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Publisher :
The Hong Kong Federation of Youth Groups www.hkfyg.org.hkwww.m21.hkwww.u21.hk
Youth Hong Kong: 21/F, The Hong Kong Federation of Youth Groups Building, 21 Pak Fuk Road, North Point, Hong Kong
Tel : 3755 70843755 7108Fax : 3755 7155Email : youthhongkong@hkfyg.org.hkWebsite : youthhongkong.hkfyg.org.hk
Youth
Volume 5 Number 4 December 2013 a quarterly journal from the hongkong federation of youth groups
H O N G K O N G
Youth
Volume 6 Number 3 September 2014 a quarterly journal from the hongkong federation of youth groups
H O N G K O N G
Hong Kong
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YOUTH HONG KONG published quarterly
by The Hong Kong Federation of Youth Groups
EDITORIAL BOARD
Rosanna Wong
Elaine Morgan (Editor)
Ada Chau (Assistant Editor)
Angela Ngai
Lakshmi Jacot
William Chung
Henry Poon
CIRCULATION (unaudited)
11,000-12,000 in Hong Kong, throughout
the region and overseas
VIEWS EXPRESSED are the authors and interviewees,
may come from official sources, and do not necessarily
reflect the views of the editorial board or publisher
REPRODUCTION OF CONTENTS without written
permission from the publisher is prohibited
INTERVIEWS
Elaine Morgan, Lakshmi Jacot, Ada Chau
PERSPECTIVES CONTRIBUTORS
Ben Tse
Elena Ng
Mimi Mo
Jessica Chan
Ajmal Samuel
Elaine Morgan
SELECETD YOUTH SPEAK CONTRIBUTORS
Lin Kristy, Ernest Chau
Christy Chu
Joy Pamnani
Ivy Ho, Kevin Li Ho-lam, Gigi Chau
Pansy Tam
OTHER CONTRIBUTORS
Virginia Addison
Education Post
Cathay Pacific
Kate Yung
Hilary Lok
HKFYG unit staff
TRANSLATION
Henry Poon
Ada Chau
PHOTOGRAPHS
Courtesy of HKFYG Very Hong Kong
competition entrants, as captioned.
Other photographs by Elaine Morgan, Ada Chau,
acknowledged as captioned, or in public domain
ARTWORK
Sam Suen, DG3
DESIGN, LAYOUT & PRINTING
DG3 Asia Ltd
ISSN 2071-3193
WEB youthhongkong.hkfyg.org.hk
CORRESPONDENCE to The Editor, Youth Hong Kong,
21/F, The Hong Kong Federation of Youth Groups
Building, 21 Pak Fuk Road, North Point, Hong Kong
TEL 3755 7084, 3755 7108
FAX 3755 7155
EMAIL youthhongkong@hkfyg.org.hk
ADVERTISING enquiries to Ada Chau 3755 7108
THE HONG KONG FEDERATION OF YOUTH
GROUPS was founded in 1960 and is one of the
citys largest non-profit youth organizations. Its
programmes and activities at over 60 locations are
attended by 5 million participants every year.
CORE SERVICES Counselling, Creativity Education
& Youth Exchange, Education, Employment,
Leadership Training, Leisure, Cultural & Sports, M21
Multimedia, Parenting, Research & Publications,
Youth at Risk, Volunteering, Youth SPOTs
ADVERTISER Alliance Franaise
MEDIA PARTNER Education Post
4-5
OVERVIEW
Hong Kong is home
20-23
YOUTH SPEAK
Neutrality, vision
& balance
Independence and
determination
Work, luck and
location
Freedom of speech
Sense of identity
24-33
YOUTH WATCH
EDUCATION POST
TALKING POINT
34-50
FEATURES
Fitness and nutrition
Pollution
YouTubers
HKFYG
Contents
OVERVIEW
4 Hong Kong is home
INTERVIEWS
6 Joseph Sung
Vice-Chancellor, CUHK
8 Yip Wing-sie
Hong Kong Sinfonietta
10 Antony Leung
Nan Fung Group
PERSPECTIVES
12 Ben Tse
13 Elena Ng
15 Mimi Mo
16 Jessica Chan
18 Ajmal Samuel
19 Elaine Morgan
YOUTH SPEAK
20 Values shared, concerns aired
YOUTH WATCH
24 Virginia Addison
Having their say
TALKING POINT
28 Education Post
Reluctant return
30 Cathay Pacific
31 HKFYG surveys
Thumbs up for Hong Kong
CITY SPACE
34 Kate Yung
Fit for life
36 William Wong
Air pollution
ART & CULTURE
38 Hilary Lok
Lights, camera me
HKFYG
40 Hang Seng Bank
Leaders to Leaders Lecture Series
42 Global Youth Entrepreneurship Forum
44 M21 Travel Mission
46 New books
47 Membership and Volunteering
48 School youth work
49 Ode to Joy mass musical event
50 Congratulations
Youth
Hong Kong
September 2014
Volume 6
Number 3
6-11
INTERVIEWS
Prof Joseph Sung
Ms Yip Wing-sie
Mr Antony Leung

12-19
PERSPECTIVES
TV presenter
Psychology student
Neuroscientist
IT project manager
Paralympic rower
Writer
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Cover image
I
t is said that home is where the heart is. Not just the heart, but the
passion, the concern, the commitment, even the worry to ensure that
home is the place where we feel most comfortable, secure and happy.
Home is also the place where we choose to stay and where we choose to make
our lives and livelihoods, committed to its prosperity, success and hopes.
The idea of home in the context of Hong Kong is what we are looking at in this issue.
In the pages that follow, well-respected members of the community explain what keeps
them here and what brings them back home again from abroad. Their appreciation is
clear: they are proud of Hong Kong peoples spirit, solidarity, pragmatism and efficiency.
The young people who write in this issue emphasize the fundamental importance of freedom
of speech and expression, and the rule of law. They praise our hometowns achievements and
successes, linger over the icons of which they are fond, and say what troubles them most.
All who have responded to our call for views have said with sincerity what
they value about the place we all call home. Whatever its fate in the larger
arenas of politics, economics and future development, their message is clear.
We cherish Hong Kong and will meet the challenges to preserve it.
Dr Rosanna Wong, DBE, JP
Executive Director, HKFYG
September 2014
Youth Hong Kong
Editorial
3
September 2014 |
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p Hong Kongs foral emblem: Bauhinia blakeana
Youth Hong Kong
Overview
| September 2014
4
Seven million people call Hong Kong home. This is the
place where they have their roots, their families and their
friends. It is the place to which they have committed
their talents and energies, and from where they have
acquired their knowledge and experience. This is the
place where their financial and material investments have
been made. It is the place which gives them their identity
and the place to which they remain steadfastly loyal.
At this moment, Hong Kong is a home in the throes
of all kinds of upset: political, social and economic.
There is general disquiet about electoral autonomy
and universal suffrage, governmental transparency,
equality, housing prices, the environment, poverty, the
state of the citys competitiveness and the increasing
number of high-profile cases of alleged corruption.
The obviously negative headlines, coupled with
thousands of people taking to the streets, airwaves
and social media to express their discontent on
one issue or another, paints a picture of a home in
discord and disorder, where people are disappointed
and divided. Yet history shows that the people of
Hong Kong are resilient in the face of change and
challenge. Their hard work transformed what was
once disparagingly called a barren rock into the
global financial and business centre it is today.
This evolution has been complex and unique: from
colonial trade entrept to haven for fleeing refugees;
from the worlds factory to a service economy;
then to its status as a Special Administrative
Region of mainland China. At all the milestones,
it is the pragmatic and open response of its people,
watching their home develop, that has ensured
what has been, essentially smooth transitions.
Confidence boosted by the
knowledge that fundamental
values and rights, such as the
rule of law, the independence
of the judiciary, human rights
and civil liberties, remained
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p The Old Supreme Court Building, home of the Legislative Council
of Hong Kong from 1985 to 2011.

Hong
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is home
Youth Hong Kong
Overview
September 2014 |
5
The people of Hong Kong have faced great challenges.
In 1956 and a decade later in 1966, there were urban
industrial riots against social inequalities, deplorable
living standards and working conditions, as well as
rampant official corruption. In 1967, the overtly anti-
colonial riots, spurred by politics in China in the midst
of its Cultural Revolution, had the potential to rip
the city apart but that didnt happen. In the following
years, Hong Kongs prosperity grew with free trade, low
taxation, and anti-corruption legislation. Improved social
welfare, education, healthcare and housing, along with
excellent infrastructure and public transport, increased
confidence as the city became more affluent and stable.
Anxieties about the Sino-British Joint Declaration
in 1984 and the events of June 4 1989 led some
to emigrate. However, by 1994 it was estimated
that 30% had already returned. Many were
disappointed with life as emigrants. This feeling
was heightened by the sense of loss of the good
things they used to have or enjoy in Hong Kong.
Peoples confidence was boosted by the knowledge
that fundamental values and rights, such as the rule
of law, the independence of the judiciary, human
rights and civil liberties, remained, along with the
core values of freedom of speech and freedom of
expression, which were protected by both the Basic
Law and the Hong Kong Bill of Rights Ordinance.
With this solid foundation in place, even the devastating
Asian Financial Crisis of 1997-1998 and the Global
Financial Crisis of 2008 could not deter Hong
Kongs spirit. It was at these points that the world-
renowned efficiency and resourcefulness of Hong
Kongs people came to the fore, their indomitable
can-do spirit ensuring that in spite of critical
economic downturns, the city bounced back.
Ultimately, it is these emotional and psychological
intangibles that make Hong Kong feel like home: the
heart and passion of its people who are able to transcend
challenges and obstacles, very often only with a strong
and positive belief that the future will be better.
There is probably no other episode in recent Hong
Kong history that exemplifies this so clearly as the
outbreak of SARS in 2003. SARS battered the economy
and, according to the papers of the day, resulted in the
loss of 13,000 jobs and the closure of 4,000 businesses.
2

The World Health Organisation issued a travel advisory
against the city. It stayed in place for over one and a
half months. For 104 days, Hong Kong was effectively
closed to the world and was known as a SARS infected
area. People pulled together, not only doctors and
other health care professionals, but ordinary people
volunteered to help their neighbours. A genuine spirit
of caring and concern highlighted Hong Kongs strength
and cohesiveness, not a surprise to those who looked
beneath the superficial hustle and bustle of the city.
Now, Hong Kong is facing a political challenge, with
the public mood charged to extremes. No one can
predict the outcome of todays discontent. But given
the citys history of confronting and facing difficulty,
it is very hard not to be optimistic that in the long
run the people want only what is best for themselves
and the city of Hong Kong, their home.
1. Lam, Lawrence in Skeldon, R. Reluctant Exiles. New York: ME Sharpe, 1994, p170.
2. South China Morning Post, 24 June 2003.
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Hong Kong is, first and foremost, a place of opportunity.
With outstanding public facilities, including education,
medicine and transport, it really is a convenient city in
which to live. These factors result, according to Professor
Joseph Sung, eminent doctor, Vice-Chancellor and
President of The Chinese University of Hong Kong,
in a place where things get done. A fast-paced city,
where one can achieve more, with a can-do spirit that
enables work to be done efficiently and effectively.
After going to Canada to do his PhD for three years,
Professor Sung found himself returning to Hong Kong
in 1992 at a time when hospitals were closing due to
Canadas economic recession. When offered a lecturers
job in Hong Kong, he says he was both excited and a
bit apprehensive. I had got used to a slower pace of
life by then, but I realized that working here, I could
get about three times as much done as in Canada. It
was because of the energy of people, eager to just say
Lets do it rather than worrying about red tape.
I
n this meeting, Professor Joseph Sung privileged Youth Hong Kong
with stories from his past and a tribute to the quality of life in Hong
Kong. He focuses on ef ciency and resilience, energy and team spirit.
However, when he left in 1989 to do his doctorate in Canada, he looked
out of the plane window and believed he would not be coming back.
Professor JY Sung, SBS, JP, is Vice-Chancellor and
President of The Chinese University of Hong Kong
(CUHK) and concurrently the Mok Hing Yiu Professor
of Medicine of CUHK. He completed his MB BS at
The University of Hong Kong in 1983, was conferred
a PhD in biomedical sciences by the University of
Calgary in 1992 and a MD by CUHK in 1997. He was
named Asian Hero by Time magazine in recognition
of his work during the SARS epidemic of 2003.
Youth Hong Kong
Interview
| September 2014
6
A place of

