the
monster, the alien. Even Mrs. Browns dog
Bitsy gets in on the insults, hence my yellow
hem.
I want the sun! I want a change in
temperature. I would like nothing better
than to thumpety-thump-thump out of
here. But no the forecast is freezing with
no thaw in sight. I am just a sitting duck
waiting for the next rock.
Jane McDonald, Bettendorf
Talking Allowed
Old Mrs. Welty missed the children after
she retired from teaching, so when the
primary school couldnt afford a librarian,
she volunteered. She sorted and organized
the dwindling number of books on the
shelves and waited. Back then kids didnt go
to the library very often. It was a forgotten
room. Whenever children wandered in,
she would entice them into searching for
a special book shed hidden. When they
found it, she gave them a reward, like a
plastic spider or a sugar-free lollipop, and
then started reading the book to them. She
wouldnt read a lot, just a little, then shed
pause and say something like, Oh, the
really exciting part is when they get chased
by wild dogs, but we better stop reading
now. Theyd beg her to read more or let
them take the book home, and shed hesitate
for a moment and then say, Well, all right,
if you really want to.
It didnt take long before kids were asking
to be sent to the library, but their teachers
objected. No discipline, they said. Mrs.
Welty encouraged children to talk about the
books, and the library was the nosiest room
in the school. For a week there was a stand-
off, then a large tent appeared in one corner
of the library and Mrs. Welty told the kids
they could only talk when they were in the
tent. Using every color in the crayon box,
the kids made a sign for their tent that said:
COVER STORY
River Cities Reader Vol. 21 No. 865 September 18 - October 1, 2014 7 Business Politics Arts Culture Now You Know RiverCitiesReader.com
Let the wild rumpus start!
Sharon Olsen Abrams, Davie, Florida
Sea Change
The sea, the snotgreen sea, the
scrotumtightening sea. The syrupy,
stench-ridden, soul-crushing sea. I once
experienced its then-azure glory dazzling
my retinas into near-blindness as it
reflected the suns rays. I would splash
and revel in those liquid diamonds and
then peacefully allow my body to become
transformed into a living buoy. I felt
amazement at its power as it surged inland
and outward in a steady, predictable, yet
dramatic rhythm. The sea flowed freely
back then, being the consistency of ... well,
the consistency of water.
Fortunately (or unfortunately?) my view
of the present putrid spectacle is mostly
obscured by the similarly thick and noxious
sea of humans, beach towels, umbrellas, and
numerous brightly colored plastic, vinyl,
and electronic items insidiously designed to
desensitize and distract as well as entertain.
One would think people would avoid the
beach. But no one seems to object to the
sight of the lifeless stew that lies beyond
the sand. No one takes offense at the
ghastly perfume, half decomposition, half
chemicals. The herds memory is short and
selective; this has quickly become all theyve
ever known, the way its always been.
Ive been told I get upset too easily. Ive
been informed that something must be
wrong with me because it doesnt bother
anybody else. Ive been asked why I cant
just enjoy a day at the beach like normal
people do.
Not for the first time, and certainly not
for the last, in the midst of the oblivious
crowd I kneel and weep.
K.J. Rebarcak, DeWitt, Iowa
Grand Prize
Sales Pitch
Rafael Raife Garza was checking
inventory when the phone rang.
Garza Hardware.
Could I please speak to Mr. Gardsa?
Speaking.
Mr. Garshaw, Im Tammy with
Burble Dynamics, the premier company
specializing in customized, proactive
strategies for small retail businesses with
under-performing sales, calling to tell you
about our upcoming seminar.
Im sorry, but its getting late.
Theres a special discount rate.
No thank you. I must be going.
If you prefer, Mr. Gartza, I could
connect you to a Spanish-speaking
associate.
Thats not necessary. Good day.
Twilight shadows fell across the road
outside the storefront window, but it was
not the time of day nor the offer to speak
Spanish that had made him ditch the call.
The phrase under-performing sales had
struck a nerve. Raife had always relied on
his well-stocked shelves, his reputation for
integrity, and his loyal customers to keep
the business going, but perhaps that was no
longer enough. The big-box stores had been
pulling away both sales and customers, and
he was unsure how to respond.
Even as a teenager hed preferred the
quiet work: processing orders, assisting
customers, even sweeping up. His
gregarious uncle Pablo had handled sales.
I am by nature an inward man, he said
silently into the disconnected phone.
A framed sepia wedding photograph of
Emilio and Guadalupe Garza hung by the
door. Theyd emigrated to this Mississippi
River town in 1915 and had seen worse
than this. Best to leave these questions for
tomorrow. Supper would be waiting.
Peter A. Small, Davenport
We are lined up in a row to play in the
violin recital, several preteen girls dressed
in their best accompanied by anxious
mothers. My mother had fluttered around
me at the department store. Her first choice
for me was a tan transparent nylon blouse
with smocking across the front that barely
camouflaged the new lace slip and bra
underneath. Next was a full circle skirt
made of cream-colored felt decorated with
flowing gold designs and made bouffant
with three layers of crinoline petticoats.
Having just turned 12, I was not yet really
developed, so it was decided that I should
have pads known as falsies to fill
in what was physiologically missing. My
naturally auburn hair was bleached blonde
from having recently played the lead role in
Goldilocks & the Three Bears in the dance
recital. And I was wearing lipstick. (I would
have gotten in trouble at school for this.
Girls put lipstick on anyway in the school
restroom from tubes they had secreted in
zipper notebooks and then hastily wiped it
off before going back to class.)
Im next in line to play when a friend
of my mothers comes up and whispers in
my ear: How did you grow them so fast?
All time freezes in that instant when the
awareness comes: I look ridiculous.
Mothers are all slightly insane.
Jean Johnson, Davenport
Continued On Page 16
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River Cities Reader Vol. 21 No. 865 September 18 - October 1, 2014 8 Business Politics Arts Culture Now You Know RiverCitiesReader.com
R
eading through
the program for
the Playcrafters
Barn Theatres Marrying
Terry filled me with
eager anticipation for
Fridays performance,
as the cast is mostly
composed of newcomers
to either the Playcrafters
stage or any stage. While its fun to see familiar
actors in different roles, it can be even more
exciting to see fresh faces take to the theatre, and
with this production, the new talents are a blend
of fine actors and those who, with time, could
become fine ones, too.
Playwright Gregg Opelkas clichd,
predictable, overly lengthy script doesnt help
matters, though. Opelka uses too much of the
first act of his story which is about a man and
a woman who share the same name of Terry
Adams (Melissa Hummel and David Lane) to
set up the setup. First, were given an explanation
about how Hummels Terry expected her
flight-delayed boyfriend to propose to her
when he arrives for New Years Eve. Her friend
Janet (Jaime Bauschka) convinces Miss Adams
to rent a room at the Drake hotel to make the
engagement even more special; however, due
to the holiday and an unforeseen snowstorm,
the only room available is the $3,000-a-night
presidential suite.
Then enters Lanes Dr. Adams, who was
recently pressured and sort of tricked into
an engagement by his girlfriend of three years
Penny (Terri Nelson), which we learn after
even more exposition explaining that he was
once engaged before, and left his fiance at the
altar. Dr. Adams, a radiologist, then realizes he
mistakenly brought home a set of x-rays that
a surgeon will need the next day, and rushes
to meet the confident, ready-to-drink doctor
Harlan (Shawn Sutton) at the Drakes bar. After
he joins Harlan and his friend Sam (Victor
Angelo) for drinks imbibed to the point of
passing out, Harlan checks Dr. Adams into
the hotel. Bearing the same name as the Terry
Adams whose credit card was mistakenly left at
the desk during check-in, Dr. Adams is taken to
Miss Adams room as if it were his. She enters to
find Mr. Adams lying in her bed, boxer-shorted-
butt sticking up, and hilarity ensues. Or could
have ensued were Opelka capable of sharper
humor or blessed with an editor to tighten his
script.
According to her bio, this is Hummels first
time acting, and admittedly, it does show, as
her wooden Miss Adams lacks chemistry with
Lanes charmingly awkward and unassuming
Dr. Adams. Hummels diction and projection,
however, are commendable, so I have little
doubt that, with more experience on stage,
THEATRE
By Thom White
thomasjasonwhite@gmail.com
Fianc What?
Marrying Terry, at the Playcrafters Barn Theatre through September 21
shell blossom into a
fine actor. And while
Lanes performance is
enjoyable, its actually
Marrying Terrys
supporting characters
that shine the most,
particularly Angelos
suave, self-assured
Sam; Suttons fun-
loving yet borderline-douchey Harlan; and Eric
Landuyts dismissive, condescending, forcefully
polite Reservation Clerk and his angry, East
Coast-accented Jonathan, Miss Adams would-
be fianc.
Unfortunately, director Greg Bouljon isnt
able to prevent Bauschka, Nelson, and Cindy
Ramos Parmley from crossing the line into
over-acting, though the former two dont move
too far into that territory. In truth, Nelsons
performance becomes comedy gold when Penny
ends up at the Drake bar herself. As Penny first
meets Jonathan, theres a palpable bitterness and
camaraderie in Nelsons and Landuyts chemistry
that renders their mutual, easily anticipated arc
not only bearable, but welcome, and downright
amusing.
Bouljons greatest success, beyond the
comically appropriate pacing, is his set design,
particularly the upstage half of the stages
thrust portion. Scenic artists Sara Wegener
and Tom Vaccaro painted this section blue and
ornamented it with elaborate, curved shapes
in yellows and golds so that the floor looks
like an expensive carpet installed in the lobby
of a grand hotel. The proscenium section of
the stage, meanwhile, is split down the middle
with a partial wall to separate the bedroom and
the sitting room of the presidential suite, with
a server, two chairs, and an end table at the
front of the thrust for scenes taking place in Dr.
Adams condo.
Its a shame that Marrying Terrys script isnt
funnier, more natural in speech, and shorter,
as the two-hour-and-15-minute production
(including intermission) did feel long, especially
given the over-abundant exposition in the first
act. Still, my partners 15-year-old-daughter,
who was forced to attend with me, actually
enjoyed the performance, and theres definitely
something to be said about that. And I, too,
found enough humor to consider Playcrafters
entertainment worthwhile, and look forward
to seeing these actors especially those Ive just
seen for the first time perform again in the
future.
Marrying Terry runs at the Playcrafters Barn
Theatre (4950 35th Avenue, Moline) through
September 21, and more information and tickets
are available by calling (309)762-0330 or visiting
Playcrafters.com.
Shawn Sutton, Eric Landuyt, Tim Vanopdorp,
Jamie Bauschka, Melissa Hummel, Terri Nelson,
David Lane, and Victor Angelo
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River Cities Reader Vol. 21 No. 865 September 18 - October 1, 2014 9 Business Politics Arts Culture Now You Know RiverCitiesReader.com
simple wisdom and
reassurance: Well, theres
worse things than bein
afraid / You could be
trapped under all that
youve made.
As strong as the
arrangements are,
Flahertys mature
songcraft and vocals
shine brightest.
Bulldozer initially
chugs along as a cheerful
kiss-off to an unhappy
childhood: I grew up
poor on a dead-end street
/ Bad people, bad livin,
bad all around me and
I didnt care about water,
food, money, or my drugs / I just knew I was
escapin from that shitty place that I grew
up.
But Flahertys voice and lyrics bring
additional dimensions to the song a
rapid-fire torrent of memories, regrets, and
destruction delivered with casual precision,
creating the impression of a narrator whos
too busy moving on to ever actually live his
life.
Throughout the album, his singing has
a rich, compelling artlessness, by which I
mean that hes perfected this slightly gruff,
seemingly effortless and natural vocal style
that likely requires a great deal of work
particularly given the volume of words he
gives himself. This lends many songs an
offhanded, nearly spontaneous charm, an
in-the-moment vitality.
But if Muddy Ruckus plays as evidence
that Flaherty has grown comfortable in a
multifaceted musical identity, the singer/
songwriter said hes still searching: I feel like
Im finding it more and more. I feel like Im
getting closer and closer to it.
Muddy Ruckus will perform on Friday,
September 19, at Rozz-Tox (2108 Third
Avenue, Rock Island; RozzTox.com). The 8
p.m. all-ages show also features Steven M.
Krug Jr., and cover is $5 to $10.
For more information on Muddy Ruckus, visit
MuddyRuckus.com.
Vol. 21 No. 865
Sep. 18 - Oct. 1, 2014
River Cities Reader
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that feels fully formed.
It starts with rollicking gypsy jazz of
Crawl on the Ceiling, an impossibly
ebullient celebration that pairs its party
energy with tight singing and musicianship.
Come with Us which Flaherty thought
would kick off the album follows with
a longing made hypnotic by the vocal
harmonies. And Ruby Red returns
Flaherty to his blues origins before stomping
all over them in a blistering rockabilly back
end.
I feel like those three elements are kind of
weaved in and out of all my songs, Flaherty
said of Muddy Ruckus opening trio of tracks.
I feel like if you listen to those three songs,
you can kind of get the gist of where the
whole album is.
The contributions of Flahertys bandmates
are essential. The record is unimaginable
without Stahls sweet singing, and Durkins
bass combines with the guitarists percussive
style to form a sturdy spine and keeps
up with some breakneck tempos. Fiddle,
percussion, and pedal steel provide just the
right amount of Americana augmentation
and drive on more-straightforward songs,
while the muted tension of Convalescent
Angel exploding into jagged fragments
suggests an experimental rock band Tom
Waits through Nine Inch Nails.
On Worse Things, busy, detailed
acoustic guitar is contrasted with a low
drone underneath, and in between are the
vocals of Flaherty and Stahl, conveying
B
y design, the open-
ing three tracks of
Muddy Ruckus
self-titled debut are meant
as an introduction.
But it might be more
accurate to say that
theyre a reintroduction
particularly for the Quad
Cities. Singer/songwriter/
guitarist Ryan Flaherty
hails from these parts,
and the album and a
September 19 performance
at Rozz-Tox will show
what hes been up to in the
decade-plus since he left.
Its been a winding
path, both geographically
and musically. He traveled extensively
with stops including the Grand Canyon,
California, Tennessee, and Europe before
settling in New England soaking up as
much experience of life and in music as
possible, Flaherty said in a phone interview
last week.
The blues of his 2002 solo album
Dimestore Blues represented a starting point,
a singer learning to play guitar. In Europe he
was exposed to the gypsy jazz rooted in the
music of Django Reinhardt, and I got really
sucked into that style for the last 10 years or
so.
