You are on page 1of 22

Understanding Portion Sizes

Grade
Level:
9
th
-10
th

Graders
Lesson Plan
Timeframe:

45 Minutes Program Topic:

Nutrition

State:

OK
Prepared
By:

Katrina Lewis Chapter/School:

Konawa High School


Overview & Purpose
This lesson focuses on teaching students to understand correct portion sizes. Portion sizes are important
in maintaining a health weight and lifestyle. This information will also help students to better understand
the recommended amount of food they should consume daily in accordance with USDA Food Guide
Pyramid.
FCCLA National Program(s)
Student Body.

Lesson Plan Goals &
Objectives
Students will be able to estimate amounts of foods by using common objects for comparison.
Students will be able to compare amounts of food they eat to serving sizes listed on food labels.

Materials Needed Paper
Pencil
Items to demonstrate the correct portion sizes (listed below)
Small computer mouse (represents cup)
Baseball (represents 1 cup)
Deck of cards (represents 2 to 3 ounces of meat)
CD (represents 1 ounce slice of bread)
2 nine volt batteries (represents 1 ounces of cheese)
4 ounces juice box (represents cup of liquid)
1 nine volt battery (represents 1 tablespoon)
Portion Distortion Quiz (Attached)
Know Your Amounts Test (Attached. On page 40 of nutrition resources from USDA)
Food Group Choices Worksheet (Attached )
FCCLAs National Program Student Body CD
Introduction of Subject
(Give and/or demonstrate
necessary information)

Begin this lesson by having students complete the Portion Distortion Quiz. (Attached)
Go over correct answers to show students how much portion sizes have changed even in the last 20 years.
Discuss with students how the increase in portions could be part of the reason for the nationwide obesity
problem.
Teach lesson by showing each of the items listed above and explain what portion size that they represent.
Also provide examples of the foods that fall into each category that the items are representing.
Verification

Check students understanding by playing a matching game and having students match the objects that were
shown with the correct measurements.
Understanding Portion Sizes Page 2
Activity 1
(Describe the independent activity to
reinforce this lesson)


Independently students will complete the Food Group Choices Worksheet. This worksheet will have the student
identify the amount of food that they individually need in each of the food groups on the food guide pyramid. This
worksheet also includes an activity that students can complete where they must list examples of foods that
represent the correct portion amounts that they just learned about.
Activity 2
(Describe the independent activity to
reinforce this lesson)
After completing this lesson, I would integrate FCCLAs National Program Study Body into this lesson by dividing
students into groups and having them make posters that will be displayed in the junior and high school that show
the object examples and the correct portion of food they are related to.

Activity 3
(Describe the independent activity to
reinforce this lesson)

After the completion of the entire nutrition unit, students will also use the resources found in the Student Body
National Program CD to plan a lesson to be taught to 3
rd
grade elementary students. The class will be divided
into small groups and each group will be responsible for a certain part of the lesson including demonstrating how
to make a healthy snack, preparing a fun exercise routine, and teaching about ways to improve nutrition using
the information they learned in our FACS class and from the FCCLA Student Body CD.

Each student will also be responsible for finding two healthy recipes to be placed in our Student Body cookbook
that will be compiled by this class and given to the 3
rd
grade students that they teach.
Summary/Evaluation
(Assign Homework, or Reflect on
the Outcomes)
The students homework for this lesson will be to study the information that was covered in order to prepare for a
quiz that will be given at the beginning of the hour the next day.
Other Resources More information about this lesson and other resources that can be used with this lesson can be found on-line at
http://tn.ntis.gov. This website will also allow you to order and download helpful free nutrition materials from the
US Department of Agriculture.