opportunity
Team spirit in dark moments
Professor Sung found himself not only able to
continue with academic research resulting in
international acclaim for him and his team but
also having the time to practise pioneering work in
gastroenterology. Then, in 2003, the SARS crisis hit.
It was a turning point for Professor Sung, who
remembers it as a time that epitomized the very best of
Hong Kong values. With huge challenges to face, it
was the Hong Kong team spirit that pulled us through.
Everyone was part of a larger family, patients especially,
as the doctors did everything they could, heart and soul,
night and day, for them. Colleagues came down with
fever and one almost died. Those were dark moments.
Yet what stands out as most poignant and rewarding,
according to Professor Sung, was the unprecedented
solidarity in Hong Kong. We received unbelievable
support from the public. Calls, emails, cards, hundreds
of childrens drawings, and even free desserts. They
were brought to us by a nearby restaurant every day,
carried by messengers endangering their own lives
by coming to the hospital. Those were certainly
were the best of times and the worst of times.
For Professor Sung, the SARS epidemic encapsulates the
essence of what Hong Kong is: a place that can bring
people together to cope with challenges. At this time,
proud of what could be achieved, he suddenly realized
that, it could all vanish with a snap of the fingers.
I began looking more at what I could do for others
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instead of what I could achieve for myself. I saw that
what matters most is humanity, family and friends.
Clear vision and no regrets
Today, things have changed. On hearing of the
discontentment among some university students,
he says it is out of proportion. We need to strike a
balance. Maybe one needs to leave Hong Kong in
order to see it more clearly, to see how blessed we are,
and to be grateful instead of focusing on grievances.
Hong Kong is home for Professor Sung, and whatever
situation the city faces, he argues that it is the
people who can make it work. As Vice-Chancellor,
he devotes an increasing amount of time to young
people, teaching and mentoring. Hong Kong is a
very materialistic place, and there has been a change
in attitude towards competitiveness. I hear young
people today say they want to lead a simple life. I tell
them I hope they will have no regrets in their lives.
Living a simple and honourable life, doing something
for others, building a society these are the beliefs to
hold on to. Only then can one have no regrets.

2003

Note
An outbreak of SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome), a viral respiratory disease, ocurred between November 2002 and July 2003. It caused 8,273
cases and 775 deaths were reported with the majority of cases in Hong Kong. Amoy Gardens (pictured left) was the site of a massive outbreak.
Youth Hong Kong
Interview
September 2014 |
7

A Hong Kong girl at heart, Yip Wing-sies parents
came here from Guangzhou in the early 60s when
she was just one year old. Life was not easy. They
lived in a small room in Kowloon City and her
mother gave piano lessons to support the family.
Growing up was like it was for thousands of other
children. We didnt feel like immigrants and I
went to ordinary schools, she says. The difference
was talent. In the late 70s, a Hong Kong Jockey
Club scholarship took her to study in London.
This exposed me to the real world of music,
but Hong Kong always remained her home.
I remember flying back in those days. Every time
the airplane approached Kai Tak runway I was so
excited. I have never analysed it before but I realize
now it was because I was coming home. The city had
a hold on her, as it does on many people who have
been away and returned. It was not going to let go.
Five years later she was still abroad, studying in the
US with famous conductors like Leonard Bernstein.
We saw the glamour of the mainstream classical music
world and all my fellow students focused on getting to
the top. Then came my first job offer, in Hong Kong.
It was difficult for conductors to find work anywhere,
let alone female conductors, so she came home to work
as resident conductor of the citys only classical
orchestra, the Hong Kong Philharmonic. I knew it
meant giving up the mainstream but I knew I would be
contributing to the place that had shaped me. I also
really appreciated the openness of Hong Kong people
to me as a female conductor. I think there was less
prejudice here. Maybe it was also because we did not
have a strong tradition of classical music then.
Much has happened on the arts scene since. Although
everyone overseas knew about Hong Kong, their
concept of the arts world was very vague, says Ms Yip.
Now when Im abroad on tour I say with pride and
confidence, Please come to Hong Kong. Theres a lot
going on. Its no longer the cultural desert people used
to say it was!
Contributing with

quality
M
s Yip Wing-sie has directed world-class performances by the Hong Kong
Sinfonietta, one of the citys home-grown orchestras, since 2002. Rightly proud of
the changes she has been part of on the Hong Kong arts scene, she is also grateful
for the public support that enables talented musicians like her to shine.
The Passage Beyond in Concert
is a new departure. Set in Hong Kong
and composed, choreographed, acted
and sung by home-grown music and
drama talents, it opens next month
with full orchestral accompaniment
by the Hong Kong Sinfonietta.
2-5 October 2014 at the HK
City Hall Concert Hall
Tickets from URBTIX.
Full details of the Hong
Kong Sinfonietta 2014/2015
programme at www.HKSL.org
I really appreciated the
openness of Hong Kong people
to me as a female conductor.
Youth Hong Kong
Interview
| September 2014
8

No doubt, a lot is happening, and the more you look,
the more you find. The arts are no longer considered
the preserve of an elite and people like Ms Yip can take
much of the credit. Support from the government and
the education system have got us this far. Parents, too,
play a part. A thriving economy has meant greater
affluence so children learn how to play instruments and
come to our concerts. Not only this, she continues,
We can now put on concerts and shows featuring
mainly home-grown artists and be confident that they
will attract good audiences.
Behind it all has been the Hong Kong spirit, says Ms
Yip. Everything moves at an incredible pace. Nowhere
else in the world do things get done so quickly, so
efficiently and - most of the time - so well. But there
are drawbacks for a professional musician. Its too noisy
and the pace is the real challenge. Artists need time
to think, space to day-dream, and peace to develop
thoughts. That means being very disciplined and
finding a way to escape. For me, its golf, in the beautiful
natural surroundings of Discovery Bay or Kau Sai
Chau near Sai Kung. It takes my mind off everything.
Hong Kong people have worked very hard to make
things happen here although very few were rich
and life was harsh. If we can keep up that kind of
spirit we can continue growing instead of becoming

increasingly self-centred. With todays polarization


she sees a risk of equating fighting for human
rights with demanding a right to break the rules.
We have much to be grateful for and I want to
give back to my home town and its people in return
for what they have given me. I want to preserve
its best qualities, nourish its innovative brains and
encourage its talented performers. I remind my
audiences, the special something they take home
after a live Hong Kong concert is a unique encounter
that could happen nowhere but here.
Photos courtesy of the Hong Kong Sinfonietta.
Ms Yip Wing-sie is Hong Kongs best
known professional female conductor.
Under her baton, the Hong Kong
Sinfonietta has gone from strength
to strength. It now offers a popular
programme for home audiences
of all ages and has represented
Hong Kong on 18 tours abroad.
Youth Hong Kong
Interview
September 2014 |
9
Friends and others have asked me if I would
consider emigrating. My answer is simple.
Why would I? Hong Kong is my home.
For someone who has attained the highest levels
of leadership and success, in both the private and
public sectors, getting a well-paid job anywhere in
the world would not be difficult. That Antony Leung
chooses to remain in Hong Kong demonstrates that
he is not just sloganeering. Instead, his words are
borne of his strong Chinese identity, coupled with
his confidence in Hong Kongs strengths and his firm
belief that as someone who has benefitted from the
system, he has the responsibility to give back to it.
My parents came to Hong Kong from southern
China just before 1949. The war years were difficult
but I believe this played a large part in the sense of
pride my parents instilled in me, of who I was and
where I had come from. We were a poor family but by
getting good grades, I was able to go to the University
of Hong Kong. It showed me that this was a place
where possibilities existed if one worked hard.
I
n this personal interview, Mr Antony Leung, CEO of the Nan Fung Group and
Hong Kongs former Financial Secretary, talks about what he values and says
he would never consider leaving Hong Kong. Its home.
Diversity, rationality
and identity
Youth Hong Kong
10
Interview
| September 2014
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Maintaining core values


As Mr Leung sees it, Hong Kongs core values are,
first and foremost, the rule of law and the freedoms
the city enjoys. Peoples rationality, their perseverance
and can-do attitude, their generosity and diversity,
have enabled Hong Kong to be both a Chinese and a
global city. This makes Hong Kong unique in his eyes
and a place of which he is very proud. I have a warm
feeling about Hong Kong and when I think of Gods
kindness to me and how I have been blessed, I feel
compelled to see what I can do for the community.
As he explains, his choice of subject at university
was based on the desire to do something for others.
Maybe I misinterpreted the Chinese translation of the
word economics which was my chosen
subject at university. But I understood it to mean, in its
broadest sense, to manage the country, to benefit the
people. And that is what I wanted to do. My first job
at Citibank was meant to be a pragmatic step towards
securing the necessary resources to do a Masters degree
in the hope that I would become an academic. Then
I found that the practical experience I was gaining
had value and I set aside my academic career.
Putting home before job
Involved in community work as a student, Mr
Leungs commitment to Hong Kong was clearly
demonstrated in 1996. On the path to one of the
highest positions at Citibank, he gave up his career to
return home. I saw Hong Kong facing the anxieties
of 1997 and I really wanted to be here. There was no
position for me at Citibank in Hong Kong, so I had
to make a choice. I chose my home over my job.
Coming back was clearly more than wanting to be
present at a historic moment. I was already involved
in public service, but the events of 1997 made
me think that I could make a bigger contribution
to both Hong Kong and China and play a small
role in ensuring that we would retain our global
competitiveness. I was able to do this as a member of
the Executive Council and later as Financial Secretary.
What about today? Mr Leung, now in the business
sector, continues to have faith in the city. We are
in the midst of a great deal of pointed political
debate. However, both in and out of government,
I have seen how the community comes together
at moments of challenge and uncertainty.
In 1989 with the events of Tiananmen Square, in 2003
with the SARS epidemic, and at the annual march on
July 1st, Mr Leung says he sees positive expressions of
people who care for their home. Today, we are seeing
the differences rather than the similarities, but I dont
think we have reached a critical point. If people were to
realize that Hong Kong was losing its competitive edge
and slipping behind, they would pull together again.
I have great faith in Hong Kong, in its people, and
in the principle of One Country Two Systems. This is
our home and we know that our can-do attitude, and
our cosmopolitan, open-minded society is what makes
us special. We are still marching forward and young
people should not despair at such times as these.

Mr Antony Leung has held senior positions in several


major international banks and is currently the CEO of the
Nan Fung Group, a large property development
company. A former Financial Secretary and a member of
the HKSAR Governments Executive Council, he was also
a Member of the Exchange Fund Advisory Committee, a
Board Member of the Hong Kong Airport Authority and
Director of the Hong Kong Futures Exchange, as well as
Chairman of both the Education Commission and the
University Grants Committee.
11
Youth Hong Kong
Interview
September 2014 |
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Hong Kong has a special place in my heart. I was
born here, went to an international school until
I was a teenager, and eventually moved abroad
to further my studies and live. However, there
was always something magical about Hong Kong
that made me want to come back, so I moved
back in 2001. I have been here ever since.
I remember how fascinating everything was then.
I used to think I understood local Hong Kong
culture; but it wasnt until I started working here and
really getting to know more people that I realized
how far removed I was from my old international
school culture. I found the local environment
very accepting even when people jokingly, but
affectionately, called me a gwai jai (Western boy).
by Ben Tse
Hardship but acceptance, and a better life
One source of Hong Kong inspiration for me is my
wife, a Shek Kip Mei girl. Like many others from that
generation, her father swam down to Hong Kong
illegally from the mainland in search of a better life,
and her mother grew up in the original Shek Kip
Mei public housing settlements built after the 1953
fire. The hardships that the previous generation had
to endure (and that many still endure now, perhaps
in different ways) helped Hong Kong become
what it is today. They are truly an inspiration.
I have been an active part of the underground indie
music scene for many years. One thing that has struck
me about Hong Kong is how open-minded people
are towards all kinds of music and art, and how
accommodating and accepting they can be. I dont
think I have ever seen the audience boo someone off
stage, laugh at or heckle them. There also isnt a sense
of elitism or snobbery when it comes to art and music.
There seems to be a genuine appreciation for all genres.
The writers in this section have lived through changing times in Hong
Kong. Now in their 20s, 30s and 40s, they look back on what Hong Kong
has given them, and what it promises for the future.
Getting inspiration
Choice, change and commitment
Youth Hong Kong
Perspectives
| September 2014
12
All photos in this section courtesy of authors unless captioned.
Ben