He played in bands but returned to
songwriting in the past few years, releasing
several additional solo albums. That
transition, he recalled, was facilitated by his
playing: Im actually getting pretty good at
guitar now. Maybe I should go back to my
own music and start writing again.
And last year, he chose the moniker
Muddy Ruckus a name that applies to his
current trio (which features singer Erika
Stahl and bassist Brian Durkin) but also to
Flaherty by himself. I wanted to come up
with something that I could just do for the
rest of my life, he explained. No matter
who I played with whether Im solo or with
a band I could say, This is Muddy Ruckus.
Im Muddy Ruckus.
The arrival of Muddy Ruckus, then,
can be seen as an evolutionary marker
especially in the context of a debut album
Muddy Ruckus, September 19 at Rozz-Tox
A Voice Found
by Jeff Ignatius
jeff@rcreader.com
MUSIC
Photo by J. Elon Goodman
River Cities Reader Vol. 21 No. 865 September 18 - October 1, 2014 10 Business Politics Arts Culture Now You Know RiverCitiesReader.com
T
hank good-
ness for second
acts, because
Saturdays production
of the Circa 21 Dinner
Playhouses Funny,
You Dont Look Like
a Grandmother, with
its first act that almost
put my own mother-
who-doesnt-look-
like-a-grandmother to sleep, had us laughing
fairly heartily during its second half. Director
Ann Niemans staging of this modern-granny
revue is fun and comfortably paced, and her
choreography is oftentimes peppy and clever,
especially in the yoga-class number and the
jazzy, early-20th-Century-styled footwork of
the musicals high-energy Grandmas to Go,
which features the plays three leads Karen
Pappas, Deborah Kennedy, and Andrea Moore
singing gorgeous, tight, Andrews Sisters-type
harmonies.
Not working in Niemans favor, however, is
the music. Composer Robert Waldmans songs
feel monotonous when chained together, as
theyre too similar in style, and Lois Wyses
and Sheilah Raes lyrics seem uninspired,
sounding more like poorly written monologues
that have been musically altered with weak
and obvious rhymes. To their credit, though,
Wyses and Raes book for Funnys song-less
scenes is sometimes hilarious, particularly the
Grandmother of the Year speech that Pappas
delivers about winning over her grandson to the
point that he begged for her over his mother.
(This bit climaxed with a sharp, unexpected
punchline that had Saturdays audience
guffawing and applauding louder than after any
other scene.)
Costumer designer Gregory Hiatt does
an exceptional job, as always, dressing our
three nameless grannies. He differentiates
them by character businesswoman, modern
everyday mother, and stereotypical, doting
grandma with age-appropriate attire thats still
somewhat stylish, while also having them begin
to cross over into grandmother-who-doesnt-
care-about-fashion ensembles. His greatest
triumph, in my estimation, is the 16th Century
dress Kennedy wears during Act Is best scene,
When Harry Met Annie, designed as a
fairytale in which, halfway through, Kennedy
strips down, tosses the long gown aside, and
reveals a spaghetti-strapped, mid-thigh-length,
shimmery gray cocktail dress. That outfit looks
stunning and sexy, as does Kenney wearing it,
as she delivers a jazzy number about returning
to the dating scene and taking a chance on a
man who wants a younger woman.
This sequence, particularly given the shows
title, demonstrates what I think the entire
THEATRE
By Thom White
thomasjasonwhite@gmail.com
It's a Grandma Night for Singing
Funny, You Dont Look Like a Grandmother, at the Circa 21 Dinner Playhouse through November 1
musical should have
been. Embodying
the attitude of a
woman whos still
active, flirty, and
sexy even though
shes just become a
grandmother, the
scene is funny, the
song is inspired
(though the
lyrics are not), and the tempo is upbeat and
rousing. Instead of maintaining these qualities
throughout, however, Wyse, Rae, and Waldman
instead opted for a nice and sweet take on new-
grandmotherhood. Act II is peppered with
more of a modern-grandma attitude than Act I,
but When Harry Met Annie left me wishing
there were more scenes like it than there are.
All is not lost, though, as in addition to
Pappas and Kennedy, Moore also performs
her heart out, especially when her character
goes through old clothes prior to moving into
a smaller home, and has trouble letting go of
long-unfashionable fashions because they make
up who she was and is now. In this Out of the
Closet scene, Moore also shares some beautiful
harmonies with Rachel Schimenti, who plays
the generic Daughter of the musical. Will
Aaron, the generic Son, impresses most during a
number featuring him (in a flattering sleeveless
shirt) as a dance instructor teaching Kennedys
grandmother modern moves, and Paul Gregory
Nelson excels at differentiating a number of
universal Grandfathers.
One of the best bits, however, is the scene
that has Moore, Nelson, and Pappas dressed
as babies, riding tricycles in big bonnets
and petticoats. Performing a comedy style
reminiscent of Hee-Haws cornfield-gag routines
mixed with Lily Tomlins Edith Anne, the three
elicit laugh after laugh as they lament their
grandmothers actions, such as dressing them
up and pinching their cheeks. The jokes are
sometimes uproarious, as when one of them
asks what a pee pee is and Pappas says, I dont
know, Ive never seen one.
In truth, when my mother told me at
intermission that she was having trouble staying
awake, I told her that I wouldnt be offended if
she wanted to leave. She declined and, at the end
of the evening, was glad for it, as we both enjoyed
the latter half and wound up discussing some
of our favorite bits of Circa 21s Funny, You
Dont Look Like a Grandmother.
Funny, You Dont Look Like a Grandmother
runs at the Circa 21 Dinner Playhouse (1828
Third Avenue, Rock Island) through November 1,
and more information and tickets are available
by calling (309)786-7733 extension 2 or visiting
Circa21.com.
Deborah Kennedy, Karen Pappas, and Andrea Moore
River Cities Reader Vol. 21 No. 865 September 18 - October 1, 2014 11 Business Politics Arts Culture Now You Know RiverCitiesReader.com
the performers (who include Ashley
Judd, Morgan Freeman, Soul Surfer
inspiration Bethany Hamilton, and
Smith himself) remain indefatigably
charming and the underwater
photography remains striking, the
cornball elements among them
the slapstick contributions of that
wacky pelican Rufus are kept to a
discreet minimum this time around.
The gifted young Nathan Gamble and
Cozi Zuehlsdorff enact a wary and
quite touching near-romance, and
are given some strong moments of
standing up to their screen parents.
The movie is realistically and lovingly
unhurried, revealing exactly how
long it takes, for example, to complete
the complicated process of moving a
dolphin from a van to an indoor tank.
(As with Dolphin Tale, this sequel ends
with pre-credits documentary footage
demonstrating just how closely the
filmmakers have hewed to the facts
of the aquariums rehab work.) And
only a total curmudgeon could fail to
be touched by Dolphin Tale 2s sincere
yet not sickly sentiment or, for that
matter, by the nearly too-good-to-
be-true casting of crooners Harry
Connick Jr. and Kris Kristofferson
as father and son. Dolphin Tale 3, I
understand, is already in the works.
Hopefully, asking for one tiny duet isnt
asking too much.
For reviews of No Good Deed, The
Identical, and other current releases,
visit RiverCitiesReader.com.
Follow Mike on Twitter at Twitter.com/
MikeSchulzNow.
Movie Reviews
by Mike Schulz mike@rcreader.com
THE DROP
Tom Hardy, by this point in his career,
has had enough major roles in enough
major movies to qualify as a familiar
face. And a good thing, too, because if
we were forced to rely on his voice and
specific screen type, how, from film to
film, would we ever recognize him? The
British stars latest is the crime thriller
The Drop, and its a solid piece of work
hardly novel, but gripping and enjoyable
nonetheless. Yet its tough to imagine any
Hardy fan even thinking about skipping
it, considering that, much like the recent
home-video release Locke, the movie
allows this brilliantly chameleon-like
character actor to perform an exquisite
slow burn that lasts 90-ish minutes, and
to sound and seem quite unlike anyone
hes ever played before.
Director Michal R. Roskams moody,
atmospheric yarn is based on a short story
by novelist (and the films screenwriter)
Dennis Lehane, and it feels like a short
story by Dennis Lehane; theres just
enough Mystic River- and Gone Baby
Gone-style pungency, dread, and sense
of looming tragedy to suggest that this
minor outing is more substantial than
it actually is. Hardy, employing a nasal
Brooklyn dialect and higher vocal pitch
than usual, plays Bob Saginowski, the
bartender for a New York dive managed
by his cousin Marv (James Gandolfini).
Abashed and reticent to the point of
appearing slow-witted, Bob makes
surreptitious cash deposits for the
Chechen Mafia while serving up drinks,
and finds his quiet routine interrupted by
his discovery of a bloodied and freaking
adorable baby pit bull, one he finds
in a garbage
can owned
by a doleful
waitress
(Noomi
Rapace). Its
from this
seemingly
innocuous
rescue that
Lehane weaves his tale involving a late-
night heist gone wrong, a long-unsolved
murder, and the threatening arrival
of a potential psychopath (Matthias
Schoenaerts). Somewhat surprisingly,
however, the heart of The Drop remains
with the dog, who becomes a perfect,
four-legged metaphor for Bob himself:
He may appear bruised and beaten, but if
backed into a corner, this pit bull will bite.
The film is too stacked with
coincidences and contrivances (John
Ortizs detective keeps popping up
whenever Bob needs him the least), and
nothing really comes of Rapaces screen
time; I was glad she didnt turn into a
stock girlfriend character, but even that
mightve been preferable to the glaringly
irrelevant purpose Rapace serves here. Yet
there are also plenty of satisfyingly creepy,
cryptic scenes and diverting throwaway
conversations, and the movie has
exceptional, if unduly manipulative, built-
in suspense, because scene after scene
leaves you waiting for something awful
to happen to Bobs beloved pooch. (Ill
offer no spoiler regarding the pups fate,
although the scene of Bob calling for the
dog and turning around with a stricken
expression did make a fellow patron, who
was clearly expecting the worst, mutter,
Oh, God, no.) It should go without
saying that
we also get
Gandolfini,
who delivers
an expansive
and
beautifully
modulated
portrayal
in his final
screen role. And bless his heart, we get
Hardy, who disappears so completely into
his wonderfully singular, contradictory
creation endearing, steely, bashful,
methodical, terrifying that you can
barely take your eyes off him, even to
look at Gandolfini, which is saying a lot.
Despite its flaws, I was happy to have
seen The Drop, and if I wind up at a
Halloween party this year, Im pretty sure
Im going as Tom Hardy. Why spend time
anguishing over a costume when you can
wear one outfit and be absolutely anyone
you want?
DOLPHIN TALE 2
As family entertainments go, Dolphin
Tale 2 is a pretty darned good one. As
totally needless sequels go, its a pretty
darned great one. Beyond bringing
continued, admirable attention to the
heroic rescue and rehabilitation work
performed at Floridas Clearwater Marine
Aquarium, there doesnt seem to be
much reason for writer/director Charles
Martin Smiths follow-up, which concerns
the attempts to find the original films
tail-less dolphin Winter a new swimming
partner. Yet in nearly every way, I
preferred this warmhearted family drama
to its not-bad 2011 predecessor. While
Tony Soprano and a Pit Bull Walk into a Bar ...
James Gandolfini and Tom Hardy in The Drop
by Mike Schulz mike@rcreader.com by Mike Schulz mike@rcreader.com
River Cities Reader Vol. 21 No. 865 September 18 - October 1, 2014 12 Business Politics Arts Culture Now You Know RiverCitiesReader.com
WORDS FROM THE EDITOR
W
hat Im about to write may shock
you. But I refuse to be the victim of
censorship any longer, so here goes ... .
Judy Blume. The Bible. Kris
Kristofferson.
Whew! Thank you for letting me get
that off my chest!
Maybe there was no reason to panic.
But those acquainted with the lists of
books and songs
that have, over the
years, been banned
in America should
understand my
concern: All it takes
is one descriptive
section from a
Blume novel, or one
suggestive passage from the Bible, for
some people to get worked up to the point
of demanding, Thats got to go!
Consequently, a host of events will
take place at local libraries in celebration
of September 21 through 27s national
Banned Books Week, which, according
to the American Library Association,
promotes the freedom to choose or
the freedom to express ones opinions
even if that opinion might be considered
unorthodox or unpopular.
Rock Islands Main Public Library, for
example, will feature some of historys
most commonly challenged literary works
in September 23s Banned Books Reading
event, co-presented by the Midwest
Writing Center. Among the evenings
participants and selections will be Angela
Campbell taking on Stephen Kings
Different Seasons; Anna Tunnicliff with a
section of Kurt Vonneguts Slaughterhouse
Five; Amanda Makula reading a selection
from Blume; Lisa Powell Williams and
Ryan Collins on banned biblical and
poetic works; Liza Gilbert (vocally)
interpreting Fifty Shades of Grey, and
Emily Tobin with that insidious novel
clearly designed to warp young minds:
Philip Pullmans The Golden Compass.
Yeah. The story with the talking polar
bears. Hide the kids.
Meanwhile, for proof that works can
also be banned when heard (as opposed to
read), the Bettendorf Public Library will
Literature and Music
Banned Books Reading
Rock Island Main Public Library
Tuesday, September 23, 6 p.m
Banned Songs Fest
Bettendorf Public Library
Wednesday, September 24, 6:30 p.m.
Whats Happenin
Music
Daytrotter Communion Club
Night featuring
Jessica Lea Mayfield
Codfish Hollow Barn
Friday, September 19, 7 p.m.
D
aytrotters latest Communion Club
Night taking place at Maquoketas
Codfish Hollow
Barn on September
19 features a set
with alternative-
country and
folk-rock musician
Jessica Lea Mayfield,
whose most recent
album was Aprils critically acclaimed
Make My Head Sing ... . Im glad to hear
that hers is singing. After checking out
the 25-year-olds accomplishments and
accolades over the past 10 years, mine is
actually swimming.
Yet you have to go back even further
than a decade for the beginnings of
Mayfields amazing career, considering
that she was already performing and
touring with her familys bluegrass
outfit One Way Rider at age eight. By
age 11, the Ohio native was playing
guitar and experimenting with
songwriting, frequently accompanying
her older brother David at area open-
mic nights. And when she was 15,
Mayfield recorded her own EP titled
White Lies, and printed a mere 100
copies one of which made its way to
Dan Auerbach, guitarist for the Black
Keys.