Additional Notes You can request a free large Portion Size poster from the US Department of Agriculture web-site that is listed
above. A small one is attached for your use with this lesson.
Source
(
Food Group Choices Worksheet, USDA Poster, and Know Your Amounts were published by the US Department
of Agriculture (USDA)
www.teamnutriton.usda.gov

Portion Distortion Quiz was published by the organization WeCan
nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/.../wecan/downloads/portion-quiz.pdf
By submitting this lesson plan you are giving FCCLA permission to publish your work on the FCCLA website, www.fcclainc.org.
cup of beans counts as 2 oz
= size of a small computer mouse
1 tablespoon of
peanut butter
counts as 1 oz
= size of one 9-volt
battery
2-3 oz. of meat,
poultry or fish
= size of a deck
of cards
cup
of fruit juice
= size of a 4 oz
juice box
1 small apple = 1 cup
= size of a baseball
cup of sliced fruit
= size of a small computer mouse
1 cup of milk
= an 8 oz
carton of milk
1 oz. of
low-fat natural
cheese*
= size of two
9-volt batteries
1 cup
of yogurt
= size of a baseball
cup of carrots or other vegetables
= size of a small computer mouse
1 cup of raw
vegetables
= size of a baseball
10 medium fries
counts as cup
= size of a deck of cards
cup of cooked pasta = 1 oz
= size of a small computer mouse
1 cup of dry cereal = 1 oz
= size of a baseball
1 slice of bread counts as 1 oz
= size of a CD*
3
5

1
/2
6
Amounts of foods
For 2,000 calories
United States Department of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service. USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. For more information, check out: teamnutrition.usda.gov November 2006
2
2
1
/2
ounces
or equivalent
Meat &
Beans
Group
ounces
or equivalent
Grains
Group
cups
or equivalent
Milk
Group
cups
Vegetable
Group
cups
Fruit
Group
*About the thickness of 10 CDs ( inch)
How Much Do YOU Eat?
Use these eveyday items to estimate the amount you eat.
*Counts as one cup
Portion Distortion Quiz
Youve probably noticed that food portions in restaurants and other places
have grown in size and provide enough food for at least two people. Larger
portion sizes can lead to bigger waistlines and weight gain.
Take the Portion Distortion Quiz below to see if you know how today's
portions compare to the portions available 20 years ago, and about the
amount of physical activity required to burn off the extra calories provided
by today's portions. The answers are provided below.
1. A bagel 20 years ago was 3 inches in diameter and had 140 calories.
How many calories do you think are in today's bagel?
a.

150 calories
b. 250 calories
c. 350 calories
2. A cheeseburger 20 years ago had 333 calories. How many calories do
you think are in today's cheeseburger?
a.

590 calories
b. 620 calories
c. 700 calories
3. A 6.5-ounce portion of soda had 85 calories 20 years ago. How many
calories do you think are in today's portion?
a.

200 calories
b. 250 calories
c. 300 calories
4. 2.4 ounces of french fries of 20 years ago had 210 calories. How many
calories do you think are in today's portion?
a.

590 calories
b. 610 calories
c. 650 calories
5. A portion of spaghetti and meatballs 20 years ago had 500 calories. How
many calories do you think are in today's portion of spaghetti and
meatballs?
a.

600 calories
b. 800 calories
c. 1,025 calories
6. A cup of coffee with milk and sugar 20 years ago was 8 ounces and had
45 calories. How many calories do you think are in today's mocha
coffee?
a.

100 calories
b. 350 calories
c. 450 calories
7. A muffin 20 years ago was 1.5 ounces and had 210 calories. How
many calories do you think are in a muffin today?
a.

320 calories
b. 400 calories
c. 500 calories
8. Two slices of pepperoni pizza 20 years ago had 500 calories. How many
calories do you think are in today's large pizza slices?
a.

850 calories
b. 1,000 calories
c. 1,200 calories
9. A chicken Caesar salad had 390 calories 20 years ago. How many
calories do you think are in today's chicken Caesar salad?
a.

520 calories
b. 650 calories
c. 790 calories
10. A box of popcorn had 270 calories 20 years ago. How many calories
do you think are in today's tub of popcorn?
a.

