1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

8.

9.

10.

INDEX INTRODUCTION 3 18.1 (a) SECULAR COUNSELLING TABLE 1.1 SECULAR OR SACRED? 5 THE NEED FOR INFORMED CONSENT 5 COUNSELING IN THE MARKETPLACE 6 18.1 (b) CHRISTIAN COUNSELING 7 18.1.1 Introduction 18.1.2 Establish importance of value system 18.1 (c ) COGNITIVE & ECLECTIC COUNSELING 8 18.1 (a) (b) (c ) CONCLUSION 9 STUDENTS VIEWPOINT 9 18.2 INDIVIDUAL TREATMENT PLAN 10 18.2 INDIVIDUAL TREATMENT PLAN PROCEDURES CARD 11 18.3 REPORT ON HOW TO HANDLE (a) PARENTAL GUIDANCE IN CHILD REARING 12 18.3.1 What causes problems? 12 18.3.2 Help parents and child to understand nature of rebellion 18.3.3 Main areas of rebellion 18.3.4 Results of rebellion in people 18.3.5 How to recognize rebellion 18.3.6 Getting healed and step out of rebellion 18.3 (b) SUICIDE TENDENCIES 14 18.3.1(b) Cause of suicide tendencies. SEE PAGE 19 FOR PRAYER ANNEXURE 1 SUICIDE 18.3 (c ) COUNSELLING SESSION ON HOMOSEXUALITY 15 18.3.1 (c ) What causes Homosexuality? 18.3.2 (c ) How to overcome Homosexuality 16/17 18.3.3 (c ) CONCLUSION 17 FROM THE STUDENT 17 RESOURCES 18 ANNEXURE 1 (3 PAGES) 19 ANNEXURE 2 (4 PAGES) 20 ANNEXURE 3 (7 PAGES) 21 18 IN : : COUNSELLING PASTORAL CARE

PAGE 4

7 7

12 12 12/13 13 13 14 15

MODULE COURSE

BACHELOR OF MINISTRY AND COUNSELLING MODULE 18 Page 47 and 48 Module 18 COUNSELLING pastoral Care outcome the candidate is able to demonstrate an ability to manage a counseling session. 18.1 Distinguish and describe the techniques used by the following counseling methods give a short description of each (a) Secular counseling (b) Christian counseling (c) Cognitive-behavioral Therapy.3-4 pages 18.2 Design a form or card on which a counselor can write the details of counseling sessions or which can be used during the session to help with the analysis of problem. 18.3 Write report on 3 counseling sessions (a) parental guidance in child rearing (b) Homosexuality and (c) Suicide tendencies 2-3 pages STUDENT DETAILS: MARIA REYNEKE STUDENT NO. 32706/0503

W.I.T.M.I. Assignment topics Module 18 : Counselling Pastoral Care page 47 and 48 18.1 Read and Distinguish and describe the techniques used by the following counseling methods and give a short description of each (a) Secular Counselling (b) Christian Couselling; Cognitive –behavioral Therapy’(3-4 pages) 18.2 Design a form or card on which a counselor can write the details of counseling sessions or which can be used during the session to help with the analysis of problem 18.3 Write a report on 3 counseling sessions (a) parental guidance in child rearing (b) Homosexuality and (c) suicide tendencies (2-3pages)

MARIA REYNEKE B-DEGREE CALVARY 32706/0503

1. INTRODUCTION We are living in the age of anxiety. In fact, the number one mental health problem today is no longer depression but anxiety disorders, with chemical addiction ranking third. Adding to t his mix of mental and emotional problems are the disintegration of the nuclear family and the struggles of interpersonal relationships. v If anyone doubts that our problems are not serious, the recent rash of school and business shootings should signal loudly and clearly that all is not well all over the world. v Fortunately, the last three decades have seen a tremendous increase of Christians entering the mental health profession. Some do so to find answers for themselves, but many are responding to god’s call to search for biblical answers that will help desperately hurting people. v Of course in order to legally practice their profession as therapists, they must be licensed by the state, which involves extensive education in psychology, social work, marriage and family studies, and psychiatric nursing. v In addition, most states require candidates to undergo a supervised intern program for at least one year. In the end, most therapists who meet these varied requirements enjoy a clinical comfort level with the psychological principles they have learned. v By way of contrast, a licensed counselor who was trained difficult time trying to apply principles for some Governments ass .Although they are well equipped to address that spiritual problems, he lacked clinical skills of diagnosis and struggled management decision making. as a pastor had a of Psychiatric aspect of emotional with case