Auerbach was so taken with the teens
skill set and passion that he not only
had her record vocals for the Black Keys
song Things Aint Like They Used to
Be (from 2007s Attack & Release), but
agreed to produce Mayfields first album,
With Blasphemy So Heartfelt, which was
released in September of 2008. Four
months later, Blurt magazine named
it Best Album of 2008 and Mayfield
Best New Artist of 2008. Early the
following year, songs from the LP were
heard on Gossip Girl and CSI:NY.
And the rest, as they say, is history
albeit very recent history. In addition to
opening for artists including Cake, the
Avett Brothers, and (it should go without
saying) the Black Keys, and performing
in the Prairie Home Companion stage
show, Mayfield has been the recipient
of sensational notices for her haunting
and subtly powerful style. Rolling Stone,
for instance, raved of her sweet and
sweltering guitar playing and forked-
tongue revelations, and Pitchfork.com
called Mayfield one of the more intriguing
artists on the fringes of alt-country whose
wry lyrical style allows for a very frank
cataloging of romantic regrets and bad
decisions. If Mayfields career at age 25
reflects the bad decisions, I cant imagine
what the good ones might yield.
Jessica Lea Mayfield performs
Daytrotters Communion Club
Night alongside Ark Life, Crash,
and Hotbreath Tea & the Invisible
Branches, and more information on
the concert event is available by visiting
CodfishHollowBarnstormers.com.
Literature
River Readings: Todd Davis
Augustana Colleges Wilson Center
Tuesday, September 30, 7 p.m.
O
n September 30,
Augustana College
will host the first guest
in its annual River
Readings series: Todd
Davis, the award-winning,
Pennsylvania-based author
of five full-length poetry
collections whose works
have been featured on Garrison Keillors
The Writers Almanac radio show and Ted
Koosers syndicated newspaper column
American Life in Poetry.
Winner of the prestigious Gwendolyn
Brooks Poetry Prize and a teacher of
American literature, creative studies,
and environmental-literature studies
at Pennsylvania State Universitys
Altoona College, Davis has been widely
celebrated for his explorations of nature
and humans relation to it, and more
than 300 of his works have appeared in
such noted publications as American
Poetry Review, Shenandoah, and Verse
Daily.
Yet as I am far from a poet myself, I
dont feel entirely comfortable attempting
to describe Davis gifts in the manner
they deserve. Please forgive me, then, if I
instead turn to other sources.
The New York Journal of Books: Davis
poems are really lyric meditations on
the way life and the world turns, done in
stillness yet shared through a poets trust
in the world.
The Washington Independent Review
of Books: Davis takes the seed of
impermanence in every living thing and
shows it growing to the good.
The Los Angeles Review of Books:
Davis works display old quiet wisdom,
not unlike the solemnity and silence of
personal prayer.
The Bloomsbury Review: Davis
beckons the reader to pause, step away
from the bright distraction of modern
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Continued From Page 3
Common Core Curricula Have Core Problems
teachers, increasing the number of charter schools,
and adopting the Common Core standards once they
were written. Also included was the requirement that
each state sign on to one of two assessment consortia,
Partnership for Assessing Readiness for College &
Careers or Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortia,
which are now fully tied to Common Core standards
making it even more critical for those states so
inclined to pull out of Common Core because the
window is closing.
Another incentive to accept the Race to the Top
grant money was a waiver for states in complying
with George W. Bushs No Child Left Behind. Not
complying with No Child Left Behind meant a loss
of federal funds. States education departments,
in desperate need of the funding, agreed to the
Race to the Top grant terms without having any
idea what the Common Core standards would
eventually dictate.
Meanwhile, the NGA and the CCSSO, instead
of approaching legislatures with Common Core,
reached out to appointed state-school-board
officials to implement it behind the scenes.
When the standards were finished and ready for
deployment, the state school boards went directly
to local districts with the curriculum, leaving
legislators out of the loop. Once the roll-out
occurred, many parents began to object. The states,
instead of facing the objections as representation
requires, simply renamed Common Core as
Governor Branstad did in branding it Iowa Core.
Illinois kept the increasingly toxic title Illinois
Common Core Standards.
Opposing nationalized one-size-fits-all
standards that dictate curricula is one thing. But
by Kathleen McCarthy
km@rcreader.com
Continued On Page 17
River Cities Reader Vol. 21 No. 865 September 18 - October 1, 2014 13 Business Politics Arts Culture Now You Know RiverCitiesReader.com
example, will feature some of historys
most commonly challenged literary works
in September 23s Banned Books Reading
event, co-presented by the Midwest
Writing Center. Among the evenings
participants and selections will be Angela
Campbell taking on Stephen Kings
Different Seasons; Anna Tunnicliff with a
section of Kurt Vonneguts Slaughterhouse
Five; Amanda Makula reading a selection
from Blume; Lisa Powell Williams and
Ryan Collins on banned biblical and
poetic works; Liza Gilbert (vocally)
interpreting Fifty Shades of Grey, and
Emily Tobin with that insidious novel
clearly designed to warp young minds:
Philip Pullmans The Golden Compass.
Yeah. The story with the talking polar
bears. Hide the kids.
Meanwhile, for proof that works can
also be banned when heard (as opposed to
read), the Bettendorf Public Library will
host September 24s Banned Song Fest,
an evening of contested music through
the years. Youll hear library staffers Carol
Anne Chouteau, Lucas Berns, and John
Resch performing a medley of songs;
Sangeetha Rayapati singing a banned
solo from Scarlattis opera Ergiti, amor;
the House of Africa Drum Circle playing
instruments forbidden in the antebellum
South; and numbers by such noted
troublemakers as Van Morrison, Frank
Zappa, and Crosby, Stills, Nash, & Young.
And the aforementioned Kristofferson?
Ellis Kell (pictured) and Bret Dale will
perform his Sunday Morning Coming
Down, a song in which censors attempted
to change the word stoned to home.
Well, time for me to get home. For more
information on these local Banned Book
Week events, visit BettendorfLibrary.com
and RockIslandLibrary.org.
MUSIC
Thursday, September 18 Loretta
Lynn. Concert with the legendary country
singer. Adler Theatre (136 East Third
Street, Davenport). 7:30 p.m. $33-53.
For tickets, call (800)745-3000 or visit
AdlerTheatre.com.
Thursday, September 18 The
Return: A Tribute to the Beatles. The
internationally touring tribute artists in
concert. Circa 21 Dinner Playhouse (1828
Third Avenue, Rock Island). 6 and 9 p.m.
$29.50-35. For tickets and information, call
(309)786-7733 extension 2 or visit Circa21.
com.
Friday, September 19 Andy McKee.
Concert with the instrumental acoustic
guitarist. The Redstone Room (129 Main
Street, Davenport). 8 p.m. $20-25. For
tickets and information, call (563)326-
1333 or visit RiverMusicExperience.org.
Friday, September 19 Nik Turners
Hawkwind. Experimental rockers in
concert, with opening sets by Witch
Mountain, Hedersleben, and Larks
Tongue. Rock Island Brewing Company
(1815 Second Avenue, Rock Island). 8 p.m.
$13 advance tickets. For information, call
(309)793-4060 or visit RIBCO.com.
Friday, September 19 Muddy
Ruckus. Concert with the Americana
swing-punk trio from Portland, Maine.
Rozz-Tox (2108 Third Avenue, Rock Island).
8 p.m. $5. For information, call (309)200-
0978 or visit RozzTox.com.
Saturday, September 20 The Hunts.
Concert with the Virginia-based siblings
and indie-folk musicians, Augustana
Colleges Centennial Hall (3703 Seventh
What Else
Is Happenin
Whats Happenin
by Mike Schulz
mike@rcreader.com
Continued On Page 14
Music
Shook Twins
The Redstone Room
Wednesday, October 1, 7:30 p.m.
P
op culture is filled with sets of
identical twins whose warmth and
charisma have brought us joy: Susan
and Sharon in The Parent Trap; Patty
and Cathy in The Patty Duke Show;
Fred and George Weasley in the Harry
Potters; the sadistic gynecologists in
Dead Ringers; those creepy little girls
in The Shining ... .
Okay, this intro kind of got away
from me.
But for some exceptional, non-
fictional fun courtesy of identical
twins, you need look no further than
Davenports Redstone Room, which
will deliver a double helping of folk-
pop enjoyment in October 1s concert
with the Portland-based Shook Twins.
Described by Acoustic Guitar
magazine as a band that packs a
tremendous amount of artistry and
talent into their compositions, Shook
Twins began as a folk-duo project
between siblings Katelyn and Laurie
Shook, who began performing paid
gigs together in 2004. Adding other
musicians to the mix, the Shooks
released their debut album You Can
Have the Rest in 2008, and were soon
gaining notice for the incredibly
diverse range of instruments employed
in the groups repertoire. Most folk
ensembles have guitars and banjos,
of course, and Katelyn and Laurie are
adept at both. But how many can also
brag the inclusion of the mandolin,
upright bass, ukulele, tambourine,
ocarina flute, glockenspiel, djembe,
telephone microphone, and giant
golden egg? (Honestly. Its a big
egg filled with popcorn kernels
occasionally used for percussion.)
Given the bands unique sound
and Katelyns and Lauries rich and
easy harmonies, its no wonder that
big names in the business have taken
notice, with recent years finding Shook
Twins performing alongside the likes
of Mason Jennings, the Indigo Girls,
the BoDeans, and Carolina Chocolate
Drops. And with the release, this
past April, of the groups What We
Do, the raves continue to amass, with
Relix magazine calling the CD their
best work yet, and a true cohesive
statement, and USA Today declaring
that Shook Twins is ready to rattle the
music world. So enjoy the concert,
and the bold, sassy, beautiful folk
music that suggests, Come play with
us! Just like the little girls in The
Shining. Man, those freaky kids are
gonna be in my head all day now ... .
Davenports Shook Twins concert
opens with a set by Under the Willow,
and more information on the night is
available by calling (563)326-1333 or
visiting RiverMusicExperience.org.
they deserve. Please forgive me, then, if I
instead turn to other sources.
The New York Journal of Books: Davis
poems are really lyric meditations on
the way life and the world turns, done in
stillness yet shared through a poets trust
in the world.
The Washington Independent Review
of Books: Davis takes the seed of
impermanence in every living thing and
shows it growing to the good.
The Los Angeles Review of Books:
Davis works display old quiet wisdom,
not unlike the solemnity and silence of
personal prayer.
The Bloomsbury Review: Davis
beckons the reader to pause, step away
from the bright distraction of modern
life, and consider the profound beauty of
the natural world.
The Englewood Review of Books: Davis
writing pushes the poet and reader
past nature and into the mystery of the
human condition.
And BooksAndCulture.com: Davis
forges intense observation with the
revelatory, akin to Dantes celebrated
realism in his epic about the afterlife.
I may not be a poet, but damn it, I can
cut and paste with the best of em.
A Wilson Center reception and book
signing will be held after Todd Davis
reading, and more information on the
authors area visit is available by calling
(309)794-7316 or visiting
Augustana.edu/arts.
River Cities Reader Vol. 21 No. 865 September 18 - October 1, 2014 14 Business Politics Arts Culture Now You Know RiverCitiesReader.com
Avenue, Rock Island). 8 p.m. $10. For tickets
and information, call (309)794-7306 or visit
Augustana.edu/tickets.
Sunday, September 21 Genesis
Doctors in Recital. Quad Cities physicians
and families perform in the fifth-annual
recital to benefit music-therapy programs
for Genesis Health System hospice patients.
Augustana Colleges Centennial Hall (3703
Seventh Avenue, Rock Island). 2 p.m. $15-20.
For tickets and information, call (563)421-
6861 or visit GenesisHealth.com/give.
Sunday, September 21 Matuto.
Brazilian-style jazz and folk artists lead a 3
p.m. jazz workshop (free for students, $5
for adults) and perform a 6 p.m. concert
($10-15) in Polyrhythms Third Sunday Jazz
and Matine Series. The Redstone Room (129
Main Street, Davenport). For information,
call (309)373-0790 or visit Polyrhythms.ning.
com or RiverMusicExperience.org. For a
2013 interview with Matutos Rob Curto, visit
RCReader.com/y/matuto.
Sunday, September 21 Tonic Sol Fa.
Concert with the a cappella quartet. Central
Performing Arts Center (519 East 11th
Street, DeWitt). 7:30 p.m. $10-25. For tickets
and information, call (563)659-3811 or visit
CentralPerformingArtsCenter.org.
Monday, September 22 Cody Canada
& the Departed. Rock and alt-country
musicians in concert. The Redstone Room
(129 Main Street, Davenport). 7:30 p.m. $17-
18. For tickets and information, call (563)326-
1333 or visit RiverMusicExperience.org. For a
2009 interview with Canada, visit RCReader.
com/y/canada.
Friday, September 26 Thollem Electric:
Silver Ochre New Silent Films of ACVilla.
Shorts ranging from 30 seconds to four
minutes in length scored and performed
live by Thollem Electric with a vintage
electric piano and analog effects. Rozz-Tox
(2108 Third Avenue, Rock Island). 9 p.m. $5.
For information, call (309)200-0978 or visit
RozzTox.com.
Saturday, September 27 Gloria
Hardiman. Blues chanteuse in concert, with
an opening set by the Mark Avey Band. The
Redstone Room (129 Main Street, Davenport).
9 p.m. $8. For tickets and information, call
(563)326-1333 or visit RiverMusicExperience.
org.
Saturday, September 27 Iowa Womens
Music Festival. The 21st-annual showcase
of female talent, with performances by Girls
Rock!, Crys Matthews, the Matriarchs, the
Rae Fehring Band, Kiya Heartwood, and Alix
Olson. Johnson County Fairgrounds (4265
Oak Crest Hill Rd. SE, Iowa City). Noon-6
p.m. Free admission. For information, call
(319)335-1486 or visit IWMF.weebly.com.
Monday, September 29 Festival of
Praise Tour. Music and fellowship with
singer/songwriter Fred Hammond and
platinum-selling tenor Donnie McClurkin.
Adler Theatre (136 East Third Street,
Davenport). 7 p.m. $30-55. For tickets, call
(800)745-3000 or visit AdlerTheatre.com.
