Canal Days results, p3 and 4

Fort Jennings downs Lady Jeffcats
in soccer, p6

HERALD

DELPHOS
The

Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869

75¢ daily

www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Delphos, Ohio

Vol. 145 No. 72

Relay ’15 to bring change
BY NANCY SPENCER
DHI Media Editor
nspencer@delphosherald.com

DELPHOS — Change will usher in the 2015
Relay for Life of Delphos in June 2015. After
examining feedback in thousands of email surveys, the American Cancer Society is proposing
a restructuring of the human framework behind
the event as well as the length of the Relay.
“We collect all the surveys turned in after a
Relay event and compile the date and we’ve seen
some consistency in concerns and what worked
and what didn’t,” Relay for Life Specialist Jamie
Orozco said at Tuesday’s public forum at VFW
Post 3035. “ACS has offered some options for
Relays to make them better suited to their communities.”
Relays are now offered three options for the
length of the event including six hours, 12 hours
and 18-24 hours. Components of the Relays
must include the Opening Ceremony, Luminaria
and a Closing Ceremony.
Local Relay Committee mainstay Sandy
Suever shared comments she had heard.
“The feedback from survivors is great. They
are grateful for anything we do,” Suever said.

“The bulk of the comments from most people is
for a shorter Relay.”
Suever and Sue Apple started discussion on
how those in attendance felt about a change in
the length of the event. The pair noted a drop
in attendance in recent years after the 9 p.m.
Luminaria and slim attendance after midnight.
“Change is good sometimes,” Doris
Neumeier said. “Maybe change is what the
Relay needs.”
Suever noted attendance at the beginning of
the event has always been good and perhaps if
people knew it would only be occurring for a
short time, participation would increase.
“I hope we get more teams and more people
who just come out and experience Relay and
stay longer,” Suever said.
The date for the 2015 Relay is also under
consideration. For years after its inception, the
Relay was always the weekend of Father’s
Day. The event was moved to the third weekend in June several years ago due to Delphos
playing host to the Northwest Ohio Volunteers
Firefighters Association Annual Convention and
Meeting. The consensus on Tuesday was to try
and move the event back to the second weekend
in June.

Andy North, financial advisor from Edward Jones, gives an in-class financial
presentation to Jefferson Middle School’s seventh and eighth-grade math
students in Kristin Gable’s class Tuesday morning. North taught students
how to calculate their savings for the cost of college, inflation rates and
interest rates. (DHI Media/Stephanie Groves)

North takes lead in School Business Partnership
BY STEPHANIE GROVES
DHI Media Staff Writer
sgroves@delphosherald.com

DELPHOS — Jefferson’s new School
Business Partnership program — spawned

The Delphos Canal Commission Museum hosted a photo booth on Saturday of
Canal Days. Above are patrons enjoying a trip back in time. (Submitted photo)

Purse Bingo buys shoes and boots
INFORMATION SUBMITTED

DELPHOS — For more than 70 years,
Phi Delta Sorority members have dedicated their time to raise funds to support the
area needy children. The sorority’s major
fundraiser, the annual Purse Bingo, is set
Saturday at the Delphos Eagles Lodge.
Doors open at 5:30 p.m. with bingo at 7
p.m. The cost is $20 for 20 games.
In 1934 the sorority decided that a
Christmas charity project would be the
focus of their efforts. They would purchase shoes for the needy children at
Christmas time. Through the Delphos
Community Christmas Project, this charity continues. The women of Phi Delta
donate shoes and boots to needy children
between the ages of 5 and 12 years.
Initially, a Christmas dance and style
show helped raise funds. Other fundraisers have included poinsettia sales, raffles,
working concessions and most recently,

Sunny
today
and
clear
tonight. Highs
in the mid 70s.
Lows around
50. See page 2.

Index

Obituaries
State/Local
The Next Generation
Community
Sports
Business
Classifieds
Comics and Puzzles
World News

DELPHOS — The city
will join the Ohio Public
Entity Consortium Joint SelfInsurance Cooperative in an
effort to curtail rising insurance costs and fees association
with the Affordable Care Act.
Council voted unanimously
to suspend the rules and passed
the ordinance that will place
the city in the consortium with
nearly 250 other municipalities.
The city budgeted $457,000
for insurance for 2014 and preliminary numbers indicate the
OPEC-HC rates will come in
at approximately $420,000 for
2015.
“This is a way for the city
to keep control of the level of
benefits and be exempt from a
lot of fees associated with the
Affordable Care Act,” Megan
Toitch of OPEC-HC told
council. “We will work with
Medical Mutual, the city’s current provider, so that will stay
the same next year.”
Council heard on first read-

ing an ordinance to keep the
employee share of healthcare
costs the same as 2014. The
deducation schedule is:
Employee only — $24.46;
Employee/spouse

$48.64;
Employee/spouse/1 child
— $59.20;
Employee/spouse/2 children — $69.74;
Employee/spouse/3 or more
children — $83.40;
Employee/1 child —
$34.98;
Employee/2 children —
$45.54; and
Employee/3 or more children — $59.18.
Ordinances
concerning adjustments to water and
sewer billing were passed on
third reading. The ordinances
replace two policies currently
used to determine adjustments
to water and sewer bills.
Water adjustments will only
be for the present billing quarter and usage due to a leak
must exceed 200 percent of
the average of the user’s last
12 quarters (three years) and
no less than the highest usage
with the last 12 quarters. The
leak must occur between the

Purse Bingo. Last year’s bingo helped the
organization provide more than $5,000 in
footwear for area children, which exceeds
the amounts from past years, providing
more than 300 pairs of shoes and boots
for the Christmas Project. They also have
donated shoes at different times of the
year, if a need is presented.
The sorority has also provided the
public and parochial schools a $1,000 in
the last two years to each school for first
aid supplies.
Anyone interested in attending the
purse bingo may contact any sorority member, including Cheri Brinkman,
Kathy Buettner, Teena Ebbeskotte,
Karen Edelbrock, Angela Eickholt,
Tina Grothouse, Laura Hammons, Lori
Kramer, Jill Martz, Kristie McCormick,
Lynn Miller, Annette Ralston, Kathy
Rose, Ellen Suever, Mandy Wiltsie, Karen Phi Delta Sorority members show some of the designer
purses that will be won on Saturday during the annual
Youngpeter or Shifawn Youngpeter.
Purse Bingo at the Delphos Eagles. (Submitted photo).

Sidewalk improvements in store for Ottoville

Forecast

BY STEPHANIE GROVES
DHI Media Staff Writer
sgroves@delphosherald.com

2
3
4
5
6-8
9
10
11
10

OTTOVILLE — Ottoville Village Council members
approved moving forward with a plan to implement
new sidewalks down Route 66 from Sunset Drive to the
library during Monday night’s council meeting.
In August, council members agreed to ask the contractors who originally bid on the sidewalk construction
to re-bid the installment with the intent to install the
walkway as soon as possible and continue to prioritize
more sidewalk money for future sidewalk projects. All
agreed to hold a special meeting to discuss the immediate and future sidewalk plans.
Council member Tony Langhals said he received two
quotes for the sidewalk work. He said the meeting went
well and the ordinance was discussed as to what needs
to be addressed and future plans.
“We should go ahead with the plan,” Langhals said.
“Is there a precedent allowing council to assess the cost

See SCHOOL, page 12

City to see insurance savings
BY NANCY SPENCER
DHI Media Editor
nspencer@delphosherald.com

Canal Museum hosts photo booth

by the Straight A Grant — is a collaboration
between local businesses and schools offering students professional insight into many
facets of business.

on residents?”
Mayor Ron Miller said the ordinance was used to
remove old sidewalks — those in disrepair — and put
new ones in.
“It’s not necessary to put sidewalks on both sides
of the street,” Langhals said. “We will plan for future
implementations, school bus stops and so forth.”
Council member Randy Altenburger said if there
are walks on both sides of the street that need extreme
repair, they have to be addressed.
“Our decisions have to be consistent,” Altenburger
said.
Discussion turned to the ordinance’s language.
Council member Karen Hoerstman said she was confused by it.
“We’re charging the resident that will not get a sidewalk one-half the cost of the installation?” she asked.
Langhals said the residents would be sharing the cost
— 70 percent (35 percent each).
See SIDEWALKS, page 12

shutoff and the building.
Bills of $500 or more users
ask to be adjusted will be presented to council.
Sewer billing adjustments
will be granted for irrigation
systems, lawn watering and
filling swimming pools. For
irrigation systems, the resident
or business must install a 3/4inch tap (at the owner’s or
developer’s cost) with a separate meter for the purpose
of watering grass, sod and/or
shrubbery (landscaping areas).
There will be a quarterly service charge based on the current water rates with no sewer
service charged on that meter.
For lawn watering or filling
a pool, the residential property
owner will be required to use
a temporary meter that can
be obtained from the city utility office with a $50 deposit
that will be refunded when the
meter is returned and found to
be in working order. The usage
of the temporary meter will be
subtracted from the permanent
meter reading and the sewer
portion will be calculated and
adjusted accordingly.
See CITY, page 12

Wastewater,
administrator
top Elida agenda
BY STEVE COBURN-GRIFFS
DHI Media Correspondent
news@delphosherald.com

ELIDA – Members of Elida’s village council made short work of a
brief agenda at Tuesday’s meeting.
Citing concerns about forthcoming
federal legislation, Mayor Kim Hardy
requested council pass on emergency a
resolution allowing the village to enter
into a contract with the engineering
firm Jones and Henry, LLC. Hardy
explained that revisions to the Federal
Clean Water Act, scheduled to go into
effect on Oct. 1, could have a detrimental impact on the village’s plans
to improve its wastewater treatment
facility. Consequently, to avoid any
adverse regulations, Hardy stressed
the need to pass the final two readings
of the resolution in one sitting.
“If we don’t, I can almost guarantee you that it will be delayed,”
he said.
Council acceded to the request and
heard both readings and passed the
resolution without comment.
Hardy also advised council on
the village’s efforts to acquire a new
administrator. After receiving a veritable trove of applications, Hardy
said that he and Councilman Larry
Flick, through over 10 hours of personal interviews, had whittled the
candidate list down to four.
“I’m real enthusiastic and pleased
with what came in through the door,”
Hardy said. “At least we have the
interviews out of the way and we’re
down to the fine tuning.”
The next meeting is scheduled for
7:30 p.m. Oct. 14.

2 — The Herald

www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

For The Record
Prison records: 3 escaped inmates often in trouble
COLUMBUS (AP) — The three
inmates who briefly escaped from an
Ohio prison earlier this month, including a convicted school shooter, all had
numerous discipline problems behind
bars, according to newly released
records.
Lindsey Bruce, Clifford Opperud and
T.J. Lane, who shot and killed three
high school students in Chardon east of
Cleveland in 2012, were all disciplined
at one time or another for not following rules, according to records released
Tuesday and earlier this month.
Bruce and Opperud were cellmates,
Tuesday’s records revealed, and the day
after their Sept. 11 escape, a search of
their cell turned up a contraband TV.
All three were transferred from Allen
Oakwood Correctional Institution in
Lima to the so-called Supermax state
prison in Youngstown after being captured.
Opperud, 45, was disciplined in
2011 for being too close to a fence
at Oakwood Correctional Facility during recreation. Oakwood was a standalone prison at the time next to Allen
Correctional. Since then, it has been
closed, with a portion used for a protective control unit to house inmates at risk

of harm from other inmates.
Bruce, Opperud and Lane were all
housed in that unit. Officials say they
scaled a fence to cross the roof of an
entryway before escaping. Criminal and
administrative investigations are underway.
“Opperud waited until the rec officer
went inside then he went out of place
again towards the east fence,” said a July
8, 2011, report.
Opperud pleaded guilty to the administrative charge, saying without explanation, “I was amazed by the green
tomatoes.”
Opperud was disciplined in 2010 for
failing to report to his early morning
job in the dining area, with a note that
said, “This inmate has had several direct
orders in the past and keep refusing to
report.”
Opperud’s explanation was that he
didn’t go to work because he hadn’t
gone to breakfast.
At the time of the escape, Opperud
was incarcerated on charges of robbery,
burglary and kidnapping out of Warren
County in southwestern Ohio.
In February, Bruce, 33, was disciplined for being in a shower area when
he was supposed to be in his cell. The

report noted, “This inmate appears to
always be out of his cell after nine pm.”
Bruce did not provide a defense, records
show.
Bruce was also disciplined for fighting, and assaulting an inmate, and for
disobeying guards’ orders, the records
show.
In 2009, he was disciplined for
having records pertaining to his case,
including a photo of the skull of the
5-year-old girl he was convicted of killing in Franklin County, in violation of
prison rules. “I did not know that we
could not keep them,” Bruce said in his
defense, according to the report.
Earlier reports show Lane, 20, was
frequently disciplined, including citations for refusing to participate in education classes, having marijuana in his
system and giving himself three tattoos.
All three were recaptured within
hours of their Sept. 11 escape.
The state announced Tuesday it will
pay corrections consultants $50,000 for
their review of security following the
escape.
The contract with the Association of
State Correctional Administrators will
examine all aspects of the unit where the
three inmates were housed.

FROM THE ARCHIVES
One Year Ago
Delphos native Brother
Nicholas (Eugene) Renner,
C.PP.S., is the recipient of the
2013 Archbishop Edwin O’Hara
Advocacy Award for Rural
Ministry from the National
Catholic Rural Life Conference.
The award recognizes Brother
Nick’s lifetime of work in soil
and water conservation.
25 Years Ago – 1989
It was knock downdrag out football game at
McGuffey Friday night as
the game between Jefferson
and Upper Scioto Valley was
stopped with 16 seconds
left after a bench-clearing
brawl broke out. The brawl
occurred on the kickoff following Jefferson’s final
touchdown. Jefferson, leading 28-13 when officials
called the game, goes to
3-2 overall and 3-0 in the
Northwest Conference.
Thirty
members
of
Landeck Catholic Ladies of
Columbia Council 84 attended a potluck meal followed
by a meeting. The date for
the trip to Bear Creek Farms
was changed to Oct. 15. The

turkey will be 5 p.m. Nov.
12 with the meal catered
by Jim’s Restaurant. Velma
Wehri and Gert Ernst each
won $6 in the 50/50 drawing. Rosalia Kill and Ethel
Schwinnen won prizes made
by Janet Siefker.
St. John’s made certain from
the first offensive play that
Hilltop didn’t give them a scare
like last year. Senior quarterback Greg Klausing hooked up
with sophomore tight end Jason
Rabe for a 64-yard strike on the
game’s first play and the Blue
Jays built a 30-0 lead en route
to a 50-12 rout of Hilltop Friday
before a homecoming crowd at
Stadium Park.
50 Years Ago – 1964
Edward Clark was elected president of the Delphos
Kiwanis Club at a meeting
held at the House of Vogts
Tuesday evening. Other
officers elected were: Bob
Schmit, vice president and
Dick Corron, treasurer. The
directors of the club are
Edgar Van Autreve, Gene
Schmersal, Don Imber, Bill
Mansfield, Gerry Fischer,
Dick Vogt and Harry Crede.

Trivia

Answers to Monday’s questions:
By 1940, when the Oscars ceremony was only a
dozen years old, character actor Walter Brennan (18941974) had already won three Best Supporting Actor
awards for his performances in Come and Get It (1936),
Kentucky (1938) and The Westerner (1940).
The names of the original seven astronauts in the
American space program are M. Scott Carpenter, L.
Gordon Cooper Jr., John H. Glenn Jr., Virgil I. Grisson,
Walter M. Schirra Jr., Alan B. Shepard Jr. and Donald
K. Slayton.
Today’s questions:
What is the closing line of “A Tale of Two Cities?”
What three words in the English language end in
gry?
Answers in Thursday’s Herald.
Today’s joke:
“Cash, check or charge?” the cashier asked after
folding items the woman wished to purchase. As the
woman fumbled for her wallet, the cashier noticed a
remote control for a television set in her purse.
“Do you always carry your TV remote?” the
cashier asked.
“No,” she replied. “But my husband refused to
come shopping with me, so I figured this was the most
evil thing I could do to him.”

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75 Years Ago – 1939
The Delphos Lilies wiltIn Daisies
the Deli
ed the Delphos
in a
baseball game played Sunday
afternoon at city field. The

Jacob E. Guy
OTTOVILLE — Jacob E.
Guy, 17, of Ottoville died as
the result of an automobile
accident Monday.
A funeral service will
be held 11 a.m. Saturday at
Shawnee Alliance Church,
4455 Shawnee Road, Lima.
Visitation will be 2-4 p.m.
and 5-8 p.m. on Friday at
Love-Heitmeyer
Funeral
Home, Jackson Township,
16085 State Route 634, Fort
Jennings, and one hour prior
to the service at the church on
Saturday.
Further arrangements are
under the direction of LoveHeitmeyer Funeral Home,
Jackson Township.
Condolences can be
expressed at lovefuneralhome.com.

Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary,
general manager
Delphos Herald, Inc.
Lori Goodwin Silette,
circulation manager
The
Delphos
Herald
(USPS 1525 8000) is published
daily except Sundays, Tuesdays
and Holidays.
The Delphos Herald is delivered by carrier in Delphos for
$1.82 per week. Same day
delivery outside of Delphos is
done through the post office
for Allen, Van Wert or Putnam
Counties. Delivery outside of
these counties is $117 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.
405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE DELPHOS HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833

FUNERAL

Sale s

MCGUE, Mary Louise
(Mueller), her friends are
score was 7 to 5 in a seven- invited to share a celebrainning contest. The Daisies tion of Mary Lou’s life from
lost their petals, it is stated, 5-7 p.m. Oct. 16 at the Lima
because some of their players Holiday Inn or at 4:30 p.m.
were out of the city. Noonan Oct. 18 in Traverse City,
Wheat
$4.50
and Kohlhorst pitched for Michigan, at the Unitarian
Corn
$3.16
the Daisies and O. Erickson Universalist Congregation.
Soybeans
$8.96
hurled for the Lilies.
Memorials in her honor
The first meeting of the should be directed to the
year of the Home Guards of Grand Traverse County Comthe Methodist Church was mission on Aging (520 W.
held at the home of their leadCLEVELAND (AP) —
er, Mrs. Thomas B. Snow, Front St., Suite B, Traverse
City,
49686).
These
Ohio lotteries were
on Saturday afternoon. The
drawn Tuesday:
elections of officers was held
Mega Millions
with the following results:
21-24-25-40-43, Mega
Dorothy Burgess, president;
Ball: 12
Helen Heiss, vice president;Save up to $1.81
Megaplier
Beth Rose Kiggins, secretary;
Janet Thomas, pianist; Betty WEATHER FORECAST
5
Tri-County
Rinard, chorister; Dorothy
Pick 3 Evening
Associated Press
Allemeier, assistant choris3-5-6
ter; Maryella Currey, mitebox
Pick 3 Midday
varieties Sunny. Highs
TODAY:
secretary; Evelyn Truesdale,selected
1-1-8
secretary of publications; and in the mid 70s. East winds
Pick 4 Evening
Jeanette Allemeier, chairman around 10 mph.
3-2-6-9
of membership committee.
TONIGHT: Clear. Lows
Pick 4 Midday
Middle Point defeated around 50. Southeast winds
1-9-9-7
Buckland Sunday afternoon around 10 mph.
Pick 5 Evening
at Middle Point by a score
THURSDAY:
Sunny.
0-4-4-6-3
of 7 to 6. Ringwald and Highs in the mid 70s. East
Pick 5 Midday
H. Pollock did the hurling winds around 10 mph.
4-7-4-9-6
duty for Middle Point. They
THURSDAY
NIGHT:
Powerball
24
oz.
allowed a total of eight runs Mostly clear. Lows in the
Estimated jackpot: $225M
and two errors were chalked lower 50s. East winds 5 to 10
Rolling Cash 5
up against their teammates. mph.
01-17-24-29-30
On Oct. 1, the Middle PointSave up to $3.00 lb.
FRIDAY: Mostly sunny.
Estimated
jackpot:
team will play the Van WertKretschmar
Highs in the mid 70s.
$175,000
Burts at Middle Point.
Virginia Brand

LOCAL GRAINS
LOTTERY

WEATHER

Arps or Dean’s

Cottage Cheese

1
$ 99
3
$ 99
1
$ 68

Post investigating fatal
accident on Monday morning
Honey Ham

INFORMATION SUBMITTED 95% Fatstruck
ditch,
a telephone pole. The
Free, NoaMSG,
Fillerand
or Gluten
vehicle partially overturned in the ditch
HOAGLIN TOWNSHIP – The Ohio and came back onto the roadway. lb.
The
State Highway Patrol’s Van Wert Post is vehicle traveled off the right side of the
investigating a fatal crash that occurred roadway and came to rest upright after
at approximately 7:58 a.m., Monday striking the ditchSave
a second
time.
up to $2.00
lb.
morning, on U.S. Route 224 near John
Niemeyer and a front seat passenYoh Road, in Van Wert County.
ger, Brandon J. Kimmet, 17, sustained
A 2001 Pontiac Grand Am, driven non-life threatening injuries and were
by Matthew S. Niemeyer, 18, of Fort transported to the Van Wert County
Jennings, was traveling westbound on Hospital by emergency squad. A left
U.S. Route 224. Niemeyer was nego- rear passenger, Christopher J. Mohr, 17,
tiating a curve in the roadway when was ejected from the vehicle and was air
he drove off the right side of the road, lifted to St. Rita’s Hospital, Lima, Ohio.