v Like the psychologist, the pastor-therapist needed to learn basic principles for integrating the Christian faith with therapy and then to put those principles into practice through application exercises. v There is the need for integration and a lot of professional people know it. MARIA REYNEKE B-DEGREE CALVARY 32706/0503 W.I.T.M.I. 18.1. (a) SECULAR COUNSELLING SHORT VIEW. 1. TABLE 1.1 FOUR WESTERN WORLDWIEW MODELS. Herewith a chart/figure to explain four Western Worldview Models in secular counseling taken from page 27 Christ Centered therapy By Neil T Anderson and both Terry and Julianne Zuehlke. (In the secular counseling.)

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

8.

INDEX INTRODUCTION 3 18.1 (a) SECULAR COUNSELLING TABLE 1.1 SECULAR OR SACRED? 5 THE NEED FOR INFORMED CONSENT 5 COUNSELING IN THE MARKETPLACE 6 18.1 (b) CHRISTIAN COUNSELING 7 18.1.1 Introduction 18.1.2 Establish importance of value system 18.1 (c ) COGNITIVE & ECLECTIC COUNSELING 8 18.1 (a) (b) (c ) CONCLUSION 9 STUDENTS VIEWPOINT 9 18.2 INDIVIDUAL TREATMENT PLAN 10 18.2 INDIVIDUAL TREATMENT PLAN PROCEDURES CARD 11 18.3 REPORT ON HOW TO HANDLE (a) PARENTAL GUIDANCE IN CHILD REARING 12 18.3.1 What causes problems? 12 18.3.2 Help parents and child to understand nature of rebellion 18.3.3 Main areas of rebellion 18.3.4 Results of rebellion in people 18.3.5 How to recognize rebellion 18.3.6 Getting healed and step out of rebellion 18.3 (b) SUICIDE TENDENCIES 14

PAGE 4

7 7

12 12 12/13 13 13

9.

10.

18.3.1(b) Cause of suicide tendencies. SEE PAGE 19 FOR PRAYER ANNEXURE 1 SUICIDE 18.3 (c ) COUNSELLING SESSION ON HOMOSEXUALITY 18.3.1 (c ) What causes Homosexuality? 18.3.2 (c ) How to overcome Homosexuality 18.3.3 (c ) CONCLUSION FROM THE STUDENT RESOURCES ANNEXURE 1 (3 PAGES) ANNEXURE 2 (4 PAGES) ANNEXURE 3 (7 PAGES) 18 IN : : COUNSELLING PASTORAL CARE

14 15 16/17 17 19 20 21 15

17 18

MODULE COURSE

BACHELOR OF MINISTRY AND COUNSELLING MODULE 18 Page 47 and 48 Module 18 COUNSELLING pastoral Care outcome the candidate is able to demonstrate an ability to manage a counseling session. 18.1 Distinguish and describe the techniques used by the following counseling methods give a short description of each (a) Secular counseling (b) Christian counseling (c) Cognitive-behavioral Therapy.3-4 pages 18.2 Design a form or card on which a counselor can write the details of counseling sessions or which can be used during the session to help with the analysis of problem. 18.3 Write report on 3 counseling sessions (a) parental guidance in child rearing (b) Homosexuality and (c) Suicide tendencies 2-3 pages STUDENT DETAILS: MARIA REYNEKE STUDENT NO. 32706/0503 ID. 560305 0046 081 ADDRESS: 18 Leeuwenhof crescent, TABLE VIEW 7441 CAPE TOWN SOUTH AFRICA. TEL.No. 083 412 6052 HOME/FAX 021 556 2886 MARIA REYNEKE