THEATRE
Thursday, September 25, through
Sunday, September 28 Big Rock Candy
Mountain. One-weekend return of Tristan
Tapscotts and Danny Whites folk/bluegrass
musical comedy. District Theatre (1623
Second Avenue, Rock Island). Thursday
through Saturday 8 p.m., Sunday 2 p.m. For
tickets and information, call (309)235-1654 or
visit DistrictTheatre.com.
Tuesday, September 30 Jekyll & Hyde.
Touring production of the Tony-nominated
musical drama based on the Robert Louis
Stevenson novel. Adler Theatre (136 East
Third Street, Davenport). 7:30 p.m. $37-
57. For tickets, call (800)745-3000 or visit
AdlerTheatre.com.
DANCE
Saturday, September 27 The Story
of Job: When Bad Things Happen to Good
People. The Chicago-based company Ballet
5:8 presents a balletic interpretation of the
biblical figures life. Nighswander Theatre
(2822 Eastern Avenue, Davenport). 6:30 p.m.
$18-24. For tickets, call (800)838-3006 or visit
Ballet58.org.
LITERARY ARTS
Monday, September 22 Chris Crutcher.
The author of King of the Mild Frontier:
An Ill-Advised Autobiography will discuss
banned books. Bettendorf Public Library
(2950 Learning Campus Drive, Bettendorf ).
7 p.m. Free admission. For information, call
(563)344-4175 or visit BettendorfLibrary.
com. For a 2009 interview with Crutcher, visit
RCReader.com/y/crutcher.
Thursday, September 25 Im with the
BannedReadings. Readings of winners
from the River Cities Readers short-fiction
contest. Bettendorf Public Library (2950
Learning Campus Drive, Bettendorf ). 7
p.m. Free admission. For information, call
(563)344-4175 or visit BettendorfLibrary.com.
Saturday, September 27 Ghost
Tales. Annual outdoor presentation of
spooky, family-friendly stories told by local
storytellers. Colonel Davenport House
(Arsenal Island, Rock Island). 7 p.m. $4-6, free
to ages 12 and under and active military.
For information, call (309)737-4280 or visit
DavenportHouse.org.
SPORTS
Saturday, September 20 Quad City
Rollers. Womens flat-track roller derby,
featuring the All-Stars vs. the Sioux City Derby
Dames. Davenport RiverCenter (136 East
Third Street, Davenport). 6 p.m. $6-12. For
tickets and information, call (563)326-8500 or
visit QuadCityRollers.com.
Sunday, September 28 WWE Live.
Event featuring world heavyweight
champion John Cena, Dean Ambrose, Seth
Rollins, Bray Wyatt, and other stars of the
WWE. i wireless Center (1201 River Drive,
Moline). 5 p.m. $18.50-98.50. For tickets, call
(800)745-3000 or visit iwirelessCenter.com.
VISUAL ARTS
Saturday, September 20, and Sunday,
September 21 Riverssance Festival of
Fine Art. The 27th-annual festival featuring
works by more than 100 national artists, live
entertainment, a childrens art tent, food
vendors, and more. Lindsay Park (River Drive
and Mound Street, Davenport). Saturday
10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free
admission. For information, call (309)737-
8910 or visit MidCoast.org.
Friday, September 26, and Saturday,
September 27 Great River Quilt
Show. Event presented by the Mississippi
Valley Quilters Guild, with more than 400
quilts on display, a judged quilt show, an
auction, quilt appraisals by appointment,
featured quilter Sally Noland, and more.
Davenport RiverCenter (136 East Third Street,
Davenport). Friday 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Saturday 9
a.m.-4 p.m. $6, ages 10 and under free. For
tickets and information, call (563)381-8685 or
visit MVQG.org.
Saturday, September 27, through
Sunday, January 4 African-American Art
After 1950: Perspectives from the David
D. Driskell Center. Exhibition of works by
artists including Faith Ringgold, Romare
Bearden, Elizabeth Catlett, Sam Gilliam,
Kara Walker, Chakaia Booker, and Willie
Cole. Figge Art Museum (225 West Second
Street, Davenport). Tuesdays through
Saturdays 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Thursdays 10 a.m.-9
p.m., Sundays noon-5 p.m. Free with $4-7
admission. For information, call (563)326-
7804 or visit FiggeArtMuseum.org.
EVENTS
Saturday, September 20 Brew Ha
Ha. The Davenport Jaycees host annual
samplings by local, regional, and national
brewers, plus live music by Corporate Rock,
improv comedy with the Blacklist, and more.
LeClaire Park (River Drive and Ripley Street,
Davenport). 1-5 p.m. $30-35. For tickets and
information, visit DavenportJaycee.com/
brewhaha.html.
Saturday, September 20, and Sunday,
September 21 Celtic Festival & Highland
Games. Annual outdoor celebration hosted
by Celtic Cultures Alliance of the Quad Cities,
featuring games of skill, competitions, live
music, dancing, vendors, childrens activities,
historical presentations, and more. Centennial
Park (Beiderbecke Drive and Marquette
Street, Davenport). Free admission. For
information, visit CelticHighlandGames.org.
Sunday, September 21 Rozz Talks.
Andrew King interviews Rozz-Tox proprietor
Benjamin Fawks, followed by a live set by
Tomtem. Rozz-Tox (2108 Third Avenue,
Rock Island). 8 p.m. Free admission. For
information, call (309)200-0978 or visit
RozzTox.com.
Thursday, September 25 2014
Womens Leadership Conference. Discover
and develop leadership skills in an event
featuring inspirational speakers, networking,
and more. Davenport RiverCenter (136 East
Third Street, Davenport). 7:30 a.m. $125-150.
For information, call (563)326-8500 or visit
RiverCtr.com.
Friday, September 26, through Sunday,
September 28 Quad City Balloon
Festival. A weekend of hot-air balloon
launches, with food vendors, a kids zone,
hot-air balloon tethered rides, and more.
Rock Island County Fairgrounds (Arthur
Drive and Avenue of the Cities, East Moline).
Friday 5-8:30 p.m., Saturday 7-9 a.m. and
5-8:30 p.m., Sunday 7-9 a.m. Donations of
non-perishable food items appreciated.
For information, call (563)940-6273 or visit
QuadCitiesBalloonFestival.com.
Saturday, September 27 The Amazing
Race featuring Anchor Games 2014. Race
around Rock Island completing physical,
mental, and entertaining tasks with one to
four family members or friends. Schwiebert
Riverfront Park (17th and 20th streets, Rock
Island). 10 a.m. $30/person; register by
September 22. For information, call (309)732-
7275 or visit RIGov.org.
Saturday, September 27 A Night to
Beat the Big O.The NormaLeah Ovarian
Cancer Foundations third-annual fundraiser
benefiting the fight against ovarian cancer,
with emcee Paula Sands and live music by
Soul Storm. Crow Valley Golf Club (4315
East 60th Street, Davenport). 7 p.m. $50. For
tickets and information, visit
NormaLeahOvarianCancerFoundation.org.
Saturday, September 27 Quad Cities
Prayer Breakfast. Event with featured
speaker Robert Schuller, music by Marshall
Hall, and testimony by Pear Harbor survivor
Jim Downing. Davenport RiverCenter (136
East Third Street, Davenport). 7 a.m. breakfast,
8-10 a.m. presentations. $18/person, $98/
table of eight. For information, call (563)322-
7777 or visit RiverCtr.com.
Saturday, September 27 Farewell to
Summer Party. Event benefiting Toys for
Tots, featuring games, prizes, a cook-out, a
homemade-bikini contest with cash prizes,
and concert sets by Jake McVey, Stephen
David Johnson, and Dirt Road Rockers. On
the Rock Grille & Bar (4619 34th Street, Rock
Island). For information, call (309)732-1631 or
visit OnTheRockGrille.com.
Continued From Page 13
What Else Is Happenin
River Cities Reader Vol. 21 No. 865 September 18 - October 1, 2014 15 Business Politics Arts Culture Now You Know RiverCitiesReader.com
With the familys proximity to Washington,
D.C., some of these classes were in major
institutions, such as junior-high classes at the
Corcoran Museum of Art. Art camp, art classes,
and art exhibitions led to college art studies at
Temple Universitys Tyler School of Art.
Once in Rock Island, Megan purchased a
home and procured a renovation grant. Kristin,
who had just finished college, came to lend a
hand for the summer of 1984. It was a great
arrangement, Kristin said. I had the attic of the
house for a studio and free lodging. ... I think it
is important to get undergraduate teachers out
of your head. The stay extended to two years.
During that time between undergraduate and
graduate schools, Kristin taught art classes for
children and adults in Augustanas Kaleidoscope
program. I was struck by her lively, inventive
teaching. One snowbound mid-winter day,
I asked what she was doing with some new,
jumbo-sized trash cans. Her laughing reply was:
We are going fishing! For her class, she set up
wooden rods to be dipped into an ocean can
that would be stocked with the fish created by
her young students.
Others recognized her teaching verve. Teresa
by Sherry C. Maurer
sherry_maurer@yahoo.com
O
ne is a potter, one a painter. Megan and
Kristin Quinn are sisters living and
teaching on opposite Mississippi River
shores of the Quad Cities. Their paths to art
were different, and their chosen media put them
at polar ends of a visual-arts axis. Kristin said
that, in jest, a brother-in-law calls her Artsy
and Megan Craftsy.
It doesnt take long in their presence to grasp
their deep mutual admiration and friendship.
However, Kristin was nine years old when
Megan left for college, and the age difference
precluded any close relationship in childhood.
As the Quinn sisters look back at their
family of five children, they see just a few
shared inspirations from their time growing
up in Bowie, Maryland. Their parents were
educators. He was a physicist and professor at
the University of Maryland who specialized
in optics and provided access to visually
stimulating apparatuses: prisms, lenses, even
early holograms. We played laser tag with real
lasers, said Megan with a laugh.
Along with plentiful lessons on the natural
world, they were encouraged to ask questions.
Kristin explained: On long car trips, we passed
the time with questions to stump Dad: Why was
the sky orange, what caused hail, and how were
Different Paths to Similar Ends
Megan and Kristin Quinn Honored with Riverssances Harley Award
Night Caravan by Kristin Quinn
Continued On Page 17
ART
tunnels built under the
bay? ... We refer to these
questions now as Tunnel
Talk questions.
The inquisitiveness
fostered in their youth
is readily apparent in
their art, and theyve
built similar teaching
careers: Megan is a
ceramics professor at
Augustana College, while
Kristin the painter is
a professor and chairs
the art department at St.
Ambrose University. They
will be jointly honored
with the Harley Award at
12:30 p.m. on Saturday,
September 20, as part of
MidCoast Fine Arts Riverssance Festival of the
Arts at Lindsay Park in Davenport.
As a teen, Megan rode her bike to Annapolis,
Maryland, where she visited a studio of potters
who held some fascination because they
worked and lived in one building. But she fell
in love with art during college although she
studied botany at the University of Maryland.
The taxonomy
course required
lots of drawing of
specimens, she
recalled. It seemed
drawing was required
for everything, so
I took a drawing
course to improve my
skills.
That was her
introduction to fine
art, and she added
ceramics classes.
After graduating,
she spent two years
in an apprenticeship
with a production
studio, Ridker
Pottery in Maryland.
She then completed her MFA in ceramics at the
University of Notre Dame. Hired by Augustana
College, Megan moved to the Quad Cities in
1980.
Kristin, on the other hand, showed an early
art interest and was encouraged to pursue it by
her mother. Beginning in late elementary school,
she said, I was in an art class every weekend.
River Cities Reader Vol. 21 No. 865 September 18 - October 1, 2014 16 Business Politics Arts Culture Now You Know RiverCitiesReader.com
Im with the Banned!
Third Prize
Right Honorable
Never buy something called a conch fritter
at a Midwestern street fair. Leo had gotten a
little too Bixed before strolling downtown,
pinging around Leo Land, inside his
sunburned head, feet on autopilot, watching
what passed for the world wobble before his
eyes. He lost himself in a maze of thoughts
that were rendered vague by his lack of words
to express them. Verbally disinclined at best,
a breakfast of Tequila Sunrises and Triscuits
had not helped. Still, he could navigate, and
make change, and order bad food. The fritter
was a new low, certainly, but no match for his
unassailably iron stomach.
Incognito in shades and flip-flops, but
maybe still a bit exposed, he bought a cap.
Now he felt relaxed, inconspicuous. Then, a
block away, he saw the first Stalker. Damn!
Had they found him already?
They always looked the same dark suit,
wraparound sunglasses, cropped hair. Leo
crossed the street, into the shade. There was
another ... no, two more! Theyd seen him!
Leo knew they wouldnt run. Too obvious. But
thered be more. There always were. Leo was
good, though. Cunning. He eased into the
crowd around the beer tent, hunkered down,
ducked between two buildings and ... shit! At
the end of the alley was a black car, its door
open. Firm hands took his elbows.
Congressman Leonard? Time for your
conference call with the Koch brothers, sir.
Coke? said Leo hopefully. No use fighting.
He got into the car.
Perhaps later, Congressman. Business
before pleasure. Some coffee?
Mary Cartter, Davenport
Whispers
For five years, it had been just the two
of them, behind the locked door of the
meeting room at the library, discussing their
shared addiction: eating. Peggy knew that
the librarians, who pretended to be so nice,
whispered about them. Admittedly, she and
Margot did appear to be an odd pair Margot,
as thin as cellophane; Peggy, as pillowy as a
snowdrift.
There had been three of them once. But
the third woman, Shelly, wanted to talk only
about finding a man. Peggy had suggested
there were other groups for that and Shelly had
stopped coming.
Peggy often saw Shelly about town, a man
on her arm, both chubby and smiling. She
never met Peggys gaze. But Peggy could hear
their whispers long after they passed.
Peggy looked at her watch. 7:05.
Margot was never late.
7:10. Peggy began to pace.
7:15. A knock on the door.
Peggy jumped at the knob, flung the door
wide.
Before her stood a man.
His white T-shirt, dotted with ketchup
and mustard stains, stretched like a sausage
casing over his belly. Bread crumbs and poppy
seeds peppered his moustache. His pea-sized
eyes were the color of Nutella. He smelled of
French fries and carried a can of Diet Coke.
Is this Weight Worriers? Am I late?
She stood there until something fell off the
shelf inside her.
Come in, Peggy said. Looks like it will be
just the two of us tonight.
She shut the door, and the librarians began
to whisper again.
Mary Kay Lane, Muscatine, Iowa
First Prize
Superman
I didnt really want to go to the reunion. Id
moved away years ago and wasnt interested
in what my classmates had done for the last
50 years, but my best friend from high school
is still my best friend and she begged me, so I
booked a flight and met her there.
