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Your Annual Autumn Guide

to Ontario and Wayne County


Canandaigua Shopping Guide Daily Messenger
Lyons-Clyde-Savannah Shopping Guide Newark Pennysaver
Sodus-Williamson Pennysaver Timesaver
Victor Post Wayne Post
Advertising supplement for the week of September 21, 2014
MESSENGER POST MEDIA
FALL GUIDE
2014
PAGE 2 FALL GuidE 2014 PAGE 3 FALL GuidE 2014
For more information visit www.nistockfarms.com
Im frequently reminded by my dear husband that
when we got married in 1990 and I brought my little
fock of fber sheep to the family farm, they were
supposed to be just for me, you know, to spin with
and be pets. When the Nistock Farms dairy herd was
dispersed in 2000, the sheep fock expanded to fll the
void, becoming the main activity on the farm. The fock
has evolved to nearly 100 ewes and rams (not counting
lambs), and has taken over the former dairy barn.
The widely varied handspinning fock includes white,
black and moorit crossbreds of Border Leicester,
Romney, Finn, Rambouillet and CVM, and our
wonderful purebred heritage breed, the Cotswold. In
our focks case, the wool is of primary importance as it
is all sold to fber artists.
The calendar year ends on December 31st but the fock
and farm always has another task overlapping the
previous one. Breeding season starts in late October and coincides with lambs from the
previous spring being sold into other focks, being registered as replacements in this fock
or going into the freezer channel. Nistock Farms sells their lamb as USDA inspected, cryovac
packaged cuts, both at the farm by appointment and at various festivals and functions.
The pelts from all freezer lambs are prepared at the
farm after each batch of lambs is processed and then
sent out for tanning. The resulting sheepskin is large,
unique and machine washable.
Before lambing begins - 148 days (5 months) after
breeding season started the bred ewes are
vaccinated and shorn. Most feeces are reserved by
spinners before they are even of the sheep and they
all need to be looked over, weighed and sent to the
buyer. Lambing ends at the end of April and shortly
thereafter the fock begins grazing, being rotated
between pastures.
Vaccinations and deworming and weighing the lambs
happens on schedule through the spring.
Ram lambs are weaned from the fock and moved to
the ram barn across the road in early July.
Putting up dry hay starts in June and continues all summer along with other feldwork for
oats and corn, and cutting frewood for the winter.
Fleeces, yarn, prepared fbers, sheepskins, quilt batting, breeding stock, freezer lamb...this
versatile fock provides many products for fber artists locally and from afar.
Since 1990, sheep have grazed the rolling pastures of the Nistocks 530-acre farm
located in the Finger Lakes region of Western New York.
BY ROBIN NISTOCK
the sheep have taken over
Nistock Farms fber goods can be found at Te Fiber and Art Emporium in Hammondsport.
We will also be attending the Finger Lakes Fiber Festival September 20 & 21 in Hemlock.
Also Christmas On the Farm at Stone Edge Farm in Phelps on December 6.
PAGE 2 FALL GuidE 2014 PAGE 3 FALL GuidE 2014
For more information visit www.nistockfarms.com
Im frequently reminded by my dear husband that
when we got married in 1990 and I brought my little
fock of fber sheep to the family farm, they were
supposed to be just for me, you know, to spin with
and be pets. When the Nistock Farms dairy herd was
dispersed in 2000, the sheep fock expanded to fll the
void, becoming the main activity on the farm. The fock
has evolved to nearly 100 ewes and rams (not counting
lambs), and has taken over the former dairy barn.
The widely varied handspinning fock includes white,
black and moorit crossbreds of Border Leicester,
Romney, Finn, Rambouillet and CVM, and our
wonderful purebred heritage breed, the Cotswold. In
our focks case, the wool is of primary importance as it
is all sold to fber artists.
The calendar year ends on December 31st but the fock
and farm always has another task overlapping the
previous one. Breeding season starts in late October and coincides with lambs from the
previous spring being sold into other focks, being registered as replacements in this fock
or going into the freezer channel. Nistock Farms sells their lamb as USDA inspected, cryovac
packaged cuts, both at the farm by appointment and at various festivals and functions.
The pelts from all freezer lambs are prepared at the
farm after each batch of lambs is processed and then
sent out for tanning. The resulting sheepskin is large,
unique and machine washable.
Before lambing begins - 148 days (5 months) after
breeding season started the bred ewes are
vaccinated and shorn. Most feeces are reserved by
spinners before they are even of the sheep and they
all need to be looked over, weighed and sent to the
buyer. Lambing ends at the end of April and shortly
thereafter the fock begins grazing, being rotated
between pastures.
Vaccinations and deworming and weighing the lambs
happens on schedule through the spring.
Ram lambs are weaned from the fock and moved to
the ram barn across the road in early July.
Putting up dry hay starts in June and continues all summer along with other feldwork for
oats and corn, and cutting frewood for the winter.
Fleeces, yarn, prepared fbers, sheepskins, quilt batting, breeding stock, freezer lamb...this
versatile fock provides many products for fber artists locally and from afar.
Since 1990, sheep have grazed the rolling pastures of the Nistocks 530-acre farm
located in the Finger Lakes region of Western New York.
BY ROBIN NISTOCK
the sheep have taken over
Nistock Farms fber goods can be found at Te Fiber and Art Emporium in Hammondsport.
We will also be attending the Finger Lakes Fiber Festival September 20 & 21 in Hemlock.
Also Christmas On the Farm at Stone Edge Farm in Phelps on December 6.
PAGE 4 FALL GuidE 2014 PAGE 5 FALL GuidE 2014
He were a corker, that Abel. I mind the day he catched a rattler.
Now, Pa, dont start, Lizzie chided. Beside her Anna stifed a giggle, shushed
by the look in her fathers eye.
Of the gaggle of young folks crouched over the heaps of cornstalks, only four
were female. Nearly a dozen young bloods mingled with the girls, staking
claim to a particular place on the oak logs edging the yard.
Seated on the other side of the circle a score of elders mostly men, a handful
of women worked side by side, nattering the while, catching one another
up on family news, gossiping over community goings-on. And at the top of
everyones mind was the recent death of Abel Short.
Bent Brown was not a man to be deterred by a daughters rebuke. His hearers,
he knew, appreciated his turn of phrase and the antics of the lately deceased
provided him just the opportunity he was adept at exploiting.
Both hands worked in coordinated rhythm, the left grasping an ear of corn, the
right bringing the corn hook to bear, and the husk was peeled back in one fuid
motion; then a backward jerk of the left hand and the stripped ear was fung
into the basket. All the while Bent was rattling on, nineteen to the dozen.
You take that horse-a his Ranger. Nattractive bay, a generous-size beast,
that un. But tractable, tractable do anything Abeld put him to.
On the other side of the corn shuck pile, Lizzie whispered into Annas ear and
the two girls slipped to the far end of the row; well they knew how their pa
did go on.
A chorus of chuckles greeted Bents next ofering, as most of those present
could remember the time Abel deep in his cups brought Ranger into
the house and up the stairs to his bed chamber. And in the morning there stood
the bewildered horse, with his great lovely head thrust out the second story
window. The gettin him down the stairs,Bent remembered, werent so easy
as the gettin him up. Fer Abel was sober goin down!
Through all the chatter of colorful pranksters, of fooded felds, of sickening
stock the pace never slackened, as each husker strove to fll his assigned
basket. The talk among the older women ranged from the travail of childbed
to the trials of ornery husbands. Remedies for catarrh and for boils were traded
and kitchen tricks for stretching the contents of a winter-depleted pantry were
shared.
At the young folks end whispers were hidden behind cupped hands, winks and
knowing looks few from eye to eye. Still, at a steady tempo they carried on;
boys and girls in competition to fll the waiting baskets.
As a general thing the corn harvest commenced in early October. Up and down
the corn rows a man walked, sickle swishing at the base of each stalk. A boy
sometimes a woman followed in his wake, bundling three or four stalks,
setting a triplet of bundles into a shock, until the feld was a decorated mosaic
of shaggy cones.
Twenty days or more it all depended how wet the weather the corn
stood, drying. On the morning of the husking-bee, round the feld went wagon
and team with a small force of hands collecting all the stalks. These were
brought into the yard and piled in great long heaps. After the mid-day dinner,
arrived a score of neighbors prepared to work the afternoon away.