B-DEGREE CALVARY 32706/0503 W.I.T.M.I. Assignment topics Module 18 : Counselling Pastoral Care page 47 and 48 18.1 Read and Distinguish and describe the techniques used by the following counseling methods and give a short description of each (a) Secular Counselling (b) Christian Couselling; Cognitive –behavioral Therapy’(3-4 pages) 18.2 Design a form or card on which a counselor can write the details of counseling sessions or which can be used during the session to help with the analysis of problem 18.3 Write a report on 3 counseling sessions (a) parental guidance in child rearing (b) Homosexuality and (c) suicide tendencies (2-3pages) 1. INTRODUCTION We are living in the age of anxiety. In fact, the number one mental health problem today is no longer depression but anxiety disorders, with chemical addiction ranking third. Adding to t his mix of mental and emotional problems are the disintegration of the nuclear family and the struggles of interpersonal

relationships. v If anyone doubts that our problems are not serious, the recent rash of school and business shootings should signal loudly and clearly that all is not well all over the world. v Fortunately, the last three decades have seen a tremendous increase of Christians entering the mental health profession. Some do so to find answers for themselves, but many are responding to god’s call to search for biblical answers that will help desperately hurting people. v Of course in order to legally practice their profession as therapists, they must be licensed by the state, which involves extensive education in psychology, social work, marriage and family studies, and psychiatric nursing. v In addition, most states require candidates to undergo a supervised intern program for at least one year. In the end, most therapists who meet these varied requirements enjoy a clinical comfort level with the psychological principles they have learned. v By way of contrast, a licensed counselor who was trained as a pastor had a difficult time trying to apply principles for some Governments of Psychiatric ass .Although they are well equipped to address that spiritual aspect of emotional problems, he lacked clinical skills of diagnosis and struggled with case management decision making. v Like the psychologist, the pastor-therapist needed to learn basic principles for integrating the Christian faith with therapy and then to put those principles into practice through application exercises. v There is the need for integration and a lot of professional people know it. MARIA REYNEKE B-DEGREE CALVARY 32706/0503 W.I.T.M.I. 18.1. (a) SECULAR COUNSELLING SHORT VIEW. 1. TABLE 1.1 FOUR WESTERN WORLDWIEW MODELS. Herewith a chart/figure to explain four Western Worldview Models in secular counseling taken from page 27 Christ Centered therapy By Neil T Anderson and both Terry and Julianne Zuehlke. (In the secular counseling.)

MARIA

REYNEKE

B-DEGREE CALVARY 32706/0503 W.I.T.M.I. 2. SECULAR OR SACRED? The word secular implies the absence of a religious foundation. As we have seen, this absence of a religious foundation in and of itself implies a religious belief (namely, there is no God) that becomes part of one’s worldview. v Because one’s worldview influence every major area of life (including psychology) there is no such thing as counseling apart form a religious perspective of one kind or another. v What transpires in the counseling environment says volumes about what the counselor and client believe about God. Thus David Noebel rightly concludes “trying to separate the sacred from the secular is like trying to sear the soul from the body – a deadly experiment. We must recognize that all worldviews have religious implications. v The problem is similar to saying, “you can’t legislate morality” They don’t want to be held accountable for a right or wrong standard from a religious implications.” v The problem is similar to saying, “You can’t legislate morality” We would judge this statement to be total nonsense! We legislate morality every day. Every bill signed into law reflects some moral judgment ; if it were possible to legislate morality, we wouldn’t have any laws identifying crimes. v What proponents of amoral legislation are really saying accountable for a right or wrong standard from a religious perspective other than their own. v According to David Noebel, to maintain that nonreligious secularism exists in counseling is a calculated political maneuver. All non-Christian world views reflect a religious belief, but secularists typically choose to believe that their god(or gods) is impersonal and thus not have to be served. v The crux of the matter is that they do not want to be accountable to some higher being. (to have Jesus as Lord of their lives) Rather they want to be the lord of their own lives. It’s the ultimate issue of life and what separates Christian from non-Christian counseling – namely, the issue of who is God, or who is playing God? 3. THE NEED FOR INFORMED CONSENT. Because every counseling session is values-based and promotes a religious agenda, a religious agenda, we need to explicitly state and practice our value system with honesty. Clients should make their choice of therapist on the basis of a full disclosure of the therapist’s values orientation. v To disclose one’s values orientation leads to informed consent by the client to continue or to decide not to continue. It is unethical according to professional care standards for counselors and state licensing boards to discriminate against one religious perspective while elevating and honoring