Our old school is a museum now and can
be rented for parties. The over-zealous reunion
organizers booked the gym and resurrected
the theme from our senior prom, An Evening
in Paris. The table decorations were little
Eiffel Towers adorned with flowers, and theyd
strung twinkly lights and twisted, crpe-paper
streamers across the ceiling. The one good
restaurant in town had been hired to cater the
event, and there was even an open bar.
I hadnt thought about Albert Klein for
years, but he rushed up to greet me as soon
as we arrived, and the rest of the night was a
throwback to our school days: He followed
me everywhere. We reminisced about how Id
always dated jocks and he always told me he
wanted to save me from them. I said he should
have because my marriage to our quarterback
had been a disaster. At the end of the evening,
when he said it wasnt too late, he could still
save me, I just laughed at him.
Later that night I was back at my hotel
getting ready for bed when Albert called
and told me to look out the window. There,
running across the parking lot, was a pudgy
old guy in his underwear with a red cape
flowing behind him.
Sharon Olsen Abrams, Davie, Florida
Yo, Dante
So, Im hanging out in the Limbo Lounge
swapping rhymes, as usual, with my man Homer
when I hear a dulcet voice whisper Virgil.
I raise my eyes to see standing before me a
woman so poised, so lovely she seems a star
fallen from another realm.
Please, call me Verge, and, sorry for
staring, but we so rarely receive visitors.
She flashes a smile radiant as grace. The
names Beatrice, but you can call me Bea.
Beatific, indeed.
Verge, heres the deal. Ive been sent to ask
you to help one of your fellow word-slingers,
a guy named Dante, find his way out of a funk
so low its put him in mortal danger.
Isnt he the one who wrote all those poems
about his crush on some girl? He borrowed
a few of my moves. Hey, thats you, the girl.
Right?
You got it.
But what can I do, Bea?
Guide him on a pilgrimage through this
place, like the tour you took before, from top
to bottom. Youre his hero; hell follow your
lead. Dont worry about getting clearance.
Well handle that. She tosses me a phone. His
numbers programmed in.
So I call him.
Yo, Dante, Verge here. No, for real. Back
atcha, love your work. I pitch him the tour; he
could write a book about it.
After a pause, he groans. All right, then, Ill
go to hell. When do we leave?
Peter A. Small, Davenport
COVER STORY
Continued From Page 7
River Cities Reader Vol. 21 No. 865 September 18 - October 1, 2014 17 Business Politics Arts Culture Now You Know RiverCitiesReader.com
Different Paths to Similar Ends
Mesich, now a well-regarded Quad Cities artist,
took one of her adult classes and said: She
inspired me to continue my foray in painting,
something my college teacher had not.
That period was the one time when Megan
and Kristin collaborated on making art. Megan
threw fairly large and roughly articulated
vessels, and Kristin responded with boldly
stroked painting on the surfaces. One of the
vessels, Judith, was added to the art displayed in
Augustana Colleges library.
Collaboration ceased when Kristin left the
Quad Cities to pursue a graduate degree in
painting at Indiana University. After completing
her MFA and a year teaching in Texas, she
was hired in 1989 to join the art faculty at St.
Ambrose.
Both artists have maintained a love of
teaching undergraduate students. Even students
who have gone on in other fields have later
told them they valued the class opportunity.
Megan chuckled about the medical doctor
who, on seeing Kristin in a restaurant, told her
that Megans ceramics class had changed his
life. Megan continued: Then I saw him in the
hospital for something, and he didnt say a word
about the class to me! Wed better not name
him.
Their approach to teaching reflects the
Tunnel Talk questions an exploration of
why. Megan noted: You have to figure it out
for yourself in art; you cant find the answer in a
book. Students learn to use their eyes and their
arms. The teachers said that students in an art
class relax to be experimental, which raises their
whole sense of self-awareness. They both said
it is an honor to see students step out of their
comfort zones and commit to trying out art.
Both teach three-dimensional design, and
they visit each others programs for inspiration.
Several times during the past decade, they both
had a design class create an assignment using
altered books, with the resulting art exhibited
together in one of the college libraries. They
share guest artists and visit art displayed on the
others campus.
When I asked if they critique each others
artwork, they said no although sometimes
Kristin will ask Megan if a work seems finished;
Megan insists Kristin already knows the answer.
In their art, the common denominator
seems to be their enthusiasm for exploring the
natural world. Megan cited early inspiration
from Cycladic art, Hieronymus Bosch and
other potters such as Hans Coper and Richard
DeVore. Kristin cited many artists who have
influenced her work as well: At first when
I started painting, I wanted to be Richard
Diebenkorn, but now it is Philip Guston who
brings me to my knees. ... And I have always
loved the [Renaissance] Italians like Mantegna.
They both blend bits from multiple sources,
moving back and forth from spare to decorative
styles, expanding out in challenges.
Megan often thinks about building vessels
in terms of human characteristics figurative
references, so lip refers to the top edge of a
form, and the words belly, neck, and foot to
other appropriate parts. Her vessels take on
anthropomorphic leans, twists, and swaggers;
she excels at asking the clay to be alive and in
motion. When wood-fired, which is her favorite
mode of firing, the works have a rosy golden
glow.
Of late, she also has built vessels that suggest
plant life, such as Blue Poppy (2013). This
porcelain jar combines a russet-pod-like base
that grows into a serrated flange, topped by
radiating flared turquoise petals. These pieces
combine her love of botany and ceramics.
Among several public-art projects Megan
has helped create, her most visible is located
in Schwiebert Riverfront Park in Rock Island.
Last summer, she guided Metro Arts high-
school and college students to create a mosaic
that was added to the 2005 sculpture by Stuart
Morris titled Lloyds Trek. The sculpture honors
Megans late husband, Lloyd Schoeneman an
instrumental administrator at Quad City Arts.
Although she was lead artist on the project,
Megan credited the result to the students who
toiled in the heat to complete the mosaic, and
she said shes delighted by the communitys
positive reaction to it.
Kristins current paintings are layered
explorations of competing levels of activity. She
works on them over an extended period of time
a year or more. Her process varies between
abstraction and representation, using all kinds
of tools to move the oil paint including putty
knives, squeegees, and spatulas. I want the
paintings to feel like you are in a space where
time is evolving, she said.
At the top of Night Caravan (2013), a smoky
yellow-pink arc swirls behind an opaque
silhouette of tree branches. Ribbons of color
drop from the swirl, stopped by a cloud of blue
on the left and truncation on the right. Below,
echoes of the stripes play through mysterious
blue, luminous glazed passages.
Of her process, Kristin writes: When I
stand on Devonian limestone on the levee of
the Mississippi, the barges and riverboats pass;
herons fly; behind, a train noisily rumbles by
and streetlights flicker on; the smell of diesel
fuel wafts by while rain clouds build. Its the
density of this kind of experience that continues
to raise questions and excite me as a painter.
In addition to teaching, Kristin has been
involved with the Freight House Farmers
Market and Quad City Arts. Megan has
volunteered for Quad City Arts, worked last year
with the Broadway neighborhood association
to present a 25th-anniversary art fair, and has
helped the Moline High School Empty Bowl
Project fundraise for local food pantries. When
the sum of their teaching, creativity, and service
activities is added to their exhibitions and
speaking engagements, it represents a lasting
art commitment recognized by the Harley
Award. In a news release on these 2014 winners,
Riverssance committee member Jenni Venema
Swanson states: Both artists contribute greatly
to the community, to their respective states and
respective academic institutions.
Sherry C. Maurer holds an MFA in painting, an
MA in art history, and a BFA with a printmaking
concentration. She teaches art appreciation at
Black Hawk College and is building coordinator
for the Bucktown Center for the Arts.
Continued From Page 15
by Sherry C. Maurer
sherry_maurer@yahoo.com
Blue Poppy by Megan Quinn
ART
WORDS FROM THE EDITOR
Continued From Page 12
Common Core Curricula Have Core Problems
when those standards are woefully inadequate,
and put our children at a significant competitive
disadvantage, its quite another matter. There is too
little space here to provide the proper insight into
the many serious problems with Common Core
standards and assessments. It is well-documented
that the Common Core curriculum strictly teaches
to its standards, and there is already an enormous
for-profit motivation to align the standards with
assessments utilized by American colleges and
universities, as well as associate-degree facilities
and vocational schools, in placing high-school
graduates.
It is a closed-loop system that uses learning
techniques and modern technologies to identify
competencies early on. Exhaustive information is
gathered into lifelong longitudinal databases for
the purpose of systematically modifying students
behavior and eventually pushing most children
toward pre-determined vocations. A smaller
percentage will be considered prepared enough
for selective-college admittance. Common Core
author Zimba admitted to an audience during
a presentation to the Massachusetts Board of
Education that the standards were not even
high enough for most to achieve readiness for a
selective college, meaning an accredited university
or college (RCReader.com/y/core4).
This is hardly an endorsement of a new
standard in education. Basically, the endgame
for Common Core is to provide students with a
minimum level of employment skills by dumbing
down the curriculum enough that students, upon
graduation, can be placed in some workplace of
the governments choosing.
Common Core lessons are designed to equalize
the classroom, disallowing higher achievement
and eliminating competition. Common Core is
a new education system, the content of which
advocates systems or group thinking as a
replacement for individual thinking. Collaboration
and learning processes are encouraged even if it
means the processes produce incorrect answers.
How a student arrives at an incorrect answer is
valued above a correct answer, especially if the
correct answer was not derived using the lessons
prescribed process. By focusing on process rather
than correct answers, the classroom is leveled so
that no student achieves more than another. Truth
becomes relative.
The longitudinal databases will include all
manner of information on each student, including
intrusive medical and lifestyle data that is none of
a schools business. Furthermore, the information
can be collected and shared with third parties,
including the federal government, without the
consent of parents.
There is a vast amount of information on
Common Core, both for and against, to investigate
and decide for yourself if it is worthy of our
children. Because Common Core is still voluntary,
at least 26 states are enacting legislation to ban
Common Core from being implemented. This
movement has legs because concerned parents and
teachers are civically engaged, with more joining
everyday. The Associated Press has published a
succinct overview of Common Core in each state
(RCReader.com/y/core5).
A leading expert on and critic of Common
Core, Duke Pesta of Freedom Project Education
(FPEUSA.org), will give a free presentation on
Saturday, September 20, at 1 p.m. at Peoria, Illinois
Gateway Building (200 Northeast Water Street).
The presentation is sponsored by Illinois Citizens
for a Better Education and will be live-streamed at
http://ustre.am/1gBby.
by Kathleen McCarthy
km@rcreader.com
River Cities Reader Vol. 21 No. 865 September 18 - October 1, 2014 18 Business Politics Arts Culture Now You Know RiverCitiesReader.com
doctor said this! Ive always been sure to make
those people feel about two inches tall by saying
that I would never do that to my husband. And
honestly, who wants a child this way?!
This womans ethics are the single best
guarantee a man has that birth control will
be used instead of dropped behind the bed.
Meanwhile, many people will tell you they
value ethics, and then just cross their fingers,
and hope their partner has them. The thing to
do is to make ethics a requirement, meaning
looking for a partner to be OMG ethical!!!
the way you look for them to be OMG hot!!!
In other words, yes, a man who doesnt want a
child should practice abstinence the practical,
doable kind: abstaining from getting into bed
with any woman until hes observed that he has
reason to trust her. If he wants something loud,
sticky, and expensive in his life, he can buy a
Ferrari and drive it over chewed gum.
Leica Woman Scorned
My girlfriend bought me a digital camera
for my birthday. Unfortunately, the one she
got me lacked some features I wanted, so
I returned it to the store, got the camera I
wanted, and paid the difference. When I
told her this, I think she was offended. Did I
screw up?
Photo-Bombed
When people say about gift-giving its the
thought that counts, they dont mean the
recipients thought: Did you find this in the
trash?
Yes, you screwed up not by ultimately
getting the camera you need, but by making
the one she gave you disappear like a witness
about to testify against a drug lord. Turning
the gift your partner gave you into the gift
you want should be a three-step process. First,
theres the effusing no matter how un-
effusive you feel: Wow, bat excrement! Then
theres the waiting. One day, maybe two days.
And finally, I just love my camera, honey. But
theres another one that has this feature I really
need this camera-nerd thing you couldnt
have known about. Would you come with me
to check it out? By keeping her involved, the
camera you upgrade to becomes, essentially,
Son of Camera that she gave you. By the way,
thats how you should start talking about
your new camera, and fast, before you find
yourself using it to take a series of forlorn all-
by-myselfies to post on your soon-to-be-live
Tinder profile.
Got A Problem? Ask Amy Alkon.
171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405
or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (AdviceGoddess.com)
2014, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved.
Ask
the
Advice
Goddess
BY AMY ALKON
Doody-Bound
You printed a letter from a guy who
doesnt want to be a father and wanted to
know how to be sure his girlfriend is on birth
control. You said, The single worst form
of birth control is trusting that a woman
longing for a baby is taking hers (with
whether shes ethical being a mitigating
factor). But you forgot to tell him the
magic word: abstinence! In addition to
preventing pregnancy, it also guarantees that
you wont get STDs or suffer the physically
or psychologically damaging effects of
premarital sex. Also, whered you get the idea
that women are conniving to get a bun in
the oven without informing their partner?
Right: Were all baby-hungry, unethical
hopeful breeders.
Saved Myself
I like to offer Dont have sex! as a form of
practical advice usually just as Im getting
into my flying car.
Yes, abstaining from sex will help a person
avoid producing offspring, getting STDs, or
breaking a leg after somebody cheaps out on
the home-dungeon installation. But theres
a reason they call it a sex drive, not a sex
parked in the garage. Also, the advice Just
dont have sex! is especially impractical for
guys in their hormone-raging early 20s like
the guy who wrote that letter. Sure, hell just
sit his 800-pound libido down for a little chat
and then politely decline any opportunity
to have sex as if hed just been offered some
questionable hors doeuvre.
As for where I got the idea about (some)
women conniving to get a bun in the oven
without informing their partner, well, (1) in
e-mail Ive received from dismayed men paying
child support to these women, and (2) from
research by therapist Dr. Melinda Spohn. She
found that more than a third of the 400 women
she surveyed at two community colleges had
risked pregnancy surreptitiously going
without birth control or sporadically using it
when they had sex with men with desirable
qualities (such as an apparent willingness to
commit and good financial prospects).