The farmers of Ontario County in the 1830s grew Indian corn what we
BY JOY LEWIS | RICHMOND TOWN HISTORIAN
the husking bee:
mid november, 1832
know as fint corn,for dent corn had not yet been developed. This variety produced an ear of kernels
colored creamy white or sunshine yellow. Occasionally an ear of all red kernels was discovered. And
all there knew what that portended. A verse common to the day suggested that if a man fnds a
red ear, a general kiss he gains, but when to some fair maid the prize is cast, she walks the round,
and calls one favord beau upon which to grant her luscious tribute. The fnding of a red ear was a
celebrated event.
By unspoken custom the younger, unmarried men with a couple of the bolder girls among them
grouped together on one side of the pile of cornstalks, while the older folks held their own,
opposite. Most of the women and adolescent girls bypassed the yard, making straight for the kitchen,
for here resided the heart of a working-bee.
Every shelf and counter was laden with the oferings of the housewife and the tributes of her visitors.
The Mrs. chicken pie, crust golden and crisped with a sprinkle of meal, held place of honor at the head
of the serving table, fanked fore and aft by a pot of sausages swimming in grease and an enormous
ham carved into hearty slabs. Ranged below were dishes of pickled beets, boiled onions, applesauce,
baked cabbage, stewed greens, and half-a-dozen varieties of bread.
They in the yard would keep at the work until the last cob was shorn and the baskets were emptied
into the corn crib. Then as dusk deepened into dark, the evening meal was served and the talk
did slacken.
Abel Short (1776-1832) was a pioneer and farmer in Richmond, Ontario County. The other characters are
fctional composites. This account is based on collected reminisces on fle at the ofce of the Richmond
Historian.
PAGE 4 FALL GuidE 2014 PAGE 5 FALL GuidE 2014
He were a corker, that Abel. I mind the day he catched a rattler.
Now, Pa, dont start, Lizzie chided. Beside her Anna stifed a giggle, shushed
by the look in her fathers eye.
Of the gaggle of young folks crouched over the heaps of cornstalks, only four
were female. Nearly a dozen young bloods mingled with the girls, staking
claim to a particular place on the oak logs edging the yard.
Seated on the other side of the circle a score of elders mostly men, a handful
of women worked side by side, nattering the while, catching one another
up on family news, gossiping over community goings-on. And at the top of
everyones mind was the recent death of Abel Short.
Bent Brown was not a man to be deterred by a daughters rebuke. His hearers,
he knew, appreciated his turn of phrase and the antics of the lately deceased
provided him just the opportunity he was adept at exploiting.
Both hands worked in coordinated rhythm, the left grasping an ear of corn, the
right bringing the corn hook to bear, and the husk was peeled back in one fuid
motion; then a backward jerk of the left hand and the stripped ear was fung
into the basket. All the while Bent was rattling on, nineteen to the dozen.
You take that horse-a his Ranger. Nattractive bay, a generous-size beast,
that un. But tractable, tractable do anything Abeld put him to.
On the other side of the corn shuck pile, Lizzie whispered into Annas ear and
the two girls slipped to the far end of the row; well they knew how their pa
did go on.
A chorus of chuckles greeted Bents next ofering, as most of those present
could remember the time Abel deep in his cups brought Ranger into
the house and up the stairs to his bed chamber. And in the morning there stood
the bewildered horse, with his great lovely head thrust out the second story
window. The gettin him down the stairs,Bent remembered, werent so easy
as the gettin him up. Fer Abel was sober goin down!
Through all the chatter of colorful pranksters, of fooded felds, of sickening
stock the pace never slackened, as each husker strove to fll his assigned
basket. The talk among the older women ranged from the travail of childbed
to the trials of ornery husbands. Remedies for catarrh and for boils were traded
and kitchen tricks for stretching the contents of a winter-depleted pantry were
shared.
At the young folks end whispers were hidden behind cupped hands, winks and
knowing looks few from eye to eye. Still, at a steady tempo they carried on;
boys and girls in competition to fll the waiting baskets.
As a general thing the corn harvest commenced in early October. Up and down
the corn rows a man walked, sickle swishing at the base of each stalk. A boy
sometimes a woman followed in his wake, bundling three or four stalks,
setting a triplet of bundles into a shock, until the feld was a decorated mosaic
of shaggy cones.
Twenty days or more it all depended how wet the weather the corn
stood, drying. On the morning of the husking-bee, round the feld went wagon
and team with a small force of hands collecting all the stalks. These were
brought into the yard and piled in great long heaps. After the mid-day dinner,
arrived a score of neighbors prepared to work the afternoon away.
The farmers of Ontario County in the 1830s grew Indian corn what we
BY JOY LEWIS | RICHMOND TOWN HISTORIAN
the husking bee:
mid november, 1832
know as fint corn,for dent corn had not yet been developed. This variety produced an ear of kernels
colored creamy white or sunshine yellow. Occasionally an ear of all red kernels was discovered. And
all there knew what that portended. A verse common to the day suggested that if a man fnds a
red ear, a general kiss he gains, but when to some fair maid the prize is cast, she walks the round,
and calls one favord beau upon which to grant her luscious tribute. The fnding of a red ear was a
celebrated event.
By unspoken custom the younger, unmarried men with a couple of the bolder girls among them
grouped together on one side of the pile of cornstalks, while the older folks held their own,
opposite. Most of the women and adolescent girls bypassed the yard, making straight for the kitchen,
for here resided the heart of a working-bee.
Every shelf and counter was laden with the oferings of the housewife and the tributes of her visitors.
The Mrs. chicken pie, crust golden and crisped with a sprinkle of meal, held place of honor at the head
of the serving table, fanked fore and aft by a pot of sausages swimming in grease and an enormous
ham carved into hearty slabs. Ranged below were dishes of pickled beets, boiled onions, applesauce,
baked cabbage, stewed greens, and half-a-dozen varieties of bread.
They in the yard would keep at the work until the last cob was shorn and the baskets were emptied
into the corn crib. Then as dusk deepened into dark, the evening meal was served and the talk
did slacken.
Abel Short (1776-1832) was a pioneer and farmer in Richmond, Ontario County. The other characters are
fctional composites. This account is based on collected reminisces on fle at the ofce of the Richmond
Historian.
PAGE 6 FALL GuidE 2014
MESSENGER POST MEDIA
advertising supplement
a division of gatehouse media inc.
73 bufalo street canandaigua ny 14424 585.394.0770 www.MPNnow.com
PAGE 7 FALL GuidE 2014
Travel scenic country roads ablaze in autumn glory. Each stop is as unique, as the taste
and texture of apples. Discover the favors, colors and sizes. Shop for gif items and crafs.
Enjoy tasting a variety of wines and some amazing fruit wines. Enter to win prizes
along the way. Free gifs and more. Call 800-527-6510 for brochure and map.
APPLE COUNTRY SPIRITS
3274 Eddy Road, Williamson
www.applecountryspirits.com
(315) 589-TREE (8733)
Apple Country Spirits is Wayne Countys
frst legal distillery since prohibition.
It produces high quality spirits from fruit
grown on the fourth generation family farm.
THE APPLE SHED
3391 Fairville-Maple Ridge Road, Newark
www.theappleshed.com
(315) 331-6294
20+ apple varieties, fresh-pressedsweet
cider, lunch, ice cream, fresh baked goods
and homemade fudge! Lots of country crafts,
playground, petting zoo and weekend hayrides.
APPLE TOWN FARM MARKET
4734 Route 104, Williamson
(315) 589-9102
A local farm market specializing in locally grown
produce.
Stop in and stock up on cider, apples, potatoes,
onions and more!
BROWNELLS FARM MARKET
5247 East Lake Road, Williamson
(315) 589-8091
Come visit our friendly road side market, located
outside of the hamlet of Pultneyville, which has
served the local community for 50+ years.
BURNAPS FARM MARKET
& GARDEN CAFE
7277 Maple Avenue, Sodus
www.burnapsfarm.com
(315) 483-4050
Fresh homegrown fruits and veggies.Sweet
goodies from our in-house bakery. Cafe serves
lunches daily. Gifords ice cream in homemade
wafe cones. Crafts and jewlery.
GRANDVIEW FARM MARKET
1040 Canandaigua Road, Macedon
www.grandviewfarmny.com
(315) 986-2551
Visit our market for seasonal fruits and veggies,
baked goods, ice cream, crafts and a visit with
our farm animals.
HELUVA GOOD CHEESE
COUNTRY STORE
6152 Barclay Road, Sodus
www.heluvagood.com
(800) 445-0269
Take a step back in time. Featuring the complete
line of Heluva Good! products, specialty cheeses,
gourmet products, unique gifts and snacks.