Dig a little deeper
There are some who say that Hong Kong culture is
superficial and people dont appreciate art, but youll
be surprised just how much goes on in this city,
and how many folks are actually interested when
given the opportunity to take part. At work, I have
seen how much goes on in this city you just need
to dig a little deeper and know where to look.
I think Hong Kong has changed a lot in these past
13 years, for the better, and for the worse, but
ultimately I still find a lot of inspiration in this city.
My ultimate source of inspiration these days is sitting
on the top of Lion Rock, looking over the beautiful
Kowloon Peninsula with Hong Kong Island in the
distance as the sun slowly sets to the west. On a clear
evening, I cannot think of any place more beautiful.
Ben Tse, a TV
presenter with RTHK,
is in his mid-30s.
He recently founded the
indie band Oh! Nullah.
www.facebook.
com/ohnullah
Greener grass
T
hinking about work overseas instead of life in Hong
Kong, this writer muses on the attractions of more
open space and cleaner air. But she is ambivalent, and
knows how dif cult it would be to leave home
Its not hard to imagine having my own little
American house, sitting out on the porch,
admiring the view, with a cup of tea at 6 oclock
after work. No noise. No pressure
Pleasures like this are hard to find in Hong Kong and
my positive experience of being an exchange student
in the US showed me how many opportunities there
are overseas. In fact, if I was offered a good job package
in a pollution-free environment I think I might prefer
the simple life. I like the idea of a simple life: money
is important but it cannot give you happiness.
Getting inspiration
Cont'd on page 14
Youth Hong Kong
Perspectives
September 2014 |
13
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by Elena Ng
Like a box of chocolates
Looking back, to be honest, I missed Hong Kong
when I was away. Mostly, I missed my family and my
friends. I missed knowing my way round and knowing
that I could get home safely at 11.30 at night. I missed
many things I barely thought of before, like knowing
where to shop, find bargains, eat a bowl of cheap and
tasty noodles. Many of these would be a problem in
the US, especially if I had to handle them alone.
Sometimes, you can make your own choices in life
but they do say life is like a box of chocolates, and
you never know which one we will get.* Given a
chance to choose one, which would you pick?
Elena Ng, a final year
student, is majoring
in psychology at the
University of Hong Kong.
Freedom at a price
Hong Kong people face so much pressure, sometimes
forced on them by society and sometimes because
they add stress to their lives. Given the option I
would not choose it. But leaving all that behind
would mean leaving my family and friends, living
alone and taking care of myself. Even moving around,
getting from the airport, getting to work. It wouldnt
be like Hong Kong, famous for its public transport.
I couldnt expect that in a big country like the US,
even if there were the freedom of the open road
to be enjoyed once I had a driving licence.
The crime rate there worries me too. I dont think
it would be as safe as Hong KongAnd I wonder if I
would fit in. Would the local people want incomers
as employees? I also ask myself about speaking
their language. Not just formal, business English,
but colloquial, American English. The real living
language everyone speaks. Without it there is so
much more likelihood of misunderstanding.
What about other cultural differences? Foreigners
working overseas need to adjust not only to a
new country and a new job, but also a whole new
cultural and work environment. That means not
only flexibility but strength of character.
Youth Hong Kong
Perspectives
| September 2014
14
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Elena

T
he writer left Hong Kong to study in the UK before working there. She
too appreciates Hong Kongs best qualities and is making the most of
the opportunities it ofers.
It was a calm night when I arrived in Hong Kong on the
evening of October 8, 2008. The feeling of being back
in the place where I grew up was familiar yet distant,
especially when I was living the dream in Boston
one month prior, working on the implementation
of a micro-nutrient programme for children in rural
Tanzania. I was surrounded by experts from Harvard,
the Clinton Foundation, as well as high-flying business
partners. Still, with one suitcase in tow, I went on my
way to my temporary apartment in Mid-Levels. Big city
glamour sparkled before my eyes, but the grim reality
was - real estate agencies had slashes of red marker pen
that suggested property prices had already dropped by
20-30% - I was at the epicentre of the financial crisis.
Hard work and passion for learning
It may seem like a clich if I point out Hong Kongs
resilience. But when I look back at the 11 years
I have lived in London, Oxford, Cambridge and
Boston, I dare not take resilience for granted. One
could argue that an elite education accelerated my
career progression, allowing me to work across
industries and geographical locations. However,
ultimately, I learnt that hard work and passion for
learning pay off in Hong Kong, where people are
both book-smart and street-smart. My mentors and
friends inspire me to take the road less travelled,
they help me through obstacles, and share my joy.
I could have continued along my path as a consultant
in the West, but I traded comfort for new experiences.
As a result, I had rejections from Hong Kong employers
back then, saying, We love you, and in better times we
would have hired you on the spot, but. Fortunately,
it only lasted a month. It was on my birthday in
November that I was offered a post managing a business
development portfolio in non-invasive pre-natal
diagnosis at the Chinese University of Hong Kong.
Responsibility for making a diference
Privileges, if anything, give people a sense of
responsibility to make a difference. Between
2011 and 2013, I took up the role of University
Development Manager at the Oxford Hong Kong
Office. In the morning, I could be organizing
a fundraising event with the Chancellor of the
University of Oxford, Lord Chris Patten.
Room to flourish
by Mimi Mo
Youth Hong Kong
Perspectives
September 2014 |
15
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In the afternoon, I might have been realizing a young
persons dream to go abroad. I met donors who
did not just have the heart to do good, but had the
pragmatic mind-set to make charitable work sustainable
through good business practice. Where else in the
world would you find such close-knit social circles
and the upward mobility that Hong Kong offers?
There are countless things I could list that represent
the uniqueness of Hong Kong: how it allows
talented people to flourish is certainly one example.
But to quote President John F. Kennedy,
Ask not what your country can do for you; ask what
you can do for your country. There are no Thats
easy for you to say excuses. We can all contribute
to the reasons why Hong Kong is so special.
I
n the past fve years, Hongkongers with
more than US$1 million in investable
assets grew by 27% annually. This is by
far the fastest growth in the world. A
good sign for young entrepreneurs-to-be
like this writer.
Open doors
by Jessica Chan
Mimi

Dr Mimi Mo went to St Pauls Co-educational College


in Hong Kong and did biochemistry at Imperial
College London before a doctorate in neuroscience at
Oxford. She currently works for GlaxoSmithKline and
is a columnist for the Hong Kong Economic Journal.
Youth Hong Kong
Perspectives
| September 2014
16
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For me, a locally-born and brought up young person
who wants to be an entrepreneur, the fact that the
number of Hong Kongs millionaires has doubled in the
last five years is very encouraging. It shows what great
opportunities are available here at home. Whatever
your business product, the market is growing and has
higher spending and investing power than ever. It is an
ideal time and place for youth to explore their potential.
Doors of opportunity are open for them to realize
their dreams and join the circle of wealth growth.
Through entrepreneurship, supported by government
schemes, one can transform dreams into successful
business ventures. There are well-known local
programmes to help, such as those at the Cyberport
Entrepreneurship Centre and at HKFYG's Youth
Business Hong Kong. In a broader sense, my
generation, growing up to be citizens of the world,
can and should create dream careers, careers that
induce change, in and across cities and continents.
Elements of advantage
This is possible largely thanks to communications
technology and social networks, available 24/
7. Hong Kongs telecommunications rank with
the top tier in the world, with mobile and data
networks available in trains, and wifi hotspots even
on buses. Combined with our advantageous time
zone, these mean we can conduct round- the- clock
business, bridging Asia, the US and Europe.
From a risk management angle, entrepreneurship
in Hong Kong is a life-long sustainable option.
It facilitates long-term strategies, even for post-
retirement years when we will all need a sustainable
passive income. As an entrepreneur, I will be able to
establish a system which will yield such an income
when my business matures. This concept will be
based on a culture of established team enterprise.
For entrepreneurship to work in the personal sphere,
it must be possible for individuals to strike a work-life
balance and that requires the flexibility to set your own
work schedule and location. Again, Hong Kong allows
for this. The close proximity of family and friends, and
an excellent public transport network mean that one can
seize precious moments to spend with them, especially
to take good care of seniors who have nurtured us.
All the right elements are in place here and so I think it
is time for me to start up in business myself. I think I
will also be able to relax and enjoy outdoor activities like
hiking and windsurfing in Hong Kong. The size of the
city, its natural environment and the close proximity of
country parks and the sea mean there can be a seamless
blend of personal priorities and the entrepreneur lifestyle.
Only a place like Hong Kong could give me all of this.
Jessica5

Jessica Chan is an Information Technology Project


Manager for a large financial corporation. She completed
her Bachelor of Science at the University of Hong Kong in
1999.
Youth Hong Kong
Perspectives
September 2014 |
17
p Author rowing for the Hong Kong team
Youth Hong Kong
Perspectives
| September 2014
18
B
orn in Pakistan in 1965, an accident in his 20s left the writer a paraplegic.
His subsequent life journey brought him to Hong Kong, where business
success was followed by sporting success. The next steps took him to
the Hong Kong paralympic rowing team.
Here for good
by Ajmal Samuel
You can feel the energy and life of this city the moment
you touch down here. I think that is what got me back
on my feet psychologically. I arrived from Europe
in 1991 where I graduated from The University of
Dusseldorf and, even early on, I decided to make Hong
Kong my home. It was so easy to get around, life could
be spontaneous. I had mobility and freedom again.
A new lease of life
Everything here moves so fast and that has helped
me focus on life instead of disability. I really feel I
can lead a normal life here though I cant say life has
been straightforward. In fact, I have been riding a
roller-coaster. Hong Kong is challenging. It was
very tough in the beginning and looking back,
I know how important the people looking
after me and mentoring me were, always
accessible at the end of a phone line.
Another quality of this city is its flexibility. It allows
one to re-invent oneself, just like Hong Kong. So I have
changed with it, getting my first job after my military
career in Pakistan in the technology sector. Then I
started my own business, grasping the opportunities
Hong Kong gave me so generously. In a place like this
you can regain self-confidence, and it was the same with
sport. Getting fit enough to do triathlons and marathons
gave me a new lease of life. And then came the rowing.
I cant imagine any other place where it could happen
like this. I joined a dragon boat team, already very
strong in my upper body. Then the trainer asked me
if I had tried single scull rowing. Soon afterwards I
was spotted training on the Shing Mun River, and the
national coach asked me to join the national squad. If Id
ever had any doubts, they evaporated at that moment.
by Elaine Morgan
East, west, home's best
Ajmal Samuel, now in his 40s, is former President
of Cityline (HK) Ltd, founder and CEO of OCTO3, a
financial technology service provider. He will be
representing Hong Kong as a rower at the Incheon
2014 Asian Para Games in October 2014.
p View from the country park to North Point, HKFYG Building and harbour
I
ve been a Hongkonger for 40 years. Its where I now belong.
Most mornings I walk to HKFYG. In the first half hour,
I climb from the dense tower blocks of old Tai Hang up to
wild hills, lush greenery and peace. Often, the only sounds
are water gushing in streams, birdsong and wind in the
trees. How lucky we are to have such places.
Then down, past the rhythmic swish of the Chinese fan
dancers and the chatter of schoolgirls, into the urban jungle
of buses, trams and jack hammers. There, big city bustle and
haste are balanced by continuity, friends and colleagues. Noise
and dirt come with buzz and variety. Jostle and hustle are side
by side with patience and pragmatism.
Todays doubts about the future come with yearning for change.
I admire those who have the courage of their convictions
and stand up for their rights. Hong Kong people, aware of their
identity, expect self-determination, and make sure the world
knows it. This is a city that welcomes difference and deserves
integrity. There is nowhere else like it. Its home.
Youth Hong Kong
Perspectives
September 2014 |
19
Hong Kong has always been good to me and when
I joined the squad my fate was sealed. I had applied
for an HKSAR passport a little before that. As a
businessman I knew it would build my network like
nothing else could. But the squad needed me to be
Chinese and that did it. Now I have lived in Hong
Kong longer than anywhere else in the world. Now
I know I am here for good. This is where I belong.
Passport for the Olympics
Attitudes have changed a lot. When I was in Hangzhou
for the China national rowing championships this
summer, I had to convince my fellow competitors from
other provinces that this foreign looking fellow was really
Chinese, just like them. They looked at me in disbelief,
but my team mates backed me up. Hes Cantonese!
Just like us, they said. And when I come back through
Immigration, even though Im not fluent in Cantonese,
Im addressed by my Chinese name ( ) at the
border. The officials say with a smile, Welcome back!
Flying back after a business trip its wonderful to
see the outlying islands spread beneath me and
I relish in the prospect of training there, so close
to my work in the glittering city nearby. The
moment the plane touches down I know I can
relax again. Im on safe ground. Im home.
Ajmal