FreshMarket

A right rear passenger, Jacob E. Guy,
17, was also ejected from the vehicle.
Guy sustained fatal injuries as a Limit
result
4 - Add
of the crash and was pronounced dead
at the scene.
The Highway Patrol was assisted on scene by Scott Fire and EMS,
Van Wert Fire Department, Van Wert
County Sheriff’s Office, Lifeflight, and
Knippen’s Towing.
The crash remains under investigation. All occupants were not wearing
safety belts, which could have minimized injuries.

Sandwich Spread

In TODAY
the Deli IN HISTORY
Associated Press

Today is Wednesday, Sept. 24, the 267th day of 2014.
There are 98 days left in the year. The Jewish New Year, Rosh
Hashanah, begins at sunset.
Today’s Highlight in History:
On Sept. 24, 1789, President George Washington signed a
Judiciary Act establishing America’s federal court system and
creating the post of attorney general.
On this date:
In 1869, thousands of businessmen were ruined in a Wall
Street panic known as “Black Friday” after financiers Jay
Save $3.42
on attempted
2
Gould and James
Fisk
to corner the gold market.
In 1890, the president of the Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter-Day Saints, Wilford Woodruff, wrote a manifesto
renouncing the practice of polygamy.
In 1929, Lt. James H. Doolittle guided a Consolidated

1

$
28
Potato Chips
Seyfert’s

8.5-9 oz.

Limitall-3 - Add
lb. over Mitchel Field in New York in the first
NY-2 Biplane
instrument flight.
In 1934, Babe Ruth made his farewell appearance as a player with the New York Yankees in a game against the Boston
Save up to $1.00
Red Sox. (The Sox won, 5-0.)
In 1948, Mildred Gillars, accused of being Nazi wartime radio propagandist “Axis Sally,” pleaded not guilty in
Washington, D.C. to charges of treason. (Gillars, later convicted, ended up serving 12 years in prison.)
In 1955, President Dwight D. Eisenhower suffered a heart
attack while on vacation in Denver.
In 1957, the Los Angeles-bound Brooklyn Dodgers played their
last game at Ebbets Field, defeating the Pittsburgh Pirates 2-0.
$2 11 s
In 1960,
USSBakery
Enterprise, the first nuclear-poweredSSave
air-$2.11;
Inthethe
craft carrier, was launched at Newport News, Virginia. “The
Howdy
Iced orDoody
Lemon Show” ended a nearly 13-year run with its final
telecast on NBC.

Angelfood
Cake

Angelfood Cake

3

$ 29

2

$ 99
ea.

Super D

Ice C

Delphos Recreation Center Presents

Her
e, Pay
r
e
H
y
st Bu

.ea
www

New Cadette Girl Scout
troops will attend an organizational meeting Wednesday
evening in Scott Hall at the
City Building. Tuesday night
troop consists of: Mrs. Alfred
Odenweller, leader; Laura
Wulfhorst, assistant leader;
Mrs. Robert Arnoldi, Peggy
Gerdeman, Mrs. Alphonse
Miller and Mrs. Louis
Scherger, committeewomen. Wednesday night troop
– Alene Grothouse, leader;
Barbara Imber, assistant
leader; Marie Buettner, Mrs.
Richard Grone, Mrs. Arthur
Haehn and Mrs. Robert
Schmit, committeewomen.
Ella Huber Delphian
Study Club held its first
meeting of the 1964-65 season Monday evening in the
home of the president, Mrs.
George Helmkamp. Members
responded to roll call by
telling about their trips and
other summer activities. Mrs.
Robert Knapp, study leader,
presented the members programs for the year. Mrs. John
Metzger will be hostess for
the Oct. 5 meeting.

The Delphos
Herald

OBITUARY

Mel Westrich

Delphos Recreation Center

PBA 50 Tournament
Sept. 26-27-28

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Wednesday, September 24, 2014

www.delphosherald.com

The Herald –3

STATE/LOCAL

BRIEFS

SAFY’s Safe Harbor
Youth Shelter hosting
town hall meeting
INFORMATION
SUBMITTED
LIMA — Specialized
Alternatives for Families and
Youth (SAFY)’s Safe Harbor
Youth Shelter is hosting a
Town Hall meeting from 6-8
p.m. Thursday at the Market
Street Presbyterian Church,
1100 W. Market St., to discuss
funding of youth services in
the community.
Safe Harbor Youth Shelter
is a vital asset in the community,
providing shelter to runaway,
homeless and in-crisis youth.
Historically, Safe Harbor
has been funded through federal grants, operating funds
provided by SAFY, and other
tangible grant funding. Today,
the shelter is in need of financial and volunteer support in
order to maintain its presence
in the community.
SAFY’s Safe Harbor Youth
Shelter is West Central Ohio’s
only runaway and homeless
youth shelter. Designed for
youth ages 12 to 17, the shelter is a 10-bed home which
provides lodging, food and
clothing for up to 21 days. The
ultimate goal of Safe Harbor
is to reunify youth and their
families utilizing communitybased services.
If you or someone you
know needs assistance, please
call Safe Harbor at 419-2287233.

Suicide Awareness
and Prevention
Walk Saturday

Middle Point wins
Waterball Contest

The Middle Point Fire Department, above, won
the Canal Days Waterball Contest. Canal Days
Queen Katie Berelsman congratulates the team.
Fort Jennings Fire Department was second. (Submitted photo)

Canal Days Basket Bingo winners 2014 Canal Days Big
Ticket Drawing winners
Winners in the Canal Days Basket Bingo has been announced. Above: Linda
McClure, center, picks out her basket as Donna Berger and Diane Sterling congratulate her. Other winners were: Diane Wells Best, tire gift certificate; Diana
Feasby, lawn furniture; Judy Suever, pop-up tent and chairs; Sharon Fortener,
spa package; Jessica Hoersten, wine accessories and storage tote; Kaolin
Williams, Apple iPad Mini; Kelly Hubert, 32-inch flat screen TV; Marcy Ricker,
Sarka grill; Nik Horstman, Kuerug coffee maker; Jeannie Martin, Kindle Fire
HD7; Marissa Bowersock, Musana jewelry; Sandy Carder, Kitchen Aid mixer;
Jamie Pierce, fitness membership; Ruth Liebrecht, lawn mower; Linda McClure,
disc golf bag and discs; Natalie Mox, Delphos restaurant gift certificates; Betty
Tiernan, Dyson cordless vacuum; Tiffany Recker, his and her watches; Nancy
Schimmoeller, wine basket; and Cathy Lauf, designer purse and clutch. Alisha
Ostendorf was the winner of a weekend in Pigeon Forge, Tennessee, and Rayleen Fisher won the 50/50 drawing. (Submitted photo)

INFORMATION
SUBMITTED

INFORMATION
SUBMITTED

Rick Koch
Ben Norbeck
12th-31st Place — $25
The Canal Days Grand
Chris Looser
Prize Drawing winners have
George Berelsman
been announced. Checks are
Scott Gengler
available for pick up at the
Adam Blockberger
Delphos Area Chamber of
Brent Gable
Commerce Office. If they are
R.M. Grone
not picked up by Monday,
Pat Osburn
they will be mailed.
Mark Grothouse
First place — $1,000
Mark Wurst
R.M. Grone
Doug Milligan
Second Place — $500
Chuck Wannemacher
Clint Gable
Karen and Mike Edelbrock
Third Place — $100
Chuck
and
Tina
Laurie Culp
Wannemacher
Fourth-11th Place — $50
LouAnn Wiltsie
Carlene
HustonMary Youngpeter
Kinworthy
Fran Schuck
Linda L. Korte
Kelly Stevenson
Ron Culp
LouAnn Wiltsie
Jayne Swygart
Rocky Klaus
Dave Metzger
Carrie
and
Kayla
Columbus;Reliable
Plumbing & Heating;A00238;3.42x6
(14Fa-Early)
Elaine Suever
McNamara

The eighth annual Suicide
Awareness and Prevention
Walk will be held at 10 a.m.
on Saturday.
The events for that day include:
• A walk beginning and ending
at Coleman Behavioral Health,
799 S. Main St., Lima, traveling
down to the Square and back.
• Resource and information
tables on accessible local services
• Presentation on local
information
• Music by Bob Ulm
• T-Shirt sale
• Yellow balloon release
IT’S MORE THAN A WORD TO US.
• Brunch of breakfast and
pizza provided
IT’S OUR WORD TO YOU.
2013 data:
Allen County lost six indiLet us earn your trust
viduals, Auglaize County lost
today — call
six individuals and Hardin
Reliable Plumbing & Heating.
County lost three individuals.
Facts on Suicide:
• Most at risk: Middle age
white male
• Second-leading cause of
death among college students
RECEIVE
• Third-leading cause of
UP TO A
REBATE*
death in adolescents
with the purchase of a qualifying Lennox home comfort system.
• Fourth–leading cause of
OR
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• There are 50 to 200
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• Almost 7 percent of high
school students report making
a suicide attempt
• Over 16 percent of high
school students report suicidal Twenty teams competed in the annual Canal Days Battle of the Businesses on
Friday. Above: Rene Mueller on the Downtown Fitness team attempts to scoop
thoughts
a spoonful of beans in “Don’t Spill the Beans.” Here is the complete list of the
teams and the points they accumulated during the games: Union Bank — 176;
419-695-2921
Lavish Salon & Spa — 152; Patel Party Shop — 131; St Rita’s Delphos Ambulawww.reliablePandH.com
205 West Second St.
tory Care — 130; Unverferth Manufacturing — 130; Sidney Electric — 129; VanDelphos, OH 45833
crest 121; Toledo Molding & Die 1 — 114; First Federal Bank — 113; Downtown
Our name says it all
Fitness — 111; Toledo Molding & Die 3 — 110; K & M Tire — 109; Toledo Molding
OH Lic #24196
OFFER
EXPIRES
11/28/2014.
& Die 2 — 109; Lakeview Farms 2 — 108; Toledo Molding & Die 4 — 102; Kiwan*System rebate offers range from $300 to $1,700. See your local Lennox dealer for details.
© 2014 Lennox Industries Inc. Lennox dealers include independently owned and operated businesses.
is — 101; Delphos Pizza Hut — 93; Lakeview Farms #1 — 88; Crouse Lumber/
One offer available per qualifying purchase.
TOLEDO (AP) — The Hines Flooring 86; and Westrich Furniture — 71. (DHI Media/Nancy Spencer)
likelihood of another algae
outbreak this year on Lake
Erie with the potential to contaminate drinking water is
winding down.
Algae on the lake will stick
Dealer-Trust-14Fa-Early.indd 44
around into October, but the
threat of a large harmful algae
bloom developing again this
year appears to be over, said
Jeff Reutter, director of the
Ohio Sea Grant Program, which
studies water quality issues.
“I don’t think we’re going
to see anything significant,”
Did you know that your
he said Monday at a meeting
of the Ohio Farmers Union in
child should have his or her
Toledo.
first dental exam by age 1?
Residents who get their
CALL TODAY TO
drinking water from western
SCHEDULE YOUR
Lake Erie have been keepCHILD’S APPOINTMENT
ing a close watch on the algae
since early August when toxWITH A GENTLE AND
ins produced by blue-green
Dr. Jacob Mohr
CARING DENTIST.
algae fouled the water supply
*Age 17 and under. Does not include prophy or x-rays. General Dentist
for 400,000 people in northwestern Ohio and southeastNEW PATIENTS ARE ALWAYS WELCOME!
ern Michigan. Toledo, Ohio’s
Open Mon-Wed-Thurs 8-5,
fourth-largest city, was forced
Fri 8-11
to issue a do-not-drink advisory
Call for appointment
for a little more than two days.
About four weeks later,
some residents of a small
Canadian island were warned
not to use their well water
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8/6/14

4 – The Herald

www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

The Next Generation

UNOH named ‘Military
Friendly School’ for 2015
INFORMATION SUBMITTED

Canal Days names Chalk Art winners
Canal
Days
has
announced the winners in
the Chalk Art Contest.
Mini Division
Emily Dienstberger

Kylee Dienstberger
Emma Mueller
Noel Warnement
Livy Carpenter

Lily Smith
Jr. Division #2
Audrey North
Lauren Mox
Courtney Teman
Sydnie McGue

Jr Division #1

Lichtensteiger earns Eagle Scout
INFORMATION SUBMITTED
VAN WERT — Van Wert Lodge No. 1197, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks participated in the Eagle Scout Court of Honor for Travis B. Lichtensteiger on Sunday. Travis is
a member of Boy Scout Troop #45, sponsored by the St. Thomas Lutheran Church in Convoy.
For his Eagle Project, Lichtensteiger planned and built a wooden hand-powered Transport
Raft at Camp Clay.
Lichtensteiger was presented an American Flag and an Eagle Scout Certificate from the
Elks. He also received a letter of commendation and a special citation from John Amen, Grand
Exalted Ruler/National President.
Representing the Van Wert Lodge at the ceremony was Michael C. Stanley, Lodge Secretary,
and Linda J. Stanley, Past Exalted Ruler.

UNOH hosts Amsoil Engine Masters Challenge
LIMA — The 2014 Amsoil
Engine Masters Challenge
will be held at the University
of Northwestern Ohio’s High
Performance Motorsports
Complex located at 1744
Hartzler Road, Lima, Oct.
6-10.
The University has proved
to be an ideal setting for the
Engine Masters Challenge
and UNOH is proud to
host the event for an eighth
straight year.
Assisting with the competition will be the faculty from
UNOH’s High Performance

Department including division heads, Randy Lucius and
Paul Higgins; and 40 students
from the university’s College
of Applied Technologies program.
This is the largest, most
renowned, dyno racing event
in the world and the 2014
competition is bound to be
better than ever. This competition has been likened to
the “Super Bowl of Engine
Building”.
This year the competition sticks with the one-class
format rules that make the
competitors build engines
that would be at home in any
muscle car cruising the streets

around the country. Despite
the restrictions placed on the
builders by the rules committee, a ton of horsepower
will still be on display as
one of the rules states the
engines must have at least
400 cubic inches of displacement. The size of the engines
is not the only thing that has
been increased this year; the
“King of the Dyno” will grab
a record $73,500 in prize
money for his or her efforts.
The
University
of
Northwestern Ohio is the
only High Performance/
Motorsports University to
ever host the Challenge. The
Challenge puts more than 40
talented engine builders in
one place to see who can
build the most powerful
engine. After a series of dyno
tests that measure torque and
horsepower, the top engine
builder is ultimately crowned
2014 AMSOIL Engine
Master.
For complete details on
rules and competitive scoring, visit www.enginemasters.com.

UNOH names summer dean’s list
INFORMATION
SUBMITTED
LIMA — The University
of Northwestern Ohio is
proud to acknowledge
its President’s List for
Summer Quarter 2014 for
students in the College of
Business.
The following part-time
students received a grade
point average of 4.0:
Delphos
Adam Taggi
Elida
Bethany Fricke
Brandon Patrick
Venedocia
Christina Young
The
university
has
acknowledged its President’s
List for students in the
College of Occupational
Professions. The following
full-time students received a
grade point average of 4.0:
Elida
Jessica Boden
Chad Rummel
The
university
has
announced its Dean’s List

for students in the College
of Business. The following
part-time students received a
grade point average of 3.5 or
better:
Delphos
Ann Kohorst
Ottoville
Seth Bendele
The
university
has
acknowledged its Dean’s List
for students in the College
of Business. The following
full-time students received a
grade point average of 3.5 or
better:
Delphos
Amy Grothouse
Diana Hitchcock
Kevin Siefker
Katelen Storm
Fort Jennings
Morgan Schroeder
Nicole Holcomb
Ottoville
James Rhodes
The
university
has
acknowledged its Dean’s
List for students in
the College of Health
Professions. The following
part-time students received

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LIMA — After exhaustive research and
compiling survey results and other data that
started last May during which G.I. Jobs
polled more than 12,000 schools nationwide, G.I. Jobs has named the University
of Northwestern Ohio a “Military Friendly
School” for 2015. This honor ranks UNOH
in the top 15 percent of all colleges, universities and trade schools nationwide. This is the
sixth consecutive year that the University of
Northwestern Ohio has received
this distinction.
The Military Friendly
Schools designation is awarded
to universities and trade schools
in the country that are doing the most to
embrace military students, and to dedicate
resources to ensure their success in the classroom and after graduation. The methodology
used for making the Military Friendly School
list has changed the student veteran landscape
to one much more transparent, and has played
a significant role over the past six years in
capturing and advancing best practices to
support military students across the country.
The UNOH Military Relations Department
started in 2001. The department provides a
one-stop shop to all military, veterans, and
spouses, and assists with scheduling, financial
aid, counseling, and customer service. About
40 percent of UNOH military students utilize
the university’s online learning options which
can be accessed from anywhere in the world.
The University has always been proud to
be a strong supporter of all servicemen and
women. Randy Gonzalez, UNOH Director
of Enrollment Advising, and Randy Gasser,
UNOH Military Relations Coordinator, are
both retired veterans and work with all branches of the United States Armed Forces assisting them with the enrollment process toward
their chosen career path. According to Dr.
Jeffrey A. Jarvis, President of the University
of Northwestern Ohio, “Being nationally recognized again as a Military Friendly School
is a fantastic honor. We are proud of our decision in January 2009 to lower tuition below
the Federal Tuition Assistance (TA) rate. We
maintain that lowered tuition rate to this day.