KITCHENS COUNTRY MARKET
10006 Ridge Road, North Rose
(315) 587-9060
A great stop ofering fall fruits and vegetables.
Our market ofers a full service deli, home-baked
goods, specialty food Items, local crafts and gifts
items.
LAGONER FARM MARKET
6895 Lake Avenue, Williamson
www.lagonerfarms.com
(315) 589-4899
Full service farm market ofering a wide variety
of homegrown fruits and vegetables, fresh
baked goods, farm-made jams and fudge.
U-pick apples and pumpkins on weekends.
LONG ACRE FARMS
& JD WINE CELLARS
1342 Eddy Road, Macedon
www.longacrefarms.com
(315) 986-4202
Farm market, ice cream shop, fve-acre corn
maze, jumping pillow, corn cannon, hay rides
and more! JD Wine Cellars ofers red, white and
fruit wines.
MASON FARMS & FARM MARKET
3135 Ridge Road, Williamson
www.masonsfarmmarket.com
(315) 589-4175
In-season homegrown fruits and vegetables.
Certifed Organic by NOFA - NY Certifed Organic.
MILLS FRUIT FARM
10979 Ridge Road, Wolcott
www.millsfruitfarm.com
(315) 594-2200
Family owned grown fruits, vegetables, fowers.
Homemade breads, pies, fudge. Hay rides,
pumpkin patch. Our diner features home cooking,
ice cream and old fashioned milkshakes.
MORGANS FARM MARKET
3821 Cory Corners Road, Marion
www.morgansfarmmarket.com
(315) 926-0910
Quaint market with orchard fresh apples,
strawberries, peaches and cherries!
Variety of fresh veggies, pumpkins, mums,
specialty foods and more. U-pick available. Old
fashioned hometown pride!
ORBAKERS FRUIT FARM
3451 Lake Road, Williamson
(315) 589-2036
Located on the Seaway Trail, we feature
homegrown apples and fresh produce. You may
pick apples of the tree, out of a bin, or packaged.
THORPE VINEYARD
8150 Chimney Heights Blvd., Wolcott
www.thorpevineyard.com
(315) 594-2502
The Little Winery on the Great Lake!
YOUNG SOMMER WINERY
4287 Jersey Road, Williamson
www.yswinery.com
(315) 589-8861
Young Sommers award-winning grape and fruit
wines are full of charm and character capturing
the unique climate that clings to the Lake Ontario
Shoreline.
OCTOBER 10-13
17TH ANNUAL WAYNE COUNTY
APPLE TASTING TOUR
New York State
is truly Te Big Apple
for a reason.
It is the second largest
apple producing state
in the United States.
Wayne County is the
number one
apple producing county
in New York State.
PAGE 6 FALL GuidE 2014
MESSENGER POST MEDIA
advertising supplement
a division of gatehouse media inc.
73 bufalo street canandaigua ny 14424 585.394.0770 www.MPNnow.com
PAGE 7 FALL GuidE 2014
Travel scenic country roads ablaze in autumn glory. Each stop is as unique, as the taste
and texture of apples. Discover the favors, colors and sizes. Shop for gif items and crafs.
Enjoy tasting a variety of wines and some amazing fruit wines. Enter to win prizes
along the way. Free gifs and more. Call 800-527-6510 for brochure and map.
APPLE COUNTRY SPIRITS
3274 Eddy Road, Williamson
www.applecountryspirits.com
(315) 589-TREE (8733)
Apple Country Spirits is Wayne Countys
frst legal distillery since prohibition.
It produces high quality spirits from fruit
grown on the fourth generation family farm.
THE APPLE SHED
3391 Fairville-Maple Ridge Road, Newark
www.theappleshed.com
(315) 331-6294
20+ apple varieties, fresh-pressedsweet
cider, lunch, ice cream, fresh baked goods
and homemade fudge! Lots of country crafts,
playground, petting zoo and weekend hayrides.
APPLE TOWN FARM MARKET
4734 Route 104, Williamson
(315) 589-9102
A local farm market specializing in locally grown
produce.
Stop in and stock up on cider, apples, potatoes,
onions and more!
BROWNELLS FARM MARKET
5247 East Lake Road, Williamson
(315) 589-8091
Come visit our friendly road side market, located
outside of the hamlet of Pultneyville, which has
served the local community for 50+ years.
BURNAPS FARM MARKET
& GARDEN CAFE
7277 Maple Avenue, Sodus
www.burnapsfarm.com
(315) 483-4050
Fresh homegrown fruits and veggies.Sweet
goodies from our in-house bakery. Cafe serves
lunches daily. Gifords ice cream in homemade
wafe cones. Crafts and jewlery.
GRANDVIEW FARM MARKET
1040 Canandaigua Road, Macedon
www.grandviewfarmny.com
(315) 986-2551
Visit our market for seasonal fruits and veggies,
baked goods, ice cream, crafts and a visit with
our farm animals.
HELUVA GOOD CHEESE
COUNTRY STORE
6152 Barclay Road, Sodus
www.heluvagood.com
(800) 445-0269
Take a step back in time. Featuring the complete
line of Heluva Good! products, specialty cheeses,
gourmet products, unique gifts and snacks.
KITCHENS COUNTRY MARKET
10006 Ridge Road, North Rose
(315) 587-9060
A great stop ofering fall fruits and vegetables.
Our market ofers a full service deli, home-baked
goods, specialty food Items, local crafts and gifts
items.
LAGONER FARM MARKET
6895 Lake Avenue, Williamson
www.lagonerfarms.com
(315) 589-4899
Full service farm market ofering a wide variety
of homegrown fruits and vegetables, fresh
baked goods, farm-made jams and fudge.
U-pick apples and pumpkins on weekends.
LONG ACRE FARMS
& JD WINE CELLARS
1342 Eddy Road, Macedon
www.longacrefarms.com
(315) 986-4202
Farm market, ice cream shop, fve-acre corn
maze, jumping pillow, corn cannon, hay rides
and more! JD Wine Cellars ofers red, white and
fruit wines.
MASON FARMS & FARM MARKET
3135 Ridge Road, Williamson
www.masonsfarmmarket.com
(315) 589-4175
In-season homegrown fruits and vegetables.
Certifed Organic by NOFA - NY Certifed Organic.
MILLS FRUIT FARM
10979 Ridge Road, Wolcott
www.millsfruitfarm.com
(315) 594-2200
Family owned grown fruits, vegetables, fowers.
Homemade breads, pies, fudge. Hay rides,
pumpkin patch. Our diner features home cooking,
ice cream and old fashioned milkshakes.
MORGANS FARM MARKET
3821 Cory Corners Road, Marion
www.morgansfarmmarket.com
(315) 926-0910
Quaint market with orchard fresh apples,
strawberries, peaches and cherries!
Variety of fresh veggies, pumpkins, mums,
specialty foods and more. U-pick available. Old
fashioned hometown pride!
ORBAKERS FRUIT FARM
3451 Lake Road, Williamson
(315) 589-2036
Located on the Seaway Trail, we feature
homegrown apples and fresh produce. You may
pick apples of the tree, out of a bin, or packaged.
THORPE VINEYARD
8150 Chimney Heights Blvd., Wolcott
www.thorpevineyard.com
(315) 594-2502
The Little Winery on the Great Lake!
YOUNG SOMMER WINERY
4287 Jersey Road, Williamson
www.yswinery.com
(315) 589-8861
Young Sommers award-winning grape and fruit
wines are full of charm and character capturing
the unique climate that clings to the Lake Ontario
Shoreline.
OCTOBER 10-13
17TH ANNUAL WAYNE COUNTY
APPLE TASTING TOUR
New York State
is truly Te Big Apple
for a reason.
It is the second largest
apple producing state
in the United States.
Wayne County is the
number one
apple producing county
in New York State.
PAGE 8 FALL GuidE 2014 PAGE 9 FALL GuidE 2014
Historic Palmyra ofers fve museums at one destination for your family fun and education.
Mention the word FLIP and fnd out about fipforhistory.com. This is a great new way to
interact with our museums through your i-phone or i-pad. Historic Palmyra is part of the
fipforhistory.com app on the I love NY Haunted History Trail, Blue Star Museum program,
Cultural Heritage Trail and the newly established Finger Lakes Museum Trail.
The Palmyra Historical Museum ofers 23 rooms of history from Palmyra throughout
the United States from the pioneer days to the era of the typewriter and frst data card
computer. Bring history to life in this spectacular museum complex also located along the
Erie Canal. No matter what the history was, it is featured within these fve museums.