20

Y
oung people of all ages have told us what they value most in Hong
Kong, what qualities they most admire in its people, and what
concerns them most. A representative group write here about the
essential culture of the place where they live.
Values shared
concerns aired
Politically, because Hong Kong is a Special Administrative Region, its citizens can enjoy many freedoms, its
Legislative Council has a strong voice and its government respects human rights. Everybody has a say, and
decisions can be made which balance the interests of various stakeholders.
Culturally, Hong Kong is like a bottle of aged yet refreshing wine. It is a balanced blend, conserving Chinese
traditions while being open to new cultures from other countries.
Economically, Hong Kong is outstanding. It is the worlds freest economy, government intervention is slight,
and the minimum wage now protects workers rights.
Perfection is rarely achieved in any human society but by preserving
neutrality we can minimize our shortcomings and maintain a rare and
precious balance.
Lin Kristy, 16
Belilios Public School
Neutrality, vision and balance
Our home city is spoken of as a hybrid of western and eastern cultures
but little attention is paid to international issues. Instead, young people
here look inwards, to grades, assignments and tutorials. The mainland
issue is the elephant in the room for many Hong Kong people and I
think as a result they lack global vision, especially teenagers. By looking
outwards more they could break out of the box that is hemming them
in, hiding the treasure beyond our borders, and blurring our image as the
Pearl of the Orient.
Ernest Chau, 19
Hong Kong
University of
Science and
Technology
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Youth Hong Kong
Youth speak
| September 2014
20
Poverty and inequality
Work, luck and location
There are many tourist attractions in Hong Kong.
People come from all over the world to visit them.
But there are also places like the dawn market. I
talked to an elderly lady there. She is 81 years old.
She told me that she still picks up second-hand items
that other people have thrown away. She sells them
for a dollar or two. A tear rolled down my face for
every word she said. She told me that she had three
daughters, but none of them take care of her.
Of course Im not saying that Im proud about the
inequalities in Hong Kong, but I am very proud of
everyone, like that old lady, who actually tries their
best to earn a living, no matter how hard it is, instead
of asking the government for money. They are very
grateful for what they have, not like kids nowadays
who have everything and still demand more.
I wish everyone could learn from that old ladys attitude.
Money cant buy everything.
People often believe that success has a great
deal to do with luck, but I beg to differ. Success
is 95% hard work and only 5% luck, much
like Hong Kongs journey to success.
It can be traced back to the communitys strong
work ethic. People here are passionate about
contributing to our economy and against the idea
of mere welfarism. Workaholics, arent we?
The Hong Kong government also gives opportunities
to people to make the most out of their lives,
whether at school, at work or in retirement.
The luck part is our location, on the South China
Sea coast, perfect as a trading hub. Now, as the world
does business with the mainland, the city benefits,
as it does from business professionals from across
the globe, willing to bring in new ideas and provoke
our inner east Asian tiger to roar even louder.
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Joy Pamnani, 15
Po Leung Kuk Ngan
Po Ling College
Christy Chu, 16
Yew Chung
International School
Youth Hong Kong
Youth speak
September 2014 |
21
Freedom of speech
Hong Kong is a city that emphasizes freedom of speech and a wide range of opinions are expressed here.
Many groups fight to protect their interests and yet, thinking positively, I believe that todays divisions allow
differences in opinion to come to the surface and do not necessarily result in confusion. Even in todays
divided community, fairness can be achieved by policymakers, problems can be resolved and respect can
be shown to all major stakeholders. However, this is only possible if freedom of speech is maintained.
Of all Hong Kongs icons I treasure
freedom of press most of all. Journalists
are responsible for representing
differing perspectives and for reflecting
accurately personal opinions conveyed
to them. This includes publishing
views of stakeholders who question
official decisions and are concerned
about social injustice. It is a means of
bringing pressure to bear on decision-
makers in order to benefit the majority
rather than minority vested interests.
Hongkonger was one of the new words recently added to the Oxford English Dictionary. For me, and many
people in Hong Kong, it means that we have finally won recognition. We have fought for our own identity
and the fight continues. We have our own unique culture and politics, and it is not the same as that of
mainlanders. We are proud to be Hongkongers and by joining protests we do not mean to cause trouble.
Rather, we want to maintain harmony. This is what Hong Kong needs despite the recent divisions in our
community. Only with harmony can there be peace of mind.
A group of secondary students who are willing to speak out have formed a political society called
Scholarism. They are involved in various political issues and demonstrations. As members of the
younger generation, they are not like all those who focus only on their smartphones. Instead,
they give voice to their views and in this I think they want to represent todays teenagers.
Ivy Ho, Year 2
BBA, HKUST
Kevin Li Ho-
lam, 16
Li Po Chun
United World
College
Gigi Chau, 23
Account
Executive
Pansy Tam,
Year 2
HKBU
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Sense of identity
Youth Hong Kong
Youth speak
| September 2014
22
Talking about home
Joey, a 23-year old student, says, I value Hong Kongs
freedoms, its multiculturalism and the rule of law
above everything. Thats why I want to stay here, but I
think most Hong Kong people focus on money and
economic development.
His friend, Mark, also in his 20s, agreed. I would add
our natural environment. Its beautiful in Hong
Kongs countryside! But for me, the high cost of living
and widening poverty gap are serious concerns. People
here only look at the short term.
Winston, an accountant aged 30 heading for an
evening class, focused on the economy and
development issues. Developer hegemony and
monopolies are the worst problem in our home city.
With Hong Kongs focus on service industries, more
people think of setting up in business, but small
companies cannot compete fairly and employment
opportunities are narrowing.
Natalie, on the other hand, had just got married.
Caught in the rush hour on her way home, she didnt
stop for long. Long working hours seriously affect
our home life. Theres no time to enjoy there. Im
always in a hurry!
Maggie was also concerned. I think we are living
through very difficult times. Views are polarized in
many ways and normal people with good jobs, who
call Hong Kong their home, cannot even afford to
buy a flat.
Jodie echoed Natalie, but as a student she did not feel
so harassed. Hongkongers are famous for their pace.
They do everything at top speed. Students rush to
school while workers rush to work. Even having
afternoon tea, which should be relaxing, is done at a
rush. More quantity, less quality. Why? Are we all just
used to it? If only people in this lovely city could slow
down a bit. We would all enjoy life more.
Ken, an executive officer on his way to a concert, said,
Few take culture, heritage or the arts here seriously.
Even the remaining farm land is under threat in the
Northeast New Territories, All people think of is flats,
flats, flats.
Overhearing him, Andy, a colleague commented, But
we have a free society and everyone is willing to work
more for the sake of success, whatever their age. Our
home citys best qualities are its hard-working people.
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assers-by in an MTR station tell Youth Hong Kong their views.
Youth Hong Kong
Youth speak
September 2014 |
23
Youth Hong Kong
Youth watch
| September 2014
24
Having their
H
ere we take a look at how youth view their
countries. Are they happy about their work, the
state of their nations, and how they see their future? This
article explores surveys which include factors such as
confdence, work, voting and the future including having children
of their own.
Australia
confident but worried about discrimination
78% of Australians are confident of a good future
and 63% feel their countrys future is bright. 54%
think earning a lot of money is important for a
good life, 52% were satisfied with their work, 25%
value their jobs social impact, but only 5% think
a good job entails prestigious status.
1
* 25% of 15-
19 year-olds thought there were insufficient job
opportunities in their community and 50% thought
they would have to look elsewhere for work.
2
Young
women ranked equity and discrimination as the top
issue facing the country, indicating concerns about
workplace discrimination, racism and inequality.
Voting is compulsory in Australia, yet Australian
Electoral Commission statistics show 25% of young
voters failed to enrol for the 2013 federal election.
3
A 2012 survey found 67% of under 30s want to
get married and 55% of all singles feel they are
expected to have children. 35% of the surveyed
singles would have a child before marriage.
4
India
optimistic and determined
Surveys reveal that young Indians are some of the
worlds most contented, with 90% sure they will do
well in the future, 83% confident in their countrys
future and 84% satisfied with the age in which they
live.* 60% of young Indians hope to earn a lot of
money in the next 15 years and 41% rate money
as important to a good life. A better wage takes
precedence over career opportunity and status matters,
with 27% wanting to be managers or leaders. 97% of
young Indians see their jobs as an important factor in
their identity. About 80% voted in the 2014 election,
and about 83% wanted a change of government.
5

74% think the country is becoming more violent and
they also worry about corruption. Only 13% want to
start a family. Being famous rates higher (27%) than
getting a degree (16%) or having children (24%).
say
by Virginia Addison
Youth Hong Kong
Youth watch
September 2014 |
25
Japan
pessimistic but enfranchised
Only 24% of Japanese youth expect their country
to thrive in future and 75% were dissatisfied with it.
51% were also unhappy with their own lives.* 60%
did not like their work, but 32%
6
thought they would
have a good job in the future although competition
is fierce. Survey responses from almost 250 university
and vocational school graduates indicated a high level
of distrust of Japanese firms and society. Nevertheless,
another survey found that 57% of young workers did
not want to work overseas.
7
Far fewer young people
exercise their right to vote in Japan than they do in
either India or Malaysia. In 2012, only 47% of all
young people voted in the general election.
8
Only
6.5% of high school students believed that they
could change society by participating. Young people
are bound by strict social codes and only around 2%
of babies are born outside marriage.
9
Official figures
for women in their early 20s indicate that 25% may
never marry and 40% may remain childless.
10
Mainland China
positive and persistent
The majority of young Chinese (82%) think their
country has a bright future and 84% feel it will
play a more important role in the world.* 40% say
a good life is predicated on feeling free. The goals
of two-thirds of youth for the next 15 years are to
earn a lot of money and to own a house or flat.
40% also want to own their own company. 44%
of 18-21 year-olds and 48% of 22-31 year olds
think democracy is a good thing, but over 50% of
the younger age group and 47% of the older said
they could not generalize and their opinion would
depend on whether Chinas current conditions
were appropriate, according to a 2013 study from
a state think tank, the Chinese Academy of Social
Sciences.
11
Around 56% of mainland Chinese polled
wanted to have a second child, according to a 2014
online survey conducted by the Southern Metropolis
Daily. 12% said they did not want any children.
12
1. http://www.fondapol.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/2011-World-Youths.pdf
2. https://www.missionaustralia.com.au/what-we-do-to-help-new/young-people/understanding-young-people/annual-youth-survey
3. http://www.abc.net.au/news/2013-08-21/figures-show-25-per-cent-of-young-people-failed-to-enrol-to-vote/4903292
4. http://www.smh.com.au/lifestyle/life/who-wants-to-get-married-20120808-23tmd.html
5. http://www.economist.com/blogs/banyan/2014/02/our-poll-young-indians
6. http://www.universityworldnews.com/article.php?story=20140117150414228
7. http://www.japantoday.com/category/lifestyle/view/why-do-so-few-young-japanese-want-to-work-overseas
8. https://storify.com/LinkAsiaNews/japan-youth-politics
9. http://www.economist.com/blogs/economist-explains/2014/07/economist-explains-16
10. http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/oct/20/young-people-japan-stopped-having-sex
11. http://www.theatlantic.com/china/archive/2013/07/young-chinese-people-may-just-not-be-that-into-western-style-democracy/277885/
12. http://www.scmp.com/news/china-insider/article/1294421/most-chinese-want-have-second-child-says-survey
Sources
*Note Source number 1 provides information for more than one country, as asterisked.
Youth Hong Kong
Youth watch
| September 2014
26
Malaysia
disempowered but vocal
A 2012 nationwide survey
13
found that 58% think
the country is moving in the right direction, although
inflation, the general economic situation, crime,
unemployment and corruption in the government
are top issues. While unemployment concerns
some, 73% say the real issue with the employment
situation is not getting a job, but getting one they
like. Only 17% of the total number of respondents
wanted to work outside Malaysia, with most being
in the younger age bracket. Socially and politically,
youth perceive themselves as under-empowered to
act. Only 39% say they can make a difference in
solving problems within their communities. In terms
of their perceived influence on the government,
41% said they could influence how government
works. However, in the 2013 election the voter
turnout for first-time, young voters was 83%.
14
Women are having fewer children, with figures
falling from three children per woman in 2000 to
2.1 in 2012. In a 2012 survey, 50.9% of Chinese
women surveyed said no to having children or, for
those who were mothers already, to having more.
15
Singapore
proud of home but looking elsewhere
74% of young people say that they are proud of
their country but six in 10 consider looking beyond
Singapore to achieve their dreams.
16
A survey by
Credit Suisse
17
showed that many of them worried
about unemployment, inflation and the high cost
of living. More than 66% say the presence of
foreigners in the city-state is causing problems such
as increasing housing prices and competition for jobs.
39% would not vote if voting were not compulsory.
About one in four young voters polled feel that
they want to, but have little say in government
policies and decision-making, despite wanting to,
according to a 2011 survey of 21-35 year-olds.
18
Top
priorities are an affordable place to live, a society
that defines success beyond academic and material
achievements, and a more fulfilling pace of life.
Only 3% put having children top of their wish list.
20. http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/overqualified-and-
underemployed-britain-faces-youth-talent-crisis-as-new-figures-reveal-
more-than-a-million-young-people-working-menial-jobs-9198044.html
21. http://www.graduates.co.uk/graduate-employment-rates/
22. http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/shocking-poll-shows-60-young-3501186
23. http://www.statista.com/statistics/293734/influence-of-family-
on-future-happiness-of-young-people-great-britain/
24. http://www.princes-trust.org.uk/macquarieyouthindex/index.html
25. http://mckinseyonsociety.com/downloads/reports/Education/
UXC001%20Voice%20of%20the%20Graduate%20v7.pdf
26. http://www.yda.org/resources/youth-vote-statistics/
27. http://www.gallup.com/poll/164618/desire-children-norm.aspx
13. http://asiafoundation.org/news/2012/12/the-asia-foundation-launches-
the-youth-factor-2012-survey-of-malaysian-youth-opinion/
14. http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/malaysia/article/the-general-
election-surprise-younger-malays-too-went-to-barisan
15. http://www.theheat.my/Article.aspx?ArticleId=1676
16. http://www.straitstimes.com/breaking-news/singapore/story/six-10-young-
singaporeans-have-considered-leaving-the-country-fulfill--#sthash.Ajs7i43S.dpuf
17. https://www.credit-suisse.com/ch/en/news-and-expertise/
publications/bulletin/barometer/youth-barometer.html
18. http://news.asiaone.com/News/AsiaOne+News/Singapore/
Story/A1Story20110330-270945.html
19. http://www.economist.com/news/britain/21578666-britains-youth-are-
not-just-more-liberal-their-elders-they-are-also-more-liberal-any
Sources cont'd
National Floral Emblems
Australia Golden wattle
by Tatters https://www.fickr.com/photos/tgerus/4140035349
India Lotus Nelumno nucifera
by Peripitus http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_symbols_of_India#mediaviewer/
File:Nelumno_nucifera_open_fower_-_botanic_garden_adelaide2.jpg
Japan Cherry blossom
(picture courtesy of author)
Mainland China Tree peony Paeonia suffruticosa
by Invertzoo http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Tree_peony,_Queens,_NYC.
JPG#mediaviewer/File:Tree_peony,_Queens,_NYC.JPG
Malaysia Chinese hibiscus
by Cristbal Alvarado Minic https://www.fickr.com/photos/ctam/2844372063
Youth Hong Kong
Youth watch
September 2014 |
27
United Kingdom
discontented and discouraged
Britons aged 18-24 are more likely than older
people to consider social problems the responsibility
of individuals rather than government.
19
74% of
young people are optimistic about their future,
but only 34% feel the same about their country.*
Nearly 1.3 million 16-24 year-olds are out of work
and another 1.2 million are underemployed or
overqualified.
20
The average full-time employment
rate for graduates for 2011-2012 was 55.1%.
21