others. v Furthermore, clients have the freedom to choose whether they want to play God, submit to an impersonal God, or submit to the one true and personal God. MARIA REYNEKE CALVARY B-DEGREE 32706/0503 W.I.T.M.I. (informed consent continues) v Believers in YHVH counseling is unique because it relies not only on divinely revealed truth but also on the presence ofYHVH. God is the One from whom secularists want to separate themselves. v It is problematic that professional organizations sent mixed messages and practice double standard in this area, It is unethical for these groups to advocate values-neutrality and tolerance of cultural and individual differences while promoting value positions (for example, pro-abortion and deviant sexual behavior) that are insensitive to the cultural beliefs and values of many. v It is dishonest for therapists to say they are valued-free and relativistic yet promote specific values and absolutes at the same time! Professional integrity requires therapists to state their values openly and clearly, to practice within those parameters, and to inform clients of those values so as to facilitate informed consent. v Instead of being helped, a client who is already confused about how to achieve satisfaction in life will very likely become more confused by a therapist who is hostile to the values that are central to the client’s existence. v A therapist must be open to the assessment of religious and spiritual needs, even if the client does not initiate the topic. Avoiding religious issues or routinely redirecting spiritual concerns elsewhere is no more justifiable than refusing to deal with the death of a client’s family members or with his or her fears of social encounters. v Stanton Jones explains: “Rather than recommitting ourselves to an impossible value neutrality, we should instead recognize that one cannot intervene in the fabric of human life without getting deeply involved in moral and religious matters. It thus seems incumbent on practitioners in our field to press for greater explicitness about this as we present our profession to the public. v In my own practice I often hear complaints from former clients about nonBelievers in our Creator one God His Name is YHVH, practitioners. The clients assumed that heir counselors were neutral, only to discover a blatant religious and moral agenda being advanced that was opposed to their own worldview! 4. COUNSELING IN THE MARKETPLACE. An article titled “Believers in YHVH Counselors in Secular Settings” offers keen insight into how Mesianic counselors can walk that sensitive line. In the article, a school counselor, a military psychologist, and a prison psychologist discuss the role of Christian values and worldview within their work settings. They agree that they should seek to demonstrate compassion in counseling, use psychological interventions that are consistent with Scripture, and conduct an open initial evaluation of a client’s religious background. If the spiritual issues are relevant and the worldview matches the therapist’s, the spiritual issues are addressed as part of the treatment, if the client so desires. MARIA CALVARY B-DEGREE 32706/0503 W.I.T.M.I. 5. 18.1 (b) PRAYER BASED BELIEVER IN YAWEH : COUNSELING. 18.1.1. Introduction. Discussions with clients who seek a biblical/Scriptural approach to psychotherapy as well as with therapists who identify themselves as A Believer in YHVH-GOD REYNEKE

reveal widely divergent beliefs and values about integration. To some the term Prayer counselor denotes a person who uses only the Scriptures/Bible in counseling sessions; others envision a therapist who goes to church on Sunday but practices secular counseling Monday through Friday; still others use the term only for born again believers who integrate Scriptural an psychological principles into the practice of psychotherapy. (Herewith I needed to state clearly that myself do not belong to any denomination, so I am not working on levels of Church going or Church system. 18.1.2 Establish importance of value system. v Clear understanding of their respective value systems and worldviews. We have to judged that informed consent and open agreement between client and therapist about the relevance of values and religious issues in the therapist about the relevance of values and religious issues in the therapy transaction are foundational and crucial to an effective therapeutic alliance. v The therapeutic relationship must embody a process whereby the parties involved talk the same language with respect to world views, lifestyle choices, and values orientations. v If the client does not wish to continue after the therapist’s value system has been disclosed, the therapist should refer the client to other appropriate therapeutic resources. v Christian counselors seeking to integrate the bible’s teachings with psychological constructs should hold themselves to high standards of professionalism 1. Prayer based /Believing in God the Creator of the universe/ counselors should accept psychological insights only if these insights are completely consistent with biblical truth. 2. They should regard the Scripture as the infallible Word of God. 3. They should agree to give Scripture “functional control” over their thinking, with the result that biblical principles take priority over contrary non biblical opinion and are put into practice thoroughly and consistently. 4. They should demonstrate serious interest in the content of Scripture by engaging in regular and systematic Bible/Scriptures study, spending at least as much time in Bible study as in the study of psychology, so that they gain both an overall grasp of the Bible’s structure and content and a working knowledge of basic biblical/(truth of the Scripture and obeying Yaweh’s commandmends. doctrines. MARIA REYNEKE