The original, authentic Wm. Phelps General Store and home on the Erie Canal shares a
step back in time with its products and containers. Come see the 74 year old eggs and
smell the 100 year old oils. Its building history from 1826 covers 108 years of the Phelps
family history. Time stands still in this unique building at 140 Market Street in Palmyra.
The Palmyra Print Shop and the Erie Canal Depot also share Palmyra history through
printing and newspapers from 1820 to 1972. The old Tenant house, now the Erie Canal
Depot, ofers original canal items, lithographs, hand-hewed beams and a whif of the
mules that once were stabled in the basement stalls. The comments from all that visit are
unbelievable, a treasure, and an experience to remember forever.
The Alling Coverlet Museum features the largest collection of American hand woven
coverlets in the United States. It is named for Mrs. Merle Alling, a Rochester resident and
coverlet collector, and is housed in a 1901 newspaper printing ofce. All styles of hand
historic palmyras
fve museums
one destination
UPCOMING AUTUMN EVENTS
October 10: Sibyls 119th Birthday Party: Mediums will be in private
rooms in the Haunted Wm. Phelps General Store to give you individual
readings from 6:30-9:30 p.m.$20 p.p. Same night ... Group Reading instead
of or in addition to this event for an additional $20 p.p. At the Alling Coverlet.
8:00-10:00 pm. Phelps General Store, 140 Market Street, Palmyra.
October 17 & 18: Historic Palmyras Famous Cemetery Walk: Come
meet famous and infamous cemetery residents. Use Vienna Street entrance.
Approximately 1 hour for each walk beginning at 6:30 and 8:00 pm. Two
shows each night. $10 p.p.
woven coverlets from 1820 to 1880 are represented in an extraordinary collection, which
takes over six years to rotate through public display. The collection also includes a Quilt
Room, looms, spinning wheels, and other assorted weavers tools.
Experience the late night life at the Wm. Phelps General Store and home as well as at the
Palmyra Historical Museum for the other side of history. The unspoken, unseen, yet always
very apparent are in every room. They will thrill you with a sudden whisper, foot step, or
touch. Come experience the strange noises, apparitions, caught photographs, and chased
ghostly cats only to fnd, nothing is there! Please call to reserve your ghost hunt. A six-hour
hunt is usually held from 7:00 pm-1:00 am or 8:00 pm-2:00 am.
The museums are now open from 10:30 am to 4:30 pm until October 31, Tuesday through
Saturday. Winter hours are Tuesday through Thursday 11:00 am to 4:00 pm, November 1 to
May 1. Tours are held during open hours and on many weekends for evening tours. A reasonable
admission fee allows you access to all fve museums with your special guide explaining the
artifacts, history and famous people. Call 315-597-6981 or visit www.historicpalmyrany.com
for more information, prices and reservations on all events.
PAGE 8 FALL GuidE 2014 PAGE 9 FALL GuidE 2014
Historic Palmyra ofers fve museums at one destination for your family fun and education.
Mention the word FLIP and fnd out about fipforhistory.com. This is a great new way to
interact with our museums through your i-phone or i-pad. Historic Palmyra is part of the
fipforhistory.com app on the I love NY Haunted History Trail, Blue Star Museum program,
Cultural Heritage Trail and the newly established Finger Lakes Museum Trail.
The Palmyra Historical Museum ofers 23 rooms of history from Palmyra throughout
the United States from the pioneer days to the era of the typewriter and frst data card
computer. Bring history to life in this spectacular museum complex also located along the
Erie Canal. No matter what the history was, it is featured within these fve museums.
The original, authentic Wm. Phelps General Store and home on the Erie Canal shares a
step back in time with its products and containers. Come see the 74 year old eggs and
smell the 100 year old oils. Its building history from 1826 covers 108 years of the Phelps
family history. Time stands still in this unique building at 140 Market Street in Palmyra.
The Palmyra Print Shop and the Erie Canal Depot also share Palmyra history through
printing and newspapers from 1820 to 1972. The old Tenant house, now the Erie Canal
Depot, ofers original canal items, lithographs, hand-hewed beams and a whif of the
mules that once were stabled in the basement stalls. The comments from all that visit are
unbelievable, a treasure, and an experience to remember forever.
The Alling Coverlet Museum features the largest collection of American hand woven
coverlets in the United States. It is named for Mrs. Merle Alling, a Rochester resident and
coverlet collector, and is housed in a 1901 newspaper printing ofce. All styles of hand
historic palmyras
fve museums
one destination
UPCOMING AUTUMN EVENTS
October 10: Sibyls 119th Birthday Party: Mediums will be in private
rooms in the Haunted Wm. Phelps General Store to give you individual
readings from 6:30-9:30 p.m.$20 p.p. Same night ... Group Reading instead
of or in addition to this event for an additional $20 p.p. At the Alling Coverlet.
8:00-10:00 pm. Phelps General Store, 140 Market Street, Palmyra.
October 17 & 18: Historic Palmyras Famous Cemetery Walk: Come
meet famous and infamous cemetery residents. Use Vienna Street entrance.
Approximately 1 hour for each walk beginning at 6:30 and 8:00 pm. Two
shows each night. $10 p.p.
woven coverlets from 1820 to 1880 are represented in an extraordinary collection, which
takes over six years to rotate through public display. The collection also includes a Quilt
Room, looms, spinning wheels, and other assorted weavers tools.
Experience the late night life at the Wm. Phelps General Store and home as well as at the
Palmyra Historical Museum for the other side of history. The unspoken, unseen, yet always
very apparent are in every room. They will thrill you with a sudden whisper, foot step, or
touch. Come experience the strange noises, apparitions, caught photographs, and chased
ghostly cats only to fnd, nothing is there! Please call to reserve your ghost hunt. A six-hour
hunt is usually held from 7:00 pm-1:00 am or 8:00 pm-2:00 am.
The museums are now open from 10:30 am to 4:30 pm until October 31, Tuesday through
Saturday. Winter hours are Tuesday through Thursday 11:00 am to 4:00 pm, November 1 to
May 1. Tours are held during open hours and on many weekends for evening tours. A reasonable
admission fee allows you access to all fve museums with your special guide explaining the
artifacts, history and famous people. Call 315-597-6981 or visit www.historicpalmyrany.com
for more information, prices and reservations on all events.
PAGE 10 FALL GuidE 2014
Crisp air, changing leaves and cozy knit
sweaters signify the return of autumn.
Fall can be a busy time for most families,
juggling back-to-school routines, carpools,
homework, after school events and sports
practice. Now is a great time to slow down,
bring the whole family together and enjoy
all of the exciting activities fall has to ofer.
Here are a few fun ways to spend quality
time with your family and relish in fall to
the fullest:
Visit an apple orchard. This is a great
way to make the most of the beautiful fall
weather and do something active with the
family. Use apples to make applesauce,
a tasty tart or just slice them up for a
great on-the-go snack. Try unique apple
varieties youve never tried they all
taste a bit diferent!
Go for a nature walk. With the vibrant,
colorful leaves and cool, crisp air, autumn
is a great time to get your family outdoors
and learn more about nature in a local
nature preserve or park. Pick up a few
fall mementos along the way to integrate
into crafts. For example, bring home some
colorful leaves and decoupage them
onto the outside of a mason jar to create
a seasonal fall candle holder, or create a
lively fall-inspired canvas incorporating
several diferent leaf shapes and colors.
Gear up for Halloween. Host a themed
get-together by incorporating fun foods
kids can help prepare and will love to eat!
Use a pumpkin-shaped cookie cutter to
create cut-out cookies and involve them
in decorating with everything from
frosting to sprinkles.
Visit a local farmers market. Fall ofers
a whole new repertoire of amazing fresh
fruits and vegetables. Encourage your kids
to try new items like fgs, acorn squash or
caulifower. If they fnd samples that they
enjoy, purchase a few and fnd a way to
incorporate them into your next meal.
Have a bonfre. As the weather cools
down, bonfres are a great way to stay
warm at night and make lasting family
memories. Gather everyone together
and reconnect by huddling around the
fre in cozy blankets. Pour mugs of warm
apple cider and munch on popcorn while
swapping ghost stories over the glow of
the fre. [BPT]
Fun and afordable fall activities
your family will love!
PAGE 11 FALL GuidE 2014
ONTARIO COUNTY
Foster Cottage Museum: Open Tuesday thru Friday,
September 1 - May 30,10 am-4 pm. Free admission. 9 East
Main Street, Clifton Springs, 315-462-7394, fostercottage.
org.