520 calories
b. 630 calories
c. 820 calories
Thank you for taking the Portion Distortion quiz. We hope it was fun and
insightful. We also hope that next time you eat out, you will think twice
about the food portions offered to you.
Answers
1. c: 350 calories for a 6 inch bagel. If you rake leaves for 50 minutes
youll burn the extra 210 calories.*
2. a. 590 calories. Youll need to lift weights for 1 hour and 30 minutes, to
burn the extra approximately 257 calories.*
3. b. 250 calories for a 20-ounce soda. If you work in the garden for 35
minutes you will burn the extra 165 calories.**
4. b. 610 calories for a 6.9-ounce portion of french fries. If you walk
leisurely for 1 hour and 10 minutes, you will burn the extra 400
calories.**
5. c. 1,025 calories for a portion consisting of 2 cups of pasta with sauce
and 3 large meatballs. If you houseclean for 2 hours and 35 minutes,
you will burn approximately 525 calories.*
6. b. 350 calories for a 16-ounce cup of coffee. If you walk approximately
1 hour and 20 minutes, you will burn the extra 305 calories*
7. c. 500 calories for a 5-ounce muffin. If you vacuum for approximately 1
hour and 30 minutes you will burn the extra 310 calories*
8. a. 850 calories for 2 large slices of pizza. If you play golf (while walking
and carrying your clubs) for 1 hour, you will burn the extra 350
calories**
9. c. 790 calories for a 3 cup portion. If you walk the dog for 1 hour and
20 minutes, you will burn the extra 400 calories.**
10. b. 630 calories for a tub of popcorn. If you do water aerobics for 1
hour and 15 minutes, you will burn the extra 360 calories.**
* Based on a 130-pound person
** Based on a 160-pound person
NUTRITION ESSENTIALS HOMEWORK REPRODUCIBLE 33
HomeworkCheck Your Nutrition Knowledge
Review the entire list of Vocabulary and Denitions section before doing this assignment.

Provide the word that matches these denitions:
They contain the entire grain kernel: the bran, germ, and endosperm. Examples: bulgur,
1. oatmeal, cornmeal, brown rice.
The recommended amounts of key nutrients, based on 2,000 calories a day. The amounts
shown for the DV nutrient levels for 2,000 and 2,500 calories are provided on many
2. Nutrition Facts labels.

Types of foods that are important sources of calcium for teens. Adolescents have a very
critical need for calcium during their growth spurt. All calcium-rich food sources
3. can help bones grow.
The food guidance system developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to guide
healthful eating and physically active living. It gives the amounts and kinds of foods
4. you need daily from the ve food groups, plus oils.
Substances, found in food, that nourish your body. They should come primarily from foods.
5. Some foods are fortied with them to meet a recognized public health need.
6. Forms of fats that are liquid at room temperature.
A fat that is solid at room temperature, such as the fat in meat, poultry skin, and foods
7. made from whole milk. It increases blood cholesterol levels and the risk for heart disease.
A lifestyle that is moderately physically activethat includes physical activity equivalent to
walking about 1 to 3 miles at 3 to 4 miles per hour, in addition to the light physical
8. activity typical in day-to-day life.
Dene or explain the meaning of three of the following words:
Calcium
Calories
Fluids
Lactose Intolerance
Serving Size
34 NUTRITION ESSENTIALS HOMEWORK REPRODUCIBLE
Your Age: years
Your Activity Level:
Inactive______

Somewhat Active______
Active _______

Your Gender:
Girl

Boy
Amounts of food for 2,000
calories.
Fill in the amounts of
food for YOU
How much more (+) or less
(-) do YOU need, compared to
the amount recommended for
2,000 calories a day?
Fruits 2 cups cups ( + ) or (-) cups
Vegetables Group 2 cups cups ( + ) or (-) cups

Milk Group 3 cups or
equivalent
cups or
equivalent
( + ) or (-)
cups or equivalent
Meat & Beans Group 5 ounces or
equivalent
ounces or
equivalent
( + ) or (-)
cups or equivalent
Grains Group 6 ounces or
equivalent
ounces or
equivalent
( + ) or (-)
cups or equivalent
Homework Lesson 1. MyPyramid Amounts of FoodsFor YOU
Using the MyPyramid Amounts of Foodsfor YOU chart, write the amounts YOU need from each food group. Identify the
approximate amount of calories you need for a day. Write down how much more, or less, you need than the amounts
of food recommended for each food group, at 2,000 calories.
NUTRITION ESSENTIALS HOMEWORK REPRODUCIBLE 35
Homework Lesson 2. Choose the Foods YOU Need