On a positive note, it isnt only men who
are appalled by this behavior. A female reader
who wanted a second child but whose husband
wasnt up for it wrote, I cant even remember
how many people heard this and said, Well,
accidents happen, followed by a wink wink.
Seriously, its disgusting! Even our family
wqpt.org
Theatre of the Mind
Live, televised 1940s-style radio
drama. . . its radio you can see,
complete with actors, music
and a crew of sound effect
technicians, creating it all
right before your eyes.
Dracula
Monday, October 13 at 10:00 p.m.
Frankenstein
Monday, October 20 at 10:00 p.m.
Twisted Tales of Poe
Monday, October 27 at 10:00 p.m.
Join us for television that
goes bump in the night!
River Cities Reader Vol. 21 No. 865 September 18 - October 1, 2014 19 Business Politics Arts Culture Now You Know RiverCitiesReader.com
consumption and Nobel Prizes. Those countries
whose citizens eat more chocolate have also
produced an inordinate number of Nobel
laureates. So does this mean that chocolate
makes you smarter, as some other studies have
also suggested? Maybe, the report concluded.
Because it is especially important for you to
be at the height of your mental powers in the
coming weeks, Leo, why not experiment with
this possibility?

VIRGO (August 23-September
22): I rarely waste my time trying
to convert the skeptics who
attack astrology with a hostile zeal that belies
their supposed scientific objectivity. Theyre
often as dogmatic and closed-minded as any
fundamentalist religious nut. When Im in a
tricky mood, though, I might tell them about
the Crawford Perspectives, a highly rated
Wall Street investment publication that relies
extensively on astrological analysis. Or I might
quote the wealthy financier J.P. Morgan, who
testified that millionaires dont use astrology;
billionaires do. That brings us to my main
point, Virgo: The astrological omens suggest
that the coming weeks will be a favorable time
for you to put in motion plans to get richer
quicker. Take advantage!

LIBRA (September 23-October
22): When Libra-born Mohandas
Gandhi was 19, he moved to London from his
native India to study law. Soon he got caught up
in the effort to become an English gentleman.
He took elocution lessons and learned to dance.
He bought fine clothes and a gold watch chain.
Each morning he stood before a giant mirror
and fussed with his hair and necktie until they
were perfect. In retrospect, this phase of his life
seems irrelevant. Years later, he was a barefoot
rebel leader using nonviolent civil disobedience
to help end the British rule of India, often
wearing a loincloth and shawl made of fabric
he wove himself. With this as your inspiration,
Libra, identify aspects of your current life that
contribute little to the soul you must eventually
become.

SCORPIO (October 23-November
21): This might be controversial, but
I suspect that for now your emphasis
shouldnt be on sex, drugs, and rock and roll.
Instead, your specialties should be hard-earned
intimacy, altered states that are solely the result
of deep introspection, and music that arouses
reverence and other sacred emotions. You
are entering a phase in which crafty power
is less important than vigorous receptivity;
when success is not nearly as interesting as
meaningfulness; when what you already
understand is less valuable than what you can
imagine and create.

SAGITTARIUS (November
22-December 21): You are entering
a phase when you will reap rich
rewards by nurturing the health of your favorite
Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny's
EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES
& DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES
The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at
1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700
FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Brezsny
ARIES (March 21-April 19): These
horoscopes I write for you arent
primarily meant to predict the future.
They are more about uncovering
hidden potentials and desirable possibilities that
are stirring below the surface right now. When
Im doing my job well, I help you identify those
seeds so you can cultivate them proactively.
Bearing that in mind, Ill pose three pertinent
questions. (1) What experiments might stir up
more intimacy in the relationships you want
to deepen? (2) What could you change about
yourself to attract more of the love and care
you want? (3) Is there anything you can do to
diminish the sting of bad memories about past
romantic encounters, thereby freeing you to
love with more abandon?

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The old
Latin motto Gradu diverso, via una can
be translated as either Continuing on
the same road, but with a different stride or
Going the same way, but changing your pace.
I think this is excellent advice for you, Taurus.
By my reckoning, you are on the correct path.
You are headed in the right direction. But you
need to shift your approach a bit not a lot,
just a little. Youve got to make some minor
adjustments in the way you flow.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): For
years, Donna and George Lewis
used a 33-pound, oval-shaped rock
as a doorstop in their Tennessee home. Later
they moved it to their garden. Then one day
George analyzed it with his metal detector and
realized it had unusual properties. He took it
to scientists who informed him it was a rare
and valuable four-and-a-half-billion-year-old
meteorite. With this as our subtext, Gemini,
Im asking you if there might be some aspect
of your life that is more precious than you
imagine. Now is a favorable time to find out and
make appropriate adjustments in your behavior.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Ive
got a radical proposal, Cancerian. It
might offend you. You may think Im
so far off the mark that you will stop reading
my horoscopes. But Im willing to take that
risk, and Im prepared to admit that I could
be wrong. But I dont think I am wrong. So
heres what I have to say: There is a sense in
which the source of your wound is potentially
also the source of the medicine that will
heal the wound. What hurt you could fix you.
But you must be careful not to interpret this
masochistically. You cant afford to be too literal.
Im not saying that the source of your pain is
trustworthy or has good intentions. Be cagey as
you learn how to get the cure you need.

LEO (July 23-August 22): The
prestigious New England Journal of
Medicine published a study with a
conclusion we might expect to see in a tabloid
newspaper or satirical Web site. It reported
that there is a correlation between chocolate
posse, ensemble, or organization. How is the
groups collective mental health? Are there
any festering rifts? Any apathetic attitudes or
weakening resolves? I choose you to be the
leader who builds solidarity and cultivates
consensus. I ask you to think creatively about
how to make sure everyones individual goals
synergize with the greater good. Are you familiar
with the Arabic word taarradhin? It means a
compromise that allows everyone to win a
reconciliation in which no one loses face.

CAPRICORN (December
22-January 19): The good news is
that America has more trees than it
did 100 years ago. Aggressive efforts to replace
the decimated old-growth forests have paid off.
The bad news is that the new forests have a far
less diverse selection of tree species than the
originals. The fresh batches are often crowded
into smaller spaces, so wildfires are more
massive and devastating. And because so many
of the forests are young, they host a reduced
diversity of plant and animal life. All in all,
the increased quantity is wonderful, the lower
quality not so wonderful. Is there a lesson here
for you? I think so. In your upcoming decisions,
favor established quality over novel quantity.

AQUARIUS (January 20-February
18): If Pope Francis isnt traveling,
he comes out to meet the public in
St. Peters Square every Wednesday. During one
such event last January, he took a few moments
to bestow tender attention on a talking parrot
that belonged to a male stripper. I foresee a
comparable anomaly happening for you in the
coming days. A part of you that is wild or outr
will be blessed by contact with whats holy or
sublime. Or maybe a beastly aspect of your
nature that doesnt normally get much respect
will receive a divine favor.

PISCES (February 19-March 20): My
definition of a devil is a god who has
not been recognized, said mythologist
Joseph Campbell. It is a power in you
to which you have not given expression, and
you push it back. And then, like all repressed
energy, it builds up and becomes dangerous
to the position youre trying to hold. Do you
agree, Pisces? I hope so, because you will soon
be entering the Get Better Acquainted with
Your Devil phase of your astrological cycle, to
be immediately followed by the Transform Your
Devil into a God phase. To get the party started,
ask yourself this question: What is the power in
you to which you have not given expression?

Homework: Name something you could change
about yourself that would enhance your love life.
Testify at TruthRooster@gmail.com and visit
FreeWillAstrology.com.
River Cities Reader Vol. 21 No. 865 September 18 - October 1, 2014 20 Business Politics Arts Culture Now You Know RiverCitiesReader.com
September 4 Answers: Right
WOOF! September 18, 2014
ACROSS
1. Sch. subj.
4. _ avis
8. Multitude
12. Mights partner
16. Mauna _
17. Weeds in a parable
18. Bellini opera
19. Bowling game in Bologna
20. Misjudge
21. Boxing match
22. Parlance
23. Shaw the bandleader
24. Cuspid: 2 wds.
27. Name on a coach
29. Dunne or Ryan
30. Concealed
32. Word in a palindrome
33. Flags
34. Goodies
36. Sport fish
39. Classify
41. Start of a toast
42. Nucleus
43. Journey of a kind
45. _ Told Every Little Star
48. _ supra
49. Calculating
51. Canister
52. Levels
54. Makes a tangled mass
56. Free electrons
57. Pimola
59. Array
60. Kind of nuclear reactor
62. Arch
63. _ Fideles
64. Al Pacino film of 1975: 3 wds.
68. Feudal tenure of land
71. Musical Count
72. Like some produce
76. Layers
77. Pennies
78. Curdle
80. You bet!
81. Still not fulfilled
82. Quercitron
83. Montanas capital
85. Hill
86. Kind of water
87. Discernment
90. Drivers problem
91. Lead and tin alloy
93. Stage part
95. Crumbles
97. Any soap opera
98. Inter _
100. Chem. or biol.
102. Skin art, for short
103. Count on
104. Intolerance
107. 1950s fashion craze: 2 wds.
112. Lil _
113. Sierra _
115. Stiff hairs
116. Scull
117. Highlanders
118. Mandate
119. Window blind parts
120. Serv. branch
121. Role in Wagner
122. Woodwind
123. Buoyant
124. Like a wallflower
DOWN
1. Energy type: Abbr.
2. Ibsen name
3. Ore of nickel
4. Birds
5. Mountain ridge
6. The Biggest Little City
7. About: 2 wds.
8. Bricks tray
9. First: Abbr.
10. Campfire treat
11. Mongol conqueror
12. Gloomy
13. Makes real
14. Fondant
15. Requisite things
17. Principles
18. _ obstat
19. Scrooges cry
25. Dies _
26. Cast
28. Lease term
31. God of the underworld
34. Pollex
35. Rod in concrete
36. Poetic time
37. An Olympian
38. Aboriginal
40. Follow: Hyph.
42. Line segment on a curve
44. Half sawbuck
46. Garment
47. _ est percipi
49. Attack
50. Small shark
53. Fight venues
55. Seated anagram
58. Less fat, less sugar
61. Sirius: 2 wds.
62. Oven
63. Big vessel
65. Perpendicular to the keel
66. Extracted
67. Time waits for _ _
68. Tail
69. Chaplins wife
70. Stumped
73. Alimentary
74. Perfume ingredient
75. Big asteroid
77. Local politician
78. Earth
79. Limbs
84. A Muse
88. Bottom-line concern
89. Capture
91. Pesters in fun
92. The Phantoms name
94. _ Sue Martin
96. Escapade
97. Like a marathoner
98. Saw
99. Of a rounded part
101. French department
103. Lords table
105. _ poetica
106. Fashion
108. Greek peak
109. Lunchtime destination
110. Precipitate
111. Salver
114. Rorem or Beatty
September 4 Crossword Answers
River Cities Reader Vol. 21 No. 865 September 18 - October 1, 2014 21 Business Politics Arts Culture Now You Know RiverCitiesReader.com
Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
Vagabond Entertainment presents
Koobys Karaoke -Bier Stube LeClaire,
1001 Canal Shore Dr. SW LeClaire, IA
Zach Harris Band -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
2014/09/20 (Sat)
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303
Brady St. Davenport, IA
Ask an Adult - Acoustic Guillotine - In
the Mouth of Radness - Def-Kittie
Blindogg -Gabes, 330 E. Washington
St. Iowa City, IA
Brew Ha Ha: Corporate Rock (1pm)
-LeClaire Park, River Dr & Ripley St
Davenport, IA
Candymakers -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
Celtic Festival andHighlandGames: Runa
- Wylde Nept -Centennial Park, Beider-
becke Dr. & Marquette St. Davenport, IA
Cody Road -Desperados, 112 S. Main St.
Wheatland, IA
Corporate Rock (9pm) -11th Street
Precinct, 1107 Mound St. Davenport, IA
Dirt Road Rockers -Broken Saddle, 1417
5th Ave. Moline, IL
Funktastic Five -River House, 1510 River
Dr. Moline, IL
Gina Venier -Kilkennys, 300 W. 3rd St.
Davenport, IA
Gray Wolf Band -Len Browns North Shore
Inn, 700 N. Shore Dr. Moline, IL
Iowa Soul Festival: The FunkDaddies
(12:30pm) - Kilowatt & Grizz Blues
Band ( 2: 30pm) - Kool s Bazaar
(4:30pm) - 10 of Soul (7pm) - Lalah
Hathaway (9pm) -University of Iowa
Pentacrest, University of Iowa Iowa
City, IA
Jason Carol & the Whole Damn Band
-RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Joe Tingles DJ Entertainment -Barrel
House Moline, 1321 5th Ave. Moline, IL
2014/09/18 (Thu)
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W.
Locust St. Davenport, IA
Battle of the Bands VII: Live Broadcast -
Crystal City - Surrounded By Giants
- Alpha Bet -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S
Linn St Iowa City, IA
Billy Peiffer & Collin Keemle Jam Night
-On the Rock Grille & Bar, 4619 34th St
Rock Island, IL
C.J. the D.J. -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
Charlie Parr - Ark Life -The Mill, 120 E.
Burlington St. Iowa City, IA
Chuck T. Murphy -Whiskey Barrel Saloon,
305 W 2nd St. Rock Falls, IL
CobraKai Karaoke -Rumors Lounge &Night-
club, 1704 Second Ave. Rock Island, IL
Double Dz Karaoke -Purgatorys Pub, 2104
State St Bettendorf, IA
Fablos Karaoke Night -RME Community
Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
I Am the Avalanche - Dads - The Easy
Mark - Huey (8:30pm) - Mixology
- Soulshake (10pm) -Gabes, 330 E.
Washington St. Iowa City, IA
Jason Carl & the Whole Damn Band
-Schwiebert Riverfront Park, between
17th & 20th Streets Rock Island, IL
Karaoke Night -Applebees - Moline, 3805
41st Ave. Moline, IL
La Yegros -CSPS/Legion Arts, 1103 3rd St
SE Cedar Rapids, IA
Loretta Lynn -Adler Theatre, 136 E. 3rd St.
Davenport, IA
Lowland Hum - Nate Gordon -Rozz-Tox,
2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Oktoberfest: Aspenreiser (6pm) -Bier
Stube LeClaire, 1001 Canal Shore Dr.