Star Picks by Stan Munro Exhibit: Now thru the end
of October. Stan Munro the Toothpick Engineers Star Picks
exhibit includes spacecraft from Star Wars, Star Trek,
BBC Doctor Who and more! All made from toothpicks and
glue! Free. Phelps Arts Center, 15 Church Street, Phelps, 315-
548-2095.
Bristol Mountain Fall Foliage Sky Rides: Saturdays &
Sundays thru October 26, Noon-4 pm, plus Columbus Day,
Monday, October 13. Ride the Comet Express chairlift to the
top of Bristol Mountain. This 15-20 minute ride provides
breathtaking views of the Bristol Hills and the valley. Catch
a glimpse of Canandaigua Lake on a clear day. Ride or hike
down marked trails. Fee. 5662 State Rt. 64, Canandaigua,
585-374-6000, bristolmountain.com/fall-sky-rides.
Tunes by the Tracks: Featuring local music groups. Join in
on the jam sessions that follow each performance. October
1: Perry Cleaveland & Rick Hoyt (Eclectic surprise) and
October 15 - Eva & the Dogboys. Free, donation suggested.
Clifton Springs Library meeting room, Railroad Avenue, 315-
462-6189.
All Grain Brewing Class: Sunday, October 5, 7-10:30 pm.
This 3-4 hour class will explore the tools, techniques and
ingredients for brewing a batch of excellent beer using
all-grain malt as the basis. A 5 gallon batch of beer will be
brewed during class. Enjoy beer samples, snacks, a tasting
glass, and a pint of the brewed beer. Fee. The VB Brewery,
6606 Rt. 96 Victor, 585-902-8166, www.thevbbrewery.
com.
Stellas Fall Family Fun Festival: Sunday, October
5, 10 am-noon. Celebrate autumn! Petting zoo, food,
entertainment. Kids receive a free pumpkin. Free. 1880
Rochester Road, Canandaigua, 585-394-1830.
A Taste of the Finger Lakes: Saturday, October 11, 2-4
pm. Sample the afternoon away with culinary delights
prepared by chefs from area restaurants and paired with
local vintages. 21 and older only. Call 585-374-9032 for
tickets. 151 South Main Street, Naples, www.bvtnaples.org.
Sonnenberg Fall Gardening Symposium: October 11.
This day-long seminar with Vincent Simeone will inform
you on how to use trees and shrubs to create visual interest
and appeal all year long in your gardens and landscaping.
Seminars include Popular Flowering Trees & Shrubs, Old-
Fashioned Trees & Shrubs, & Four Season Gardening with
Woody Plants. Lunch & book-signing included. Fee. Prepaid
reservations required. 151 Charlotte Street, Canandaigua,
585-394-4922, www.sonnenberg.org.
Fiddlers of the Genesee: Sunday, October 12, 2 pm.
Get your toes tappin with reels, jigs and more! Fee. Bristol
Valley Theater, 151 S. Main Street, Naples, 585-374-6318.
Overnight Ghost Investigations at The Naples Hotel:
Sunday, October 12 and Friday, October 24. Investigations
begin at midnight and end at 4 am. Reservations required.
The Naples Hotel, 111 South Main Street, Naples, 585-478-
6381.
Bristol Mountain Fall Festival: Sunday, October 12,
10 am-5 pm. Sky rides, live music, food, arts and crafts
vendors, chicken BBQ, wine and beer tastings and more.
Free admission. 5662 Rt. 64, Canandaigua, 585-374-6000,
bristolmountain.com.
Sonnenberg Mansion Mysteries: October 17, 18, 24 &
25, 7-9 pm, October 19 matinee performance, 4-6 pm. Take
part in a whodunit! Take part in this live-theater event by
uncovering clues that will solve the mystery and bring the
guilty party or parties to justice! Light refreshments
and cash wine bar provided. Have even more fun and
attend in costume. Fee. 151 Charlotte Street, Canandaigua,
585-394-4922, www.sonnenberg.org.
FLCC Book Feast: Saturday, October 18, 5:30 pm. This
fundraiser is a one night book club event featuring
intriguing books, delicious dinners at diferent local
homes and venues along with enlightening conversation
by authors or expert speakers. Proceeds from the event
support the work of the FLCC Foundation. Space is limited,
and books will be assigned in the order paid RSVPs are
received. Fee. FLCC, 3325 Marvin Sands Drive, Canandaigua
585-394-3500, www.fcc.edu/bookfeast.
Lehigh Valley Railroad Station Historical Society
Station Museum Open House: October 19, 1-3 pm.
Historical artifacts from the railroad is on display. Rail
historian presentations. Gift shop. Free, donations welcome.
8 East High Street, Shortsville, 585-289-9149.
Sonnenberg Haunted Garden Stroll: October 26, 6-8:30
pm. Join us if you dare! Hear strange Sonnenberg tales
from the last 126 years that will leave you in goosebumps!
Spooky characters appear perhaps the Lady in Black
who continues to walk the grounds? Fee. 151 Charlotte
Street, Canandaigua, 585-394-4922, www.sonnenberg.org.
go to www.fngerlakes.org for more area events!

WAYNE COUNTY
Apple Shed Weekend Hayrides & Haunted Barn:
October weekends, noon-5 pm. 3391 Fairville Maple Ridge
Road, Newark, 315-331-6294, www.theappleshed.com
Heritage Square Museum Fall Arts and Crafts
Festival: Saturday, October 4, 9 am-5 pm, rain or shine.
Arts and crafts, The Blue Ridge Country Ramblers 1-3 pm.
Kids! ride the Ore Bed Express, enjoy games and pony rides.
Bake sale and Pony Bingo! Hot dogs and chili available for
purchase. Guided museum tours 11 am, 12:30 pm, 2 pm
and 2:30 pm. Free admission. 7147 Ontario Center Rd.,
Ontario, www.heritagesquaremuseum.org.
Haunted History Ghost Walks: Saturdays in October
4-25, 7 pm. Take a 60-minute ghostly walking tour of
Lyons. Wayne County Courthouse, Church Street, Lyons, 315-
946-4943, www.waynehistory.org
Get to Know Your Neighbor Picnic - Autumn on
the Erie at Canal Lock 30: October 4, 8 am. Pancake
breakfast, chicken BBQ, apple pie contest, live music, kids
events, hayrides, vendors. Bring a dish to pass and your
drinks. Tableware provided. Macedon Canal Park.
Family Fun Day at Morgan Farms: Saturday, October 11,
10 am-2 pm. Guided walks thru the orchard, wagon rides,
pony rides, alpacas, bin maze, bounce house, samplings
and other fun! Picnic foods available, u-pick apples and
pumpkins. Free. 3821 Cory Corners Road, Marion, 315-926-
0910, www. morgansfarmmarket.com.
Candlelight Cemetery Tours: October 10 & 11, two
tours each night 7 and 8 pm. Sponsored by the Williamson-
Pultneyville Historical Society. Come and enjoy actors
in period costume portray citizens from the past. After
the tour, enjoy cider and donuts in Gates Hall. Lakeview
Cemetery, Pultneyville. www.w-phs.org.
Witches Night Out Charity Fundraiser: October 16.
Calling all witches near and far! Help support a great cause
and enjoy a night out for just the ladies. Enjoy refreshments
and wine, music and vendors. Tickets required. 6-9pm. Long
Acre Farms, 1342 Eddy Road, Macedon. www.longacrefarms.
com.
Pumpkin Palooza Family Fall Festival: October 18, 11
am-6 pm. Contests, crafts, food vendors and activities. The
Great Pearl Street Pumpkin Roll and the Zombie Walk.
Village Square, Lyons.
34th Annual Harvest Festival & Auction: October 18.
Childrens games, silent auction, chicken BBQ, live auction,
dessert tea room, attic treasures and farmers market. East
Palmyra Christian School, 2023 East Palmyra-Port Gibson
Road, Palmyra, www.eastpalmyrachristianschool.com
Harvest Moon Festival: October 18, 1-4 pm. Pony rides,
bounce house, petting zoo, crafts, music, beer tastings,
chili contest and more. Ginegaw Park, 3600 Lorraine Drive,
Walworth.
Haunted Jail & Cellblock Terror: October 24 & 25,
6-9 pm. Scary Halloween attraction, refreshments.
Wayne County Museum, 21 Butternut Street, Lyons, www.
waynehistory.org
Visit www.waynecountytourism.com or
www.fngerlakes.org for even more
fun and interesting area events!
area events...