Write down the specic foods and beverages and the amounts you might eat at dinner.
Put an X in the appropriate food group.
DINNER
Food and Beverages Amounts In
cups and ounces
Fruits
Group
Vegetables
Group
Milk
Group
Meat &
Beans
Group
Grains
Group
3 ounces x
(example: hamburger)
36 NUTRITION ESSENTIALS HOMEWORK REPRODUCIBLE
Homework Lesson 3. Choose Foods for Their Nutrients
Locate some Nutrition Facts labels at home. Make a list of four foods that are HIGH (20% DV or higher)
in calcium, ber, or saturated fat, and give 5 foods that are LOW (5% DV or less) in saturated fat,
cholesterol, or any vitamin.
Food(s) 1. low-fat milk 2. 3. 4. 5.
HIGH in 1. calcium 2. 3. 4. 5.
Foods 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.
LOW in 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.
Homework Lesson 4. Estimate the Amounts of Foods
Write down an estimate of the amount of each food you eat and each beverage you drink for one
evening meal. Use the objects introduced in the class session to estimate amounts.
Food and Beverages Estimated Amounts in cups or ounces
Example: fat-free milk 12 ounces (or 1 cups)
NUTRITION ESSENTIALS HOMEWORK REPRODUCIBLE 37
Homework Lesson 5. Put it all TogetherFood for a Day
Describe another evening meal that has the same amount of food group foods as in Moms Oriental
Stir-Fry Dinner. Identify at least one food HIGH in calcium. Write the amounts of foods that you
probably would eat.
DINNER
Food and
Beverages
Amounts

In cups or
ounces

Fruits
Group

Vegetables
Group

Milk
Group

Meat &
Beans Group

Grains
Group
Green beans cup cup
Foods HIGH in Calcium 1. 2. 3.

Amounts 1. 2. 3.

Homework Lesson 6. Move It to Keep Your Health in Balance
Write three ways teens can be physically active almost every day.
Write three health benets of being physically active.
Explain the talk-sing test as a way to measure a level of physical activity.
Ways to be Active Health Benets

1. 1.
2. 2.
3. 3.
The Talk-Sing Test means that you can(complete the sentence)

38 NUTRITION ESSENTIALS HOMEWORK REPRODUCIBLE
Vocabulary ChallengeTest

Provide the word that matches these denitions:


Forms of fats that are liquid at room temperature.
The food guidance system developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture
to guide healthful eating and physically active living. It gives the amounts and
kinds of foods people need daily from the ve food groups, plus oils.
A fat that is solid at room temperature, such as the fat in meat, poultry
skin, and foods made from whole milk. It increases blood cholesterol
levels and the risk for heart disease.
The recommended amounts of key nutrients, based on 2,000 calories a day.
The amounts of nutrients for 2,000 calories or 2,500 calories is provided on many
Nutrition Facts food labels.
A description of living in a way that is moderately physically active.
This lifestyle includes physical activity that is equal to walking about 1.5 to
3 miles per day at 3 to 4 miles per hour, in addition to the light physical
activity of day-to-day life.
Types of foods that are important sources of calcium for teens. Adolescents
have a critical need for calcium during the growth spurt. All calcium-rich food
sources can help bones grow.
Dene the following three words:


Calcium
Calories
Serving Sizes
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
NUTRITION ESSENTIALS HOMEWORK REPRODUCIBLE 39
Using the Nutrition Facts Panels below:
Circle the nutrients that have a HIGH % DV for nutrients.
Circle the Serving Size, and amount of calories on each label.
Write the name of a common object (a deck of cards, for example) equal to the
Serving Size amount for each label.
Extra Credit: Using food labels above, add up the total foods, for each
of three nutrients.
Vitamin A Fiber Iron
Carrots
Cantaloupe
Total
Serving Size 1 strip (9g)
Servings Per Container 8
Amount Per Serving
%Daily Value*
30. Candy, red licorice
Nutrition Facts
Calories 30
Total Fat 0g 0 %
Saturated Fat 0g 0 %
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000
calorie diet.
Cholesterol 0mg 0 %
Sodium 20mg 1 %
Total Carbohydrate 6g 2 %
Protein 0g
Dietary Fiber 0g 0 %
Sugars 4g
Vitamin A 0% Vitamin C 0%
Calcium 0% Iron 0%
L
O
W
=
5
%