CALVARY B-DEGREE 32706/0503 W.I.T.M.I. 6. 18.1 (c ) COGNITIVE – BEHAVIORAL THERAPY. We have very little direct control of our emotions, but we can change how we think and we can choose what we believe. Many secular psychologists, such as Ellis and Beck have been saying for years that our emotions are essentially a product of our thoughts. Christian counselors such as Backus, the author of Telling Yourself the truth say essentially the same thing. Cognitive-behavioral – the essential premise of this therapy is that certain “precipitating” events do not cause an emotional response; rather, the emotional response is determined by how the mind interprets the events. v Recall that our brains receive the external data, through our five senses and that our minds interpret the data, which in turn determines our volitional and emotional response. v For instance, if two people hear the sound of a slamming door one might become afraid while others ignores it. Why the difference? First person thought he were alone thinking someone was breaking in. 2nd person invited relative to

enter house failing to tell other person. v This behavioral therapy is perhaps the fastest growing and most widely accepted approach to counseling at present time. v 1. first, the client is helped to see the connection between negative thoughts, the emotions they create, and the behaviors that follow. v Then the client is taught to recognize and monitor negative thoughts or distortions of reality. Thoughts or beliefs leading to negative feelings and improper responses to life are identified as ineffective or dysfunctional (c ) ECLECTIC COUNSELING Eclectic involves a combination of theories, methods and viewpoints and this counseling approach is predominant. There are four kinds of eclecticism: 1. Research-based: certain methods are used for certain problems (Best treatment of phobias are behavior therapy, specifically desensitization) 2. Experimental / pragmatic: One’s own counseling method is compared to other counselors and certain approaches are likely in their methods. 3. Rational: counselors study different methods, thinking them through and make a conclusion for certain approaches and use those most effective for his philosophy. 4. Mystical: associated with memory healing. This approach is believed to be a methods where God directly intervene in the process and healing takes place such a modern “ such as modern “Theophostics” Most of the counselors who use this counseling methods tend to have one or more “fall-back theory, where they will search through theoretical options in specific situations. Here Christians may relate to the problem as sin instead of searching deeper for the real problem. These “fall-back “ theories might be helpful, but a good counselor will keep current by reading recent textbooks and journal articles, consulting with colleagues, joining professional associations and attend conferences so that the number of fall-back situations will be minimized.

MARIA

REYNEKE (b) (c) CONCLUSION.

CALVARY B-DEGREE 32706/0303

W.I.T.M.I. 7. 18.1 (a)

STUDENTS VIEWPOINT: In all of both discussions we will see that there is a big difference in approaches towards people/clients. We always have to remember that god is always presents, not only have secular psychologists and many Christian therapists overlooked the kingdom of darkness and the possibility that spiritual warfare could be part of the counseling process, they have also competently overlooked the real presence of Yahashua. To understand the reality of the spiritual world requires biblical faith. However, contemporary secular psychology has not consulted the only authoritative source of truth about god, humans, and the world in which we live. Moreover, some Christian therapists live out a practical dichotomy, holding to “psychology only” on the office and “Christ only” in their religious practices. (The word/name Christ derived from the Roman church and is not our Saviors real name. Yahashua is His Name if you want to be called on your Name don’t you think our YHVH creator want that too. (Turn Towards the real truth.)