PAGE 10 FALL GuidE 2014
Crisp air, changing leaves and cozy knit
sweaters signify the return of autumn.
Fall can be a busy time for most families,
juggling back-to-school routines, carpools,
homework, after school events and sports
practice. Now is a great time to slow down,
bring the whole family together and enjoy
all of the exciting activities fall has to ofer.
Here are a few fun ways to spend quality
time with your family and relish in fall to
the fullest:
Visit an apple orchard. This is a great
way to make the most of the beautiful fall
weather and do something active with the
family. Use apples to make applesauce,
a tasty tart or just slice them up for a
great on-the-go snack. Try unique apple
varieties youve never tried they all
taste a bit diferent!
Go for a nature walk. With the vibrant,
colorful leaves and cool, crisp air, autumn
is a great time to get your family outdoors
and learn more about nature in a local
nature preserve or park. Pick up a few
fall mementos along the way to integrate
into crafts. For example, bring home some
colorful leaves and decoupage them
onto the outside of a mason jar to create
a seasonal fall candle holder, or create a
lively fall-inspired canvas incorporating
several diferent leaf shapes and colors.
Gear up for Halloween. Host a themed
get-together by incorporating fun foods
kids can help prepare and will love to eat!
Use a pumpkin-shaped cookie cutter to
create cut-out cookies and involve them
in decorating with everything from
frosting to sprinkles.
Visit a local farmers market. Fall ofers
a whole new repertoire of amazing fresh
fruits and vegetables. Encourage your kids
to try new items like fgs, acorn squash or
caulifower. If they fnd samples that they
enjoy, purchase a few and fnd a way to
incorporate them into your next meal.
Have a bonfre. As the weather cools
down, bonfres are a great way to stay
warm at night and make lasting family
memories. Gather everyone together
and reconnect by huddling around the
fre in cozy blankets. Pour mugs of warm
apple cider and munch on popcorn while
swapping ghost stories over the glow of
the fre. [BPT]
Fun and afordable fall activities
your family will love!
PAGE 11 FALL GuidE 2014
ONTARIO COUNTY
Foster Cottage Museum: Open Tuesday thru Friday,
September 1 - May 30,10 am-4 pm. Free admission. 9 East
Main Street, Clifton Springs, 315-462-7394, fostercottage.
org.
Star Picks by Stan Munro Exhibit: Now thru the end
of October. Stan Munro the Toothpick Engineers Star Picks
exhibit includes spacecraft from Star Wars, Star Trek,
BBC Doctor Who and more! All made from toothpicks and
glue! Free. Phelps Arts Center, 15 Church Street, Phelps, 315-
548-2095.
Bristol Mountain Fall Foliage Sky Rides: Saturdays &
Sundays thru October 26, Noon-4 pm, plus Columbus Day,
Monday, October 13. Ride the Comet Express chairlift to the
top of Bristol Mountain. This 15-20 minute ride provides
breathtaking views of the Bristol Hills and the valley. Catch
a glimpse of Canandaigua Lake on a clear day. Ride or hike
down marked trails. Fee. 5662 State Rt. 64, Canandaigua,
585-374-6000, bristolmountain.com/fall-sky-rides.
Tunes by the Tracks: Featuring local music groups. Join in
on the jam sessions that follow each performance. October
1: Perry Cleaveland & Rick Hoyt (Eclectic surprise) and
October 15 - Eva & the Dogboys. Free, donation suggested.
Clifton Springs Library meeting room, Railroad Avenue, 315-
462-6189.
All Grain Brewing Class: Sunday, October 5, 7-10:30 pm.
This 3-4 hour class will explore the tools, techniques and
ingredients for brewing a batch of excellent beer using
all-grain malt as the basis. A 5 gallon batch of beer will be
brewed during class. Enjoy beer samples, snacks, a tasting
glass, and a pint of the brewed beer. Fee. The VB Brewery,
6606 Rt. 96 Victor, 585-902-8166, www.thevbbrewery.
com.
Stellas Fall Family Fun Festival: Sunday, October
5, 10 am-noon. Celebrate autumn! Petting zoo, food,
entertainment. Kids receive a free pumpkin. Free. 1880
Rochester Road, Canandaigua, 585-394-1830.
A Taste of the Finger Lakes: Saturday, October 11, 2-4
pm. Sample the afternoon away with culinary delights
prepared by chefs from area restaurants and paired with
local vintages. 21 and older only. Call 585-374-9032 for
tickets. 151 South Main Street, Naples, www.bvtnaples.org.
Sonnenberg Fall Gardening Symposium: October 11.
This day-long seminar with Vincent Simeone will inform
you on how to use trees and shrubs to create visual interest
and appeal all year long in your gardens and landscaping.
Seminars include Popular Flowering Trees & Shrubs, Old-
Fashioned Trees & Shrubs, & Four Season Gardening with
Woody Plants. Lunch & book-signing included. Fee. Prepaid
reservations required. 151 Charlotte Street, Canandaigua,
585-394-4922, www.sonnenberg.org.
Fiddlers of the Genesee: Sunday, October 12, 2 pm.
Get your toes tappin with reels, jigs and more! Fee. Bristol
Valley Theater, 151 S. Main Street, Naples, 585-374-6318.
Overnight Ghost Investigations at The Naples Hotel:
Sunday, October 12 and Friday, October 24. Investigations
begin at midnight and end at 4 am. Reservations required.
The Naples Hotel, 111 South Main Street, Naples, 585-478-
6381.
Bristol Mountain Fall Festival: Sunday, October 12,
10 am-5 pm. Sky rides, live music, food, arts and crafts
vendors, chicken BBQ, wine and beer tastings and more.
Free admission. 5662 Rt. 64, Canandaigua, 585-374-6000,
bristolmountain.com.
Sonnenberg Mansion Mysteries: October 17, 18, 24 &
25, 7-9 pm, October 19 matinee performance, 4-6 pm. Take
part in a whodunit! Take part in this live-theater event by
uncovering clues that will solve the mystery and bring the
guilty party or parties to justice! Light refreshments
and cash wine bar provided. Have even more fun and
attend in costume. Fee. 151 Charlotte Street, Canandaigua,
585-394-4922, www.sonnenberg.org.
FLCC Book Feast: Saturday, October 18, 5:30 pm. This
fundraiser is a one night book club event featuring
intriguing books, delicious dinners at diferent local
homes and venues along with enlightening conversation
by authors or expert speakers. Proceeds from the event
support the work of the FLCC Foundation. Space is limited,
and books will be assigned in the order paid RSVPs are
received. Fee. FLCC, 3325 Marvin Sands Drive, Canandaigua
585-394-3500, www.fcc.edu/bookfeast.
Lehigh Valley Railroad Station Historical Society
Station Museum Open House: October 19, 1-3 pm.
Historical artifacts from the railroad is on display. Rail
historian presentations. Gift shop. Free, donations welcome.
8 East High Street, Shortsville, 585-289-9149.
Sonnenberg Haunted Garden Stroll: October 26, 6-8:30
pm. Join us if you dare! Hear strange Sonnenberg tales
from the last 126 years that will leave you in goosebumps!
Spooky characters appear perhaps the Lady in Black
who continues to walk the grounds? Fee. 151 Charlotte
Street, Canandaigua, 585-394-4922, www.sonnenberg.org.
go to www.fngerlakes.org for more area events!

WAYNE COUNTY
Apple Shed Weekend Hayrides & Haunted Barn:
October weekends, noon-5 pm. 3391 Fairville Maple Ridge
Road, Newark, 315-331-6294, www.theappleshed.com
Heritage Square Museum Fall Arts and Crafts
Festival: Saturday, October 4, 9 am-5 pm, rain or shine.
Arts and crafts, The Blue Ridge Country Ramblers 1-3 pm.
Kids! ride the Ore Bed Express, enjoy games and pony rides.
Bake sale and Pony Bingo! Hot dogs and chili available for
purchase. Guided museum tours 11 am, 12:30 pm, 2 pm
and 2:30 pm. Free admission. 7147 Ontario Center Rd.,
Ontario, www.heritagesquaremuseum.org.
Haunted History Ghost Walks: Saturdays in October
4-25, 7 pm. Take a 60-minute ghostly walking tour of
Lyons. Wayne County Courthouse, Church Street, Lyons, 315-
946-4943, www.waynehistory.org
Get to Know Your Neighbor Picnic - Autumn on
the Erie at Canal Lock 30: October 4, 8 am. Pancake
breakfast, chicken BBQ, apple pie contest, live music, kids
events, hayrides, vendors. Bring a dish to pass and your
drinks. Tableware provided. Macedon Canal Park.