o
r

l
e
s
s



H
I
G
H
=
2
0
%

o
r

m
o
r
e



Trans Fat 0g
Serving Size 1/4 melon (157g)
Servings Per Container 4
Amount Per Serving
%Daily Value*
31. Cantaloupe
Nutrition Facts
Calories 50
Total Fat 0g 0 %
Saturated Fat 0g 0 %
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000
calorie diet.
Cholesterol 0mg 0 %
Sodium 30mg 1 %
Total Carbohydrate 12g 4 %
Protein 1g
Dietary Fiber 2g 7 %
Sugars 14g
Vitamin A 120% Vitamin C 100%
Calcium 2% Iron 0%
L
O
W
=
5
%

o
r

l
e
s
s



H
I
G
H
=
2
0
%

o
r

m
o
r
e



Trans Fat 0g
Serving Size 1/2 cup (73g)
Servings Per Container 4
Amount Per Serving
%Daily Value*
32. Carrots, canned
Nutrition Facts
Calories 20
Total Fat 0g 0 %
Saturated Fat 0g 0 %
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000
calorie diet.
Cholesterol 0mg 0 %
Sodium 30mg 1 %
Total Carbohydrate 4g 1 %
Protein 0g
Dietary Fiber 1g 4 %
Sugars 2g
Vitamin A 200% Vitamin C 4%
Calcium 0% Iron 2%
L
O
W
=
5
%

o
r

l
e
s
s



H
I
G
H
=
2
0
%

o
r

m
o
r
e



Trans Fat 0g
Fill in your
Gender:
Activity level:
Age:
MyPyramid
food group amounts
at 2,000 calories
Fill in YOUR
Amounts
Fruits
Group
cups
Vegetables
Group
cups
Milk
Group

cups or
equivalent
Meat &
Beans
Group

ounces or
equivalent
Grains
Group
ounces or
equivalent
Using the Nutrition Facts PanelsTest
% DV % DV % DV
Write in the recommended amounts of food for each
food group for a total of 2,000 calories for a day in the
rst column.
Fill in the Amount of Food YOU Need in the second
column in the chart:
40 NUTRITION ESSENTIALS HOMEWORK REPRODUCIBLE
Know Your AmountsTest
On the chart below, ll in the foods, and amounts of foods, in common measures (such as cup, 1 cup)
that would take up an equal amount of space on a plate as the object in Column 1.
(Include at least one food from each of the food groups.)
Object

Amount of Common
Measure (in cups or ounces)

Examples of Foods
From the Food Groups
baseball 1 cup 8 ounces
1 CD (and thickness) wafe
1 deck of cards slice of meat
2 computer mice 1 cup 8 ounces
an 8-ounce carton
small juice box
9-volt battery 1 tablespoon

Describe three health benets of being physically active.
1.

2.

3.
Identify the recommended amount of time teens should be physically active, and how often during the week.
minutes days of the week
NUTRITION ESSENTIALS HOMEWORK REPRODUCIBLE 41
Extra creditTest
Fill in amounts (in household measures) for each food listed below to show how to meet the recommended
amounts for the each food group, for 2,000 calories a day.
Add up the total amounts in each food group and compare to what is needed for 2,000 calories a day.