“Higher education is now affordable and
available to all the young men and women
who serve our country. All active duty military, Guard and Reserve, Veterans, along with
their spouses and dependents, are eligible for
the UNOH Military tuition rate and/or the
UNOH Military Scholarship. We want to do
everything we can to help servicemen and
women better their lives through education.”
UNOH has many university leaders and
employees who have also served their country.
Because of this, UNOH offers an understanding of the time commitment
and the dedication that every
soldier must give to serve.
UNOH, from the President to
each and every employee, is
dedicated to helping veterans, as well as
active service members, spouses, and their
dependents.
UNOH is a member of SOC Consortium,
Military Spouse Career Advancement
Account Program, GoArmyEd and Virtual
Army. UNOH accepts military transcripts
(AARTS, SMART, etc.) and honors credit equivalencies defined by the American
Council on Education (ACE) for military
course work, experience, and testing programs such as CLEP and DANTES. UNOH
also has an on-campus military support group
Operation H.U.M.V.E.E which stands for
Helping Understand Men & Women Veterans
Entering into Education and a UNOH Chapter
of the Student Veterans of America (SVA).
The American Legion, the nation’s largest wartime veterans’ organization, declared
the University of Northwestern Ohio as an
“Education Partner of the American Legion,”
and offers $20,000 per year in scholarship
monies for surviving children or grandchildren of a United States Armed Forces member
who died as a result of hostile action (KIA)
or who is officially listed as missing in action
(MIA). Scholarships are need-based and will
be placed in the UNOH Scholarship Fund
prior to the award of that year’s scholarship
award winners.
For more information about how UNOH
works with military veterans and their spouses
and dependents, visit: www.unoh.edu/offices/
military/index.shtml.

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a grade point average of 3.5
or better:
Delphos
Garth Lucius
The university has
announced its Dean’s List
for Summer Quarter 2014
for students in the College
of Health Professions.
The following full-time
students received a grade
point average of 3.5 or
better:
Delphos
Abby Violet
Katy Wagner
The
university
has
acknowledged its Dean’s
List for students in the
College of Occupational
Professions. The following
full-time students received
a grade point average of 3.5
or better:
Delphos
Whitney Miller
Elida
Haley Calvelage
Fort Jennings
Macy Schroeder
Middle Point
Kathryn Ringwald

BGSU announces
summer dean’s list
INFORMATION
SUBMITTED
BOWLING
GREEN
— Bowling Green State
University has announced the
undergraduate students who
have been named to the summer semester Dean’s List for
achieving grade point averages of 3.5 or better on a 4.0
scale.
To be chosen for the Dean’s
List, undergraduate students
must carry no fewer than 12
letter-graded credit hours per
semester.
Area students on the list
include:
Delphos
Alyssa Berelsman
Cloverdale
Neil Gerding

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Delphos Herald
on Facebook.

www.delphosherald.com

LANDMARK

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

COMMUNITY

Memories of loved
ones flavor the week
BY LOVINA EICHER

Delphos St. John
Elementary School

CALENDAR OF
EVENTS

TODAY
9 a.m. - noon — Putnam
County Museum is open, 202
E. Main St. Kalida.
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. — The
Delphos Museum of Postal
History, 339 N. Main St., is
open.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff St.
Noon — Rotary Club
meets at The Grind.
6 p.m. — Shepherds of
Christ Associates meet in the
St. John’s Chapel.
7 p.m. — Bingo at St.
John’s Little Theatre.
THURSDAY
9-11 a.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. — The
Delphos Museum of Postal
History, 339 N. Main St., is
open.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff St.
3-7 p.m. — The Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for shopping.
7:30 p.m. — American
Legion Post 268, 415 N. State
St.
FRIDAY
7:30 a.m. — Delphos
Optimist Club, A&W DriveIn, 924 E. Fifth St.
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. — The
Delphos Museum of Postal
History, 339 N. Main St., is
open.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff St.
1-4 p.m. — Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for shopping.
SATURDAY
9 a.m.-noon — Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for shopping.
St. Vincent dePaul Society,
located at the east edge of the
St. John’s High School parking lot, is open.
10 a.m. to 2 p.m. —
Delphos Postal Museum is
open.
12:15 p.m. — Testing of
warning sirens by Delphos
Fire and Rescue.
1-3 p.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
7 p.m. — Bingo at St.
John’s Little Theatre.
SUNDAY
1-3 p.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
1-4 p.m. — Putnam
County Museum is open, 202
E. Main St. Kalida.
1:30 p.m. — Amvets Post
698 Auxiliary meets at the
Amvets post in Middle Point.

It’s a little after 7 a.m. As I look out
toward the east, it looks like it will be a
beautiful day. The red glow of the sun is
beaming over the trees. What a sight to
behold. And only our Master Artist can create such wonderful art.
The four youngest children left a few
minutes ago for school. My husband, Joe,
daughters Elizabeth and Susan, and son
Benjamin are all at work. Daughter Verena
and I are alone now through the day. I am
so glad for Verena’s help with laundry,
gardening, cooking, and cleaning—and the
list goes on. Seems like it doesn’t take long
for laundry to accumulate with ten people
in the family!
Today is Sept. 17—a day that brings
sad memories of the passing of my dear
mother, Elizabeth Coblentz. It has now
been twelve years since she so suddenly
left us. Memories—that is all we have
left now. She was a great mother and will
remain in our hearts forever! How often I
would love to talk to her and share the joys
and sorrows of my family with her. God
has a reason for everything, so let me leave
it in His hands.
I can only imagine the busy week sister
Liz is having. Her oldest daughter’s wedding is this Friday. Daughter Verena and
I will travel on Thursday, with some of
our relatives, to help bake pies and help
with whatever has to be done for the wedding. We leave at 4:30 a.m. Thursday. We
will travel the two hours back home again
Thursday evening, and then our whole
family will start out at 5 a.m. Friday morning for the wedding. Timothy and Mose,
friends of Elizabeth and Susan, will also be
going with us.
Elizabeth and Timothy and Verena’s
clothes are all sewn and ready for the wedding. I still need to sew my cape and apron
today. My dress is finished, so it won’t take
too long.
Verena will bake 100 cookies to take
along for the wedding. We thought that
would be a way of helping sister Liz. Wish
we lived closer so that we could help her
more with the wedding preparations.
Our thoughts and prayers are with teacher Barbara Kay, 20, and her family. Barbara
Kay was in an accident not too far from
here, along with some other Amish teachers traveling to Indiana to teach school.
Barbara Kay was hurt the worst, and doctors think she will be paralyzed. God is
above all and can perform miracles. His
will is what we need to pray. I think this
was Barbara’s first year of teaching school.

Due to technical
issues , we will be
rebuilding our daily

BIRTHDAY
LIST!

If you have a birthday you
would like to submit to the
Delphos Herald for
our new updated list,
please email, call or mail to:
Delphos Herald
Attn: Nancy Spencer
405 N. Main St., Delphos
419-695-0015 ext. 134
nspencer@delphosherald.com

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Lovina Eicher is an Old Order Amish
writer, cook, wife and mother of eight.
Formerly writing as The Amish Cook,
Eicher inherited that column from her
mother, Elizabeth Coblentz, who wrote
from 1991 to 2002. Readers can contact
Eicher at PO Box 1689, South Holland,
IL 60473 (please include a self-addressed
stamped envelope for a reply) or at
LovinasAmishKitchen@MennoMedia.org.

Marion Baptist Church
to hold Fall Festival
INFORMATION SUBMITTED

Marion Baptist Church located on Defiance Trail will hold
its 2014 Fall Festival from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Oct. 4.
Join them for free food, fun and games.
For more information, call the church at 419-339-6319.

Happy
Birthday

.

.

.

Financial
Advisor
Financial
Advisor
1122 Elida
Avenue 1122
1122 Elida Avenue
advisor
today.
1122 Elida Avenue
Elida Avenue
.

.

.

.

Andy
North
419-695-0660

Delphos, OH 45833

Delphos, OH 45833
Corey
Norton
419-695-0660

.

.

Delphos,1122
OH 45833
Delphos, OH 45833
Delphos,
OH 45833
1122 Elida AvenueDelphos, OH 45833
Elida
Avenue
419-695-0660419-695-0660
419-695-0660419-695-0660

Financial Advisor

Financial Advisor

1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660

1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660

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The Amish van driver, Joe, was also hurt
and had a hospital stay. May God comfort
all of those who were involved in the accident. The community is having a bake sale
to help with hospital expenses for Barbara
Kay. Let us all pray that God will give her
strength to go on. How suddenly our lives
can be changed.
Timothy’s brother Alvin, Rhoda, and
family took brunch in to brother-in-law
Jacob, sister Emma, and family on Sunday
forenoon. They invited us to come also.
This was in memory of Marilyn, Jacob and
Emma’s youngest child; she would have
been five years old on Sunday. Marilyn
died at the sweet, innocent age of eightand-one-half months. She is missed dearly,
but God wanted another angel. Alvin and
Rhoda’s ten-month-old daughter, Clara,
passed away three years ago. The two
families can sympathize with each other.
I’m taking this peaches and cream coffee cake along tomorrow to sister Liz’s
house. I have one baking in the oven right
now, and it smells so good!
Peaches and Cream Coffee Cake
Batter:
2/3 cup flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 egg
1/2 cup milk
3 tablespoons melted butter
1 large can sliced peaches or 2 1/2 cups
fresh peaches, sweetened with a few tablespoons sugar
Cream Filling:
8 ounces cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup sugar
3 tablespoons reserved peach juice
Topping:
1 tablespoon sugar
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
Mix batter ingredients together for 2
minutes. Pour into a well-greased 8-inch
round or square pan. Drain peaches, reserving juice. Arrange peaches over batter.
Cream together filling ingredients and
spoon over peaches. Mix cinnamon and
sugar together. Sprinkle on top and bake at
350 degrees for 30–35 minutes.

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6 – The Herald

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

SPORTS

www.delphosherald.com

sweep Jefferson
Musketeers even mark in Lancers
in NWC volleyball
4-1 defeat of Lady Wildcats
By JIM METCALFE
DHI Media Sports Editor
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com

FORT JENNINGS — The Fort
Jennings girls soccer crew under mentor
Rodney Wagner has been a slow-starting
team early in the season but always
seems to start putting it together toward
the latter half.
Wagner hopes that Tuesday’s 4-1
victory over Jefferson on a gorgeous
afternoon at the Fort Jennings Athletic
Complex is that sign of things to come.
Jefferson head coach Josiah Stober
also hopes the last 55 minutes of the
matchup are also indicative of better
things to come.
“We didn’t come out ready
to play and it cost us. It took
us over half the first half to
wake up; falling behind four
goals was a wakeup call,”
Stober explained. “If we’d
have played the entire match
like the last 55 minutes, we can compete
with teams from the PCL. We’re trying
different things to motivate ther girls
right now; it’s later in the season and
their bodies are wearing down, so it’s
been a tough stretch for us. We just have
to be ready to play when we get off the
busevery match.”
Wagner felt this match was the best

his team has played overall all season.
“I sure hope this is our usual late-season run. The first half was probably our
best half of the season; we did everything we’ve been working on and found
the back of the net,” Wagner added. “We
played Bath — a strong team —
very well the other day, which is
a great sign. We had a little bit of
a letdown the second half; I didn’t
sub much, so I think we got a little
tired. Still, overall, I was pleased
with our total effort.”
The Lady Musketeers (4-4-3) controlled the orb for most of the first 25
minutes and built up a 4-0 edge.
They got on board at 30:55 on a
lead pass from sophomore Erin Eickholt
to junior Brandi Kaskel on the
left side; the latter did the rest.
As she neared the 18, Jefferson
junior keeper Jessica Pimpas (8
saves versus 12 shots on-goal)
hesitated just enough coming
off her line that Kaskel fired a
16-yarder from the left wing to the right
side for a 1-0 edge.
The Lady Wildcats (6-3-2) had a chance
for the tie at 28:23 when sophomore
Arianna Knebel maneuvered for a good
look from 16 yards outside the right post
but senior Jennings keeper Erin Osting (3
saves vs. 4 shots) deflected it away and a
defender kicked it out of danger.

The hosts nearly made it 2-0 at
27:16 when senior Alyssa Louth fired
a 25-yarder that hit the crossbar and
stayed in the field of play; on the follow, Eickholt and Jefferson junior Tasha
Shaeffer collided, with Schaeffer having
to leave the pitch due to injury. She
did return at the 37-minute mark of
the second half.
The Musketeers did make it 2-0
at 24:27. Junior Jordan Horstman
passed inside to senior Sarah
Chandler on the right wing; she
took a quick dribble or two and her
16-yarder found the left side.
They made it 3-0 at 21:10. Off a
throw-in from the right sideline, Kaskel
got possession and dribbled through the
Wildcat defense to the middle where she
fired a 12-yarder that slid through the
hands of Pimpas and into the twine.
Pimpas made a diving deflection of
a 22-yard free kick by senior Jenna
Calvelage but at 15:22, Kaskel found
Horstman on a cross from the left side
to the right post and she made good on a
14-yarder for the 4-0 edge.
The Wildcats answered back at 12:08.
Senior Kylee Haehn got in position to cross
the ball from the left wing to the middle,
where junior Logan Hamilton’s 10-yard
header found the net for a 4-1 scoreboard.
See MUSKETEERS, page 8

Rockets knock off somber Lady Green
By JIM METCALFE
DHI Media Sports Editor
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com

OTTOVILLE — It was
a somber mood inside L.W.
Heckman
Gymnasium
at Ottoville High School
Tuesday evening as the Big
Green faithful were mourning the death of student Jacob
Guy Monday morning.
The Lady Big Green volleyballers had to focus on
beating Putnam County
League foe Pandora-Gilboa
but in the end, the Rockets
prevailed 20-25, 25-23,
25-22, 25-15.
“It’s been a long week
already, especially the last
two days. We were supposed
to play last night but all our
sports teams decided to cancel; we didn’t even practice,” Ottoville coach Andi
Wertenberger
explained.
“There was a lot of emotions and thoughts the girls
had to deal with and I felt
they did a great job starting out tonight, playing really
well. I just think the emotions got to them in the end;
they were simply exhausted.
Unfortunately, they are learning life lessons.”

Pandora-Gilboa coach
Kristyn Hovest and her crew
felt for their opponents.
“We prayed for them and
had a lot of sympathy for
them; I had a similar experience over here a couple of
seasons ago in this gym,” she
explained. “However, I felt
the ultimate respect we could
pay was to play hard and try
to win the match. It
took us a while to get
going — that is the
norm this season —
but we have a lot of
weapons, both blocking and hitting, and
that took over in the end.”
The first set was the definition of back-and-forth: for most
of the way, the biggest lead
was three as both teams had
turns in command. Ottoville
setter Lexie Thorbahn (13/13
serving; 103/107 setting, 42
assists) used as many options
as she could, led by senior
Annie Lindeman (12 kills),
along with freshman lefty
Bridget Landin (10 kills) and
freshman C.J. Kemper (5
blocks, 10 kills). On the other
end, the Rockets and setter
Kayla Rieman (27 assists, 16
digs, 2 aces) had a versatile
array to choose from, such

as Brittany Hovest (11 kills,
15 digs, 5 blocks), Mikaylie
Morman (11 kills) and Serena
Maag (5 kills, 7 blocks). The
Lady Green (6-6, 2-2) had the
closing splurge of four straight
points: a kill by Kemper and
three hitting errors by the
guests (24 for the match) to
take the opener.
Set two was much the same
way: a battle with the
biggest lead being
four. Both teams were
mixing in hitting/serving errors and kills/
aces — with the latter
being more numerous.
Kemper led her team with
five kills and Alexa Maag (10
blocks) led her Rockets with
three blocks. Ottoville seemed
on the verge of taking a commanding 2-0 lead on a belt off
the defense by Lindeman to
lead 23-19. However, Morman
started the Lady Rockets back
with her off-speed kill off the
defense. With S. Maag at the
serve, they caught the hosts at
23 on an ace, took the lead on
a hitting error (27 for the night)
and evened the match on a
kill by Rieman on a scramble
point.
The third set didn’t start
out as close as its two pre-

decessors, with the usual
Rocket suspects leading the
way to a 15-8 lead after a 7-0
spurt. However, the youthful Lady Green had other
plans and fought back behind
their leaders: Lindeman,
Kemper, Landin and sophomore Brooke Mangas. They
twice got within one — the
last at 22-21 on a bomb by
Landin. However, a serving
error (the 3rd of the set, 7 for
the match) broke the momentum. A kill by Morman and a
serving error by the visitors
(8 overall) brought it to set
point, where A. Maag laid
down a bomb for a 2-1 edge.
P-G took command relatively early in the fourth set: a
kill by Rieman gave the serve
to the libero, Shana Hovest
(19 digs), and six miscues by
the Big Green (plus 3 kills and
an ace) later, Pandora was up
15-4. From there, it was a matter of time and when the hosts
were called for being in the net
on match point, it was over.
Junior Nicole Kramer led
the host defense with 17 digs.
Ottoville won the JV
match 25-16, 20-25, 25-18.
Pandora hosts McComb
tonight; Ottoville visits
Leipsic Thursday.

Grove netters broom away Lady Bearcats
By LARRY HEIING
DHI Media Correspondent
news@delphosherald.com
SPENCERVILLE — The Columbus Grove volleyball team
traveled south to Spencerville to take on the Bearcats in
Northwest Conference action Tuesday night.
The Lady Bulldogs swept the match in 3 sets: 25-13,
25-12, 25-22.
The first set began as a back-and-forth battle as both
teams fought to an 11-all tie at the midway point. Columbus
Grove began to take control as Mackenzie Clymer set up the
kill by Carlee McCluer for the lead. Briana Glass dropped in
consecutive aces as the Bulldogs lead suddenly grew to 19-12.
Spencerville’s Katie Merriman slammed her second kill of
the set to stop the Columbus Grove run. The Bulldogs scored
the final six points of the set as Sydney McCluer was a
perfect 6-of-6 serving, including an ace, to wrap up the
first-set victory.
Set two opened as Columbus Grove’s Kristen Wynn
exchanged kills with Grace Hollar of Spencerville.
After the Bearcats return went out of bounds, the Bearcats
tied the contest with a kill by Hollar with the assist by Schylar
Miller. Then Grove went on a 7-0 run, highlighted by a Wynn
kill Glass assist), a block by Becca Endicott and a trio of aces
by Jade Clement. After a Spencerville timeout, a battle on
the frontline raged on between the Bearcat’s Merriman and
Madison Vorhess for the Bulldogs. The pair exchanged blocks

INFORMATION SUBMITTED
Lady Lancer golfers runner-up at Fox’s Den
CELINA — Twelve area teams consisting of 61
golfers all converged on the Fox’s Den Golf Course in
Celina to partake in the 2014 sectional golf tournament.
After all the divots were replaced the Lima Central
Catholic T-Birds (388) claimed the team title.
The Lady Lancers of Lincolnview earned the runner-up spot with the Wayne Trace Raiders coming in
third place. All three teams will advance to the district
tournament next week at the Sycamore Springs golf
course in Arlington.
Claiming the individual match medalist honors,
Lincolnview’s Mikenna Klinger bested the field with a
round of 86. Klinger’s round started on the back nine
and she cruised to a solid round of 40. At the turn,
Klinger trailed LCC’s Jessica Armstrong by two shots
and was tied with St. Marys’ Jill Schmitmeyer. Abby
Mansfield from Minster followed with a 42 and Gracie
Gudakunst tallied a 44 for the Raiders.
Klinger’s second nine featured possible disaster as

as both teams played out a tremendous volley but Vorhess
won the point with a jump up above the net for the return
kill. Megan Miller cut the Grove lead in half, 12-6, with a
return kill of her own for the Bearcats. Teams again traded
points on a kill by Hollar for the Bearcats and the Bulldogs’
Carlee McCluer. An ace for Grove by McCluer pushed
the lead to double digits 18-8. A full extension dig by
Merriman on the backline preserved the Bearcats volley
allowing Tiffany Work to get the kill. The combination
of Glass with a backset to Wynn for the kill and an ace
by Clement ignited another Bulldog rally. Vorhess smacked
down two more blocks and Clement launched a pair of kill
shots as the Bulldogs took a comfortable 24-11 lead. A kill
by Spencerville’s Work extended the set for one more serve
before Vorhess dropped in a block for the win.
Columbus Grove jumped out quickly in the third set on an
ace by Glass along with her two kills and a return kill
by Wynn. The Bearcats got on the scoreboard thanks to
an assist by Miller to Merriman for the slam. The setters
on both sides of the net sparked the scoring as Glass
notched her third assist in the first six points with a set
to Wynn for the kill. The Bearcats’ Miller showed great hustle
running up from the serve to also notch her second and third
assists on consecutive kills by Hollar. Grove scored on a block
by Wynn that fell just inside the line and the duo of Glass to
Wynn struck again for the kill.