Family Fun Day at Morgan Farms: Saturday, October 11,
10 am-2 pm. Guided walks thru the orchard, wagon rides,
pony rides, alpacas, bin maze, bounce house, samplings
and other fun! Picnic foods available, u-pick apples and
pumpkins. Free. 3821 Cory Corners Road, Marion, 315-926-
0910, www. morgansfarmmarket.com.
Candlelight Cemetery Tours: October 10 & 11, two
tours each night 7 and 8 pm. Sponsored by the Williamson-
Pultneyville Historical Society. Come and enjoy actors
in period costume portray citizens from the past. After
the tour, enjoy cider and donuts in Gates Hall. Lakeview
Cemetery, Pultneyville. www.w-phs.org.
Witches Night Out Charity Fundraiser: October 16.
Calling all witches near and far! Help support a great cause
and enjoy a night out for just the ladies. Enjoy refreshments
and wine, music and vendors. Tickets required. 6-9pm. Long
Acre Farms, 1342 Eddy Road, Macedon. www.longacrefarms.
com.
Pumpkin Palooza Family Fall Festival: October 18, 11
am-6 pm. Contests, crafts, food vendors and activities. The
Great Pearl Street Pumpkin Roll and the Zombie Walk.
Village Square, Lyons.
34th Annual Harvest Festival & Auction: October 18.
Childrens games, silent auction, chicken BBQ, live auction,
dessert tea room, attic treasures and farmers market. East
Palmyra Christian School, 2023 East Palmyra-Port Gibson
Road, Palmyra, www.eastpalmyrachristianschool.com
Harvest Moon Festival: October 18, 1-4 pm. Pony rides,
bounce house, petting zoo, crafts, music, beer tastings,
chili contest and more. Ginegaw Park, 3600 Lorraine Drive,
Walworth.
Haunted Jail & Cellblock Terror: October 24 & 25,
6-9 pm. Scary Halloween attraction, refreshments.
Wayne County Museum, 21 Butternut Street, Lyons, www.
waynehistory.org
Visit www.waynecountytourism.com or
www.fngerlakes.org for even more
fun and interesting area events!
area events...
PAGE 12 FALL GuidE 2014 PAGE 13 FALL GuidE 2014
Haunted with the thought of a ho-hum Halloween? Never fear trick-or-treaters will
want more than just candy once they see your party table. Throw a fabulous Halloween
party ft for little goblins or grown-up monsters with some devilishly good sweets. Try
these easy party ideas from Wilton to make your Halloween spook-tacular:
Add some pop to popcorn: Trick out ordinary popcorn into a sweet-and-salty party
pleaser. Drizzle on candy melts for festive favors, and then capture the Halloween spirit
by adding fun sprinkle mixes.
Masquerade cookies: Who says you cant play with your food? Create edible masks
with decorated shaped cookies and attach them to cookie sticks with melted candy
melts. Set up a photo station at your party, so guests can take pictures with their cookie
mask creations before eating them.
Jack-o-lantern cakes: It wouldnt be Halloween without carved pumpkins. Make
yours edible by baking a delicious pumpkin spice pound cake shaped like a pumpkin.
Increase the fun by adding silly icing facial features.
Midnight potions: Spice up the night with candy corn drinks served in containers
guests can devour, making cleanup easy and delicious. Or, toast the night with the
Witchs Brew Mocktail.
Masquerade Cookies
2 3/4 cups all-purpose our
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, softened
1 1/2 cups granulated sugar
1 egg
1 1/2 teaspoons Imitation Clear Vanilla Extract
1/2 teaspoon Imitation Almond Extract
Royal icing
Orange, Black, Green, Lemon Yellow, Brown and Violet Icing Colors, as desired
Orange, Yellow, Orange, Lavender and Black Colored Sugars, as desired
Halloween Jimmies, Nonpareils and Icing Decorations, as desired
Candy Melts
Cookie sticks
Preheat oven to 350F. In large bowl, mix four, baking powder and salt. In second large
bowl, beat butter and sugar with electric mixer until light and fufy. Beat in egg and
extracts. Add four mixture to butter mixture 1 cup at a time, mixing after each addition.
Do not chill dough. Divide dough into 2 balls.
On foured surface, roll each ball into a circle approximately 12 inches in diameter by 1/8
inch thick. Dip eye and glasses cookie cutters in four before each use. Arrange cookies
on ungreased cookie sheet.
Bake 8-11 minutes or until cookies are lightly browned. Cool completely on cooling
grid. Decorate as desired using tinted royal icing, colored sugars and Halloween icing
decorations. Use melted candy to attach sticks to backs of cookies; chill until set. Makes
2 dozen cookies.
Pumpkin Spice Popcorn
6 cups popped kettle corn
2 cups mini pretzel twists
1 package (10 ounces) Pumpkin Spice Candy Melts candy
1 bottle (2.5 ounces) Pumpkin Mix Sprinkles
Spread popcorn and pretzels on parchment paper-lined cookie sheet. In disposable
decorating bag, melt candy in microwave at 50 percent power for 1 minute; remove
bag and knead. Continue melting candy for 30-second intervals at 50 percent power until
completely melted. Snip of end of bag and drizzle melted candy over popcorn mixture;
immediately add sprinkles. Let stand until candy has hardened, about 20 minutes. Break into
pieces to serve. Makes 6 cups.
Caramel Apple Popcorn
6 cups popped popcorn, buttered and salted
3/4 cup roasted salted peanuts
1 package (10 ounces) Caramel Apple Candy Melts
1 bottle (2.5 ounces) Spider Mix Sprinkles
Spread popcorn and peanuts on parchment paper-lined cookie sheet. In disposable
decorating bag, melt candy in microwave at 50 percent power for 1 minute; remove bag and
knead. Continue melting candy for 30-second intervals at 50 percent power until completely
melted. Snip of end of bag and drizzle melted candy over popcorn. Immediately top with
sprinkles. Let stand until candy has hardened, about 20 minutes. Break into pieces to serve.
Makes 6 cups.
Pumpkin Pound Cake
3 cups all-purpose our
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 cups (2 sticks) butter, softened
2 cups granulated sugar
4 eggs
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1 1/4 cups canned 100 percent pumpkin (not pie lling)
Preheat oven to 325F. Prepare Dimensions Large Pumpkin Pan lightly with vegetable pan
spray with four. Place on baking sheet. In medium bowl, combine four, baking powder,
cinnamon, salt and nutmeg. In large bowl, beat butter and sugar with electric mixer until
light and fufy. Add eggs, one at a time, mixing well after each addition; beat in vanilla. Add
four mixture alternately with pumpkin; mix well. Pour batter into prepared pan. Bake 70-80
minutes or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. Cool 15 minutes in pan. Turn
onto cooling rack. Cool completely before serving. Serves 16.
Witchs Brew Mocktail
3 cups ginger ale, chilled
1 1/2 cups pineapple juice, chilled
1/3 cup sweetened lime juice, chilled
Green gel food color or green icing color (optional)
Black Colored Sugar
Gummy Eyeball Skewers
Continued on next page...
halloween party
brew up a frightfully fun
for ghoulish guests
of all ages
PAGE 12 FALL GuidE 2014 PAGE 13 FALL GuidE 2014
Haunted with the thought of a ho-hum Halloween? Never fear trick-or-treaters will
want more than just candy once they see your party table. Throw a fabulous Halloween
party ft for little goblins or grown-up monsters with some devilishly good sweets. Try
these easy party ideas from Wilton to make your Halloween spook-tacular:
Add some pop to popcorn: Trick out ordinary popcorn into a sweet-and-salty party
pleaser. Drizzle on candy melts for festive favors, and then capture the Halloween spirit
by adding fun sprinkle mixes.
Masquerade cookies: Who says you cant play with your food? Create edible masks
with decorated shaped cookies and attach them to cookie sticks with melted candy
melts. Set up a photo station at your party, so guests can take pictures with their cookie
mask creations before eating them.
Jack-o-lantern cakes: It wouldnt be Halloween without carved pumpkins. Make
yours edible by baking a delicious pumpkin spice pound cake shaped like a pumpkin.
Increase the fun by adding silly icing facial features.
Midnight potions: Spice up the night with candy corn drinks served in containers
guests can devour, making cleanup easy and delicious. Or, toast the night with the
Witchs Brew Mocktail.