Your Food for a Day
Fill in: your age: gender: physical activity level:
Amounts you need 2 cups 2 cups 3 cups
5 oz or
equivalent
6 oz or
equivalent
Food and
Beverages
Amounts in cups or
ounces
Fruits
Group
Vegetables
Group
Milk
Group
Meat &
Beans Group
Grains
Group
Example: Green Beans cup cup
Milk 1 cup 1 cup
Cereal 1 cup 1 oz
Orange Juice 4 oz cup
Sandwich 2 slices bread 2 oz
tomato 2 slices tomato cup
cheese 2 slices cheese 1 cup
meat ham = 2 oz 2 oz
Apple 1 small apple 1 cup
Milk 1 cup 1 cup
Frozen juice bar 4 oz cup
Chili with meat 1 cup
beans cup cup
tomatoes cup cup
meat 2 oz 2 oz
Cornbread 3 inch square 1 oz
Soft Margarine 1 Tbsp
Carrot slices 1 cup 1 cup
Milk 1 cup 1 cup
Cookies 2 small 1 oz
Total amount you ate
Did you eat what you
need?
Yes/No Yes/No Yes/No Yes/No Yes/No

42 NUTRITION ESSENTIALS HOMEWORK REPRODUCIBLE
Answers to Test Questions
Vocabulary ChallengeANSWERS
Provide the word that matches the following denitions:
1. Oils or Unsaturated Fats Forms of fats that are liquid at room temperature.
2. MyPyramid The food guidance system developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
It is a guide for healthful eating and active living. It gives the amounts and kinds
of foods needed daily from the ve food groups, plus oils.
3. Saturated Fat or Trans Fat A fat that is solid at room temperature. It increases blood cholesterol levels and
the risk for heart disease.
4. Daily Values Daily Values (DVs) are recommended amounts of key nutrients, based on 2,000
calories a day. The amounts shown for the DV nutrient levels for 2,000 and 2,500
calories are provided on many Nutrition Facts labels.
5. Somewhat Active A lifestyle that is moderately physically active. It includes physical activity that
is equal to walking about 1.5 to 3 miles at 3 to 4 miles per hour, in addition to
day-to-day life activities.
6. Milk or foods made from milk Types of foods that are important sources of calcium for teens. Adolescents have a
critical need for calcium during the growth spurt. All calcium-rich food sources
can help bones grow.
Explain the meanings of the following three words:
Calcium A mineral nutrient that helps build and renew bones and teeth. It is also important in regulating the function of the
heart, muscles, and nerves.
Calories (Food Energy) A way to measure the energy used by the body, and the energy that food supplies to the body.
Serving Size A xed amount of food, such as 1 cup or 1 ounce, that can be used in making comparisons among similar foods.
Serving Sizes are found on the Nutrition Facts label.
NUTRITION ESSENTIALS HOMEWORK REPRODUCIBLE 43
Serving Size 1 strip (9g)
Servings Per Container 8
Amount Per Serving
%Daily Value*
30. Candy, red licorice
Nutrition Facts
Calories 30
Total Fat 0g 0 %
Saturated Fat 0g 0 %
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000
calorie diet.
Cholesterol 0mg 0 %
Sodium 20mg 1 %
Total Carbohydrate 6g 2 %
Protein 0g
Dietary Fiber 0g 0 %
Sugars 4g
Vitamin A 0% Vitamin C 0%
Calcium 0% Iron 0%
L
O
W
=
5
%

o
r

l
e
s
s



H
I
G
H
=
2
0
%

o
r

m
o
r
e



Trans Fat 0g
Serving Size 1/4 melon (157g)
Servings Per Container 4
Amount Per Serving
%Daily Value*
31. Cantaloupe
Nutrition Facts
Calories 50
Total Fat 0g 0 %
Saturated Fat 0g 0 %
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000
calorie diet.
Cholesterol 0mg 0 %
Sodium 30mg 1 %
Total Carbohydrate 12g 4 %
Protein 1g
Dietary Fiber 2g 7 %
Sugars 14g
Vitamin A 120% Vitamin C 100%
Calcium 2% Iron 0%
L
O
W
=
5
%

o
r

l
e
s
s



H
I
G
H
=
2
0
%

o
r

m
o
r
e



Trans Fat 0g
Serving Size 1/2 cup (73g)
Servings Per Container 4
Amount Per Serving
%Daily Value*
32. Carrots, canned
Nutrition Facts
Calories 20
Total Fat 0g 0 %
Saturated Fat 0g 0 %
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000
calorie diet.
Cholesterol 0mg 0 %
Sodium 30mg 1 %
Total Carbohydrate 4g 1 %
Protein 0g
Dietary Fiber 1g 4 %
Sugars 2g
Vitamin A 200% Vitamin C 4%
Calcium 0% Iron 2%
L
O
W
=
5
%