Local Roundup

she recorded a double bogey and a penalty-filled triple
bogey. She recovered to post an 46 for her 18 hole tally
of 86. Armstrong ran into her own trouble as she could
only muster a 49 on the back nine. Her 87 earned her
runner-up medalist honors. Schmitmeyer hung on for
a 48 on the back and recorded an 88 for third best on
the day. These were the only scores in the 80’s on the
day. Liberty Benton’s Kiera Robinson’s 91 snuck in for
fourth best score with Gudakunst finishing out the top
five with a 92.
For the Lancers scoring, Klinger led the way with
her 86 while Makenzie Kraft posted a solid round of
46-51 for a total of 97. McKenzie Davis followed with
two rounds of 53 for her 106 and Macala Ashbaugh
recorded 55-52 for her 107. Madison Shepherd also
played for the runner-up Lancers as they scored a 396.
Lancer head coach Brad Doidge was extremely
pleased with his team’s effort.
“We had a plan coming into today of how to attack
the golf course, the girls bought into the strategy and
executed it to near perfection,” commented Doidge. “We
still need to work on our short game and putting but we

See GROVE, page 8

have improved in that area.”
The third and final District spot came down to a
trio of teams that included Wayne Trace, St.Henry, and
Minster. The teams were separated by seven strokes so
all shots were important coming down the stretch. With
a team score of 415, the Raiders claimed the final spot
over St. Henry (419) and Minster (422).
Gudakunst (44-48) led the Raiders with her 92
and her freshman classmate, Gillian Wiseman (50-50)
posted a 100. Veteran Paige Rahrig posted a 103 (5350) with Brooke Sinn matching a pair of 60’s for her 120.
Raider head coach Al Welch was brief with his comments as he stated that “Paige Rahrig was a solid leader
and all the freshman came through at the right time. We
shocked some people today.”
The Parkway Panthers also competed in the tournament and posted a team score of 469. They were led by
Terra Walls (103) and Autumn Stetler (113). Contributing
to the team score was Chanel Walls (126) and a pair of
(127) by Taylor Hesse and Brenna Brazle.

See more online: www.delphosherald.com

By BRIAN BASSETT
DHI Media Correspondent
news@delphosherald.com

MIDDLE POINT - The Delphos Jefferson Lady Wildcat
volleyball team traveled to Lincolnview High School Tuesday
evening for a Northwest Conference contest and ran into the
buzz-saw that was the Lady Lancer offense.
Lincolnview (6-9, 2-3 NWC) took the first set 25-3 and
rolled to a 3-0 victory (25-3, 25-14, 25-21).
“We’re very happy with that conference win,” said
Lincolnview coach JaNahn Evans. “We’ve been working on a
quick offense… It’s nice to see it come together.”
The Lady Lancer offense was certainly quick to put up
points on the evening - jumping out to a 3-0 lead out of the
gate thanks to three consecutive kills from senior outside hitter
Ashley Teman.
After a kill from senior middle hitter
Baylee Neate gave Lincolnview a 4-0 lead
before a Lady Lancer error gave Jefferson
one of it’s three points.
Leading 7-2, Lincolnview started its biggest rally of the game. A kill from sophomore outside hitter Katie McClure gave the Lancers an 8-2
lead, which turned into a 24-2 lead before Jefferson (3-8, 0-4
NWC) scored again.
Neate had three aces and a kill during the rally, McClure
added three more kills and sophomore middle hitter Katlyn
Wendel added two kills of her own during the run.
Finally, Jefferson countered with its only earned-point of
the set - a tip from senior outside hitter Desteni Lear. Another
Wendel kill, however, quickly ended the set.
“The first set, (the girls) were talking, they were running a quick offense, they were hitting at
(Jefferson). We were playing smart net play,
we would hit then we would tip,” explained
Evans.
After Lincolnview jumped out to a
6-1 lead to open the second set, things
didn’t look good for the visitors. The Lady
Wildcats began to claw their way back into the set, however.
Three consecutive Lady Lancer errors later in the set helped
Jefferson pull within two, 7-5.
Lincolnview responded with two points from Wendel and
an ace from junior hitter Ashton Bowersock to spark a 4-0 rally
which culminated in a Lady Wildcat timeout trailing 14-6.
The Lady Lancer lead grew to 16-7 before freshman outside
hitter Macy Wallace recorded the first Lady Wildcat kill of the
evening.
Another Wallace kill a point later pulled Jefferson within
eight, 17-9, but Lincolnview continued to pull away.
A kill and a tip from McClure ran the Lady Lancer advantage to 22-11 and, despite a Wallace block and a kill from
senior middle hitter Andrea Geise, Lincolnview coasted to the
25-14 set win.
“Going into the second set, and the third, we kind of let off
a little bit,” said Evans. “We’re working on controlling that
up-and-down part of the ball game. We’re trying to just keep
going at a team and keep giving it to them all three sets.”
Lincolnview got Jefferson’s best shot on the evening in the
third set. The teams fought back-and-forth before the Lady
Lancers took a 6-4 lead with a McClure point. An ace from
senior setter Devann Springer then gave Lincolnview a 7-4
lead and some breathing room.
Later in the match, the Lincolnview lead was still four,
13-9, after a point from Lear returned some momentum to the
visitors. Lear then picked up another point to spark a mini run
for the Lady Wildcats, which helped them tie the game at 13.
The teams tied again at 14 before kills from McClure and
Bowersock gave the Lady Lancers some breathing room.
See LANCERS, page 7

OHSAA releases Weekly
Football Computer Ratings
INFORMATION
SUBMITTED
COLUMBUS – The
Ohio High School Athletic
Association released its first
weekly football computer
ratings Tuesday. The weekly computer ratings
are released every
Tuesday afternoon
beginning after the
fourth week of the
season, leading up
to the final report on
Nov. 2.
The top 20 schools
in both Division
I regions are shown below,
while the top 12 schools are
shown in Divisions II through
VII. Ratings are listed by division and region with record
and average points. Log on to
the football page at OHSAA.
org for an explanation of how
the ratings are calculated.
There are seven football
divisions, with the largest 72
schools placed in Division
I and the remaining schools
placed in Divisions II through
VII (approximately 108
schools in each division).
There are two regions in
Division I and four regions
each in Divisions II through
VII. The top 16 teams in both
Division I regions will qualify for the playoffs, while the
top eight schools in Divisions
II through VII will qualify.
OHSAA
Football
Computer Ratings – Sept. 23

Division I (top 16 from both
regions will qualify for the playoffs)
Region 1 - 1. Hudson (4-0) 11.4, 2.
Solon (4-0) 10.175, 3. Westerville Central
(4-0) 9.85, 4. Massillon Jackson (4-0)
9.3, 5. Stow-Munroe Falls (4-0) 9.2, 6.
Findlay (4-0) 9.175, 7. Mentor (4-0) 9.15,
8. Strongsville (3-1) 7.675, 9. Brunswick
(3-1) 7.625, 10. Powell Olentangy Liberty
(3-1) 7.575, 11. Austintown-Fitch (3-1)

7.4293, 12. Cle. St. Ignatius (3-1) 7.352,
13. Lakewood St. Edward (3-1) 7.1071,
14. Wadsworth (3-1) 6.975, 15. BereaMidpark (3-1) 6.925, 16. Marysville (3-1)
6.75, 17. Lorain (3-1) 6.65, 18. Warren G.
Harding (2-2) 5.675, 19. Tol. Whitmer (2-2)
5.275, 20. Canton GlenOak (3-1) 5.175
Region 2 - 1. Cin. Archbishop Moeller
(4-0) 12.45, 2. Centerville (4-0) 12.4, 3.
Pickerington Central (4-0) 10.6888, 4.
Liberty Twp. Lakota East
(4-0) 10.525, 5. Dublin
Coffman (4-0) 10.0, 6.
Huber Hts. Wayne (4-0)
9.8119, 7. Miamisburg
(4-0) 8.875, 8. Cin. Elder
(3-1) 8.475, 9. Westerville
South (3-1) 7.35, 10-tie.
Springboro (3-1) 7.325,
10-tie. Hilliard Darby (3-1)
7.325, 12. Cin. St. Xavier
(3-1) 6.475, 13. Milford
(3-1) 6.25, 14. Gahanna Lincoln (2-2)
6.2, 15. Hilliard Davidson (2-2) 5.9031,
16. Clayton Northmont (2-2) 5.425, 17.
Upper Arlington (3-1) 5.15, 18. West
Chester Lakota West (2-2) 5.025, 19.
Grove City Central Crossing (2-2) 4.625,
20. Lebanon (2-2) 4.575
Division II (top eight from each
region will qualify for the playoffs in
Divisions II through VII)
Region 3 - 1. Madison (4-0) 9.6837,
2. Bedford (4-0) 9.175, 3. North Olmsted
(3-1) 7.075, 4. Painesville Riverside (3-1)
6.35, 5. Mayfield (3-1) 6.2, 6. BrecksvilleBroadview Hts. (3-1) 6.125, 7. Cle.
Rhodes (3-1) 5.9, 8. Garfield Hts. (3-1)
5.8, 9. Westlake (2-2) 5.525, 10. Maple
Hts. (2-2) 3.6, 11. Cle. Glenville (2-2)
3.425, 12. Cle. John Marshall (1-3) 2.9
Region 4 - 1. Grafton Midview (4-0)
10.925, 2. Massillon Washington (4-0)
10.3546, 3. Perrysburg (4-0) 9.875, 4.
Macedonia Nordonia (4-0) 9.65, 5. Avon
(4-0) 8.575, 6. Copley (4-0) 7.85, 7. North
Ridgeville (3-1) 7.65, 8. Akron Ellet (3-1)
6.5, 9. Holland Springfield (3-1) 5.275,
10. Sylvania Southview (2-2) 5.0, 11.
Fremont Ross (2-2) 4.575, 12. Cuyahoga
Falls Walsh Jesuit (2-2) 4.2917
Region 5 - 1. Lewis Center Olentangy
(4-0) 10.95, 2. Pataskala Watkins Memorial
(4-0) 8.5332, 3. Dublin Scioto (2-2) 6.775,
4. Lewis Center Olentangy Orange (2-2)
6.675, 5. Worthington Kilbourne (3-1)
6.225, 6. Mount Vernon (3-1) 6.075, 7.
Ashville Teays Valley (3-1) 5.95, 8. Hilliard
Bradley (3-1) 5.925, 9. Pataskala Licking
Hts. (3-1) 5.325, 10. New Albany (2-2)
5.025, 11. Ashland (2-2) 4.625, 12. Cols.
Hamilton Township (2-2) 4.375

See OHSAA, page 8

www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

The Herald — 7

St. John’s girls slide by Miller City in soccer Pioneers avenge defeat
By JIM METCALFE
DHI Media Sports Editor
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
MILLER
CITY

Despite being outshot 8-6,
the St. John’s girls soccer
crew had the one that counted
in besting Miller City 1-0 on
a gorgeous but breezy earlyspring Monday afternoon at
Miller City.
The young Lady Wildcats
(2-7-3) — with the wind and
the sun the first half — had
the better of the proceedings
in the first half, especially the
first 20 minutes. They got off
mroe shots on-goal and more
shots in general but many
of those were off-target or
Lady Blue Jay (2-7-2) senior
netminder Sam Wehri got the
stops (5 saves the first half, 7
overall).
“We didn’t play as well
as we’d have liked the first
half but the second half, we
played a very solid game.
We had a few more chances
the second half,” St. John’s
coach Katrina Smith said.
“Our defenders and midfielders really did a nice job of
not giving up many open
chances and we kept the ball
more in our offensive zone.

We’re starting to get the ideas
down of making good passes,
moving, making good runs
and making the connections;
the girls are figuring that
out more and more. Now we
have to take the next step and
make the final connections in
the last third and put the ball
in the net.”
Miller City head man Ron
Bruce is still trying to
get his youthful troops
there.
“We start four freshmen, three sophomores, three juniors
and a senior. You can
only get expeerience
trough playing time,” Bruce
added. “The girls are trying
to put it together but part of
the problem is we’re not really aggressive yet, not going
to the ball hard enough and
consistently enough. We’re
working to get there this year
but it’s getting late in the
season; hopefully, we don’t
run out of time before it happens.”
The best chance the
hosts had of scoring came
at 35:13, when lone senior
Livia Schroeder got behind
the defense in the middle but
Wehri came out enough to

force the 18-yarder over the
crossbar.
That happened again at
15:40 when MC freshman Faith
Troyer got behind the defense
in the middle but Wehri again
came off her line and forced an
18-yarder over the top.
The Jays had two scoring efforts the first half:
the first was at 22:14 when
sophomore Carleigh
Ankerman
took
a 22-yarder from
the right side but
Wildcat junior keeper Amanda Simon (5
saves) knocked it out
of bounds.
The second was the only
goal of the night. Set up by
a center-to-right lead pass
by sophomore Courtney
Wrasman, Ankerman got
enough of an opening from
the right wing and her
18-yarder slipped through the
hands of Simon and into the
goal at 18:27 of the first half.
The second half, shots
on-goal were few and far
between as the defenders
and midfielders of both sides
latched onto the forwards and
attacking mids of their opponents and gave them little
room to score.

The Wildcats had a chance
to score at 37:27. Off a free
kick from the left side by
Schroeder, Wehri knocked the
ball off the bar and junior Liz
Klear was there for the putback
but she ran into the keeper and
the goal was disallowed.
The guests had four chances the second half but Simon
denied them all: at 24:21, on
a 28-yarder by Wrasman; at
9:46, a 30-yarder by sophomore Maria GiambrunoFuge; at 8:42, a 25-yarder
by junior Anna Mueller; and
at 29 ticks, a 22-yarder by
senior Emilee Grothouse
The keeper also stopped a
dangerous sequence in front
of her net at 12:20, when she
took away a free ball before
Mueller could get a shot off
on the left doorstep.
Wehri denied two attempts:
at 6:21, a 28-yard blast by
junior Cassie Niese; and at
2:03, when a Wildcat was
tackled in the 18. Troyer took
the penalty kick but a diving
Wehri deflected the orb away.
Each team had one corner
kick.
Both teams are in action
Saturday as St. John’s pays a
visit to Lincolnview (11 a.m.) and
Miller City entertains Archbold.

Lady Jays squeeze past Lincolnview
BY JIM COX
DHI Media Correspondent
news@delphosherald.com

but St. John’s scored four straight — tip
by Buettner, kill by Kahney, service ace
by freshman Kennedy Clarkson, kill
error into the net by Lincolnview —
23-20, Jays. A Delphos passing error
broke that string, but kills by Geise and
Kahney ended it at 25-21.
The third set was similar but with a
different ending. There were nine
ties and five lead changes. Delphos
led 21-20, but the Lancers scored
the next three — kill by freshman
Alana Williams, communication
error by the Jays letting an easy
ball drop, tip by Bowersock — to
lead 23-21. A Lincolnview lift violation and a kill by Buettner tied it at 23,
but Lancer senior Baylee Neate tipped
one into the open court to lead by one.
The Jays then failed to handle a
Bowersock serve to end the set
at 25-23.
There were no lead changes
in the fourth set, and the only tie
was at 1-1. The St. John’s lead
got as big as seven at 19-12,
but the feisty Lancers made it interesting, getting as close as 24-21 before a
Kahney kill sent everybody home.
“We played maybe a little better
defense, fewer unforced errors,” said
Blue Jay coach Carolyn Dammeyer in
explaining the difference between the
two teams. “I thought our hitting was
very good, and I thought we blocked
a lot better than we’ve been block-

by Lady Jeffcats

By LARRY HEIING
DHI Media Correspondent
news@delphosherald.com
LIMA — For the second time in three days, Jefferson took
on Lima Temple Christian in girls volleyball.
On Saturday, the Wildcats met the Pioneers on a neutral
court at the Cory-Rawson Invitational.
Jefferson dropped the first set but came
back to win the final two sets and the
match.
On Monday, Jefferson traveled to Lima
to take on the Pioneers on their home court
and low ceiling. Temple Christian took the
rematch in three sets, winning 25-11, 25-18, 25-19.
With Jefferson trailing 2-0 to open the match, Macy Wallace
put the Wildcats on the board with a kill. After both teams traded points on unforced errors, Lynnea Clay slammed a kill and
Bethany Powell followed with an ace for the Pioneers. Andrea
Geise responded for the Wildcats with a kill shot to keep
Jefferson close 7-5. Temple then scored the next eight points
as Jefferson’s returns failed to fall in for points. Destiny Lear
stopped the Temple run with a kill off an assist by Wallace.
The Pioneers put together another scoring streak by scoring the
final nine points of the first set to seal the victory.
Temple Christian came out strong in the second set with
consecutive kills by Clay and a Kaitlyn Sutton ace. Geise
again scored the first offensive point for the Lady ‘Cats in the
set with a kill. After long back-and-forth volleys between the
two squads, returns landing out of bounds resulted in the next
flurry of points for both sides. There may be no “I” in team
but as Michael Jordan once said, “there is an ‘I’ in win.” That
“I” for Lima Temple Christian is Lynnea Clay. The verballycommitted Toledo recruit showed why she is sought after by
Division I schools with a kill from the backcourt to give the
Pioneers the lead 9-3. Jefferson junior Claire Thompson’s set
to Danielle Harman for the kill was good for a point but the
Wildcats gave it right back as a return by Temple’s Bethany
Powell fell in between the visitors’ defense. Jefferson coach
Joy DeVelvis called timeout to regroup her squad. Thompson
made another big play after the break in the action with a kill
to pull the Wildcats within 11-5. The Jefferson play at the
net stepped up as Jenna Gilden slammed a kill and her return
kill off of a rocket by Temple’s Clay fell in for a score. Sarah
Miller’s set to Harman for her second kill of the set led a 5-2
rally by Jefferson. Clay sparked the Pioneers scoring with a
block and her sixth kill of the second set. Thompson spiked her
third kill of the set and Brooke Culp also had a kill off an assist
by Devyn Carder as the Wildcats cut into the lead 21-18. Just
like in the first set, Temple Christian rallied to score the final
four points, the last coming on an ace by Sydney Rex that hit
the top of the net and fell in.
Jefferson took its first lead of the evening to open the
third set. A pair of kills by Clay put Temple back in front but
Jefferson wasn’t about to give up the lead without a fight.
Harman scored on a return kill and Wallace followed with an
ace to tie the score at 3. Outstanding defensive play by the
backcourt of Thompson and Wallace with point-saving digs led
to a kill by Harman as Jefferson took the lead back. An assist
by Culp to Geise for the kill put the Wildcats ahead by a pair.
The Pioneers began to charge back with a block by Clay and a
return kill by Rachel Acklin as the score continued to go back
and forth.