In my own experience, spirituality has been important, and I believe with my whole heart it will come to play an increasingly important role in the psychology of the future. Holistic medicine, scientology approach (widely advertised in post boxes and overall) with its interest in meditation, prayer, and the role of spiritual healing in recovery from serious illness, has become a mainstream movement in the nineties and still now in 2006/7. I believe there will be a “holistic psychology” in the not too distant future, like holistic medicine, (that) integrates scientifically based treatment approaches with alternative more spiritually based modalities. Its already here what else are the devil going to use to take people’s eyes off what the real truth is. It is certainly end times, the devil roaring in every aspect of lives like a deadly wounded animal try and succeed a lot of times to take away people from Our Great God. MARIA REYNEKE B-DEGREE CALVERY W.I.T.M.I. 32706/0503

2. SECULAR OR SACRED? The word secular implies the absence of a religious foundation. As we have seen, this absence of a religious foundation in and of itself implies a religious belief (namely, there is no God) that becomes part of one’s worldview. v Because one’s worldview influence every major area of life (including psychology) there is no such thing as counseling apart form a religious perspective of one kind or another. v What transpires in the counseling environment says volumes about what the counselor and client believe about God. Thus David Noebel rightly concludes “trying to separate the sacred from the secular is like trying to sear the soul from the body – a deadly experiment. We must recognize that all worldviews have religious implications. v The problem is similar to saying, “you can’t legislate morality” They don’t want to be held accountable for a right or wrong standard from a religious implications.” v The problem is similar to saying, “You can’t legislate morality” We would judge this statement to be total nonsense! We legislate morality every day. Every bill signed into law reflects some moral judgment ; if it were possible to legislate morality, we wouldn’t have any laws identifying crimes. v What proponents of amoral legislation are really saying accountable for a right or wrong standard from a religious perspective other than their own. v According to David Noebel, to maintain that nonreligious secularism exists in counseling is a calculated political maneuver. All non-Christian world views reflect a religious belief, but secularists typically choose to believe that their god(or gods) is impersonal and thus not have to be served. v The crux of the matter is that they do not want to be accountable to some higher being. (to have Jesus as Lord of their lives) Rather they want to be the lord of their own lives. It’s the ultimate issue of life and what separates Christian from non-Christian counseling – namely, the issue of who is God, or who is playing God?

3. THE NEED FOR INFORMED CONSENT. Because every counseling session is values-based and promotes a religious agenda, a religious agenda, we need to explicitly state and practice our value system with honesty. Clients should make their choice of therapist on the basis of a full disclosure of the therapist’s values orientation. v To disclose one’s values orientation leads to informed consent by the client to continue or to decide not to continue. It is unethical according to professional care standards for counselors and state licensing boards to discriminate against one religious perspective while elevating and honoring others. v Furthermore, clients have the freedom to choose whether they want to play God, submit to an impersonal God, or submit to the one true and personal God. MARIA REYNEKE v Believers in YHVH counseling is unique because it relies not only on divinely revealed truth but also on the presence ofYHVH. God is the One from whom secularists want to separate themselves. v It is problematic that professional organizations sent mixed messages and practice double standard in this area, It is unethical for these groups to advocate values-neutrality and tolerance of cultural and individual differences while promoting value positions (for example, pro-abortion and deviant sexual behavior) that are insensitive to the cultural beliefs and values of many. v It is dishonest for therapists to say they are valued-free and relativistic yet promote specific values and absolutes at the same time! Professional integrity requires therapists to state their values openly and clearly, to practice within those parameters, and to inform clients of those values so as to facilitate informed consent. v Instead of being helped, a client who is already confused about how to achieve satisfaction in life will very likely become more confused by a therapist who is hostile to the values that are central to the client’s existence. v A therapist must be open to the assessment of religious and spiritual needs, even if the client does not initiate the topic. Avoiding religious issues or routinely redirecting spiritual concerns elsewhere is no more justifiable than refusing to deal with the death of a client’s family members or with his or her fears of social encounters. v Stanton Jones explains: “Rather than recommitting ourselves to an impossible value neutrality, we should instead recognize that one cannot intervene in the fabric of human life without getting deeply involved in moral and religious matters. It thus seems incumbent on practitioners in our field to press for greater explicitness about this as we present our profession to the public. v In my own practice I often hear complaints from former clients about nonBelievers in our Creator one God His Name is YHVH, practitioners. The clients assumed that heir counselors were neutral, only to discover a blatant religious and moral agenda being advanced that was opposed to their own worldview! 4. COUNSELING IN THE MARKETPLACE. An article titled “Believers in YHVH Counselors in Secular Settings” offers keen insight into how Mesianic counselors can walk that sensitive line. In the article, a school counselor, a military psychologist, and a prison psychologist discuss the role of Christian values and worldview within their work settings. They agree that they should seek to demonstrate compassion in counseling, use psychological interventions that are consistent with Scripture, and conduct an open initial evaluation of a client’s religious background. If the spiritual issues are relevant and the worldview matches the therapist’s, the spiritual issues are addressed as part of the treatment, if the client so desires.