o
r

l
e
s
s



H
I
G
H
=
2
0
%

o
r

m
o
r
e



Trans Fat 0g
Using the Nutrition Facts panelsANSWERS

Circle the nutrients that have a HIGH % DV.
Circle the Serving Size and Calories on each label.
Write the name of a common object (such as a deck of cards) equal to the Serving Size amount for each label.
Extra Credit: Using food labels above, add up the total
% DV in two foods, for each of three nutrients.
Vitamin A Fiber Iron
Carrots 200 7 2
Cantaloupe 120 4 0
Total 320% DV 11% DV 2% DV
Fill in your --
Gender:
Activity level:
Age:
MyPyramid
food group amounts
at 2,000 calories
Fill in YOUR
Amounts
Fruits 2
Group cups
cups
Vegetables 2
Group cups
cups
Milk 3
Group cups or
equivalent

cups or
equivalent
Meat & 5
Beans ounces or
equivalent

ounces or
equivalent
Grains 6
Group ounces or
equivalent
ounces or
equivalent
Write in the recommended amounts of food for each
food group for a total of 2,000 calories for a day in the
rst column.
Fill in the Amount of Food YOU Need in the second
column in the chart:
44 NUTRITION ESSENTIALS HOMEWORK REPRODUCIBLE
Know Your AmountsANSWERS
On the chart below, ll in the foods, and amounts of foods, in common measures (such as cup, 1 cup)
that would take up an equal amount of space on a plate as the object in Column 1.
(Include at least one food from each of the food groups.)
Object
Amount of Common
Measure (in cups or ounces)
Examples of Foods
From the Food Groups
baseball 1 cup apple, orange, scoop of rice, cereal
1 CD (and thickness) 1-ounce slice bread, wafe
1 deck of cards 2 to 3 ounces or 1 cup meat, French fries
2 computer mice 1 cup (= 2 half cups) peach slices, peas, pasta
an 8-ounce carton 1 cup (or 8 uid ounces) yogurt, low-fat milk
small juice box cup juice
9-volt battery 1 tablespoon peanut butter
Describe three health benets of being physically active
Makes the most of physical appearance.
Helps you feel good about yourself.
Helps improve body weight.
Increases physical tness.
Lowers the risk of type 2 diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, obesity, and some cancers.
Builds muscle strength and stamina.
Builds and maintains healthy bones, muscles, and joints.
Promotes fun with family and friends.
Improves relationships within your family.
Reduces feelings of stress.
Helps you sleep better.
Identify the recommended amount of time teens should be physically active, and how often during the week.
60 minutes every day or most or all days of the week.
NUTRITION ESSENTIALS HOMEWORK REPRODUCIBLE 45
Extra credit:ANSWERS
Fill in amounts (in household measures) for each food listed below to show how to meet the recommended amounts
for the each food group, for 2,000 calories a day.
Add up the total amounts in each food group and compare to what is needed for 2,000 calories a day.

Your students amounts of food may not reect the pattern as shown on this answer page. Total amounts for each
column should be close to the 2, 2, 3, 5, 6 pattern. Students will need to estimate how some foods need to be
described as equivalent amounts (i.e. cheese is equivalent to cups of milk; beans can be counted in cups as part of the
Vegetable Group or in ounces in the Meat and Beans Group.)
Your Food for a Day
Fill in: your age: gender: physical activity level:
Amounts you need 2 cups 2 1/2 cups 3 cups 5 1/2 oz
6 oz or
equivalent
Food and
Beverages Amounts
In cups or ounces Fruits
Group
Vegetables
Group
Milk
Group
Meat &
Beans Group
Grains
Group
Example: Green Beans (1/2 cup) (1/2 cup)
Milk 1 cup 1 cup
Cereal 1 cup 1 oz
Orange Juice 8 oz 1 cup
Sandwich 2 slices bread 2 oz
tomato 2 slices tomato cup
cheese 2 slices cheese 1 cup
meat ham = 2 oz 2 oz
Apple 1 small apple 1 cup
Milk 1 cup 1 cup
Frozen juice bar 4 oz cup
Chili with meat
beans cup cup
tomatoes cup cup
meat 2 oz 2 oz
Cornbread 3 inch square 1 oz
Soft Margarine 1 Tbsp
Carrot slices 1 cup 1 cup
Milk 1 cup 1 cup
Cookies 2 small 1 oz
Total amount you ate 2 cups 2 cups 4 cups 4 oz 5oz
equivalent
Did you eat what
you need?
Yes No Yes No No