Over 40% believe the economy is one of the biggest
issues facing the country and are concerned about
unemployment.
22
Nevertheless, 60% say they
will not vote in the 2015 general election. 31%
of 16-24-year-olds said the biggest influence on
their future happiness was their family and 80%
of 18-34 year-olds say they would consider having
a family before getting married.
23
Disquietingly,
in a recent survey of over 2,000 16-25-year-
olds, 9% said they had nothing to live for.
24
United States
ambivalent but hopeful
One in three graduates did not feel college had
prepared them well for the world of work but
76% were sure they would have a good job in the
future and 53% hoped to earn a lot of money.
Unemployment was a worry, but 66% wanted to
try new things and, for 62%, exploring the world
outdid pursuing a career.
25
50% of eligible young
voters cast a ballot in the 2012 election.
26
In 2013,
nearly 75% felt the political system needed some sort
of fundamental reform. 33% of young Americans
had a rather bleak view of their societys future,
according to the Credit Suisse survey, although other
statistics revealed that 81% thought their personal
future was bright and 87% thought they had the
power to change society through their actions.*
More than half of Americans aged 18-40 have
children. 40% have none yet but hope to one day.
Only 6% neither have nor want children.
27

Singapore Orchid Vanda Miss Joaquim
by MaX Fulcher https://www.fickr.com/photos/maxful/11302326975
UK Tudor rose, Scottish thistle, daffodil, shamrock
Tudor rose http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Tudor_Rose.svg
Scottish thistle by Lyn Jardine https://www.fickr.com/photos/
lynjardine/5978488416
Dafodil by Christine Majul https://www.fickr.com/photos/
kitkaphotogirl/4449964450
shamrock by Ruthandave https://www.fickr.com/photos/
ruthanddave/13414933284, thistle, shamrock
US Rose
https://www.fickr.com/photos/crabchick/5608389064
Britain, Australia, the US and Canada were the most
popular destinations for Hong Kong people who
sought homes abroad around the time of the handover
and Doris Lams family was among the migrants who
chose to go to Vancouver, although their decision
had nothing to do with 1997 according to her
mother, Mrs Lam. We emigrated in 1998, after the
handover. We had few concerns about the mainland
government ruling Hong Kong. The move was for
the family to experience life in a foreign country.
Doris was only two years old when she moved from
Hong Kong to Canada. She was too young to have
formed lasting impressions of the city where she was
born and she easily became accustomed to life in
Canada. It was less easy for her mother, who had to
quit her job to become a full-time housewife. One
thing that my mother disliked about living in Canada
was that she had to travel a long way to get things
done. My mother did not like driving a car, but in
Canada she had to drive every day to shop and take
me to school. It was not like Hong Kong, where shops
are nearby. That was tough on her, Doris says.
Doris attended a local school in Canada with limited
access to Chinese, so her parents made sure that she
learned her mother tongue by sending her to classes.
Every weekend, I attended Chinese class with many
other kids whose families were from Hong Kong.
Despite this, my standard of Chinese was way behind
that of students in Hong Kong, she admits.
After spending five years in Canada and acquiring
Canadian passports, Doriss family decided to return to
Hong Kong. We came back because my grandfather
was sick. If I had been old enough to choose, I would
rather have preferred to stay in Canada, she confesses.
I had a hard time adjusting to life in Hong Kong.
Doris returned to Hong Kong after finishing Primary
One in Canada. The first hurdle for her parents was
finding her a school. She didnt know a lot of Chinese
so it wasnt easy to find a school for her, Mrs Lam says.
I
n the late 1980s and early 1990s, many Hong Kong families worried that their
way of life and the political environment of Hong Kong would change
drastically after the handover to the mainland. Some chose to emigrate. In this
contribution from the Education Post, we see what life has been like for them.
Reluctant return
Youth Hong Kong
Talking point
| September 2014
28
One thing that my mother
disliked about living in Canada
was that she had to travel a
long way to get things done. It
was not like Hong Kong.
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We tried applying to a number of local schools, but
had no success. Eventually we got her a place at a direct
subsidy school St Margaret's Co-educational English
Secondary and Primary School, which caters to English-
speaking students. We considered ourselves lucky.
Like many students who returned to Hong Kong after
education in a western country, Doris had trouble both
with her Chinese and with adapting to school life. I
cannot tell you how many times I failed my Chinese
examinations. Every year before the summer break, I
had to take remedial classes when my classmates were
enjoying trips to theme parks. I am lucky in that I can
take GCSE Chinese, which is easier than DSE Chinese.
This will help when applying for local universities.
Now in Secondary Five, Doris still hankers after
Canada. It feels weird having to wear school
uniform and bow to teachers when we wish them
good morning. Also, the air quality in Hong Kong
is really bad compared to Canada. I love nature, but
I feel so far away from it in Hong Kong. Even when
we go on field trips, like visiting the wetland park, I
dont think of it as really interacting with nature.
Doris has not enjoyed her return to Hong Kong. She
does not like the citys fast pace. In Canada, cars
will stop to wait for pedestrians to cross, and people
will hold doors open for others, but in Hong Kong
people just rush past, never looking behind and
letting doors slam in your face, she complains.
Doris will sit the HKDSE next year and then hopes to go
back to university in Canada. My preference is to study
in Canada because I would love to study creative writing
and universities here do not offer much by way of such
programmes. I think the education system in Canada
suits me better, but I have not made a decision yet
because my mother prefers to have me in Hong Kong.
Time will tell whether family ties are stronger
for Doris than personal preferences.
Youth Hong Kong
Talking point
September 2014 |
29
In Canada, cars will stop to
wait for pedestrians to cross,
and people will hold doors
open for others, but in Hong
Kong people just rush past.
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Cathay Pacific, founded in 1946,


has grown up with Hong Kong.
In the 50s and 60s, it was running
early passenger flights to Manila,
Bangkok, Singapore and Shanghai.
By the late 1970s, the first Boeing
747-200 had arrived here and long-
haul flights to London, Europe
and North America began.
M
any people who call Hong Kong their home have travelled by air to
study, work and explore overseas before returning home. They think
fondly of the citys iconic, made-in-Hong Kong airline, Cathay Pacifc.
Bringing us all back home
Then came the handover of Hong
Kong to mainland China in 1997.
For this Cathay put on its best for the
community, dressing up one of their
747s in a special livery, Spirit of Hong
Kong. The airline has been one of the
citys leaders at times of crisis, joining
efforts to get Hong Kong back onto
its feet after the SARS epidemic with
the We Love Hong Kong campaign.
The next decade saw huge economic
growth, greater prosperity for Hong
Kong people and many more Hong
Kong air travellers. Then came the
economically difficult years of the
early 90s. It was a troubled time
for Hong Kong people too. For
some of them, airline travel became
synonymous with emigration.
Every city needs a brand name to
be proud of and in a year when the
community has become polarized,
the airline has done our home city
proud. Once again in 2014 it was
named the Worlds Best Airline.
Youth Hong Kong
Talking point
| September 2014
30
Thumbs
up

for
Core values
Several surveys have been run by
HKFYG over the years to track
changing attitudes and values.
When asked what mattered, a 2002
survey revealed that the three most
fundamentally held values held were
freedom (44%), incorruptibility
(35%) and fairness (34%). Two
years later, in 2004, a second surveys
findings showed that they had most
confidence in diligence, the rule of law
and once again incorruptibility.
Ten years later, when invited to rate
their confidence level with respect
to the preservation of values, on a
scale of 0-100, youths confidence
in diligence was rated highest, at 72
points on average, followed by rule of
law at 69 points, and incorruptibility
at 65 points. Confidence in freedom,
justice, respect, equality, fairness
and trust were all over 60 points.
T
o conclude this section, we look at surveys which explore how
Hongkongers feel about their home. They reveal what respondents
feel most strongly about, and the special tastes, sights and sounds
which they think refect the citys essence.
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Youth Hong Kong
Talking point
September 2014 |
31
Widespread concerns
However, today there is widespread concern in the
community about the independence of the judiciary and
the separation of powers, pillars on which the rule of law
rests. In the surveys, 54% said the worsening poverty
gap made them feel unhappy and 45% were annoyed by
high property prices. Others were concerned about high
pressure at work (36%), poor constitutional development
(24%), and poor environmental quality (22%).
Outstanding icons
Which outstanding icons do young people single out
as essential symbols of Hong Kong? The results in the
2013 HKFYG Very Hong Kong survey varied widely,
from heritage and the harbour, Ocean Park and the
Golden Bauhinia, to landmarks, certain public figures,
freedom of speech, and the International Finance
Centre. Some homely items were typical foods and red-
white-blue plastic bags, without which Hong Kong
would no longer be the home we know and love.
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Youth Hong Kong