SW LeClaire, IA
Open Mic Night -Rookies, 2818 N. Brady St.
Davenport, IA
Open Stage Night -Theos Java Club,
213 17th St. Rock Island, IL
Karaoke Night -Boozies Bar & Grill, 114 1/2
W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
Moonshine Run -On the Rock Grille
& Bar, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL
North of 40 -Hawkeye Tap Sports Bar N
Grill, 4646 Cheyenne Ave. Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night -Downtown Central Perk,
226 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
Peter Oprisko: Fabulous Frank -Ohnward
Fine Arts Center, 1215 E Platt St. Ma-
quoketa, IA
Pierced Productions Karaoke & DJ featur-
ing Leigh Timbrook -The Old Stardust
Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street Moline, IL
Richie Lee -Riverside Casino and Golf
Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA
Rocktoberfest w/ Dirt Road Rockers -Bier
Stube Moline Biergarten, 415 15th St.
Moline, IL
Sierra Leones Refugee All Stars (noon)
- BrightSky (1:15 & 3pm) - Kinobe &
the Wamu Spirit (1:45pm) - Matuto
(3:30pm) -Greene Square Park, Cedar
Rapids, IA
Southern Thunder Karaoke -Hollars Bar
and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL
The Hunts -Centennial Hall, Augustana
College, 3703 7th Ave. Rock Island, IL
The Knockoffs -Fargo Dance & Sports, 4204
Avenue of the Cities Moline, IL
The Tangents -RME Community Stage, 131
W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Travis Hosette (4pm) -Wide River Winery
- Clinton, 1776 East Deer Creek Rd.
Clinton, IA
Ukulele Social Club (4pm) - Nancita
Wernett (7pm) -Uptown Bills Coffee
House, 730 S. Dubuque St. Iowa City, IA
Vice Squad -Purgatorys Pub, 2104 State St
Bettendorf, IA
Wild Oatz -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W. Locust
St. Davenport, IA
Funktastic Five -On the Rock Grille
& Bar, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL
Giant Question Mark - m50 - Protman
- Dad HD - Alientech -Gabes, 330 E.
Washington St. Iowa City, IA
Gina Venier -Kilkennys, 300 W. 3rd St.
Davenport, IA
Hollys Buddies (5:30pm) - Wild Oatz
(8pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W. Locust
St. Davenport, IA
Iowa Soul Festival: Kinobe & The Wamu
Spirit (5:30pm) - Conjunto Angola 70
(7pm) - Al Jarreau(8:30pm) -University
of Iowa Pentacrest, University of Iowa
Iowa City, IA
Jack Lion - Dan Dimonte & the Bad As-
sets - Local on the 8s -The Mill, 120 E.
Burlington St. Iowa City, IA
Jerry Beauchamp Dance -Wal cott
Coliseum, 116 E Bryant St Walcott, IA
Karaoke Night -Bowlmor Lanes, 2952 N.
Brady St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Roosters Sports Bar & Grill,
2130 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Stardust Talent Night -The Old Stardust
Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street Moline, IL
Telvin Trio (6:30pm) -First Presbyterian
Church - Cedar Rapids, 310 5th St SE
Cedar Rapids, IA
The Return: A Tribute to the Beatles (6 &
9pm) -Circa 21 Dinner Playhouse, 1828
3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Tyler Barham -Broken Saddle, 1417 5th
Ave. Moline, IL
Vanessa Vo (noon & 5pm) -Cedar Rapids
Public Library, 500 1st St SE Cedar
Rapids, IA
2014/09/19 (Fri)
ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 W. Locust St.
Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303
Brady St. Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Moose Lodge - Davenport,
2333 Rockingham Rd Davenport, IA
Andy McKee -The Redstone Room, 129
Main St Davenport, IA
Brown Bag Lunch: Lewis Knudsen (noon)
-Bettendorf Public Library, 2950 Learn-
ing Campus Bettendorf, IA
Celtic Festival and Highland Games:
Burning Bridget Cleary - Turas -Cen-
tennial Park, Beiderbecke Dr. & Mar-
quette St. Davenport, IA
Daytrotter Communion: Jessica Lea May-
field - Ark Life - Crash - Hotbreath Tea
& the Invisible Branches -Codfish Hol-
low Barn, 3437 288th Ave. Maquoketa, IA
Emel Mathlouthi -CSPS/Legion Arts, 1103
3rd St SE Cedar Rapids, IA
Family Oktoberfest w/ Die Reinischko-
glbuam (6pm) -Bier Stube Moline
Biergarten, 415 15th St. Moline, IL
Franti Project - Patio -Rascals Live, 1414
15th St. Moline, IL
Funkma$ter -Iowa City Yacht Club, 13 S
Linn St Iowa City, IA
Lewis Knudsen (5pm) -Wide River Winery
- LeClaire, 106 N. Cody Rd. LeClaire, IA
Live @ Five: The Beaker Brothers Band
(5pm) -RME Courtyard, 131 W. 2nd St.
Davenport, IA
Muddy Ruckus -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Nik Turners Hawkwind - Witch Mountain
- Hedersleben - Larks Tongue -RIBCO,
1815 2nd Ave. Rock Island, IL
North of 40 -Heros Pub, 3811 N. Harrison
St. Davenport, IA
Pierced Productions Karaoke & DJ featur-
ing Leigh Timbrook -The Old Stardust
Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street Moline, IL
Ri ver Ci ty Radi o Hour (5: 30pm) -
Moline Commercial Club, 513b 16th
St Moline, IL
Southern Thunder Karaoke -Hollars Bar
and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL
The Fl ami ngos (8pm) - Ri chi e Lee
(9:30pm) -Riverside Casino and Golf
Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA
The Paul Avers Band -Col Ballroom, 1012
W. 4th St. Davenport, IA
Twisted Mic DJ -Broken Saddle, 1417 5th
Ave. Moline, IL
Cody Canada & the Departed @ The Redstone Room September 22
30
20 SATURDAY
00
19 FRIDAY
Continued On Page 22
00
18 THURSDAY
UIU - QUAD CITIES CENTER
1401 Kimberly Road, Bettendorf, IA 52722
563-359-7111 uiu.edu/quadcities
UPPER IOWA UNIVERSITY QUAD CITIES CENTER
Your Degree.
Your Way.
Courses that ft your busy
lifestyle classroom,
online and self-paced
Regionally accredited,
not-for-proft university
Year-round schedule
with 8-week terms
Easy transfer of up
to 90 college credits
River Cities Reader Vol. 21 No. 865 September 18 - October 1, 2014 22 Business Politics Arts Culture Now You Know RiverCitiesReader.com
Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
Banned Song Fest (6:30pm) -Bettendorf
Public Library, 2950 Learning Campus
Bettendorf, IA
Burlington Street Bluegrass Band -The
Mill, 120 E. Burlington St. Iowa City, IA
Cody Road Unplugged (6pm) -Go Fish
Marina Bar & Grill, 411 River Dr. Princ-
eton, IA
Jam Session w/ Ben Soltau -Iowa City
Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA
Karaoke Night -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Modern Kin -Gabes, 330 E. Washington St.
Iowa City, IA
Open Mic Night -Rumors Lounge & Night-
club, 1704 Second Ave. Rock Island, IL
Open Mic Night w/ Karl Beatty & Mike
Miller -Boozies Bar & Grill, 114 1/2 W.
3rd St. Davenport, IA
The Chris & Wes Show -Ubriacos Trattoria,
1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA
The Harris Collection Open Jam Ses-
sion -Brady Street Pub, 217 Brady St.
Davenport, IA
The Parrot Head Club & The Fry Daddies
-Bier Stube LeClaire, 1001 Canal Shore
Dr. SW LeClaire, IA
2014/09/22 (Mon)
ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
Cody Canada & the Departed -The Red-
stone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA
Live Lunch w/ Lewis Knudsen (noon)
-RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St.
Davenport, IA
Mark Kozelek -Englert Theatre, 221 East
Washington St. Iowa City, IA
Mike Dillon Band - Dead Larry - Das
Thunderfoot -Gabes, 330 E. Washing-
ton St. Iowa City, IA
Open Mic w/ J. Knight -The Mill, 120 E.
Burlington St. Iowa City, IA
Tatsuya Nakatani - Curt Oren -Rozz-Tox,
2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
2014/09/23 (Tue)
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303
Brady St. Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W.
Locust St. Davenport, IA
Acoustic Music Club (4:30pm) -RME
(River Music Experience), 129 N. Main
St. Davenport, IA
Doreens Jazz -The Mill, 120 E. Burlington
St. Iowa City, IA
Glenn Hickson (5pm) -Jake Os Grille, 2900
Blackhawk Rd. Rock Island, IL
Heavy Glow - The Sapwoods - Milk Duct
Tape -Gabes, 330 E. Washington St.
Iowa City, IA
Keller Karaoke -Broken Saddle, 1417 5th
Ave. Moline, IL
Open Jam Session -Brady Street Pub, 217
Brady St. Davenport, IA
OpenMic Night (6:30pm) -Cool Beanz Cof-
feehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL
Twisted Mic DJ -Broken Saddle, 1417 5th
Ave. Moline, IL
Whiskey Wednesday: Buddy Olsen
-Valley Inn Ale House, 24575 Valley Dr.
Pleasant Valley, IA
2014/09/25 (Thu)
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W.
Locust St. Davenport, IA
Battleof theBandsVII: Soul Phlegm- Def
Kitty Blinddog - The Sapwoods -Iowa
City Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA
Billy Peiffer & Collin Keemle Jam Night
-On the Rock Grille & Bar, 4619 34th St
Rock Island, IL
C.J. the D.J. -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
Charlie & Holly: Johnny Cash Cover Band
-Broken Saddle, 1417 5th Ave. Moline, IL
Cobra Kai Karaoke -Rumors Lounge &
Nightclub, 1704 Second Ave. Rock
Island, IL
Daniel & the Lion - Michaela Thomas -The
Mill, 120 E. Burlington St. Iowa City, IA
Double Dz Karaoke -Purgatorys Pub, 2104
State St Bettendorf, IA
Doug Brundies Big Acoustic Show -Har-
ringtons Pub, 2321 Cumberland Square
Dr. Bettendorf, IA
Ellis Kell Band -Schwiebert Riverfront
Park, between 17th & 20th Streets
Rock Island, IL
Fablos Karaoke Night -RME Community
Stage, 131 W. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Applebees - Moline, 3805
41st Ave. Moline, IL
Open Mic Night -Rookies, 2818 N. Brady
St. Davenport, IA
Open Stage Night -Theos Java Club,
213 17th St. Rock Island, IL
Soulshake - Mixology -Gabes, 330 E.
Washington St. Iowa City, IA
Stardust Talent Night -The Old Stardust
Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street Moline, IL
2014/09/21 (Sun)
ABC Karaoke -11th Street Precinct, 1107
Mound St. Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W.
Locust St. Davenport, IA
Alan Sweet & Friends (6pm) -The Muddy
Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA
Barefoot Becky (1:30pm) -Walcott Coli-
seum, 116 E Bryant St Walcott, IA
Both - The Seen -Gabes, 330 E. Washington
St. Iowa City, IA
Buddy Olson (3pm) -Duckys Lagoon,
13515 78th Ave W. Taylor Ridge, IL
Chuck T. Murphy (5pm) -On the Rock
Grille & Bar, 4619 34th St Rock Island, IL
Crystal Bowersox -CSPS/Legion Arts, 1103
3rd St SE Cedar Rapids, IA
Jim Ryan (3pm) -Len Browns North Shore
Inn, 700 N. Shore Dr. Moline, IL
Open Mic for Originals Only (noon)
-Mama Comptons, 1725 2nd Ave Rock
Island, IL
Open Mic Night w/ Karl Beatty -Barrel
House 211, 211 E. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night w/ Rob Dahms (5pm)
-Rustic Ridge Golf Course Grille & Pub,
1151 East Iowa St. Eldridge, IA
Sunday Jazz Brunch (8:30 & 10:30am,
12:30pm) -Bix Bistro, 200 E. 3rd St.
Davenport, IA
The Lowest Pair -Rivers Edge Gallery, 216
W 3rd St Muscatine, IA
Third Sunday Jazz Presents Matuto
(6pm) -The Redstone Room, 129 Main
St Davenport, IA
Tomten -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
Tonic Sol Fa -Central Performing Arts Cen-
ter, 519 E. 11th St. DeWitt, IA
2014/09/26 (Fri)
ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 W. Locust St.
Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303
Brady St. Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Moose Lodge - Davenport,
2333 Rockingham Rd Davenport, IA
A Damn Good Time Volume VIII: MRG -
The Blacklist - Earth Ascending - Errol
Hem - Travis Barron - Little Ruckus
-RME (River Music Experience), 129 N.
Main St. Davenport, IA
Amos Lee - Priscilla Ahn -Englert Theatre,
221 East Washington St. Iowa City, IA
Biersetube Oktoberfest w/ Die Rein-
ischkoglbuam (6pm) -Bier Stube Mo-
line Biergarten, 415 15th St. Moline, IL
Candymakers - OSG -Iowa City Yacht Club,
13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA
Cody Road -Docs Inn Bar & Grill, 985 Av-
enue of the Cities Silvis, IL
Corporate Rock -Stooges, 908 3rd St
Orion, IL
Doug Brundies Big Acoustic Show -The
Dam View Inn, 410 2nd St Davenport, IA
Hoba Hoba Spirit -CSPS/Legion Arts, 1103
3rd St SE Cedar Rapids, IA
Jazz After Five: Blake Shaw & Grace
Leong (5pm) - Slewgrass - Brian
Johannesen - Ryan Joseph Anderson
(9pm) -The Mill, 120 E. Burlington St.
Iowa City, IA
Karaoke Night -Bowlmor Lanes, 2952 N.
Brady St. Davenport, IA
Karaoke Night -Roosters Sports Bar & Grill,
2130 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Live @ Five: Curtis Hawkins Band (5pm)
-RME Courtyard, 131 W. 2nd St. Dav-
enport, IA
Lost Country Dancers Dance -Walcott
Coliseum, 116 E Bryant St Walcott, IA
Open Mic Nite w/ Alan Sweet -Vans
Pizza, Pub, & Grill, 3333 N. Harrison St.
Davenport, IA
Open Mic w/ Corey Wallace & Friends
-11th Street Precinct, 1107 Mound St.