ing. Overall, I was really impressed
with both teams, because Lincolnview is
always scrappy; they always play great
defense, so we had some great rallies
MIDDLE POINT — Two scrapgoing back and forth.”
py, evenly-matched volleyball teams
“St. John’s, they were scrappy, they
slugged it out Monday night with
never gave up,” said Lancer coach
Delphos St. John’s edging Lincolnview
JaNahn Evans. “You gotta give it to ‘em.
in four tight sets, 25-23, 25-21,
They had some great hits; they had some
23-25, 25-21. The Lady Jays
good weapons that they kept throwing at
are now 7-8, the Lady Lancers
us. I thought my girls did a good job of
5-9.
being aggressive in the back row. We’ve
Both teams displayed some
been working on running a quicker
incredible defense, resulting is
offense, and I think when we did run the
many extended rallies. Every
quick offense, it was effective, but then
set was close. There were 34
we seemed to get a little relaxed. We
ties and 22 lead changes in the match.
need to keep playing aggressive.”
The first set went down to the wire.
Both teams featured a balanced
There were 12 ties and eight lead changoffense. Lincolnview was led in kills by
es. The biggest lead belonged to the Jays
McClure, Neate, Bowersock, and
at 10-6. but Lincolnview then reeled off
Williams with 14, 9, 9, and 8. St.
six points in a row to take a 12-10 lead,
John’s was led by junior Maddie
and neither team led by more than two
Pohlman, Geise, Buettner, senior
after that. A kill by Lancer sophomore
Bekah Fischer, and Kahney with
See JEFFCATS, page 8
Katie McClure had Lincolnview up
11, 10, 9, 7, and 7. Lancer senior
22-21, but kills by St. John’s freshman
Devann Springer was splendid
Madison Ellis and junior Olivia Kahney,
with 41 assists; Sophomore Maya Gerker
sandwiched around a Lancer passing
and senior Colleen Schulte had 21 and 20
error, had the visitors on the brink at
for the Jays.
24-22. The Jays thought they had it on a
The defensive leaders were junior
matched its win total from
By TOM WITHERS
stuff block, but they were called for a net
Grace Gorman for Lincolnview and
last season. It’s the first time
Associated
Press
violation, making it 24-23. Sophomore
senior Kestley Hulihan for Delphos with
the Royals have had consecuJessica Geise ended it with a clean kill.
16 digs and 21 digs, respectively.
tive seasons with at least 86
CLEVELAND

With
The second set was nearly a carbon
Lincolnview won the junior varvictories since 1977-78.
another
win,
the
Royals
copy of the first with 12 ties and nine
sity match 25-16, 25-21. The Lancer
The playoffs are within
lead changes. The Lancers led 20-19,
reserves are now 2-9. The Jays are 3-9. stepped closer to history and
reach, but the Royals aren’t
a playoff berth.
They’ve got a much bigger banking on anything just yet.
“We’ve got to stick to
goal in mind.
Rookie Yordano Ventura the plan,” first baseman Eric
blanked Cleveland’s punch- Hosmer said. “We keep sayless offense for seven innings ing it over and over again, but
Milwaukee’s offense has unraveled in the closing weeks of as Kansas City kept pressure it’s what you have to do as a
By JOE KAY
the season, scoring two or fewer runs in each of the last six on first-place Detroit in the team. We went out and took
Associated Press
games. Gomez hit a solo homer in the sixth, ending a streak AL Central with a 7-1 win care of our business.”
The Indians’ faint playCINCINNATI — With another dominating performance, of 14 consecutive batters retired by Cueto. The right-hander over the Indians on Tuesday
off hopes grew dimnight.
Johnny Cueto kept his hopes of a 20-win season in play.
walked one and struck out seven.
mer. Cleveland trails
Following the game,
Cueto allowed one run over eight innings, and Todd Frazier
Aroldis Chapman pitched the ninth for his 34th save in 36
Kansas City by 4 1/2
and Devin Mesoraco hit back-to-back homers on Tuesday chances, fanning Ryan Braun with two runners aboard to end the Royals retreated to
games in the wild-card
their
clubhouse
to
watch
night, sending the Cincinnati Reds to a 3-1 victory that pushed it.
chase with four games
the Milwaukee Brewers to the verge elimination from wild
The Brewers had chances in the first inning, when they had the ninth inning of the
remaining.
card contention.
two singles and a walk but failed to score. Gomez Tigers’ 5-4 win over
Cleveland’s offense
Cueto (19-9) gave up four hits, including Carlos
singled and was picked off first base. Scooter Chicago. As they ate
went into a funk at
Gomez’s homer. He’ll pitch Cincinnati’s final game
Gennett walked but was thrown out at the plate their postgame meals,
on Sunday against Pittsburgh at Great American
while trying to score from second base on Aramis Kansas City’s players roared the worst time possible. The
loudly when the White Sox Indians scored an unearned
Ball Park with a chance for win No. 20.
Ramirez’s single.
scored three runs in the ninth run in the eighth, ending a
“That would feel really good,” he said. “I’ve
BAD AT GABP
never had a 20-game season. I hope I feel like I felt today.”
The Brewers have lost 13 of their last 18 games at Great to tie it. It got much quieter string of 19 straight scoreless
The Reds haven’t had a 20-game winner since left-hander American Ball Park and 31 of their last 43. Overall this season, when Miguel Cabrera deliv- innings.
Ventura made his major
Danny Jackson in 1988. The last Reds right-hander to win 20 the Reds are 9-8 against Milwaukee, including 6-2 at GABP. ered a game-winning hit to
keep the Tigers one game league debut against the
games was Sammy Ellis in 1965.
STATS
Indians last September, a per“He was phenomenal,” manager Bryan Price said. “He was
Fiers’ five innings matches his season low as a starter. … ahead of Kansas City.
formance Indians manager
Still,
the
Royals
are
stalkreally in command after the first inning.”
Gomez was caught stealing for the 12th time. … It’s the secTerry Francona called “elecThe Reds got the better of a matchup between teams with ond time Cueto has won 19 games in a season. He went 19-9 ing.
Manager
Ned
Yost tric.”
huge second-half fades. The Reds are 22-40 since the All-Star in 2012. … CF Billy Hamilton threw Gennett out at the plate
“We’re not hoping for
break.
in the first inning. It was his 10th assist, the most by any center knows his club almost has
a wild-card berth locked up. electric tonight,” Francona
Milwaukee led the NL Central for 150 days, but fell apart fielder in the NL and any rookie outfielder in the majors.
However, he’s got his sights said beforehand.
at the end. Up by 6 ½ games on June 28, the Brewers have
TRAINER’S ROOM
Ventura didn’t have to
gone 29-45 and fallen far behind Pittsburgh and San Francisco
Reds: 1B Joey Votto continues to take batting practice and on a bigger prize.
“I’m not really interested be. The Indians are currently
in the wild card race. Their loss on Tuesday was their 19th in infield practice, but it’s still unclear whether he’ll play this
26 games.
week. Votto has missed 94 games because of strained muscles in the wild card right now,” powerless.
With a chance to stay in
“It’s always tough,” said Mike Fiers (6-4). “We kind of above his left knee. He’s been out since July 6 on his second Yost said. “That (magic)
number doesn’t mean much the race in the season’s final
gave it away. We had a lot of opportunities. It was in our DL stint.
to me. The wild card has week, Cleveland is collapshands.”
UP NEXT
Frazier and Mesoraco connected in the first inning off
Brewers: Kyle Lohse (12-9) makes his fifth start against the always been Plan B. We’re ing.
“We didn’t win, which we
Fiers. It was Frazier’s 28th homer, the most by a third baseman Reds this season. He’s 1-1 with a 2.92 ERA in the other four. in good shape right now. Our
in the National League. Mesoraco’s homer was his 25th. He Overall, he’s 6-5 career against Cincinnati with a 2.90 ERA. focus is on winning this divi- set out to do,” Francona said.
“The only thing we can do
leads the majors in homers by a catcher.
Reds: Daniel Corcino (0-1) makes his third career start. sion.”
now is play tomorrow and try
The
hard-throwing
Ventura
That’s all that Cueto needed.
Corcino, who was called up this month, made his first major
“A two-run lead with him feels like five or six with other league start at Milwaukee on Sept. 12 and gave up two runs in (14-10) allowed four singles to win that game.”
Omar Infante’s two-run
and threw a 100 mph fastball
six innings. The Reds lost 3-2.
guys,” Mesoraco said.
double in the fourth gave the
on his 104th pitch.
Salvador Perez’s two-out, Royals a 2-0 lead, and with
two-run double off Danny the Indians’ offense sputterSalazar (6-8) put the Royals ing, Ventura had more than
ahead 5-0 in the fifth and they enough cushion to notch his
a lot better this game,” continued Evans. really starting to read (Katie) really well… turned their attention to the fifth win in six starts and
(Continued from page 6)
“The defense was really picking up. I think Katie is learning well to hit the line. left-field scoreboard to moni- improve to 3-0 with a 1.57
After a point from Jefferson freshman Ashley Teman was passing some low She’s got a fast swing. I think she really tor the Tigers’ score. Kansas ERA in five career starts
City remained one game out against the Indians. He’s 7-1
setter Devyn Carder, the Lady Lancers passes in for us to run a quick offense.” stepped up to the plate for us today.”
with a 2.02 ERA in his last
Jefferson head coach Joy DeVelvis of first with five games left.
McClure paced the Lady Lancers with
rolled off four straight points to take a
It’s been 29 years since eight starts in the division.
14 kills on the evening and accounted was unavailable for comment.
21-18 lead.
“He’s a special guy,” Yost
Jefferson returns to the court the Royals were in the postThe Lady Wildcats got within two on for 17 total points - good for Jefferson’s
Thursday at home versus Paulding (5:30 season, and that run in 1985 said. “He has all the makings
two occasions, 22-20 and 23-12, before team total through two sets.
ended with their only World of being a high-level, upper“I think Devann (Springer) and Katie p.m. JV start).
a Neate kill and a block by Neate and
tier pitcher in the American
Lincolnview is in the Minster Series title.
Springer sealed the set and the game.
are really starting to connect with each
At 86-71, Kansas City League.”
“I definitely thought out passes were other,” Evans explained. “(Devann) is Invitational 9 a.m. Saturday.

Cueto wins 19th, Reds beat Brewers 3-1

Lancers

Royals roll on, shut out Indians

8 – The Herald

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

www.delphosherald.com

Kalida seizes PCL Golf Tournament
BY CHARLIE WARNIMONT
DHI Media Correspondent
news@delphosherald.com
DELPHOS — Weather conditions
were ideal for shooting good scores at
the Putnam County League golf tournament Monday.
Despite the sunshine and calm conditions, golfers were unable to take advantage of the weather. Kalida was the only
team to have a player shoot under 80 and
they added in three other good scores to
win the 2014 PCL title.
The Wildcats repeated as
PCL champions shooting a 328.
Columbus Grove and Miller City
both finished at 385, with the
Bulldogs taking the runner-up
spot based on their fifth man score.
Ottoville was fourth at 399, followed by
Leipsic at 404 and Fort Jennings had a
423 for sixth place.
“It kind of surprised there were
weren’t more scores under 80 other
than the one,” Kalida coach Ken
Schnipke said. “There wasn’t much
wind blowing today. I think the greens
were super fast and you just had to
watch where you put it on the greens.
Sometimes you get three putts and
you don’t like them. A couple of players played higher than I thought they
would, the pressure of playing the
PCL and doing it different this year as
far points and the kids are looking at
that, that may have played a factor in
it as well.”
Instead of the tournament deciding the first and second teams,
a points system was used this
year taking into consideration how
players played in PCL regular season matches as well. The squads
also played with six man teams for
the first time.
Trent Siebeneck, the Wildcats number three man, was the lone player to
shoot below 80 as he finished with a 78,
opening with a 37 on the front nine and
finishing with a 41 for tournament medalist honors. Evan Recker followed with
an 81, Zach Erhart had an 84 and Collin
Nartker rounded out the team scoring
with an 85.

OHSAA

(Continued from page 6)
Region 6 - 1. Cin. LaSalle (4-0)
11.3, 2. Lima Senior (4-0) 9.35, 3.
New Carlisle Tecumseh (4-0) 9.125,
4. Kings Mills Kings (4-0) 8.825, 5.
Harrison (4-0) 8.575, 6. Cin. Mount
Healthy (4-0) 7.975, 7. Xenia (3-1)
6.65, 8. Cin. Northwest (3-1) 5.925, 9.
Batavia Amelia (3-1) 5.35, 10. Piqua
(2-2) 4.45, 11. Loveland (2-2) 4.375,
12. Cin. Winton Woods (2-2) 4.375
Division III
Region 7 - 1. Tallmadge (4-0)
10.525, 2. Hubbard (4-0) 9.45, 3.
Aurora (4-0) 8.2, 4. Poland Seminary
(4-0) 7.975, 5. Chardon (4-0) 7.775,
6. Akron Archbishop Hoban (4-0)
6.475, 7. Warren Howland (3-1) 6.0,
8. Louisville (3-1) 5.9, 9. Richfield
Revere (3-1) 5.2, 10. Akron East (2-2)
4.45, 11. Chesterland West Geauga
(2-2) 4.35, 12. Geneva (2-2) 4.2
Region 8 - 1. Clyde (4-0) 10.325,
2. Norwalk (4-0) 7.175, 3. Napoleon
(4-0) 6.925, 4. Sandusky Perkins (3-1)
5.9, 5. Tol. Central Cath. (2-2) 5.475,
6. Tiffin Columbian (2-2) 5.225, 7.
Mansfield Madison Comp. (2-2) 4.55,
8. Rocky River (3-1) 4.5, 9. Hunting
Valley University School (2-2) 4.45,
10. Maumee (2-2) 4.2, 11. Painesville
Harvey (2-2) 4.0, 12. Mentor Lake
Cath. (1-3) 2.925
Region 9 - 1. Circleville Logan Elm
(4-0) 8.95, 2. Jackson (4-0) 8.075,
3. The Plains Athens (4-0) 7.975,
4. Dresden Tri-Valley (4-0) 7.45, 5.
Thornville Sheridan (4-0) 7.2, 6. Cols.
St. Francis DeSales (3-1) 6.95, 7.
Granville (3-1) 6.475, 8. Carrollton
(4-0) 6.025, 9. Sunbury Big Walnut
(2-2) 4.75, 10. Cols. Briggs (3-1) 4.45,
11. New Philadelphia (2-2) 4.15, 12.
Chillicothe (2-2) 4.125
Region 10 - 1. Wapakoneta (4-0)
8.95, 2. Mount Orab Western Brown
(4-0) 7.7992, 3. Trotwood-Madison
(3-1) 7.675, 4. Wilmington (4-0)
7.4407, 5. Tipp City Tippecanoe (4-0)
6.775, 6. Bellefontaine (3-1) 6.65,
7. Springfield Kenton Ridge (4-0)
6.475, 8. Celina (3-1) 5.425, 9. Day.
Thurgood Marshall (2-2) 5.025, 10.
St. Marys Memorial (2-2) 4.625, 11.
Springfield Shawnee (2-2) 4.525, 12.
New Richmond (2-2) 4.5
Division IV
Region 11 - 1. Perry (3-1) 8.375,
2. Jefferson Area (4-0) 7.725, 3. Bay
Village Bay (3-1) 6.55, 4. Chardon
Notre Dame-Cathedral Latin (3-1)

Jeffcats

“Trent just played great,” Schnipke
said. “I call him my little bulldog, he
just grinds it out. He’s a smart player,
he knows the type of shots he’s going to
hit, he’ll play that shot that day, he just
doesn’t give up. I could say that about
all my guys today. Jeffrey (Knueve) said
he let the team down today, but I told
him the only way he could let the team
down today, but these guys don’t give
up until the end and that’s all you can
ask for.”
With the new system this year,
Schnipke was named the PCL’s
first Coach of the Year as Kalida
not only won the tournament, but
went undefeated in regular season
play at 10-0.
Ottoville senior Wesley
Markward was named the PCL Player
of the Year. Although Markward
struggled Monday shooting an 87,
it was the medalist honors he won
in PCL matches that helped him to
the honor.
“The year started out well with the
matches, I was happy to get a big win
against Kalida, medalist in that match,
because they are our toughest opponent.
It’s kind of hard not playing well today,
but I was able to hold on,” Markward
said. “I just think the pressure of the
PCL today got to all the players. This is
my third year playing the PCL and every
year you get the atmosphere is just so
intense. You want to beat everyone out
here and there are a lot of good golfers
out here.”
“What I like it’s not a one day crap
shoot, its a culmination of the
entire year and what he has done
all year in our PCL matches,”
Ottoville coach Jim Brown said.
“He was pretty much the top dog
in all our PCL matches and if you
just had today he may have been
second team. This just shows what he
has done throughout the year, his work
ethic and play throughout the year and
I’m really proud of him.”
Markward headlined a first team that
included Davis Lammers, Miller City,
Zach Erhart, Kalida, Alex Ellerbrock,
Leipsic, Brandon Hoffman, Columbus
Grove, and Collin Nartker, Kalida.

6.475, 5. Cle. Benedictine (3-1) 6.225,
6. Mantua Crestwood (4-0) 6.2, 7.
Pepper Pike Orange (3-1) 5.525, 8.
Youngstown Cardinal Mooney (3-1)
5.35, 9. Mogadore Field (3-1) 5.3,
10. Streetsboro (4-0) 5.05, 11. Canal
Fulton Northwest (3-1) 4.975, 12.
Peninsula Woodridge (3-1) 4.675
Region 12 - 1. Wooster Triway
(4-0) 7.475, 2. Bellevue (3-1) 7.375,
3. Galion (3-1) 6.6, 4. Wauseon (4-0)
6.25, 5. Sheffield Brookside (3-1)
5.25, 6. Port Clinton (3-1) 5.05, 7.
Genoa Area (3-1) 4.975, 8. Millbury
Lake (4-0) 4.9, 9. Oberlin Firelands
(3-1) 4.725, 10. Bryan (3-1) 4.55, 11.
LaGrange Keystone (3-1) 4.35, 12.
Kenton (2-2) 4.2
Region 13 - 1. Johnstown-Monroe
(4-0) 8.925, 2. Cols. Beechcroft (4-0)
8.4, 3. Bexley (4-0) 7.9, 4. Steubenville
(4-0) 7.8, 5. Zanesville Maysville (4-0)
6.825, 6. Cols. Marion-Franklin (3-1)
6.25, 7. Wintersville Indian Creek
(4-0) 6.0, 8. Amanda-Clearcreek (3-1)
5.975, 9. Carroll Bloom-Carroll (3-1)
5.55, 10. Newark Licking Valley (3-1)
5.425, 11. Gnadenhutten Indian Valley
(3-1) 5.2, 12. Lancaster Fairfield Union
(2-2) 3.775
Region 14 - 1. Kettering
Archbishop Alter (4-0) 9.25, 2. Cin.
Archbishop McNicholas (4-0) 8.925,
3. Cleves Taylor (4-0) 8.025, 4.
Clarksville Clinton-Massie (4-0)
7.15, 5. Cin. Wyoming (3-1) 6.475,
6. Circleville (3-1) 5.9, 7. Minford
(3-1) 5.375, 8. Monroe (3-1) 4.875,
9. Washington C.H. Miami Trace (2-2)
4.6, 10. Chillicothe Unioto (3-1) 4.5, 11.
Urbana (2-2) 4.35, 12. Germantown
Valley View (3-1) 4.3
Division V
Region 15 - 1. Canton Central
Cath. (4-0) 9.6, 2. Gates Mills Gilmour
Acad. (4-0) 7.225, 3. Cadiz Harrison
Central (3-1) 6.175, 4. Middlefield
Cardinal (3-1) 5.25, 5. Youngstown
Liberty (3-1) 5.075, 6. Hanoverton
United (3-1) 4.725, 7. Youngstown
Ursuline (2-2) 4.575, 8. Independence
(2-2) 4.55, 9. Girard (3-1) 4.225, 10.
Magnolia Sandy Valley (3-1) 3.75, 11.
Columbiana Crestview (2-2) 3.625, 12.
Leavittsburg LaBrae (3-1) 3.575
Region 16 - 1. Coldwater (4-0)
8.425, 2. Ottawa-Glandorf (4-0) 8.175,
3. Delta (4-0) 7.25, 4. Marion Pleasant
(4-0) 7.075, 5. Findlay Liberty-Benton
(4-0) 6.975, 6. Elyria Cath. (3-1)
6.675, 7. Doylestown Chippewa (4-0)
6.5, 8. Columbia Station Columbia