Talking point
| September 2014
32
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What pleases Hong Kong youth most about their
home city? Given a choice of 12 options, Hong Kongs
reputation as an eating and shopping paradise came
top of the list for 43% in the Very Hong Kong survey.
This light-hearted response was followed closely by
freedoms. Hong Kongs multi-cultural society, then
good public security and infrastructure, the citys trend-
setting quality, cosmopolitanism, and civic society, as
well as its natural environment, social welfare system
and heritage conservation were all well noted.
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Some photos in the issue are from the 2013 HKFYG Very Hong Kong photo competition.
Statistics are from HKFYG surveys in 2002, 2004 and 2013. Full details available on request.
Youth Hong Kong
Talking point
September 2014 |
33
While weekends may see the citys hills filled with
hikers, many young Hongkongers are happier
holed up inside with their phones or computers,
but this behaviour is putting them on the road
to a future of ill health and weight problems.
In Hong Kong, many young people suffer from
chronic ill health and disabilities because of preventable
non-communicable diseases (NCDs) such as heart
disease, stroke, diabetes and cancer. In 2011 in
Hong Kong, 19% of the cancers reported in the 20-
44 age group for men affected the nasopharynx,
11.6% affected the liver. 35.4% of women in
the same age group suffered breast cancer.
1

Changing our own behaviour
According to studies by the World Health Organization
(WHO), 80% of premature NCDs can be prevented.
2

How? By changing our own behaviour. It is not always
easy to motivate young people, particularly in a society
where parents value academic results more than exercise.
According to the WHO classification for adult Asians, in
2012, 18% of the citys population is overweight, while
19% is obese.
3
Being overweight or obese increases the
risk of diseases such as type 2 diabetes and NCDs. The
best way to tackle the problem is with a combination of
diet and exercise rather than by diet or exercise alone.
4

Revamp your diet
The Hong Kong Behavioral Risk Factor Survey in
2012 found that 82% of adults eat less than the
WHOs recommended five servings of fruit and
vegetables a day needed to obtain optimal health
benefits.
5
An unhealthy diet may lead to raised
blood pressure, blood sugar and cholesterol and
other conditions linked to obesity and NCDs.
A healthy diet should also include legumes, nuts and
grains and minimal amounts of salt, sugar and fats, in
particular saturated fats and trans-fatty acids. Some
studies have found vegetarian-style eating patterns have
been associated with improved health outcomes, such as
lower levels of obesity, a reduced risk of cardiovascular
disease, and lower total mortality.
6
Why not have a
Green Monday and give up meat one day per week?
Tofu is a great item for a low-fat, low-cholesterol diet
as it contains complete protein.
7
Eggs also supply all
essential amino acids and are considered a source of
complete protein. Some studies show that a moderate
consumption of eggs, up to one a day, does not appear
to increase heart disease risk in healthy individuals.
8
Fit for life by Kate Yung
I
f you want to stay healthy, be smarter and live longer you need to start eating right and
getting your body moving, according to this ftness coach who works with young people
and her mobile gym.
Youth Hong Kong
34
City space
| September 2014
Get moving
Although HK is a modern metropolis, its natural
playgrounds are just around the corner. There are country
parks to walk in, pools to swim in, endless sporting
clubs to join and the beach for fun. Hong Kong Park
in Admiralty and Kowloon Park in Tsim Sha Tsui are
excellent outdoor areas where you can join boot camps
and work out with your colleagues before or after work.
Sport can help young people increase their self-esteem
and become more outgoing. Exercise will also build
stronger bodies and better brains, as it enhances childrens
neurological development and executive function.
9

Exercise helps to improve our cardio-pulmonary
function, reduces the risk of NCDs, some cancers,
maintains optimum body weight and relieves stress.
So, how much exercise is enough? For adults, WHO
recommends at least 150 minutes of moderate-
intensity aerobic physical activity throughout the
week.
10
You may divide it into multiple short bouts
of at least 10 minutes if necessary. For adolescents,
WHO suggests an accumulation of at least 60 minutes
of moderate to vigorous physical activity on a daily
basis.
11
Muscle strengthening and bone loading
exercise, such as jumping, running and turning,
should also be included at least three times per week
to enhance bone health and to improve body build.
As dangerous as smoking
Researchers warn that physical inactivity may be as
dangerous for the heart as smoking a packet of cigarettes
every day.
12
However, most Hongkongers are still not
exercising enough, with less than 40% of the population
able to meet the WHO recommendation.
13
Hong
Kong is falling behind other places like England and
the US. In 2012, 67% of British men and 55% of
British women were able to meet the recommendation.
14

In 2011, New York 53.7% of men and 49.4% of
women were able to meet the recommendation.
15
What is keeping you from exercise? Too little time? Why
not use everyday opportunities to get moving? Ditch the
lift and climb the stairs, get up 15 minutes earlier in the
morning and walk in the park or make use of lunchtime
for a city stroll. Too tired? Exercise will boost your
energy level by producing endorphins (hormones that
give pleasure). If you have trouble keeping up the exercise
habit, find a workout partner. In my own experience,
exercising with a friend is better than working out alone
because the competition motivates you to work harder.
So put down that smartphone and grab a pair
of trainers now. Its time to change your ways
and get the best out of your life.
Sources
1. http://www3.ha.org.hk/cancereg/Summary%20of%20CanStat%202011.pdf
2. http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs317/en/
3. http://www.chp.gov.hk/en/data/1/10/280/1331.html
4. Curioni, CC & Lourenco, PM. Long-term weight loss after diet and exercise: a systematic review. Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord, 29(10), 1168-1174, 2005.
5. http://www.chp.gov.hk/en/data/1/10/280/1340.html
6. http://www.cnpp.usda.gov/Publications/DietaryGuidelines/2010/PolicyDoc/Chapter5.pdf
7. Cross, AJ. Higher red meat consumption is associated with increased risk of all-cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality. Evidence Based Nursing, 15(4), 2012.
8. Hu FB et al. A prospective study of egg consumption and risk of cardiovascular disease in men and women. JAMA 281 (15): 138794, 1999.
9. Tomporowski, P et al. Exercise and Childrens Intelligence, Cognition, and Academic Achievement. Ed Psych Rev, 20(2), 111-131, 2008
10. http://www.who.int/dietphysicalactivity/factsheet_adults/en/
11. http://www.who.int/dietphysicalactivity/factsheet_young_people/en/
12. Lee, I et al. Effect of physical inactivity on major non-communicable diseases worldwide: an analysis of burden of disease and life expectancy. The Lancet, 380(9838), 219-229,
13. http://www.chp.gov.hk/en/data/1/10/280/1341.html
14. http://www.hscic.gov.uk/catalogue/PUB13218/HSE2012-Ch2-Phys-act-adults.pdf
15. http://www.health.ny.gov/statistics/brfss/reports/docs/1309_brfss_physical_activity.pdf
Kate Yung is a final year BSc physiotherapy student
at Hong Kong Polytechnic University, founder of
Playfit and the 2014 PolyU Micro Fund Awardee.
Playfit is the first mobile gym in Hong Kong
with support in sports medicine. It offers fitness
training at customers preferred location.
www.playft.asia
kate@playft.asia
https://www.facebook.com/HKPlayft
35
Youth Hong Kong
City space
September 2014 |
O
utdoor air quality in Hong Kong is
deteriorating despite government
incentives such as grants for LPG cars
and fnes for leaving engines idling.
Where do the air pollutants come
from, how do they afect health and
how might we solve the air pollution
problem?
Pollution in Hong Kong has various sources
including electricity generation and vehicles of all
kinds: road, air and sea. It gets worse in winter
when northerly winds bring smog from the
Pearl River Delta, and better in summer when
prevailing winds are from the South China Sea.
Two major challenges for the Hong Kong government
are the local street-level pollution and regional
smog. Throughout 2013, very high readings were
recorded in the Air Pollution Index (API). They
are particularly bad in the busiest parts of the
city when vehicles are at their densest: Central,
Causeway Bay and Mong Kok (see Figure 1).
In December 2013, the Environmental Protection
Department replaced the API with a new Air Quality
Health Index (AQI) which measures the health risks
of air pollution by analyzing the three-hour average
concentrations of four major pollutants ozone,
nitrogen dioxide, sulphur dioxide and particulate
matter (PM10 and PM2.5). Real-time readings are
online.
1
Similar measurements are used in other
cities such as Singapore, Vancouver and Shanghai.
2

Harm to health
Where particulate matter is concerned, the smaller
the particle, the greater the risk of health problems. In
Hong Kong, according to the University of Hong Kong
Hedley Environmental Index,
3
over 3,000 people died
due to the air pollution last year. Information from
the government is available
4
and an excellent update
and infographic was published in March 2014.
5

Air Pollution
from
bad to worse
200
150
100
1999 2013
50
Figure 1
Six major air pollutants
Sulphur dioxide: SO2
Nitrogen oxides: NOx
Respirable suspended particulates PM10
Fine suspended particulates PM2.5
Volatile organic compounds: VOC
Carbon monoxide: CO
Source Environmental Protection Department
Combined total of days when
roadside API was above 100 in Central,
Causeway Bay and Mong Kok
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Youth Hong Kong
36
City space
| September 2014
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The Hong Kong government is collaborating with
Guangdong on a new set of targets. Emission
of four major pollutants - SO2, NOx, RSP and
VOC are set to drop. (See Figure 2). At present,
Hong Kongs air quality is broadly comparable
to that of high-income Asian cities such as Seoul
and Taipei, but not as good as in Singapore.
6
What else can be done? Electric vehicles are one answer
but for buses there are special problems: high volume
of passengers, steep hills and air-conditioning, to say
nothing of the tilting test up to 35, which makes
safe battery location crucial. Diesel-electric hybrids
are another option. So is retro-fitting of catalytic
converters to reduce emissions. Meantime, hundreds
of old Euro buses are still on Hong Kongs roads and
newer buses will not replace all of them until 2020.
All of us can help to reduce air pollution. Campaigns
minimizing use of private cars, using the MTR instead
of buses, and walking wherever this is a healthy, feasible
option, are all ways of dealing with the situation.
Approximately 90% of all private car journeys are
made by a single driver with one passenger. However,
in the end, economic sanctions often work better
than any public awareness campaign. What about
electronic road pricing? The first tests were conducted
in Hong Kong in the 1980s and it was adopted
successfully by Singapore in the 1990s. There is surely
Sources
1. http://www.cleartheair.org.hk/
2. http://www.aqhi.gov.hk/en/related-websites/other-related-websites.html
3. Hedley Environmental Index: http://hedleyindex.sph.hku.hk/mobile/tc/
4. The Health Effect of Air Pollution, Centre for Health Protection, Department of Health, HKSAR: http://www.chp.gov.hk/en/content/9/460/3557.html
5. http://www.scmp.com/infographics/article/1456143/youre-choking-where-particulate-matter-comes
6. http://www.enb.gov.hk/en/files/New_Air_Plan_en.pdf
7. http://www.epd.gov.hk/epd/english/environmentinhk/air/prob_solutions/strategies_apc.html
8. https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.taxishare&hl=zh_HK
9. Car-sharing start-up wins investment, by Mark Sharp, South China Morning Post
http://www.scmp.com/lifestyle/motoring/article/1222940/car-sharing-start-wins-investment
a chance that the public opposition it met in Hong
Kong 30 years ago might be mitigated by now.
Another answer is car sharing. Hong Kong has private
car start-ups like Carshare.hk and taxi sharing by
TaxiShare.
8
Carshare
9
targets housing estates where car
owners are few because parking is limited. They also
offer an electric vehicle. TaxiShare detects and connects
commuters seeking a taxi who share a destination. These
socially responsible, innovative ideas are great for helping
to reduce traffic volume on the road as well as reduce
individuals transport costs so much to be encouraged.
Pollutant Area
2015 Emission Reduction Targets
(compared to 2010)
2020 Emission Reduction Targeted
Ranges (as compared with 2010)
So
2
Hong Kong -25% -35% to -75%
PRD Economic Zone -16% -20% to -35%
NO
X
Hong Kong -10% -20% to -30%
PRD Economic Zone -18% -20% to - 40%
RSP
Hong Kong -10% -15% to -40%
PRD Economic Zone -10% -15% to -25
VOC
Hong Kong -5 -15%
PRD Economic Zone -10% -15% to -25%
Figure 2 Emission Reduction Targets for 2015 and 2020
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7
37
Youth Hong Kong
City space
September 2014 |
It is hard to imagine a world without the vibrant
multimedia that now surrounds our everyday lives. The
internet hosts a wealth of material that never seems to
stop expanding, but one area seems to be attracting
increasing numbers of young people the posting of
short videos. The advent of popular video platforms such
as YouTube, Instagram, and Vine over the past 10 years
has spurred those wanting a moving picture experience
of their very own to spread their creative wings and
produce personal, five-minute records of their lives.
Many of these videos are created by young people,
mostly with no film-making experience, as a form
of self-expression. The internet age has opened up a
new outlet for those who perhaps arent best suited
to writing, but want their voices to be heard. Some
people, extroverts in particular, may find it easier to
express themselves in a video instead of writing. I
think articulation is important regardless of format,
and videos encompass aspects of body language which
may better suit those whose actions give flavour and
meaning to their words. I have a good friend who makes
a lot of short videos because he enjoys learning new
special effects techniques and finds them a lot of fun,
in fact he now wants to take this further and hopes to
study motion graphics and visual effects at university.
The evolution of technology is most likely a leading
factor in encouraging this new wave of young video-
makers. A decade ago it would have seemed folly to
even attempt to shoot amateur videos just for the
sake of it. Equipment was expensive and filming took
a lot of time. Today, however, with the convenience
of smartphones which have built-in, high-quality
recording functions, and compact digital cameras that
far outshine the technology available years ago, anyone
can record their daily lives and produce quality videos.
As a result, almost every young person owns a
smartphone and has the ability to whip out a powerful
video recording device from their pocket at any given
moment lends itself well to the growing popularity of
youth-produced videos. Not all videos produced are of
good quality, and not all are well made, but there are a
lot of very good ones. Id define a good video as one that
is able to captivate its audience and leave them wanting
more from the same uploader after the video is finished.
M
ore and more young people are making short videos of themselves
and posting them on the internet, this writer looks at the reasons
for the growing trend.
Lights, camera
by Hilary Lok
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Youth Hong Kong
38
Arts and culture
| September 2014
Going viral
Many young people are also inspired by the current
generation of leading YouTubers and Internet
stars. These internet role models have millions of
subscribers and young people look up to them and
follow their creative endeavours in video form. Now,
people such as Jenna Marbles, Jack Harries and Ryan
Higa are household names, simply because they created
videos at home and uploaded them onto YouTube.
Jenna Marbles provides a comedic perspective on life,
which I enjoy watching on days when I dont want
to think too much. Ryan Higas videos are highly
amusing, and Jacksgap has very good cinematography.
It is not surprising if these figures inspire many
youngsters to chase similar dreams in the hope of one
day going viral. I think the film-makers have shown
young people that its possible to become something and
someone who has the power to influence others, even if
they have started out as just teenagers recording vlogs in
their bedrooms. This gives teens a glimpse of the scope
of unlimited potential that they too might possess.
Next big thingone day
Adolescence is a road of self-discovery, and only through
self-expression can it be achieved. Short videos can, in
fact, highlight young peoples internal drive to express
themselves. The rise of the internet and the convenience
of smartphones merely contribute to the vast plethora
of choice youngsters have to choose from to channel
their emotions and thoughts. The video is, perhaps,
no more significant than other art forms, writing
or photography. It is possible that its popularity lies
in the novelty of the medium. Perhaps, when a new
form of technology comes along, the fad will fade, but
for now, the trend appears to be still going strong.
The current popularity of short videos as a form of self-
expression is an amalgamation of various factors, but one
stands out above the rest - making and watching videos
is fun. A lot of young people are willing to sacrifice
their free time and pour heart and soul into making
these videos, for the sake of the intrinsic value these
videos have of for them. Self-expression in itself can be
a very fun thing if done right! As a writer, the personal
satisfaction I gain after I finish a good piece of writing is
exponentially more rewarding than any kind of external
attention. In order to understand it, I imagine its exactly
the same with videos. The fact that youve created
something thats so personally yours really hits home.
Hilary Lok, 17
Sha Tin College
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39
Youth Hong Kong
Arts and culture
September 2014 |