Davenport, IA
Pokey LaFarges Central Time Tour: Pokey
LaFarge - Dom Flemmons - Joel Savoy -
The Tillers - Loot Rock Gang -Englert The-
atre, 221 East Washington St. Iowa City, IA
Small Houses - Padraig Steadman - Devin
Tuel & Stephan Harms -Rozz-Tox, 2108
3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
The Paramedic - Household - Fossil -
Endeavor (6pm) -Bier Stube Moline
Blackhawk Room, 417 15th St. Moline, IL
2014/09/24 (Wed)
ABC Karaoke -11th Street Precinct, 1107
Mound St. Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 W. Locust St.
Davenport, IA
Acoustic Open Mic Night (6:30pm) -RME
Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St.
Davenport, IA
Band du Jour (6pm) - Karaoke King
(9:30pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W.
Locust St. Davenport, IA
Matt Bednarsky @ Ca dZan September 28
25 THURSDAY
Continued From Page 21
00
26 FRIDAY
24 WEDNESDAY
22 MONDAY
23 TUESDAY
21 SUNDAY
Davenport, Iowa 563.326.7804
www.ggeartmuseum.org
A display of artwork featuring the talents and achievements of art
professors from Ashford University, Augustana College, Black Hawk
College, Eastern Iowa Community College, Knox College, Monmouth
College, St. Ambrose University and Western Illinois University is on
view at the Figge Art Museum through November 2, 2014.
EXHIBITION OPEN NOW
FIRST
College Art Faculty of the Quad Cities
_
*
_
T H R O U G H N O V E M B E R 2 , 2 0 1 4
FIRST
ARTISTS
This exhibition is funded through a generous
Arts Dollar$ grant from Quad City Arts.
Davenport, Iowa 563.326.7804
www.ggeartmuseum.org
River Cities Reader Vol. 21 No. 865 September 18 - October 1, 2014 23 Business Politics Arts Culture Now You Know RiverCitiesReader.com
Live Music Live Music Live Music
Email all listings to calendar@rcreader.com Deadline 5 p.m. Thursday before publication
Open Mic Nite w/ Alan Sweet -Vans
Pizza, Pub, & Grill, 3333 N. Harrison St.
Davenport, IA
Open Mic w/ Corey Wallace & Friends
-11th Street Precinct, 1107 Mound St.
Davenport, IA
Whiskey Blanket -Gabes, 330 E. Washing-
ton St. Iowa City, IA
2014/10/01 (Wed)
ABC Karaoke -11th Street Precinct, 1107
Mound St. Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -Circle Tap, 1345 W. Locust St.
Davenport, IA
Acoustic Open Mic Night (6:30pm) -RME
Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St.
Davenport, IA
Cody Road Unplugged (6pm) -Go Fish
Marina Bar & Grill, 411 River Dr. Princ-
eton, IA
Jam Session w/ Ben Soltau -Iowa City
Yacht Club, 13 S Linn St Iowa City, IA
Judson Claiborne - Heavens Jail -Rozz-
Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Karaoke Night -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Little Ruckus -Gabes, 330 E. Washington
St. Iowa City, IA
Open Mic Night -Rumors Lounge & Night-
club, 1704 Second Ave. Rock Island, IL
Open Mic Night w/ Karl Beatty & Mike
Miller -Boozies Bar & Grill, 114 1/2 W.
3rd St. Davenport, IA
Shook Twins - Under the Willow -The Red-
stone Room, 129 Main St Davenport, IA
The Alloy Orchestra -Englert Theatre, 221
East Washington St. Iowa City, IA
The Chris & Wes Show -Ubriacos Trattoria,
1029 Mound St. Davenport, IA
The Harris Collection Open Jam Ses-
sion -Brady Street Pub, 217 Brady St.
Davenport, IA
Twisted Mic DJ -Broken Saddle, 1417 5th
Ave. Moline, IL
Community Drum Circle (10:30am) -RME
(River Music Experience), 129 N. Main St.
Davenport, IA
Crystal City - Bob Bucko Jr. - Mystic
Dolphin -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
Dani Lynn Howe -Broken Saddle, 1417 5th
Ave. Moline, IL
Doug Brundies Big Acoustic Show -Co-
chrans Pub, 13464 Galt Rd. Sterling, IL
Farewell To Summer 2014 Party: Ste-
phen David Johnson (4:30pm) - Jake
McVey (7pm) - Dirt Road Rockers
(9pm) -On the Rock Grille & Bar, 4619
34th St Rock Island, IL
Gloria Hardiman - The Mark Avey Band
-The Redstone Room, 129 Main St
Davenport, IA
I Cry Wolfe - Torchlight Parade (6pm) -The
Mill, 120 E. Burlington St. Iowa City, IA
Il Sogno del Marinaio w/ Mike Watt
-Gabes, 330 E. Washington St. Iowa
City, IA
Iowa Womens Music Festival: Girls Rock!
(noon) - Crys Matthews (1pm) - The
Matriarchs (2pm) - The Rae Fehring
Band (3pm) - Kiya Heartwood (4pm)
- Alix Olson (5pm) -Johnson County
Fairgrounds, 4265 Oak Crest Hill Rd. SE
Iowa City, IA
Jeremiah Johnson Band -Burlington Capi-
tol Theater, 211 N. 3rd St. Burlington, IA
Joe Tingles DJ Entertainment -Barrel
House Moline, 1321 5th Ave. Moline, IL
Karaoke Night -Boozies Bar & Grill, 114 1/2
W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
Natty Scratch -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W.
Locust St. Davenport, IA
O.S.G. -The Muddy Waters, 1708 State St.
Bettendorf, IA
Open Mic Night -Downtown Central Perk,
226 W. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
Past Masters -Riverside Casino and Golf
Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA
Sunday Jazz Brunch (8:30 & 10:30am,
12:30pm) -Bix Bistro, 200 E. 3rd St.
Davenport, IA
The Lonelyhearts - Troy Ave. - DJ Ched-
dah & A. Rem -Gabes, 330 E. Washing-
ton St. Iowa City, IA
2014/09/29 (Mon)
ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
Festival of Praise Tour: Fred Hammond
and Donnie McClurkin -Adler Theatre,
136 E. 3rd St. Davenport, IA
Live Lunch w/ Lewis Knudsen (noon)
-RME Community Stage, 131 W. 2nd St.
Davenport, IA
Open Mic w/ J. Knight -The Mill, 120 E.
Burlington St. Iowa City, IA
Sirsy - Skittish -Gabes, 330 E. Washington
St. Iowa City, IA
2014/09/30 (Tue)
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303
Brady St. Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -The Muddy Waters, 1708
State St. Bettendorf, IA
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W.
Locust St. Davenport, IA
Acoustic Music Club (4:30pm) -RME
(River Music Experience), 129 N. Main
St. Davenport, IA
Dear Rabbit - Julie Byrne - Suno Deko
-Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave. Rock Island, IL
Glenn Hickson (5pm) -Jake Os Grille, 2900
Blackhawk Rd. Rock Island, IL
Head North - Acoustic Locals (6pm) -Bier
Stube Moline Blackhawk Room, 417
15th St. Moline, IL
Keller Karaoke -Broken Saddle, 1417 5th
Ave. Moline, IL
Open Jam Session -Brady Street Pub, 217
Brady St. Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night (6:30pm) -Cool Beanz Cof-
feehouse, 1325 30th St. Rock Island, IL
2014/09/28 (Sun)
ABC Karaoke -11th Street Precinct, 1107
Mound St. Davenport, IA
ABC Karaoke -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W.
Locust St. Davenport, IA
Alan Sweet & Friends (6pm) -The Muddy
Waters, 1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA
Buddy Olson (3pm) -Duckys Lagoon,
13515 78th Ave W. Taylor Ridge, IL
Detroit Larry & Charlie Hayes Blues Jam
(5pm) -On the Rock Grille & Bar, 4619
34th St Rock Island, IL
Matt Bednarsky -Ca dZan, 411 South Rd.
Cambridge, IL
OpenMic for Originals Only(noon) -Mama
Comptons, 1725 2nd Ave Rock Island, IL
Open Mic Night w/ Karl Beatty -Barrel
House 211, 211 E. 2nd St. Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night w/ Rob Dahms (5pm)
-Rustic Ridge Golf Course Grille & Pub,
1151 East Iowa St. Eldridge, IA
Sunday Blues Brunch: Jeremiah Johnson
Band (noon) -Burlington Capitol The-
ater, 211 N. 3rd St. Burlington, IA
Pierced Productions Karaoke & DJ featur-
ing Leigh Timbrook -The Old Stardust
Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street Moline, IL
SeeingRed- Heavyweight - Peer Pressure
-Bier Stube Moline Blackhawk Room,
417 15th St. Moline, IL
Smooth Groove (3pm) -Schwiebert River-
front Park, between 17th & 20th Streets
Rock Island, IL
Southern Thunder Karaoke -Hollars Bar
and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL
Steve McFate & Friends -Tims Corner Tap,
4018 14th Ave. Rock Island, IL
The Karry Outz -Hawkeye Tap Sports Bar N
Grill, 4646 Cheyenne Ave. Davenport, IA
The Ripplers (4pm) -Wide River Winery - Clin-
ton, 1776 East Deer Creek Rd. Clinton, IA
Travis Hosette (2pm) -Creekside Vineyards
Winery & Inn, 7505 120th Ave. Coal
Valley, IL
Vertical Horizon & Tonic -Riverside Ca-
sino Event Center, 3184 Highway 22
Riverside, IA
Wild Oatz (1pm) -Poopys Pub & Grub, 1030
Viaduct Rd Savanna, IL
Lynn Allen -On the Rock Grille & Bar,
4619 34th St Rock Island, IL
Mercury Brothers -The Muddy Waters,
1708 State St. Bettendorf, IA
Moonshiners (5:30pm) - Whiplash Abby
(9pm) -The Rusty Nail, 2606 W. Locust
St. Davenport, IA
Open Mic Night (5pm) -River Valley District
Library, 214 S. Main St. Port Byron, IL
Past Masters -Riverside Casino and Golf
Resort, 3184 Highway 22 Riverside, IA
Pierced Productions Karaoke & DJ featur-
ing Leigh Timbrook -The Old Stardust
Sports Bar, 1191 19th Street Moline, IL
Satellite Heart - White Zephyr - The Last
Glimpse -RIBCO, 1815 2nd Ave. Rock
Island, IL
Southern Thunder Karaoke -Hollars Bar
and Grill, 4050 27th St Moline, IL
Switchback -Orpheum Theatre, 57 S. Kel-
logg St. Galesburg, IL
The Dirty Water Boys -Broken Saddle, 1417
5th Ave. Moline, IL
The Whoozdads? (5pm) -Wide River Winery
- LeClaire, 106 N. Cody Rd. LeClaire, IA
Thollem Electric -Rozz-Tox, 2108 3rd Ave.
Rock Island, IL
Uun - Dylan Newton - Bleek -Gabes, 330
E. Washington St. Iowa City, IA
Vagabond Entertainment presents
Koobys Karaoke -Bier Stube LeClaire,
1001 Canal Shore Dr. SW LeClaire, IA
2014/09/27 (Sat)
319 Fest: The Post Portems (noon) -Hawk-
eye Downs, Cedar Falls, IA
ABC Karaoke -Creekside Bar and Grill, 3303
Brady St. Davenport, IA
Biersetube Oktoberfest w/ Die Rein-
ischkoglbuam (6pm) -Bier Stube Mo-
line Biergarten, 415 15th St. Moline, IL
Castle Ridge -Uptown Bills Coffee House,
730 S. Dubuque St. Iowa City, IA
1 WEDNESDAY
29 MONDAY
30 TUESDAY
30
27 SATURDAY
28 SUNDAY
Nik Turners Hawkwind @ RIBCO September 19
River Cities Reader Vol. 21 No. 865 September 18 - October 1, 2014 24 Business Politics Arts Culture Now You Know RiverCitiesReader.com
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Things we want you to know: New Retail Installment Contracts and Shared Connect Plan required. Credit approval required. Device activation fee of $25 per line may apply. Regulatory Cost Recovery Fee applies (currently $1.82/line/month); this is not a tax or gvmt. required charge. Add. fees, taxes
and terms apply and vary by svc. and eqmt. Offers valid in-store at participating locations only, may be fulfilled through direct fulfillment and cannot be combined. See store or uscellular.com for details. $140 Price Plan based on $100/mo. 10GB Shared Connect Plan plus 4 lines with discounted $10
Device Connection Charges each. Retail Installment Contract required to receive discounts, otherwise regular Device Connection Charges apply. Other discounts available for additional Shared Connect Plans. Contract Payoff Promo: Offer valid on up to 6 consumer lines or 25 business lines. Must port
in current number to U.S. Cellular and purchase new Smartphone or tablet through a Retail Installment Contract on a Shared Connect Plan. Submit final bill identifying early termination fee (ETF) charged by carrier within 60 days of activation date to www.uscellular.com/contractpayoff or via mail to
U.S. Cellular

Contract Payoff Program 5591-61; PO Box 752257; El Paso, TX 88575-2257. Customer will be reimbursed for the ETF reflected on final bill up to $350/line. Reimbursement in form of a U.S. Cellular MasterCard

Debit Card issued by MetaBank Member FDIC pursuant to license


from MasterCard International Incorporated. This card does not have cash access and can be used at any merchant location that accepts MasterCard Debit Cards within the U.S. only. Card valid through expiration date shown on front of card. Allow 1214 weeks for processing. To be eligible, customer
must register for My Account. Retail Installment Contracts: Retail Installment Contract (Contract) and monthly payments according to the Payment Schedule in the Contract required. If you are in default or terminate your Contract, we may require you to immediately pay the entire unpaid Amount
Financed as well as our collection costs, attorneys fees and court costs related to enforcing your obligations under the Contract. Upgrade your handset after 12 consecutive payments made on Contract. Kansas Customers: In areas in which U.S. Cellular receives support from the Federal Universal
Service Fund, all reasonable requests for service must be met. Unresolved questions concerning services availability can be directed to the Kansas Corporation Commission Office of Public Affairs and Consumer Protection at 1-800-662-0027. Limited-time offer. Trademarks and trade names are the
property of their respective owners. Additional terms apply. See store or uscellular.com for details. 2014 U.S. Cellular
Switch now and well
pay of your old contract.
Valid for families
and businesses.
per
month
4 LINES 10GB
$
140
EVERY YEAR
with the best plan in wireless.
UPGRADE
your phone
T:9.25"
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