(Continued from page 7)
Miller, one of five freshmen playing for the varsity Wildcats,
scored with a kill from a set by the senior Geise. Kara Brown
paced the Pioneers with a pair of returns and an ace as Temple
jumped out to a 16-11 advantage. Harman’s fourth kill of the
night pulled Jefferson within four points but that’s as close as

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The second team consisted of Trent
Siebeneck, Jeffrey Knueve, Noah
Lambert and Evan Recker, Kalida,
Brandon Schnipke, Ottoville, and Sam
Vetter, Fort Jennings.
Columbus Grove finished in the runner-up spot based on their fifth man
score. Noah Oglesbee finished with a
102 and Jordan Schmenk had a 113 for
the Wildcats.
Hoffman led the Bulldogs with a 94,
while Logan Hardeman had a 95 and
Kyle Welty a 97.
“I was very happy with the way
we finished out,” Grove coach Travis
Gallmeier said. “The past two 18 holes
things we did were a 385 at Sycamore
Springs and a 391 at Delphos (invitational) and a 404 at NWC’s. I thought
we could be right around 390 and we
were today. The course played
a little harder today as they had
an outing here Sunday and its
was wet in spots after Saturday’s
rain, but overall the course was
in good shape and the pins were pretty
accessible for the kids.”
Leipsic’s Bryce Heitmeyer and
Nick Goedde were recognized as PCL
Scholar-Athletes.
***
1. Kalida (328) Trent Siebeneck 78;
Evan Recker 81; Zach Erhart 84; Collin
Nartker 85; Noah Lambert 87; Jeffrey
Knueve 96.
2. Columbus Grove (385) Brandon
Hoffman 94; Logan Hardeman 95; Kyle
Welty 97; Gage Gerdeman 99; Noah
Oglesbee 102; Wyatt Mayberry 110.
3. Miller City (385) Davis Lammers
83; Jacob Schimmoeller 96; Cody
Sheets 100; Trey Hermiller 106; Jordan
Schmenk 113; Adam Schroeder 130.
4. Ottoville (399) Wesley Markward
87; Brendon Schnipke 94; Andy
Schimmoeller 102; Isaiah Miller 116;
Thomas Waldick 119; Kaleb Hanicq 129.
5. Leipsic (404) Alex Ellerbrock 91;
Justin Ellerbrock 102; Tyler Selhorst
105; Bryce Heitmeyer 106; Nick Goedde
113; Tyler Goedde 145.
6. Fort Jennings (423) Sam Vetter 93;
Alex Sealts 109; Austin Luebrecht 110;
Nick Von Sossan 111; Drew Grone 111;
Collin Wieging 118.

(3-1) 6.025, 9. Huron (3-1) 5.75, 10.
Creston Norwayne (3-1) 5.725, 11.
Pemberville Eastwood (3-1) 5.25, 12.
Apple Creek Waynedale (2-2) 3.825
Region 17 - 1. Cols. Eastmoor
Acad. (4-0) 8.7, 2. Wheelersburg
(4-0) 7.725, 3. Ironton (3-1) 7.375,
4. Coshocton (4-0) 6.775, 5. St.
Clairsville (4-0) 6.7, 6. Cols. Bishop
Hartley (2-2) 5.1, 7. Baltimore Liberty
Union (3-1) 4.4, 8. Martins Ferry
(3-1) 4.3346, 9. Bidwell River Valley
(3-1) 4.325, 10. Waverly (2-2) 3.95,
11. Portsmouth West (2-2) 3.15, 12.
Piketon (2-2) 3.0
Region 18 - 1. Cin. Hills Christian
Acad. (4-0) 7.9823, 2. Cin. Mariemont
(4-0) 7.4482, 3. Hamilton Badin (4-0)
7.325, 4. Richwood North Union (3-1)
6.05, 5. Day. Chaminade Julienne (3-1)
6.0177, 6. Jamestown Greeneview
(4-0) 5.9, 7. Waynesville (3-1) 5.65, 8.
Cin. Madeira (3-1) 5.6, 9. Cin. Shroder
(3-1) 5.1907, 10. Reading (3-1) 4.5,
11. Cin. Purcell Marian (2-2) 3.9, 12.
Bethel-Tate (3-1) 3.7
Division VI
Region 19 - 1. Sugarcreek
Garaway (4-0) 9.075, 2. Mogadore
(4-0) 8.325, 3. McDonald (4-0) 7.45,
4. Loudonville (4-0) 7.35, 5. Kirtland
(4-0) 6.725, 6. Louisville St. Thomas
Aquinas (3-1) 6.25, 7. New Middletown
Springfield (3-1) 5.575, 8. Cuyahoga
Hts. (3-1) 5.075, 9. Dalton (3-1) 5.0,
10. Columbiana (3-1) 4.95, 11. Cle.
Villa Angela-St. Joseph (2-2) 4.675,
12. Jeromesville Hillsdale (3-1) 4.6
Region 20 - 1. Defiance Tinora
(4-0) 7.25, 2. Convoy Crestview (4-0)
6.375, 3. Bucyrus Wynford (3-1) 6.025,
4. Spencerville (4-0) 5.8, 5. Delphos
Jefferson (4-0) 5.45, 6. Lima Central
Cath. (3-1) 5.4, 7. Gibsonburg (4-0)
5.05, 8. Defiance Ayersville (4-0)
4.875, 9. Van Buren (3-1) 4.55, 10.
Haviland Wayne Trace (3-1) 4.125, 11.
Carey (3-1) 3.975, 12. North Robinson
Colonel Crawford (3-1) 3.8
Region 21 - 1. Lucasville Valley
(4-0) 8.675, 2. Fredericktown (4-0)
7.55, 3. Grandview Hts. (3-1) 5.8, 4.
Nelsonville-York (3-1) 5.725, 5. Cols.
Bishop Ready (3-1) 5.5947, 6. Oak Hill
(3-1) 5.375, 7. Centerburg (3-1) 5.025,
8-tie. West Lafayette Ridgewood (3-1)
4.325, 8-tie. Cardington-Lincoln (3-1)
4.325, 10. Newark Cath. (3-1) 4.275,
11. Gahanna Cols. Acad. (2-1) 4.1667,
12. Coal Grove Dawson-Bryant (2-2)
3.725
Region 22 - 1. Cin. Country Day

(4-0) 5.8, 2. West Liberty-Salem
(4-0) 5.7, 3. Cin. Summit Country
Day (4-0) 5.4912, 4. Versailles (3-1)
5.375, 5. Lewisburg Tri-County North
(4-0) 5.125, 6. Anna (3-1) 5.05, 7.
Casstown Miami East (4-0) 4.9091,
8. St. Henry (3-1) 4.825, 9. London
Madison Plains (3-1) 4.025, 10. West
Alexandria Twin Valley South (3-0)
3.8333, 11. Mechanicsburg (3-1) 3.6,
12. Minster (2-2) 3.45
Division VII
Region 23 - 1. Berlin Center
Western Reserve (4-0) 6.85, 2.
Plymouth (3-1) 5.675, 3. Norwalk St.
Paul (3-1) 5.0, 4. Ashland Mapleton
(2-2) 3.925, 5. Richmond Hts. (3-1)
3.9, 6. Sandusky St. Mary Central
Cath. (2-2) 3.8, 7. Cle. Hts. Lutheran
East (2-1) 3.7778, 8. Garfield Hts.
Trinity (2-2) 3.3346, 9. Toronto (3-1)
3.325, 10. Sebring McKinley (3-1)
2.975, 11-tie. Wellsville (2-2) 2.8,
11-tie. Lowellville (2-2) 2.8
Region 24 - 1. Arlington (4-0)
6.95, 2. North Baltimore (3-1) 4.6,
3-tie. Tiffin Calvert (3-1) 4.375, 3-tie.
Columbus Grove (3-1) 4.375, 5.
Delphos St. John’s (2-2) 4.125, 6.
Tol. Christian (3-1) 3.55, 7. McComb
(3-1) 3.5, 8. New Washington Buckeye
Central (3-1) 3.275, 9. Edgerton
(2-2) 2.9, 10. Leipsic (2-2) 2.85, 11.
Oregon Cardinal Stritch (2-2) 2.725,
12. Arcadia (2-2) 2.575
Region 25 - 1. Glouster Trimble
(4-0) 6.9, 2. Shadyside (4-0) 6.4,
3. Caldwell (4-0) 6.225, 4. New
Philadelphia Tuscarawas Central
Cath. (4-0) 5.0896, 5. Millersport (4-0)
5.0391, 6. New Matamoras Frontier
(4-0) 4.85, 7. Bainbridge Paint Valley
(2-2) 4.15, 8. Canal Winchester
Harvest Prep. (3-1) 3.6, 9. Bellaire St.
John Central (3-1) 3.325, 10. Danville
(3-1) 3.25, 11. Willow Wood Symmes
Valley (2-2) 3.075, 12. Crown City
South Gallia (2-2) 2.575
Region 26 - 1. Fort Recovery
(3-1) 6.95, 2. Maria Stein Marion
Local (4-0) 6.425, 3. North Lewisburg
Triad (3-1) 5.075, 4. Covington (3-1)
4.1376, 5. DeGraff Riverside (3-1)
4.0896, 6. Cin. Miami Valley Christian
Acad. (3-1) 3.675, 7. Hamilton New
Miami (3-1) 3.325, 8-tie. Troy Christian
(2-2) 2.8, 8-tie. Ridgeway Ridgemont
(2-2) 2.8, 10. Cin. Riverview East
Acad. (3-1) 2.75, 11. Sidney Lehman
Cath. (2-2) 2.6, 12. Fort Loramie (2-2)
2.35

they would get the rest of the night. The Pioneers outscored
the Wildcats 6-1 as Clay landed back-to-back aces along with
another kill.
Then the Wildcats showed they weren’t about to give up as
Wallace scorched a kill off an assist by Miller. Jenna Gilden
landed an ace on the next serve and Temple was called for a
4-hit violation as Jefferson made it a 23-18 set, forcing the
Pioneers to call timeout. Temple set up match point with a
Sutton kill and the match ended as the Wildcats’ return fell
out of bounds.
“After we lost the first game on Saturday to Temple
Christian, we made some adjustments and it worked,” said
Coach DeVelvis after the match. “Tonight we made those
same adjustments and it didn’t work tonight. We did a good
job stopping a lot of the shots made by Lynnea Clay but she
still managed to get in some big kills.”
Highlights for the Wildcats include Jenna Gilden having
a perfect night of serving on 10-of-10. Culp had eight assists
and Geise scored five kills.
Clay had 18 kills for the Pioneers.
The Wildcats are at home against Paulding on Thursday.
Lima Temple Christian will travel to Waynesfield-Goshen
for a NWCC matchup Thursday.
In JV action, Jefferson came away with a sweep 25-12 and
25-21.

MLB Glance

Associated Press
American League
East Division
W L
Pct
GB
x-Baltimore 94 63
.599

New York 81 76
.516
13
Toronto
80 77
.510
14
Tampa Bay 76 81
.484
18
Boston
68 89
.433
26
Central Division
W L
Pct
GB
Detroit
87 70
.554

Kansas City 86 71
.548
1
Cleveland 82 76
.519

Chicago 72 85
.459
15
Minnesota 66 90
.423
20½
West Division
W L
Pct
GB
x-L Angeles 96 61
.611

Oakland 86 70
.551

Seattle
83 74
.529
13
Houston 69 89
.437
27½
Texas
64 93
.408
32
x-clinched division
___
Monday’s Results
Cleveland 4, Kansas City 3, 10 innings,
comp. of susp. game
N.Y. Yankees 5, Baltimore 0
Kansas City 2, Cleveland 0
Toronto 14, Seattle 4
Chicago White Sox 2, Detroit 0
Texas 4, Houston 3
Arizona 6, Minnesota 2
Oakland 8, L.A. Angels 4
Tuesday’s Results
Baltimore 5, N.Y. Yankees 4
Kansas City 7, Cleveland 1
Toronto 10, Seattle 2
Detroit 4, Chicago White Sox 3
Tampa Bay 6, Boston 2
Texas 2, Houston 1
Arizona at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels at Oakland, 10:05 p.m.
Today’s Games
Baltimore (B.Norris 14-8) at N.Y. Yankees
(Greene 5-3), 1:05 p.m.
Chicago White Sox (Sale 12-4) at Detroit
(Verlander 14-12), 1:08 p.m.
Arizona (Nuno 0-6) at Minnesota
(P.Hughes 15-10), 1:10 p.m.
L.A. Angels (H.Santiago 5-9) at Oakland
(Lester 16-10), 3:35 p.m.
Kansas City (J.Vargas 11-10) at
Cleveland (Bauer 5-8), 7:05 p.m.
Seattle at Toronto, 7:07 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Houston at Texas , 8:05 p.m.

Grove

—————National League
East Division
W L
Pct
GB
x-Wash.
92 64
.590

Atlanta
76 81
.484
16½
New York 76 81
.484
16½
Miami
75 81
.481
17
Philadelphia 71 86
.452
21½
Central Division
W L
Pct
GB
z-St. Louis 88 69
.561

z-Pittsburgh 86 71
.548
2
Milwaukee 80 77
.510
8
Cincinnati 73 84
.465
15
Chicago 69 88
.439
19
West Division
W L
Pct
GB
z-L Angeles 89 68
.567

San Fran 85 71
.545

San Diego 75 81
.481
13½
Colorado 65 92
.414
24
Arizona
63 94
.401
26
z-clinched playoff berth
x-clinched division
___
Monday’s Results
Pittsburgh 1, Atlanta 0
St. Louis 8, Chicago Cubs 0
Arizona 6, Minnesota 2
San Diego 1, Colorado 0
San Fran 5, L.A. Dodgers 2, 13 innings
Tuesday’s Results
Washington 4, N.Y. Mets 2
Cincinnati 3, Milwaukee 1
Miami 2, Philadelphia 0
Pittsburgh 3, Atlanta 2
St. Louis at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
Arizona at Minnesota, 8:10 p.m.
Colorado at San Diego, 10:10 p.m.
San Fran at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10 p.m.
Today’s Games
Arizona (Nuno 0-6) at Minnesota
(P.Hughes 15-10), 1:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Gee 7-8) at Washington
(G.Gonzalez 9-10), 7:05 p.m.
Milwaukee (Lohse 12-9) at Cincinnati
(Corcino 0-1), 7:10 p.m.
Philadelphia (K.Kendrick 9-13) at Miami
(Hand 3-8), 7:10 p.m.
Pittsburgh (Locke 7-5) at Atlanta (Teheran
13-13), 7:10 p.m.
St. Louis (Lackey 3-2) at Chicago Cubs
(Arrieta 9-5), 8:05 p.m.
Colorado (Flande 0-5) at San Diego
(Wieland 0-0), 9:10 p.m.
San Francisco (T.Hudson 9-12) at L.A.
Dodgers (Kershaw 20-3), 10:10 p.m.

(Continued from page 6)

Spencerville responded to take the lead back at 9-8 on kills
by Miller and Merriman. Miller kept the Bearcat offense going
with a set to Merriman for a kill and followed with a quick
tapper that fell in as Spencerville lead 12-9. After a timeout by
Grove, the Bulldogs began to comeback with kills by Sydney
McClure, Vorhess and Carlee McCluer. Spencerville kept
pace with a kill by Merriman and Miller’s tapper seamed to
catch the Bulldogs off guard. The teams traded kills and the
set remained tight with the score tied at 18. An ace by Hope
Schroeder gave the Bulldogs the lead as Sydney McCluer followed with a kill. The Bearcats refused to give up continuing
to battle and knotted the set at 22. But Columbus Grove did
like they did in the previous two sets by scoring the final points
on a run to win the match in three sets.
Spencerville’s junior varsity coach Sydney Kuhlman, filling in for under-the-weather varsity coach Shelby Cox, was
“happy with my team’s effort. We played great in that third
game and refused to give up.”
Columbus Grove coach Susan Jones was not as pleased
with her team: “I thought we played sluggish tonight. Our goal
is to go on long runs serving and we made errors that prevented
that from happening. We won and that is the important goal.”
The next action for Spencerville is Thursday at Crestview
and Columbus Grove takes on Allen East.
Hollar lead the Bearcats with 15 digs and Merriman had
eight kills. Miller was a perfect 12/12 serving.
Columbus Grove was paced by Glass with 20 assists and
two aces, Clement (11 assists, 5 aces), Wynn (10 kills, 4
blocks), Carlee McCluer (8 kills), Vorhess (7 kills, 5 blocks)
and Schroeder (5 digs).

Musketeers
(Continued from page 6)

In the second half, open
looks were tough to come by.
Both keepers did their duty
in keeping their opponent off
the scoreboard and the midfielders and defenders gave
their opponent’s forwards
little space.
The Red and White had
two prime chances: at 39:40,
when Haehn got an opening on the right doorstep but
was denied by Osting; and at
26:10, when Hamilton took

a steal for a 14-yarder but
Osting deflected it away.
Jennings had three golden chances: at 16:17, when
Eickholt got loose for a
6-yarder that Pimpas denied;
at 12:32 when Pimpas dove
to stymie an 18-yarder by
Kaskel; and at 8:02, when
Pimpas deflected and finally
controlled another 18-yarder
by Kaskel.
Jefferson visits Crestview
under the lights (7:30 p.m.)
Thursday; Jennings hosts
Elida at noon Saturday.

BOWLING

Tuesday Merchant
Sept. 16, 2014
Lears Martial Arts
37-10
Ace Hardware
34-14
Pitsenbarger Supply
31-12
R C Connections
30-12
Men over 200
Shane Schimmoller 226, Joe
Geise 209, Chris Martin
227,
Terence Keaser 212-223-233, Phil
Austin 207-255, Bruce VanMetre
245-264-247, Don Honigford 205,
Ted Kill 220, Dave Stemen 204.
Men over 550
John Jones 564, Chris Martin
561, Terence Keaser 668, Phil
Austin 650, Bruce VanMetre 756,
Don Honigford 569, Dave Stemen
564.
Wednesday Industrial
Sept. 17, 2014
Buckeye Painting
24-16
Unverferth Mfg.
26-16
Rustic Cafe
23-17
K-M Tire
22-18
Cabo
20-20
John Deere
19-21
Fusion Graphic
18-22
D & D Grain
17-23
Topp Chalet
17-23
Heather Marie Photo
16-24
Men over 200
Jim Thorbin 221-204-232, Rick
Kennedy 222, Erin Deal 212-249,
Brent Miller 254-279-207, Brian
Sharp 238-209-234, Mike Rice 203,
Sean Hulihan 224, Justin Rahrig
223-235, Daniel Uncapher 218, Matt
Hamilton 201-204, Zach Pauley 258225-256, Kyle Hamilton 210, Matt
Hoffman 212, Danny Schleeter 202,
Rob Shaeffer 243, Terence Keaser
236, Butch Prine Jr. 245-228-278,
Frank Miller 202-214, Joe Geise
215, John Allen 201, John Jones
236-258, Kyle Early 222-300-235,
Dave Moenter 250-213-262, Randy
Fischbach 224, Thomas Brusseau
209, Jason Mahlie 259-256-247, Don

Rice 204-234-218, Shawn Allemeier
213-258, Chandler Stevens 205, Phil
Austin 254.
Men over 550
Jim Thorbin 657, Rick Kennedy
574, Erin Deal 650, Brent Miller 740,
Brian Sharp 681, Mike Rice 577,
Dan Kleman 582, Justin Rahrig 627,
Daniel Uncapher 587, Matt Hamilton
565, Zach Pauley 739, Ryan Robey
552, Rob Shaeffer 587, Terence
Keaser 626, Butch Prine Jr. 751,
Frank Miller 610, John Allen 560,
John Jones 666, Kyle Early 757,
Dave Moenter 725, Randy Fischbach
584, Jason Mahlie 762, Don Rice
656, Shawn Allemeier 647, Chandler
Stevens 592, Phil Austin 634.