Leaders to Leaders Lecture Series 2014
E
ach year, HKFYG and The University of
Hong Kong co-organize Hang Seng
Bank Leaders to Leaders Lecture
Series. It features prominent speakers
from the community and this year the
series won a mainland award for the
Hang Seng Bank.
An award made by the most respected public relations
competition on the mainland was won this year by the
Hang Seng Bank Leaders to Leaders Lecture Series, run
by HKFYG and supported by Hang Seng Bank. The
" -
- " [11
th
China Golden Awards for
Excellence in Public Relations] is organized by the
China International Public Relations Association
(CIPRA), in recognition of demonstration of
excellence in corparate social responsibility.
p (left to right)
Dr Rosanna Wong Yick-ming, Executive Director, HKFYG,
and Ms Rose Lee Wai-mun, Vice-Chairman
and Chief Executive, Hang Seng Bank
Guest Speakers May September 2014
Dr Law Chi-kwong
Associate Professor, Department of
Social Work and Social Administration,
University of Hong Kong
Disparity between Rich and Poor
Dr Law, Chairman, Community Care Fund Task Force,
Commission on Poverty, pointed out that Hong Kongs
Gini coefficient (0.537) is very high for a developed
city. He warned about cross-generational poverty and
suggested that government should adopt a policy of
redistribution of wealth.
The Hon Mr Justice Kemal Bokhary
Non-Permanent Judge of Hong
Kongs Court of Final Appeal
Upholding the Rule of Law
Mr Justice Bokhary has served in Hong Kongs legal
system since the 80s. He expressed his view that the
most important factors for actualizing the rule of law are
the maintenance of an independent judiciary and the
separation of powers. These ensure that the judiciary will
not be affected by any political factors. He encouraged
students to hold fast to their beliefs and to safeguard
human rights.
NEW! Leaders to Leaders Online Classroom 2014
A free online learning platform has been launched for students
to gain valuable insight from the Leaders to Leaders Series
lectures by well-known members of the community.
This years online classroom started in September with free
access to all the videos of the 2014 lectures after registration.
Suitable for registration by all Secondary 3 students or older.
Hang Seng Bank
Youth Hong Kong
HKFYG
| September 2014
40


Leaders to Leaders Lecture Series 2014
Guest Speakers May September 2014
Ms Ada Ho Ching-ying
Director, L Plus H Fashion
& L Plus H Creation Foundation
Youth Entrepreneurship
Ms Ho worked for several multinational corporations
before becoming director of a social enterprise which
helps local workers and youth. She encouraged students
to prepare themselves well, not be afraid of failure, and
learn from experience.
Mr Antony Leung Kam-chung
Group CEO of the Nan Fung Group
Rise of the Middle Class
Mr Leung is a former Financial Secretary and member of
the HKSAR Governments Executive Council. He has held
senior positions in several financial institutions and was
a Member of the Exchange Fund Advisory Committee,
a Board Member of the Hong Kong Airport Authority,
Director of the Hong Kong Futures Exchange, and former
Chairman of the Education Commission and the University
Grants Committee. He spoke of the increasing number of
members of the middle class in various Asian countries.
Mr Francis Ngai Wah-sing
Founder and CEO,
Social Ventures Hong Kong
Social Innovation
Mr Francis Ngai runs a non-profit organization dedicated
to the support of social innovation in Hong Kong.
Formerly, he was Head of Strategy in a listed technology
conglomerate. He spoke of successful social innovations
such as Muhammad Yunus micro-finance initiative and
Hong Kongs Diamond Cab, Green Monday and Dialogue
in the Dark. He believes that social innovation is a
proactive means of answering societys needs.
Prof Gabriel Leung Cheuk-wai
Dean, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine,
University of Hong Kong
Healthcare Development
Prof Leung, a former Under Secretary for Food and
Health and Director of the Office of the Chief Executive,
HKSAR, shared his life story with the largely student
audience and talked about his vision of support for the
development of public healthcare in Hong Kong.
For information on the 2015 Hang Seng Bank -
Leaders to Leaders Lecture Series on Globalization
contact Betty Tse or Iris Wan, tel 2169 0255
Web http://ltl.m21.hk
Now open for registration.
Enroll at https://ltl.m21.hk/intro2.php
Co-organized by HKFYG and The
University of Hong Kong, it is fully
supported by the Hang Seng Bank.
Youth Hong Kong
HKFYG
September 2014 |
41

T
he Global Forum will bring together 400 young entrepreneurs from
Hong Kong, mainland China and a dozen other countries to engage in
discussions and practical action. The aim is to press start
entrepreneurial ideas and make them into creative, innovative reality.
The inaugural Forum is on 13 October at Hong
Kongs Kowloonbay International Trade and
Exhibition Centre (KITEC). It is open to anyone
aged 18-45 who runs an established business or
is just starting up with a new idea. Practical start-
up skills, social innovation, and the potential of the
Asian market are covered in dialogue sessions.
Overseas participants will include university students
and entrepreneurs, some of whom are now in
employment but have an interest in starting a business.
They are coming from Australia, Cambodia, Canada,
India, Italy, Japan, Malaysia, New Zealand, Poland,
Singapore, Thailand, the UK and the US, as well as
from mainland China, to join those from Hong Kong.
Entrepreneurship is a driver of sustainable economic
growth and has a long history in Hong Kong. Recent
survey findings* show that about 80% of new
entrepreneurs start new businesses with HK$200,000
or less. 30% of them are engaged in retail and about
12% start business using information technology,
with many developing mobile phone apps.
Press Here to Start : Beyond the Talk
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* http://economists-pick-research.hktdc.com/business-news/article/Research-Articles/Main/
rp/en/1/1X000000/1X09XC6U.htm
Youth Hong Kong
HKFYG
| September 2014
42

Guest of Honour
The Hon John C Tsang Financial Secretary
Keynote speaker
Dr Victor K Fung
Chairman, Victor and William Fung Foundation
Group Chairman, Fung Group
Luncheon speaker
Mr Antony Leung CEO, Nan Fung Group
Special Guest Speaker
Plenary Session: New Opportunities in Qianhai
Mr Zhang Bei Director General, Authority of the
Qianhai Shenzhen-Hong Kong Modern Service
Industry Cooperation Zone of Shenzhen
More information
Web globalforum@hkfyg.org.hk
Contact Mabel Woo, tel 2811 2779
Organizer: Co-organizers:
Sponsor:
Plenary Dialogue Moderators and Speakers
u
Dialogue 1 How to Start Smart and Know the Risks
Moderated by Dr Allen Fung
Executive Director, Sun Hung Kai Properties Limited
With panel speakers
Mr Jordan McRae Octo23 Technologies (France)
Ms Edith Yeung Dolphin Browser, (US)
Mr Chen Di YouMi (Mainland China)
Dr Alan Lam Sengital Limited (HK)
u
Dialogue 2 What Makes Social Innovation Successful
Moderated by Ms Ada Wong
Founder & Hon Chief Executive, Hong Kong
Institute of Contemporary Culture
With panel speakers
Mr James Boon Elephant Branded (UK)
Ms Zhang Lijuan Green Tomato (Mainland China)
Mr David Yeung Green Monday (HK)
Mr Vincent Wong Solution-On-Wheels (HK)
u
Dialogue 3 Why Asia is Competitive for Entrepreneurs
Moderated by Prof Paul Cheung Associate Vice-President (Research)
The University of Hong Kong
With panel speakers
Mr Tan Ying Lan Sequoia (Singapore)
Mr Liu Zihong Royole Corporation (Mainland China)
Mr Victor Wong VFXNova Digital Production (HK)
Mr Eric Chen Vitargent (HK)
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Authority of Qianhai
Shenzhen-Hong Kong
Modern Service Industry
Cooperation Zone
Shenzhen Youth Federation
Youth Hong Kong
HKFYG
September 2014 |
43
First they did research for travel proposals and made
video presentations for public voting and selection
by a panel of judges. Then they spent about a month
developing feasible itineraries with a social purpose and
practised their presentation skills in front of the camera
so that ultimately they could perform well on video.
M21 Travel Mission
I
n the past few months, the M21 Travel Mission has sent four teams on funded Caring for
Children assignments. They went to Yunnan in southwest China, Siberia in northwest
Russia, Mandalay in Myanmar, and Kathmandu in Nepal to make video travelogues.
The Yunnan teams four members were Hiu-ching,
Wing-chuen, Mo and Wuki. They introduced art
jamming to parents and their children at Kunming
citys popular Green Lake Park on a sunny Sunday.
They attracted many locals to take part and the
children enjoyed drawing very much that day.
Next, the team took their show to a primary
school, 2,000 metres up in the nearby hills.
p Introducing art jamming at the Green Lake Park p Giving art lessons to Yunnan children.
p (left to right) Karen, Harvey, Luying, Hobby
Youth Hong Kong
HKFYG
| September 2014
44
Another four adventurers from Hong Kong were Luying,
Karen, Hobby and Harvey. They travelled for three days
to reach a school for nomads' children in Siberia. They
went via Moscow to Salehard, north of the Arctic Circle,
before taking an 8-hour bus trip, then a speedboat ride,
followed by a 3-hour drive in a tracked all-terrain vehicle
before they reached the The Land of Hope school.
In this very remote area, children grow up very
differently from those in Hong Kong. So the team took
with them a large world map and spent the next eight
days telling them stories about Hong Kong and other far
corners of the world. By the end of the week they were
able to show a video illustrating the daily lives and happy
faces of the village children, as a thank you to their kind,
warm-hearted hosts who so rarely have such visitors.
Then, at the end of June, the third team set off
for Mandalay in Myanmar. Ronald, Stephy, Lit
and Nick went to a monastery school there to
give classes in Sudoku, recorder-playing, laughter
yoga and healthy habits. The team also spent time
exploring Mandalays temples and historical sites.
M21 Travel Mission
The seasons last team consisted of two enterprising
young ladies, Vivian and Ellie, who spent the last
week of August at an orphanage in Kathmandu. They
prepared a series of job-related workshops for secondary
students to help them plan their dream careers.
The M21 Travel Mission aims to encourage young
people to travel with a social purpose, enjoying
themselves but also making the most of their talents
to contribute to communities all over the world. The
project is funded by SOCAM Development Limited,
a company that supports innovative projects for youth
development. Future teams will travel to Seoul, Surabaya,
Tashkent and Kenya. Their mission: to carry out
projects which Sustain Happiness in the community.
The videos of their journeys will be broadcast on
the M21 Travel Channel from October onwards.
Stay tuned for more details.
More information
Kaylie Wong tel 3979 3979 www.M21.hk/TravelMission
Go to http://youtu.be/amWK0RNoyY0 to see the Siberia video
p Schoolchildren watching the M21 Travel
Mission video
p (left to right) Vivian and Ellie
p Giving art lessons to Yunnan children.
Youth Hong Kong
HKFYG
September 2014 |
45
New books from HKFYG in 2014
Turning Point