Food group amounts based on age, gender, activity level
Less Food Food Amounts
for 2,000
calories
More Food Fill in Amounts
YOU need
Fruits 1 cups 2 cups 2 cups
Vegetables 2 cups 2 cups 4 cups
Milk 3 cups 3 cups 3 cups
Meat and Beans 5 ounces 5 ounces 7 ounces
Grains 5 ounces 6 ounces 10 ounces
How to use the Food Group Choices-worksheet:
1) Write the names of foods on the squares for each food group on the worksheet.
Divide the total amount for a day (5 oz. or equivalent) among the three Meat and Beans group squares.
Choose two vegetables (try to get dark-green and orange-colored ones).
Choose grain foods made with whole grains (for extra credit).
2) Cut, or tear apart, the square sections of this chart.
3) Sort the squares into piles according to the way you would eat them as part of meals or snacks.

Food Group Choices


What and How Much Would YOU Eat for a Day?
Use this chart to plan a days worth of foods YOU like to eat that will give you the
kinds and amounts of foods you need.
NUTRITION ESSENTIALS REPRODUCIBLE 19
Food Group Choices
NUTRITION ESSENTIALS REPRODUCIBLE 20
Grains Group
1 oz. or equivalent
Grains Group
1 oz. or equivalent
Grains Group
1 oz. or equivalent
Grains Group
1 oz. or equivalent
Name a food made from whole grains
Grains Group
1 oz. or equivalent
Name a food made from whole grains
Grains Group
1 oz. or equivalent
Name a food made from whole grains
Vegetables Group cup
Choose an ORANGE
colored vegetable
Vegetables Group cup
Choose a dark-GREEN
colored vegetable
Vegetables Group cup
Vegetables Group cup Vegetables Group cup Fruits Group cup
Fruits Group cup Fruits Group cup Fruits Group cup
Milk Group
8 oz. cup or equivalent
Milk Group
8 oz. cup or equivalent
Milk Group
8 oz. cup or equivalent
Meat & Beans Group
Write # ounces, or equivalents
(for a total of 5 oz. for a day)
Meat & Beans Group
Write # ounces, or equivalents
(for a total of 5 oz. for a day)
Meat & Beans Group
Write # ounces, or equivalents
(for a total of 5 oz. for a day)
Breakfast
hard cooked egg (= 1 ounce), toast, (= 1 ounce), orange juice (= 1 cup)

Lunch
ham & cheese sandwich (1 ounce ham, 1
1
/
2
ounce natural cheese)
on whole-wheat bread (= 2 ounces) with lettuce and tomato (=
1
/
2
cup)
vanilla yogurt (= 1 cup), pear (= 1 small), carrot chunks (=
1
/
2
cup).
Snacks
2 molasses cookies, 2 mugs of coffee with
1
/
2
cup milk each (= 1cup)
Dinner
chicken breast (= 3
1
/
2
ounces), rice (= 1 cup), spinach salad (= 1 cup),
cucumber slices (=
1
/
2
cup), pineapple chunks (=
1
/
2
cup)

Salad dressing, mayonnaise, and soft margarine are YOUR source of oils for this day.
My Food Group Choices-Topic 5 Teachers Version
This worksheet shows YOUR alternative days worth of foods, compared to the poster.

NUTRITION ESSENTIALS REPRODUCIBLE 21