Thursday National
Sept. 18, 2014
Evans Construction
27-13
S & K’s Landeck Tavern
23-17
Wannemachers
22-18
D R C Big Dogs
22-18
Old Mill Campgrounds
22-18
VFW
20-20
K-M Tire
18-22
First Federal
18-22
Mushroom Graphics
16-24
Westrich
12-28
Men over 200
Tom Pratter 207, Mike Rice 207,
Dan Mason 202, Joe Geise 212-238,
John Allen 237, Doug Milligan Jr
210, Tim Koester 232, Ted Wells
217-222, Doug Milligan Sr. 211,
Shawn Allemeier 256, Jason Mahlie
203, Rick Schuck 219, Lenny Hubert
204-250, Travis Hubert 237, Kevin
Decker 245, Don Rice 211, Jeff
Lawrence 202.
Men over 550
Mike Rice 578, Joe Geise 645,
Doug Milligan Jr. 574, Tim Koester
580, Ted Wells 620, Shawn Allemeier
604, Chris Martin 573, Jason Mahlie
554, Rick Schuck 578, Lenny Hubert
631, Travis Hubert 585, Don Rice
584, Jeff Lawrence 558.

www.delphosherald.com

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

The Herald - 9

Business

Low interest rates put
Keehn named new marketing and
squeeze on CD holders
communications director at St. Rita’s
Bruce Williams
INFORMATION SUBMITTED

Memorial Civic and Convention Center,
Allen Lima Leadership, ArtSpace Lima,
LIMA — Beth Keehn
Breast Cancer Coalition,
has been named director of
St. Anthony School and
Marketing & Communication
HeartChase Lima.
for St. Rita’s Health Partners,
Keehn and her husband,
replacing Linda Chartrand,
Mike, have three children.
who is retiring in October.
They reside in Columbus
Most recently, Keehn
Grove and are parishioners
was marketing director at
at St. Anthony Catholic
Husky Energy in Lima and
Church.
previously held a number
Marker
assumes
of positions at The Ohio
expanded responsibilities
State University, both in the
at St. Rita’s
Columbus and Lima camMary
M a r k e r,
puses. She earned bachelor
Administrator of The Henry
of arts degrees in economics
& Beverly Hawk Heart &
Keehn
and journalism from OSU as
Vascular Center at St. Rita’s
well as a master in business administra- since 2003, and manager of respiratory
tion from Ohio State’s Fisher College of care, pulmonary function lab, EEG lab
Business.
and St. Rita’s Audiology Department,
Keehn has been active in the com- recently assumed responsibility for St.
munities where she lives and works, Rita’s Sleep Center.
serving on boards for the Veteran’s
Marker has been employed at St.

P&G selling rest of
pet care business
NEW YORK (AP) — The Procter
& Gamble Co. is selling its Iams and
Eukanuba brands in Europe to Spectrum
Brands, shedding the remaining parts of
its pet care business.
Financial terms were not disclosed.
The transaction includes 42 markets in
Europe. P&G said that exiting the pet care
business will help it focus on its core businesses. Its brands include Tide detergent
and Pampers diapers.
Spectrum Brands Holdings Inc. is a
consumer products company whose pet
group brands include Tetra, Furminator
and Dingo.
In April, Cincinnati-based P&G said
that it was selling 80 percent of its
global pet care business — including
North America and Latin America — to
Mars Inc. Europe was not included in
that transaction, except for Russia and
Turkey. Mars later agreed to buy an
additional 10 percent of P&G’s pet care
business in additional markets such as
Japan, Australia and South Africa.
The portion of the pet care business
that Spectrum is buying has about $200
million in annual sales. Spectrum said
in a statement that the acquisition will
give its United Pet Group unit access
to the growing European dog and cat
food market. Its board has approved the
transaction.
Spectrum Brands, based in
Middleton, Wisconsin, also has brands
including Rayovac, Black & Decker and
Farberware.

Rita’s
since
1976 and led
the opening of
the first sleep
center in 1990.
She is a 1981
graduate
of
Lima Technical
College respiratory program
and in 2007,
earned a bachelor of business
administration
Marker
from
Mount
Vernon Nazarene University. She is a
Certified Respiratory Therapist, Certified
Pulmonary Function Technologist, a
Respiratory Care Professional, a 2007
graduate of Allen Lima Leadership,
past president of the Ohio Society for
Respiratory Care and served as chairperson of Rhodes Respiratory Care
Advisory Board for 13 years.

US clampdown on tax
maneuver leaves its mark
NEW YORK (AP) — A handful of big companies pursuing overseas
mergers to lower their tax bills came under pressure Tuesday after the
U.S. unveiled rules to discourage them.
The Treasury Department announced new regulations on Monday
aimed at making these so-called inversion deals less lucrative. In a typical deal, an American company buys a foreign firm based in a country
with a lower tax rate, then moves its headquarters overseas.
Drug companies in Ireland and the U.K. have been popular targets.
The pharmaceutical company AbbVie, based in Chicago, reached an
agreement to buy Dublin-based Shire in July for $54 billion. Shares of
both companies sank in Tuesday trading. AbbVie Inc. lost 2 percent in
New York trading, while Shire sank 2 percent in London.
“The repercussions of these rules could end up reaching far more
businesses than the headlines might suggest …” said Jan Wald, an analyst at Benchmark Co., a financial advisory firm. In a note to clients,
Wald listed a number of changes made by the new restrictions, including
“the way that loans to foreign entities with U.S. participation are treated
under U.S. tax law.”
Among other companies getting hit in Tuesday trading, Minneapolisbased Medtronic Inc., which plans to buy Dublin-based Covidien
Plc., fell 4 percent. Covidien lost 3 percent. The British drugmaker
AstraZeneca, still considered a likely takeover candidate after it successfully rebuffed overtures from Pfizer Inc. earlier this year, slumped
3 percent.
The new regulations attempt to stop a range of complicated transactions companies use to lower their U.S. tax bill. One measure tries to
stop “hopscotch” loans, in which companies turn their foreign earnings
into U.S. loans. Another rule change tightens the application of a law
that says the U.S. company’s shareholders must own less than 80 percent
of the new, combined company.
About 50 U.S. companies have carried out inversions over the past
decade, according to the nonpartisan Congressional Research Service.
Many more had been considering it.

Tips on how to protect your good name online

name and profile out there by signing up
with several key social media sites. Your
profile page on LinkedIn.com, essential
to anyone employed or looking for a job,
will zoom to the No. 1 spot in search
results. If you create a YouTube.com
profile page, that will probably climb
to No. 2 thanks to new blended textimage-video search techniques. Those
and Facebook, Twitter and Google+ will
help fill up the first page of a Google
search, which “89 percent of people never look beyond,” says William Arruda,
founder and president of Reach Personal
Branding, which helps professionals
manage their business reputations.
-- Buy the Web address of your own
name. Do this even if you don’t intend to
launch a website. That prevents someone
else -- say, an evil ex-spouse -- from
getting it. (Shop at a domain name
registry service like GoDaddy.com or
NetworkSolutions.com.) You can also
create your own websites at personal
portals like About.me and Flavors.me
(no “.com” extension).
-- Create positive content. Don’t be
intimidated by the need to fill up pages
on all those sites. Although more content creation is better than less, you can
choose your own pace. “A lot of people

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establish a bio on Twitter but never actually tweet, because the bio itself will
come up high in searches,” says Shannon
Wilkinson, founder and chief executive
officer of Reputation Communications,
which works with businesses, philanthropies and politicians. Or you can
curate your own content. If you read an
article online that’s meaningful to you,
write a one-sentence description and
send the link to friends.
-- If you’re really gung-ho, start a
blog. The easiest way is on a hosted blog
site like Blogger.com, Squarespace.com,
TypePad.com or WordPress.com.
-- Take down bad content. The previous steps should go a long way toward
burying bad news. But if you think
that more action is required, Consumer
Reports suggests you start by contacting
your Facebook blabbermouth or website tormentor (find the site owner’s or
administrator’s contact information on
WhoIs.com) and ask that the information
be removed, says Bennet Kelley, attorney and founder of InternetLawCenter.
net, a Los Angeles law firm. Appeal to
the humanity of your nemesis. If that
doesn’t work, Kelley advises that you
attack the problem as a violation of law,
regulation or hosting platform policy
-- whichever may apply. Finally, a cease
and desist letter from an attorney can be
a powerful persuader. It can cost $750 to
$2,000, but that’s still cheaper than your
other option: a lawsuit.
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Embarrassing photos. Youthful indiscretions. Unguarded comments. In a
world where everyone can be -- and is
being -- Googled by everyone else, the
past can come back to bite you like never
before, warns Consumer Reports.
If you’re searching for a new job
or applying to an educational program,
someone in that process is likely to
investigate you over the Internet. If
you’re a self-employed professional or
small-business owner, technology now
serves up user reviews about you even
to people who aren’t looking for them.
Positive information, of course, can
open doors, but negative reviews might
keep them shut. One consultant, worried
about a bad critique that popped up when
he searched his name, spent $1,000 for
help removing it. But Consumer Reports
notes that you can preserve and protect
your online reputation for a lot less.
Here’s how:
-- Google yourself. Start by looking
for your own name on that search engine
as well as on Bing.com and Yahoo.com.
In the Internet age, you should regularly
keep tabs on what’s being said about
you. You can even automate this chore.
Go to google.com/alerts to set up a daily,
weekly or as-new-things-pop-up scan of
your name. The results will be emailed
to you.
-- Post your own profiles online. This
will quickly polish your online reputation, because search engine algorithms
tend to push your own positive online
disclosures to the top of search results.
That pushes negatives lower. Get your

DEAR BRUCE: I currently have four IRAs and CDs
invested with a local bank.
They pay next to nothing. I
am over 59 1/2. Do you have
any suggestions for reinvesting these? -- T.T.
DEAR T.T.: You know this
is a serious problem. You’re
caught in a squeeze, not of
your making and not in your
control. The Federal Reserve
is still paranoid about inflation and as a result, keeps the
interest rate at ridiculously low
levels. If you are a borrower,
say you need a mortgage or
personal loan, that’s a good
deal. The flip side is people
such as you, who are getting
taken of advantage royally.
If you are concerned
about bank rates, take a look
at what money market funds
are paying these days: nothing. Unless you are prepared
to get almost no return on
your money, you’re forced to
take some risk and that means
entering the marketplace. I still
maintain achieving a decent
return is possible if you invest
in a variety of solid American
companies. You will do far
better in the marketplace than
you will with any bank, money
market and most bonds.
DEAR BRUCE: I sold my
home after 36 years in residence and am now preparing
to do my taxes. My ex-husband
and I purchased the house in
1977 for $74,000. We divorced
in 1991 and I bought him out
at an agreed property value
of $230,000. He received a
$78,000 equity payment from
the refinanced loan and signed a
quit claim deed.
Over the next several years,
I refinanced the house several
times to provide housing for
my children and grandchildren. This in turn resulted in a
smaller return on the property.
The house sold in 2013 for
$540,000. My net return was
less than $200,000, and I am
currently leasing a condo in a
55-and-older community.
Since my net income
from the sale was less than
the $250,000 one-time exemption, am I still responsible for
capital gains tax on the property? I understand that I have
until 2015 to purchase another
property. What would be the
impact of doing so? -- D.E.
DEAR D.E.: It seems to
me, given all of the refinancing and financial maneuvering,
that it would be to your advantage to hire a knowledgeable
accountant to go through all of
these transactions and determine exactly what your tax
responsibility is. Since you
netted less than $200,000, I am
reasonably confident that there
will be no tax responsibility,
given the $250,000 exemption
that goes to every individual.
That having been said, I would
be more comfortable having

Smart
Money
the facts reviewed by a competent practitioner.
As to the repurchase of
another property, once again,
with a $250,000 exemption,
I don’t think there would be
any impact at all. But why do
you need the aggravation? At
your age, you are far better off
leasing than owning a condo.
Let someone else have the
problems of ownership.
DEAR BRUCE: We read
your response to a letter about
a tree falling into a neighbor’s yard and asking who
is responsible. Our neighbor
has bamboo planted along our
property line. It has grown out
of control -- 20 feet to 30 feet
tall, and the roots constantly
erupt with growth on our side.
During storms, its branches
fall over his fence, breaking
our horse fence and restricting
our horses’ path to their normal feeding area. This averages 30 to 100 stalks per storm.
The broken branches are still
attached to the root plant and
need to be removed from the
pasture area after every rain,
snow or sleet storm.
Who’s responsibility is
this, due to the invasive nature
of the plant? We reside in
Pennsylvania, if state law is a
factor. -- S.K.
DEAR S.K.: I sympathize with your situation. It’s
a shame that you can’t get
together with your neighbor
and come to some kind of
compromise. If that is not possible, you might wish to seek
the help of an attorney since
the branches are constantly
falling and doing damage on
your property.
You have a perfect right to
cut any branches that intrude
in your air space on your property, which may dissuade the
owner from continuing this
practice. The same thing is
true with roots. Any roots
that cross the property can be
cut. You have to be careful in
regard to any damage that you
do to the bamboo, but I don’t
think that would be too much
of a problem.
The best solution, in my
opinion, is to try to work
something out with the neighbor before seeking an attorney.
(Send questions to bruce@
brucewilliams.com. Questions of
general interest will be answered
in future columns. Owing to the
volume of mail, personal replies
cannot be provided.)
COPYRIGHT
2014
UNITED
FEATURE
SYNDICATE

WEBB

INSURANCE
AGENCY, INC.

HOME • AUTO • BUSINESS • LIFE • HEALTH

1-800-727-1113

212 W. High - Lima, 419-228-3211
138 N. Main - Bluffton, 419-358-4015

­
Description­

00102500

STOCKS

Quotes of local interest supplied by
EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS
Close of business September 23, 2014
Last­Price­

American­Electric­Power­Co.,­Inc.­
52.56­
AutoZone,­Inc.­
507.79­
Bunge­Limited­
84.44­
BP­p.l.c.­
45.72­
Citigroup­Inc.­
52.84­
CenturyLink,­Inc.­
40.46­
CVS­Health­Corporation­
79.99­
Dominion­Resources,­Inc.­
68.30­
Eaton­Corporation­plc­
65.14­
Ford­Motor­Co.­
16.17­
First­Defiance­Financial­Corp.­
27.06­
First­Financial­Bancorp.­
16.14­
General­Dynamics­Corporation­
125.97­
General­Motors­Company­
33.22­
The­Goodyear­Tire­&­Rubber­Company­ 23.61­
Huntington­Bancshares­Incorporated­
9.92­
Health­Care­REIT,­Inc.­
62.71­
The­Home­Depot,­Inc.­
91.49­
Honda­Motor­Co.,­Ltd.­
34.32­
Johnson­&­Johnson­
107.46­
JPMorgan­Chase­&­Co.­
60.94­
Kohl’s­Corp.­
61.89­
Lowe’s­Companies­Inc.­
53.12­
McDonald’s­Corp.­
93.51­
Microsoft­Corporation­
46.56­
Pepsico,­Inc.­
92.93­
The­Procter­&­Gamble­Company­
84.44­
Rite­Aid­Corporation­
5.31­
Sprint­Corporation­
6.67­
Time­Warner­Inc.­
75.27­
United­Bancshares­Inc.­
14.86­
U.S.­Bancorp­
42.59­
Verizon­Communications­Inc.­
49.91­
Wal-Mart­Stores­Inc.­
75.60­
Dow­Jones­Industrial­Average­
17,055.87­
S&P­500­
1,982.77­
NASDAQ­Composite­
4,508.69­

Change

-0.41
+2.41
-0.81
-0.41
-0.20
-0.33
-0.61
0.00
+0.07
-0.19
-0.34
-0.19
-2.05
-0.22
-0.43
-0.12
-0.42
-0.40
-0.27
-0.42
+0.03
+0.16
-0.34
-0.42
-0.50
-0.65
-0.37
+0.20
-0.13
-0.40
-0.07
-0.43
-0.27
-0.71
-116.81
-11.52
-19.00

Classifieds
www.delphosherald.com

Dear Abby

Minimum Charge: 15 words,
Deadlines:
Acreage and
235 Help Wanted
405
Lots
For Sale
2 times - $9.00
11:30
a.m. for the next day’s issue.
Each word
isLLC$.30 2-5 days
BREESE
FARMS
22+ ACRES
of
tillable paper is 11:00 a.m. Friday
Saturday’s
Class A-CDL
land for sale East of Del$.25 *HOME
6-9 days
DAILY*
Monday’s
paper is 1:00 p.m. Friday
Drivers Needed $.20 10+ days
phos. Price
in line with
Local company with
current
appraisal.
If
interA
Herald Extra is 11 a.m. Thursday
Each word
$.10 forCDL
3 months
openings
for OTRis
driver
ested call 419-236-4264,
$800-$900
WKLY
running van loads &
or more prepaid11am-8pm. We accept
Allen County Pallet Co. is
235 Help Wanted

BREESE FARMS LLC
Class A-CDL
Drivers Needed
Local company with
openings for OTR driver
running van loads &
regional driver running
hopper loads in Ohio,
Michigan & Indiana.
Please call
Dave @ 419-203-2745
Missy @ 419-203-1376
CLASS A CDL Truck
Drivers wanted for local
work. One full-time, one
part-time position available. Home daily, round
trip runs. Ottoville and
Columbus Grove locations preferred. Excellent
pay. Call 419-707-0537.

Looking for a
career change?

Our company is expanding and we need
your help! We are
looking for energetic
people with a genuine interest in assisting individuals with
intellectual disabilities
with daily supports
and fulfilling involvement in activities in
Putnam County. We
have openings for full
and part time hours,
flexible
schedules,
weekends, or 24 hour
shifts.

Please call Jessica at
419-523-5810
for more
information.
EOE/DFWP
00101418

HELP WANTED. Automotive/Heavy
Duty
Truck Technician for local car dealership. Competitive pay, paid vacation and medical/dental
insurance plan. Apply at:
Knippen Chrysler, 800
West
5th
St.,
Delphos,OH 45833.

S
610 Automotive

Geise

Transmission, Inc.
• automatic transmission
• standard transmission
• differentials
• transfer case
• brakes & tune up

2 miles north of Ottoville

419-453-3620
625 Construction

POHLMAN
BUILDERS
ROOM ADDITIONS

GARAGES • SIDING • ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED

POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS

Residential
& Commercial
• Agricultural Needs
• All Concrete Work

Mark Pohlman

419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460

All shifts are home daily
with full benefits, 401 K
plans, paid vacations,
paid holidays.
All routes are 90% drop
and hook which are
compensated and
100% no touch.
Stop in at
700 E. Hanthorn Rd.
Monday-Friday
8am to 4 pm to apply.

425 Houses For Sale
BY OWNER. Updated
4BR, 2BA home w/basement and heated, at tached two-car garage.
Located in Landeck. For
appointment
call
419-234-2231.