FOUR WESTERN BIBLICAL BELIEVERS SOURCES Spangler HUMANISM

WORLD VIEW MODELS NEW AGE

UTOPIANISM

Humanist Writings of Marx Bible Manifestos 1 & 11 and Lenin Ferguson, and the like THEOLOGY Pantheism PHILOSOPHY Supernaturalism ETHICS Relativism BIOLOGY Creation/God Evolution Atheism Atheism

Writings of

Theism

Naturalism

dialectical Materialism

Nonnaturalism

Relativism Absolutes Darwinian Evolution YHVH

Proletariat Morality

Darwinian/Punctuated

Darwinian/Punctuated Evolution

PSYCHOLOGY Self-actualization Consciousness Mind/Body SOCIOLOGY Nontraditional Home Good traditions Church and State LAW Self Law Natural Laws POLITICS World Government Justice, Freedom Godly Order ECONOMICS Enlightened Production HISTORY Evolutionary Historical Socialism Stewardship of

Behaviorism

Collective

Abolition of Home

Non traditional Church and state

Family home/ BELIEVERS Positive Law Biblical and

Positive Law

New World Order

New

Age

Order

Socialism Property Historical Historical

Universal

Godhood Resurrected Yahashua

Evolution Omnipotent God

Materialism

CALVARY B-DEGREE 32706/0503 W.I.T.M.I. 5. 18.1 (b) PRAYER BASED BELIEVER IN YAWEH : COUNSELING. 18.1.1. Introduction. Discussions with clients who seek a biblical/Scriptural approach to psychotherapy as well as with therapists who identify themselves as A Believer in YHVH-GOD reveal widely divergent beliefs and values about integration. To some the term Prayer counselor denotes a person who uses only the Scriptures/Bible in counseling sessions; others envision a therapist who goes to church on Sunday but practices secular counseling Monday through Friday; still others use the term only for born again believers who integrate Scriptural an psychological principles into the practice of psychotherapy. (Herewith I needed to state clearly that myself do not belong to any denomination, so I am not working on levels of Church going or Church system. 18.1.2 Establish importance of value system. v Clear understanding of their respective value systems and worldviews. We have to judged that informed consent and open agreement between client and therapist about the relevance of values and religious issues in the therapist about the relevance of values and religious issues in the therapy transaction are foundational and crucial to an effective therapeutic alliance. v The therapeutic relationship must embody a process whereby the parties involved talk the same language with respect to world views, lifestyle choices, and values orientations. v If the client does not wish to continue after the therapist’s value system has been disclosed, the therapist should refer the client to other appropriate therapeutic resources. v Christian counselors seeking to integrate the bible’s teachings with psychological constructs should hold themselves to high standards of professionalism 1. Prayer based /Believing in God/YHVH the Creator of the universe/ counselors should accept psychological insights only if these insights are completely consistent with biblical truth. 2. They should regard the Scripture as the infallible Word of God.

3. They should agree to give Scripture “functional control” over their thinking, with the result that biblical principles take priority over contrary non biblical opinion and are put into practice thoroughly and consistently. 4. They should demonstrate serious interest in the content of Scripture by engaging in regular and systematic Bible/Scriptures study, spending at least as much time in Bible study as in the study of psychology, so that they gain both an overall grasp of the Bible’s structure and content and a working knowledge of basic biblical/(truth of the Scripture and obeying Yaweh’s commandmends. doctrines. 6. 18.1 (c ) COGNITIVE – BEHAVIORAL THERAPY.