Masquerade Cookies
2 3/4 cups all-purpose our
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, softened
1 1/2 cups granulated sugar
1 egg
1 1/2 teaspoons Imitation Clear Vanilla Extract
1/2 teaspoon Imitation Almond Extract
Royal icing
Orange, Black, Green, Lemon Yellow, Brown and Violet Icing Colors, as desired
Orange, Yellow, Orange, Lavender and Black Colored Sugars, as desired
Halloween Jimmies, Nonpareils and Icing Decorations, as desired
Candy Melts
Cookie sticks
Preheat oven to 350F. In large bowl, mix four, baking powder and salt. In second large
bowl, beat butter and sugar with electric mixer until light and fufy. Beat in egg and
extracts. Add four mixture to butter mixture 1 cup at a time, mixing after each addition.
Do not chill dough. Divide dough into 2 balls.
On foured surface, roll each ball into a circle approximately 12 inches in diameter by 1/8
inch thick. Dip eye and glasses cookie cutters in four before each use. Arrange cookies
on ungreased cookie sheet.
Bake 8-11 minutes or until cookies are lightly browned. Cool completely on cooling
grid. Decorate as desired using tinted royal icing, colored sugars and Halloween icing
decorations. Use melted candy to attach sticks to backs of cookies; chill until set. Makes
2 dozen cookies.
Pumpkin Spice Popcorn
6 cups popped kettle corn
2 cups mini pretzel twists
1 package (10 ounces) Pumpkin Spice Candy Melts candy
1 bottle (2.5 ounces) Pumpkin Mix Sprinkles
Spread popcorn and pretzels on parchment paper-lined cookie sheet. In disposable
decorating bag, melt candy in microwave at 50 percent power for 1 minute; remove
bag and knead. Continue melting candy for 30-second intervals at 50 percent power until
completely melted. Snip of end of bag and drizzle melted candy over popcorn mixture;
immediately add sprinkles. Let stand until candy has hardened, about 20 minutes. Break into
pieces to serve. Makes 6 cups.
Caramel Apple Popcorn
6 cups popped popcorn, buttered and salted
3/4 cup roasted salted peanuts
1 package (10 ounces) Caramel Apple Candy Melts
1 bottle (2.5 ounces) Spider Mix Sprinkles
Spread popcorn and peanuts on parchment paper-lined cookie sheet. In disposable
decorating bag, melt candy in microwave at 50 percent power for 1 minute; remove bag and
knead. Continue melting candy for 30-second intervals at 50 percent power until completely
melted. Snip of end of bag and drizzle melted candy over popcorn. Immediately top with
sprinkles. Let stand until candy has hardened, about 20 minutes. Break into pieces to serve.
Makes 6 cups.
Pumpkin Pound Cake
3 cups all-purpose our
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 cups (2 sticks) butter, softened
2 cups granulated sugar
4 eggs
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
1 1/4 cups canned 100 percent pumpkin (not pie lling)
Preheat oven to 325F. Prepare Dimensions Large Pumpkin Pan lightly with vegetable pan
spray with four. Place on baking sheet. In medium bowl, combine four, baking powder,
cinnamon, salt and nutmeg. In large bowl, beat butter and sugar with electric mixer until
light and fufy. Add eggs, one at a time, mixing well after each addition; beat in vanilla. Add
four mixture alternately with pumpkin; mix well. Pour batter into prepared pan. Bake 70-80
minutes or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. Cool 15 minutes in pan. Turn
onto cooling rack. Cool completely before serving. Serves 16.
Witchs Brew Mocktail
3 cups ginger ale, chilled
1 1/2 cups pineapple juice, chilled
1/3 cup sweetened lime juice, chilled
Green gel food color or green icing color (optional)
Black Colored Sugar
Gummy Eyeball Skewers
Continued on next page...
halloween party
brew up a frightfully fun
for ghoulish guests
of all ages
PAGE 14 FALL GuidE 2014
Continued from previous page...
In large pitcher, combine ginger ale, pineapple juice, sweetened lime juice and, if using, gel
food color. To prepare glasses, dip rims of martini glasses in water, then in black sugar. Fill
with drink mixture; add eyeball skewers. Serves 6.
Candy Corn Drinks
1 cup (half of 12-ounce package) Bright White Candy Melts,
melted according to package directions
1 cup (half of 12-ounce package) Orange Candy Melts,
melted according to package directions
1 package (12 ounces) Yellow Candy Melts, melted according to package directions
Orange avored fruit drink, orange, peach or mango juice or other favorite drink
Fill disposable decorating bag with melted bright white candy. Divide evenly among
cavities of 8-cavity silicone shot glass mold, taking care to not get any candy on sides of
mold. Repeat process with orange and yellow candy. Refrigerate until candy is set, about
30 minutes. Carefully remove candy glasses from mold and set aside. Fill with orange drink.
Serves 8.
For more Halloween ideas and inspiration, visit wilton.com. [FAMILY FEATURES]
Spending a little too much time indoors these
days? If youre feeling cooped up, then theres no
doubt that your canine companion is feeling it as
well.
So what are you waiting for autumn is the
perfect time for you and your pup to get outside.
Check out some of these fun ways for you and
your dog to embrace the great outdoors!
Go hiking: Hiking is a great way to turn your
routine walk into an adventure! Just be sure to
check that dogs are allowed on the trails ahead
of time and ALWAYS bring plenty of extra water
for your pooch.
Take a road trip: What dog doesnt love cruising
down the highway with their best friend in the
drivers seat? There are plenty of dog-friendly
places all over the country so if youre planning on
taking a trip, make it a trip your pup can bark
home about! Be sure to pack some extra snacks
for Fido and never leave your dog in a hot car.
Have a BBQ: Get out there and grill! Gather
friends, both human and canine, to get the party
started. And, as youre fring up the grill, dont
forget a meaty dog treat for your four-legged
friends. Be sure to keep your furry friend away
from the hot grill!
Whether youre on top of a mountain or grilling
in the backyard, share your time with mans best
friend.
For more ideas on getting outside with your pup
please visit Pedigree.com. [FAMILY FEATURES]
embrace the outdoors
with your canine companion
PAGE 15 FALL GuidE 2014
PAGE 14 FALL GuidE 2014
Continued from previous page...
In large pitcher, combine ginger ale, pineapple juice, sweetened lime juice and, if using, gel
food color. To prepare glasses, dip rims of martini glasses in water, then in black sugar. Fill
with drink mixture; add eyeball skewers. Serves 6.
Candy Corn Drinks
1 cup (half of 12-ounce package) Bright White Candy Melts,
melted according to package directions
1 cup (half of 12-ounce package) Orange Candy Melts,
melted according to package directions
1 package (12 ounces) Yellow Candy Melts, melted according to package directions
Orange avored fruit drink, orange, peach or mango juice or other favorite drink
Fill disposable decorating bag with melted bright white candy. Divide evenly among
cavities of 8-cavity silicone shot glass mold, taking care to not get any candy on sides of
mold. Repeat process with orange and yellow candy. Refrigerate until candy is set, about
30 minutes. Carefully remove candy glasses from mold and set aside. Fill with orange drink.
Serves 8.
For more Halloween ideas and inspiration, visit wilton.com. [FAMILY FEATURES]
Spending a little too much time indoors these
days? If youre feeling cooped up, then theres no
doubt that your canine companion is feeling it as
well.
So what are you waiting for autumn is the
perfect time for you and your pup to get outside.
Check out some of these fun ways for you and
your dog to embrace the great outdoors!
Go hiking: Hiking is a great way to turn your
routine walk into an adventure! Just be sure to
check that dogs are allowed on the trails ahead
of time and ALWAYS bring plenty of extra water
for your pooch.
Take a road trip: What dog doesnt love cruising
down the highway with their best friend in the
drivers seat? There are plenty of dog-friendly
places all over the country so if youre planning on
taking a trip, make it a trip your pup can bark
home about! Be sure to pack some extra snacks
for Fido and never leave your dog in a hot car.
Have a BBQ: Get out there and grill! Gather
friends, both human and canine, to get the party
started. And, as youre fring up the grill, dont
forget a meaty dog treat for your four-legged
friends. Be sure to keep your furry friend away
from the hot grill!
Whether youre on top of a mountain or grilling
in the backyard, share your time with mans best
friend.
For more ideas on getting outside with your pup
please visit Pedigree.com. [FAMILY FEATURES]
embrace the outdoors
with your canine companion
PAGE 15 FALL GuidE 2014
PAGE 16 FALL GuidE 2014

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