ISBN: 978-988-12444-2-0
Price: $80
7 winners of the The Turning
Point - Youth Improvement
Award 2013" share their stories.
By understanding the experience
of these young people, we can
encourage others in similar
circumstances be more positive.
Legal Guide for Business Starters II
II
ISBN: 978-988-12444-7-5
Price: $80
8 chapters analyze the common
issues that business starters may
encounter. Highly recommended for
those involved in entrepreneurship.
Understanding Mediation:
A Guide Book to Theories and Cases

ISBN: 978-988-12444-8-2
Price: $80
Mediation skills are useful in
many fields. Here, theories of
mediation and actual cases help
readers understand more.
My dream, my way

ISBN: 978-988-12444-4-4
Price: $80
12 real cases of young peoples
choices of what to study. Inspiration
for others who need to decide
about education or careers.
Easy LEAD The Scratch
2.0 Musketeers
Easy LEAD
Scratch 2.0
ISBN: 978-988-12445-0-5
Price: $80
This book is based on the popular
software Scratch 2.0. Useful
for primary and secondary
students, parents and teachers
with interesting adventures
stories as illustration.
Neighbourhood First Radio Drama
??
ISBN: 978-988-12444-5-1
Price: $90
The book is based on a popular
radio drama created by HKFYG
about relationships between
neighbours. It is illustrated by
comics drawn by young people.
Key Success of Outstanding
Young Entrepreneurs

ISBN: 978-988-12445-1-2
Price: $100
15 winners of the HSBC Youth
Business Award share their
success stories with our readers,
encouraging others to start up
in business. Readers may find
out more by scanning the QR
code at the end of each story.
The Right Turn

ISBN: 978-988-12444-1-3
Price: $90
19 Felix Wong Youth Award
winners share their stories
of overcoming hardship and
difficulties. Readers will discover
how challenges can be faced.
Seasoned with Love: A
Collection of Home Recipes

ISBN: 978-988-12444-3-7
Price: $90
A delicious meal with your family is
a memorable occasion. 18 young
people share 40 recipes and stories.
Volunteering around
the World

ISBN: 978-988-12444-9-9
Price: $90
The author, Clive Lee, did voluntary
work in 6 countries, Ghana,
Argentina, China, Cambodia,
Thailand and India. He shares his
experiences and memories.
C
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46
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q Examples of free gifts
Membership and Volunteering
M
embership and volunteering services at HKFYG are being integrated and new
platforms will enable the Federation to connect with our members and foster a
culture of volunteering through apps and mobile sites.
Signature events for members or volunteers
Summer Volunteer Project
International Volunteer Day
Regular promotions on social media and other
channels
Free quotas for courses
Free gifts for messages on HKFYG Youth S.P.O.T.
Magazines facebook page
Membership offers
Discounts and complimentary gifts from our partners
HKTDC Food Expo tickets
Member bonus points scheme
Happy Farm 2014
Summer programme with children and families at
AsiaWorld-Expo including exhibitions,stalls and
handicraft workshops
Summer Volunteers for Glass
Recycling Action 2014
Save the Earth programme with added value:
recycling glass bottles from streets and bins.
HKFYG app
Embraces news of all
HKFYGs service units
Makes for simple access to:
Easymember.hk
Easyvolunteer.hk
Easymember.hk
Includes news about events,
applications and payment
Makes members personal
profiles available
Enables record-keeping on e-cards
Easyvolunteer.hk
Supports volunteers searches for
suitable service opportunities
Contains the most updated service
information
Shares volunteering experiences
Serves as a bridge between HKFYG,
other NGOs and
New platforms
Opportunities for volunteering
Membership campaigns
Youth Hong Kong
HKFYG
September 2014 |
47
T
he Federations counselling services for students are undergoing restructuring and will
soon be available on two e-platforms and at three centres. The aim is to create new
channels and pathways taking HKFYG counselling into schools.
M21 School Net
WITH
Schoolike.hk: a brand new campaign to promote
a positive atmosphere on school campuses
Enhanced M21 School Net channels: consolidated
and integrated with enhanced content
Training and courses on the new media for students
Teachlike.hk
WITH
Youth culture news and youth trends research
Resources for teachers, including materials on
} the emotionally disturbed
} love and sex education
} learning difficulties
} study paths
} delinquency
} new media
Exchange of experience
Continuous learning resources
Platforms
Positioning for this new departure is focused on
student-centered services for those in need. The purpose
is to connect with all Hong Kong students, teachers and
schools that seek advice and respond by helping them
to tackle the many hurdles and problems associated
with growing up, thus encouraging them to build
self-confidence.
More information at
http://mcc.hkfyg.org.hk/
http://ssw.hkfyg.org.hk/
Redefining youth work for schools
Provision of new services and products
Improved communication and
networking with schools
Strengthened support for schools and teachers
Expanded impact in the schools sector
Strategies
Study Planning Centre
For students needing consultations, training
programmes, and workshopsetc
For students needing help to match their
personal qualities with study paths
Youth Emotional Support Centre
Offering evaluation tools to identify
students with emotional problems
Providing prevention services
Media Counselling Centre
Developing and using new media
Raising awareness of new medias risks
by enhancing Be NetWise
Three centres for HKFYGs school youth work
Youth Hong Kong
HKFYG
| September 2014
48
C
Entitled Ode to Joy [ Teen ], the
programme emphasizes a crossover of art genres
including opera, ballet, animations and short
films. It has large-scale participation which builds
a sense of community and this is the culmination
of a 6-month series of community activities.
The grand multi-media concert at the Hong Kong
Coliseum on 6 December, 4pm-5.30pm, is in six
musical sections: a prelude, rhapsody, march, concerto,
variation and finale. These are inspired by works of
Bach, Bizet, Mozart and Tchaikovsky, and Beethoven.
The musical arrangements and interpretation are
reflections on growing up, the pressures, connectivity,
creativity, persistence and joy of youth.
Up to 10,000 young singers will join well-known
Hong Kong tenor Warren Mok, Rao Lan (soprano),
Samantha Chong (mezzo-soprano) and Gong
Dongjian (bass), plus the C All Stars and Alfred Hui,
in Ludwig van Beethovens magnificent Ode to Joy.
They will be accompanied by the Global Symphony
Orchestra conducted by Mak Ka Lok in an effort to
set a new Guinness World Record for joint singing
by the most people broadcast live through radio.
Ode to Joy is a poem written by German poet,
playwright and historian Friedrich Schiller (pictured
left), in the summer of 1785. It celebrated the
brotherhood and unity of all mankind. The poem was
set to music by Ludwig van Beethoven (pictured
right) in the final movement of his Ninth (Choral)
Symphony, first performed 190 years ago in 1824.
Artistic Advisors Warren Mok, Barbara Fei, Chiu Tsang-hei
Chorus Director Alex Tam
Major Sponsor The Hong Kong Jockey Club Charities Trust
Strategic Partner Lee Hysan Foundation
Venue Sponsor Leisure and Cultural Services Department
Organizers HKFYG, Opera Hong Kong and RTHK
I
n early December this year, a frst-of-its-kind large-scale music outreach and education
programme will reach its climax. Its goal is to bring the younger generation, classical music
and the arts together and send a clear message that music can unite people and bring
positive energy to all.
Ode to Joy
bringing youth and classical music together
Organizers:
Strategic Partner:
Venue Sponsor: Supporting Organization:
Major Sponsor:
More information m21.hk/odetojoy Contact Iris Sham tel 3755 7107
Youth Hong Kong
HKFYG
September 2014 |
49
World Green Mech Contest Winners 2014
Congratulations!
Good news from World Green Mech Contest!
Michelle Kwan, with her teammates from the HKFYG
Hong Kong Melody Makers, won the Best Vocal award
at the first Incheon World A Cappella Competition last
month. Competing against contestants from Taiwan,
South Korea and Japan, the line-up of seven experienced
vocalists gave an exciting 12-minute performance at
the Millennium Hall, Incheon International Airport.
They kicked off with an acoustic mimesis of a coastal
soundscape, followed by a nostalgic tune sung in German
and Korean featuring the smooth, warm voices of the
entire ensemble. Then came a Chinese classic where the
theme willpower was manifested by Michelles strong
voice accompanied by vocal Chinese musical concepts.
Illustrating the versatility of the group, the last of the
set was a fast-paced a cappella number for all to share.
The HKFYG Hong Kong Melody Makers have
performed in Hong Kong and overseas for nearly 10 years
with sponsorship from The Dragon Foundation.
Sign up now for the Hong Kong International
a Cappella Contest 2014
2 & 16 November. Deadline 18 October
Details at acappella.hkfyg.org.hk
Made possible by the HKFYG Jockey Club a cappella
Education Programme with exclusively sponsorship from
The Hong Kong Jockey Club Charities Trust.
More information Gabriel Lee, Music Administrator,
tel 2395 5753
This contest was brought to Hong Kong from
Taiwan by HKFYG in 2010 and the best 2014 teams
performed excellently at the Worlds in Taipei this
year. They won eight medals with highly complex
models that applied scientific principles and green
energy concepts. The Hong Kong and Macau
Lutheran Church Primary School (pictured) was
champion and Tin Shui Wai Methodist Primary
School was 1
st
runner-up in the primary division. Pok
Oi Hospital Chan Kai Memorial College (pictured)
was 1
st
runner-up in the junior secondary division.
School Division Award
Hong Kong and Macau Lutheran
Church Primary School
Primary Champion
Tin Shui Wai Methodist
Primary School
Primary 1
st
Runner-up
Pok Oi Hospital Chan Kai
Memorial College
Junior Secondary 1
st
Runner-up
Tai Po Old Market Public
School (Plover Cove)
Primary
Superior Scientific
Application
CNEC Christian College Junior Secondary
Excellent Green
Energy Design
Raimondi College Senior Secondary
Superior Green
Energy Design
Queen's College Senior Secondary
Outstanding Green
Energy Design
Pok Oi Hospital Chan Kai
Memorial College
Senior Secondary
Excellent Scientific
Application
p (left to right, back to front) Gabriel Lee, Hopeful Chan, Jefrey
Mok, Joey Cheng, Cherry Yeung, Una Pang, Michelle Kwan
p Hong Kong and Macau
Lutheran Church Primary
School Champion, Primary
Division
p Pok Oi Hospital Chan Kai
Memorial College Excellent
Scientifc Application, Senior
Secondary Division
Organized in Hong Kong by:
HKFYG Centre for Creative Science and Technology
More information
Benny Cheng tel 2561 6149 http://ccst.hkfyg.org.hk
Well done to all!
Youth Hong Kong
HKFYG
| September 2014
50
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