We have very little direct control of our emotions, but we can change how we think and we can choose what we believe. Many secular psychologists, such as Ellis and

Beck have been saying for years that our emotions are essentially a product of our thoughts. Christian counselors such as Backus, the author of Telling Yourself the truth say essentially the same thing. Cognitive-behavioral – the essential premise of this therapy is that certain “precipitating” events do not cause an emotional response; rather, the emotional response is determined by how the mind interprets the events. v Recall that our brains receive the external data, through our five senses and that our minds interpret the data, which in turn determines our volitional and emotional response. v For instance, if two people hear the sound of a slamming door one might become afraid while others ignores it. Why the difference? First person thought he were alone thinking someone was breaking in. 2nd person invited relative to enter house failing to tell other person. v This behavioral therapy is perhaps the fastest growing and most widely accepted approach to counseling at present time. v 1. first, the client is helped to see the connection between negative thoughts, the emotions they create, and the behaviors that follow. v Then the client is taught to recognize and monitor negative thoughts or distortions of reality. Thoughts or beliefs leading to negative feelings and improper responses to life are identified as ineffective or dysfunctional (c ) ECLECTIC COUNSELING Eclectic involves a combination of theories, methods and viewpoints and this counseling approach is predominant. There are four kinds of eclecticism: 1. Research-based: certain methods are used for certain problems (Best treatment of phobias are behavior therapy, specifically desensitization) 2. Experimental / pragmatic: One’s own counseling method is compared to other counselors and certain approaches are likely in their methods. 3. Rational: counselors study different methods, thinking them through and make a conclusion for certain approaches and use those most effective for his philosophy. 4. Mystical: associated with memory healing. This approach is believed to be a methods where God directly intervene in the process and healing takes place such a modern “ such as modern “Theophostics” Most of the counselors who use this counseling methods tend to have one or more “fall-back theory, where they will search through theoretical options in specific situations. Here Christians may relate to the problem as sin instead of searching deeper for the real problem. These “fall-back “ theories might be helpful, but a good counselor will keep current by reading recent textbooks and journal articles, consulting with colleagues, joining professional associations and attend conferences so that the number of fall-back situations will be minimized.

W.I.T.M.I. 7. 18.1 (a)

MARIA REYNEKE CALVARY B-DEGREE 32706/0303 (b) (c) CONCLUSION.

STUDENTS VIEWPOINT: In all of both discussions we will see that there is a big difference in approaches towards people/clients. We always have to remember that god is always

presents, not only have secular psychologists and many Christian therapists overlooked the kingdom of darkness and the possibility that spiritual warfare could be part of the counseling process, they have also competently overlooked the real presence of Yahashua. To understand the reality of the spiritual world requires biblical faith. However, contemporary secular psychology has not consulted the only authoritative source of truth about god, humans, and the world in which we live. Moreover, some Christian therapists live out a practical dichotomy, holding to “psychology only” on the office and “Christ only” in their religious practices. (The word/name Christ derived from the Roman church and is not our Saviors real name. Yahashua is His Name if you want to be called on your Name don’t you think our YHVH creator want that too. (Turn Towards the real truth.) In my own experience, spirituality has been important, and I believe with my whole heart it will come to play an increasingly important role in the psychology of the future. Holistic medicine, scientology approach (widely advertised in post boxes and overall) with its interest in meditation, prayer, and the role of spiritual healing in recovery from serious illness, has become a mainstream movement in the nineties and still now in 2006/7. I believe there will be a “holistic psychology” in the not too distant future, like holistic medicine, (that) integrates scientifically based treatment approaches with alternative more spiritually based modalities. Its already here what else are the devil going to use to take people’s eyes off what the real truth is. It is certainly end times, the devil roaring in every aspect of lives like a deadly wounded animal try and succeed a lot of times to take away people from Our Great God.

MARIA REYNEKE

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