Garage Sales/
Yard Sales

555

MULTI-FAMILY, COR NER North St. and Elm St.
9/25-9/27, Thurs-Sat,
8am-8pm.
Antiques,
books, kids’ items, furniture, kitchenware, toys,
2-8’ wood tables, drafting
table, quilting items.

OTR, CLASS A CDL
SEMI-DRIVER. Home
most evenings, includes
benefits. Send resume to
AWC Trucking, 835
Skinner St., Delphos,
OH 45833 or to
577 Miscellaneous
ulmsinc@bizwoh.rr.com ,
419-692-3951
FOR SALE Fall & Christmas Decorations. Call
419-695-2881
PART-TIME
HELP
wanted Mornings and afternoons. Drug Screen
Contingent upon hiring.
Good work history required. Apply at Pats Donuts, 662 Elida Ave, Delphos

Apartment/
Duplex For Rent

305

LAMP REPAIR, table or
floor. Come to our store.
Hohenbrink
TV.
419-695-1229
SEARS
EXERCISE
bike, like new, $10. Collector
dolls,
$35.
419-695-8751

Pets and

583

Supplies
NEWLY REMODELED
2-bedroom apartment,
234 N. Cass St., FREE KITTENS to good
$400/mo. No pets. Call homes. 419-692-4525
419-615-5798
or
419-488-3685
MALTESE, SHIH Tzus,

320 House For Rent
SEVERAL MOBILE
Homes/House for rent.
View homes online at
www.ulmshomes.com or
inquire at 419-692-3951

345 Vacations
LOOKING FOR a Florida Rental this Winter?
Clean mobile home near
Punta Gorda, Florida furnished, heated pool,
fishing, boating on Shell
Creek. $900 monthly 3
month minimum. Call
260-667-3662 or email:
nettlelake2@juno.com

Pomapoos, Shihpoos,
Shihtese. Garwick's the
Pet People. Puppies
reduced: Terrier mix $99.
Morkie $299.
419- 795-5711.
garwicksthepetpeople.com
.

592 Wanted to Buy

Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold

Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.

2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899

DEAR DOCTOR
K: My mother was
recently diagnosed
with
a
“sliding
hernia.” What is this?
D E A R
READER: A “sliding
hernia” is a type of
hiatal hernia. OK,
so what’s a hiatal
hernia? A hernia
occurs when part
of an organ juts
through an opening
into an area where
it shouldn’t. The

ervice
Home Repair
and Remodel

665

Lawn, Garden,
Landscaping

Quality Home
Improvements
• Roofing &
siding
• Seamless
gutters
• Decks
• Windows &
doors
• Electrical
• Complete
remodeling
No job too small!

419.302.0882
A local business

L.L.C.

• Trimming & Removal
• Stump Grinding
• 24 Hour Service • Fully Insured

KEVIN M. MOORE

(419) 235-8051
TEMAN’S
OUR TREE
SERVICE

Check The
Service
Directory
In

The
Delphos
Herald

670 Miscellaneous

COMMUNITY
SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES
NEWER FACILITY

419-692-0032
Across from Arby’s

GESSNER’S
PRODUCE
CHRYSANTHEMUM’S
ASTERS, PUMPKINS,
GOURDS, STRAW
AND INDIAN CORN

• Trimming • Topping • Thinning
• Deadwooding
Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal
Since 1973

AVAILABLE NOW!

Bill Teman 419-302-2981
Ernie Teman 419-230-4890

APPLES COMING
THIS WEEK!

419-692-7261

Is It
PROPERTY
Broken? DAY’S
MAINTENANCE

Find A
Repairman
To Fix It

To place an ad phone 419-695-0015 ext. 122
FREE ADS: 5 days free if item is free
or less than $50. Only 1 item per ad, 1
ad per month.
BOX REPLIES: $8.00 if you come
and pick them up. $14.00 if we have to
send them to you.
CARD OF THANKS: $2.00 base
charge + $.10 for each word.

THANKS TO ST. JUDE: Runs 1 day at the
price of $3.00.
GARAGE SALES: Each day is $.20 per
word. $8.00 minimum charge.
“I WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
DEBTS”: Ad must be placed in person by
the person whose name will appear in the ad.
Must show ID & pay when placing ad. Regular rates apply

LLC

• Mowing
• Landscaping
• Lawn Seeding

Brent Day
567-204-8488

www.dayspropertymaintenance.com

Mueller Tree
Service

Tree Trimming,
Topping & Removal,
Brush Removal

419-203-8202

bjpmueller@gmail.com
Fully insured

love than Dawn appears to be capable
of.
DEAR ABBY: I often eat out
with friends when we travel and
when we’re here at home. Some of
them bring their own canned drinks
or powdered drink mix to add to
water served by the restaurant. I have
an uneasy feeling about this. I don’t
think it is right to take my own drink
into an eating establishment.
I have never said anything
negative about it, but I haven’t joined
in the practice. Is my discomfort MY
problem? What do you think about
this? -- TESTY SOUTHERN BELLE
DEAR BELLE: What I think
about it is less important than what
the restaurant does, and not knowing
the reason your friends behave this
way, I am hesitant to judge them.
I’m not sure what kind of canned
or powdered drink your friends are
bringing, but if they are on some kind
of restricted diet, then it’s what they
need do for a while. If the restaurant
objected, the manager would either
tell your friends not to do it anymore
or institute a charge to make up for
the lost income.
DEAR ABBY: I have been with
“Russell” for four months. We live
together and eventually would like to
be married. Russ is very honest. He
told me he had impregnated a woman
prior to me and she was eight months
pregnant. I asked him to contact her
on my behalf so I can meet her, since

we plan on having a future together.
When I called the woman to
suggest we meet somewhere, she
cursed me out for contacting her and
for telling her she can’t communicate
with Russ unless I’m involved. When
Russ told her the same thing, she
ordered him not to contact her again.
Russ has tried calling her since
then because he wants to be involved
in his child’s life, but she never called
him back. What do you think we
should do? -- LOOKING TOWARD
THE FUTURE
DEAR
LOOKING:
What
Russell should do -- and you, as
well -- is talk with an attorney to
establish exactly what his rights and
responsibilities will be to his child,
once paternity has been established.
TO MY JEWISH READERS:
At sundown, Rosh Hashanah, the
Jewish New Year, begins. This
is the beginning of our time of
solemn introspection. “Leshana
tova tikatevu” -- may each of us be
inscribed in the Book of Life and
enjoy a good year.
Dear Abby is written by Abigail
Van Buren, also known as Jeanne
Phillips, and was founded by her
mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact
Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com
or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA
90069.
COPYRIGHT 2014
UNIVERSAL UCLICK

Most hiatal hernias do not
require treatment

AT YOUR

655

Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869

DEAR ABBY: I am a 42-yearold divorced father of two. I have had
a girlfriend, “Dawn,” for about a year.
She has met my kids, but she’s still
uncomfortable with the “situation.”
She has concerns about me having
been married before, such as having
experienced many of the firsts she has
yet to enjoy.
Dawn doesn’t like being in my
house because I had it when I was
married, and she says my kids remind
her of my past. She says she doesn’t
want to share me with anyone,
including them.
When we’re alone, we are
absolutely phenomenal as a couple.
We love and care about each other
deeply. This is causing a tremendous
amount of stress on us, and neither
of us knows how to handle it or
what to do. Please help. -- TWO’S
COMPANY IN ILLINOIS
DEAR TWO’S COMPANY:
Forgive me for being blunt, but you
need to break it off with this woman
before you waste any more of her time
or yours. You may be crazy about
Dawn, but your first responsibility
must be to your children, and she
has made it clear how she feels about
them.
You may be phenomenal as a
couple, but there are more people
involved than just the two of you. She
needs to find someone who has no
encumbrances, and you need to find
a lady who has a greater capacity for

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Wednesday, September 24, 2014

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Custom Golf Carts
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Delphos, Ohio

stomach is an organ
that is supposed to
stay in the abdomen,
for example. The
abdomen is separated
from the chest by a
flat, dish-like plate
of muscle called the
diaphragm.
Above
the
diaphragm
are
the
lungs,
heart
and
esophagus
(the
swallowing
tube).
Below
are the stomach,
intestines and other
abdominal
organs.
The very bottom of
the esophagus and
the very top of the
stomach are joined
right at the diaphragm.
A hiatal hernia
is named for the
hiatus, an opening in
the diaphragm. Food
swallowed down the
esophagus normally
enters the stomach
just
below
the
diaphragm. In most
people, that opening is
small enough that the
stomach could not fit
through it.
In a hiatal hernia,
however, the upper
part of the stomach
slips up through

the diaphragm into
the chest. The term
“sliding” means that
the junction between
the stomach and
esophagus moves up
and down. Unlike the
case in most people,
the junction is not
stuck right at the
diaphragm. (On my
website, AskDoctorK.
com, I’ve put an
illustration
of
a
normal, tight hiatus
and a hiatal hernia.)
Sliding
hiatal
hernias
are
very
common. Smokers,
overweight
people
and women older
than 50 are more
likely to develop one.
And certain activities
or conditions that
increase
pressure
within the abdomen
can
increase
the
risk of developing
a
sliding
hiatal
hernia. They include
persistent or heavy
coughing, vomiting,
straining
while
defecating,
sudden
physical exertion and
pregnancy.
Many
people
with hiatal hernias
have no symptoms

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at all. Hopefully,
your mother is one
of those. Others
have heartburn or
gastroesophageal
reflux (GERD). This
tends to be worse
when
they
lean
forward, strain or lie
down. Still others
may have a hard
time swallowing, or
chronic
belching.
Sliding hiatal hernias
rarely cause major
complications.
Most people with
hiatal hernias do not
require
treatment.
If your mother has
reflux
symptoms,
lifestyle
changes
might
help.
For
example, she can try
eating smaller, more
frequent meals. She
should also avoid
eating for at least two
hours before going to
bed and sit up for at
least one hour after
eating.
If
lifestyle
changes
do
not
relieve her symptoms,
medication
can
help. She can try
one or more of the
many antacids and
acid blockers on the
market.

Few people with
a sliding hiatal hernia
require surgery. In
fact, I’ve never had
a patient with a hiatal
hernia who required
it. Surgery is usually
reserved for patients
who have persistent
reflux
symptoms
or inflammation of
the esophagus that
does not heal with
medication.
So, your mother
has a quite common
condition. And there
almost surely will be
good treatments for it
-- if your mother has
symptoms from it.
(Dr.
Komaroff
is a physician and
professor at Harvard
Medical School. To
send questions, go
to AskDoctorK.com,
or write: Ask Doctor
K,
10
Shattuck
St., Second Floor,
Boston, MA 02115.)
COPYRIGHT
2014 THE PRESIDENT
AND
FELLOWS
OF
HARVARD
COLLEGE
DISTRIBUTED
BY
UNIVERSAL
UCLICK FOR UFS

Thanks for
reading
News About Your Community

DELPHOS
THE

HERALD

Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869

405 N. Main St., Delphos, OH 45833 419-695-0015
www.delphosherald.com

Got a news tip?
Want to promote an event or business?
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419-695-0015 ext. 134
nspencer@delphosherald.com

PUBLIC AUCTION
THURSDAY, SEPT. 25, 2014 1:00 PM
The Downsizing of Long Time
Resident Norma Fields

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Comics & Puzzles
Zits

Today’s
Horoscope
By Eugenia Last

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Blondie

For Better or Worse

Don’t take unnecessary
risks. You will feel secure if
you know that your health,
financial and legal matters are
being dealt with competently
and on a regular basis. The
new
opportunities
that
you encounter as the year
progresses will call for decisive
and positive action, so don’t
waffle.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
23) -- Your schedule will be
hectic and overflowing. Rely
on trusted colleagues to help
you manage your tasks. Your
collaborative efforts will result
in an unusual and creative
concept. Focus on getting
things done.

SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) -- Make sure that you ask
for any current deals to be put
in writing. Don’t be taken in
by a swindler with unrealistic
promises of quick money.
Prudent,
well-thought-out
investments will pay off over
time.

Beetle Bailey

Pickles

Garfield

The Herald — 11

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

SAGITTARIUS
(Nov.
23-Dec. 21) -- Your vision
may be clouded regarding
a heated encounter. Don’t
make a commitment or bold
declaration until you have taken
an honest look at extenuating
circumstances. Haste makes
waste.

Crossword Puzzle

ACROSS
1 Tighten a
corset
5 PC memory
unit
8 Claw or
talon
12 Persia,
today
13 Previously
14 Sky bear
15 Brass component
16 Quandaries
18 Kind of
energy
20 Work station
21 Gigantic
bird of myth
22 Earth
orbiter of yore
23 Change the
clock
26 Croc’s
cousins
29 Sporty
trucks
30 Blondie’s
shrieks
31 Winery
cask
33 Kind of
dance
34 Not prompt
35 Prefix for
half
36 Directs
38 Noted fabulist
39 Clavell
novel “Tai --”
40 Triangular
sail
41 Fixed the
table
43 Mystify
46 Free throw
(2 wds.)
48 Garage
event
50 Low voice
51 Chow down
52 Mix it up
53 Online
journal
54 Dirty place
55 Four quarters

DOWN
1 Designer -Claiborne
2 Met highlight
3 Jargon
4 Recital
extras
5 Battlefield
doc
6 Guitarist
Clapton
7 Hair goop
8 -- uno
9 With open -10 Author Dinesen
11 Refrain syllables
17 Fixes typos
19 Witticism
22 Create
23 Dull routine
24 ORD
guesses
25 Equinox mo.
26 Catches on
27 66 and I-80
28 Type of wrestling
30 Hold down a
job

Monday’s answers
32 Bite
34 Is ahead
35 “Clair de
lune” composer
37 Play
postscript
38 Intention
40 Pier
41 Slouch
42 Kind of
insurance

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) -- Your generosity and
eagerness to help others will
cause you to neglect your own
duties. It will be difficult, but
you will be relieved once you
learn to say no.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb.
19) -- Keep things moving
smoothly and continue to stick
to the schedule and routine
that got you where you are.
If you are too nonchalant, an
opportunity may pass you by.

PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) -- Changes to a current
relationship will puzzle you.
Tackle legal, financial or health
matters if you are involved in
a joint venture. Falling behind
with these important issues
will turn out to be costly.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) -- Do your best to get to
know people who share your
interests and values. A travel
experience will provide the
motivation and inspiration
to initiate positive personal
changes.

Born Loser

TAURUS (April 20-May
20) -- Maintaining a healthy
lifestyle is crucial if you
intend to pursue your personal
and professional goals. Keep
up to date with medical
appointments, good nutrition
and exercise.

Marmaduke

GEMINI (May 21-June
20) -- Expect to face friction
when working on a project
with someone who thinks
differently. Don’t let anyone
undermine you, but don’t
ignore quality advice or a good
suggestion.

Hagar the Horrible

Barney Google & Snuffy Smith

CANCER (June 21-July
22) -- It’s time for some
truthful introspection. Ask
yourself if you’ve been fair to
those around you, and, if not,
admit your shortcomings and
clear the air.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
-- Remember to have fun. It’s
possible to get so caught up
in day-to-day drama that time
flies by. Spend quality time
with family and close friends
whenever you can.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22) -- Have faith in your
abilities. Your intuition can
be a powerful tool. Trust your
instincts regarding professional
strategies. Focus on forward
motion, not rehashing the past.
COPYRIGHT 2014 United
Feature Syndicate, Inc.

Answer to Sudoku
Hi and Lois

The Family Circus® By Bil Keane

43 Gravy
dish
44 More than
satisfy
45 Essay
byline
46 “When
We Was --”
47 Stag attendees
49 Blow it

12 – The Herald

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Sidewalks

(Continued from page 1)

“We’ll give them 60 days notice
and residents on both sides of the
street have to agree on a contractor,” Langhals said. “We’d like to do
it this fall. If they (residents) don’t
want to do it, they can sign off and
we (the village) will take care of it.”
Councilman Jerry Markward said
once the village puts the sidewalk in,
the village does not own it.
“We need to know who’s paying what dollar amount,” Langhals
said. “We’ll deliver the letter to the
homeowner and if they don’t want to
install the walks, we need to know.
Spring would be a good time to get
it done.”
Miller suggested a meeting with
property owners. He also suggested
budgeting money for the plan in
2015.
Langhals agreed to draft a letter
to residents and having all council
members give their input.
Council members agreed to allow
homeowners the opportunity to
choose either their own contractor to
install their sidewalks or have the village take care of the installation and
have the cost assessed on their taxes
over a 3-year time span.
Council passed the motion to
accept J & M Concrete’s quote.
Homeowners may hire out the sidewalk work to be done on their properties through another contractors. Any
necessary sidewalk work done which
is over and above the specifications
of a 4-foot wide by 4-inch thickness
— for thicker tapered edges — will
be paid for by the village.
“The village will handle the backfill,” Miller said.
Council members also approved
a motion to pass the assessments to
both sides (residents) with the village
paying 30-percent of the cost and
the residents splitting the remaining
70-percent.
Council members were approached
by Kent Byrne and Pete Seffernick
about a property the Ottoville Fire
Department used this past summer
for training. Initially, Byrne was asking the village to assist with the
clean-up costs but further discussion
entailed the role the Environmental
Protection Agency (EPA) was playing in the situation.

The residence was used for a fire
training in July and per Seffernick,
a Hazard Evaluation Inspector, the
residence changed to a facility when
firefighters entered it for training.
He said the residence was never
inspected for asbestos or certified
and/or approved by the EPA before
demolition. He said there were eight
National Emission Standards for
Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP)
violations.
Ottoville’s Village Solicitor
Theresa Von Sossan, Miller and
council members were aware the
EPA was involved and have been in
conversations with them about the
site and circumstances.
Further discussion resulted in
Altenburger recommending Von
Sossan review the documentation
and correspondence for discussion at
the next council meeting.
Board of Public Affairs member Phil Hilvers told council Water
Treatment Plant Supervisor Steve
Wittler estimated the cost of the
water lines for the residential development of the Niedecken properties on Road P to be $45,000, with
$31,000 of the total accounting for
materials.
“Nothing is going on out there
yet,” Miller said. “We may be six
months out.”
Council agreed purchasing materials now would be beneficial but
going ahead with constructing the
water lines with no perspective
homeowners would not be. Miller
thought signing a mutual agreement
with potential home builders might
be a feasible approach.
As requested by Police Chief Jay
Herrick in August, council held a special meeting to review the village’s
golf cart ordinance and suggested
fining repeat offenders — those driving under age with no license.
Hoersten reported on amending
the ordinance by including drivers of
golf carts must have a valid driver’s
license.
“The first violation carries a warning sent to the owner of the golf cart
and the second and any subsequent
violations will incur a $25 fine,” she
said.
The next village council meeting
will be held at 7 p.m. on Oct. 27 in
council chambers.

www.delphosherald.com

Obama opens a new front against al-Qaida
BY KEN DILANIAN
Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The U.S.
decision to strike the Khorasan
Group to stop a possible terror attack
represents a significant expansion of
the largely secret war against core
al-Qaida, a group President Barack
Obama has proclaimed was “a shadow of its former self.”
Administration officials said
Tuesday they have been watching
the Khorasan Group, an al-Qaida
cell in Syria, for years. But Obama
had resisted taking military action
in Syria to avoid inadvertently
helping President Bashar Assad, a
leader the U.S. would like to see
gone. That changed, officials said,
because intelligence showed that
the Khorasan Group was in the final
stages of plotting attacks against
the U.S. and Europe, most likely
an attempt to blow up an airplane
in flight.
On the same night that U.S. and
Arab allies carried out more than
200 airstrikes against the Islamic
State group in Syria and Iraq, the
U.S. on its own launched more
than 20 Tomahawk cruise missiles
and other ordinance against eight
Khorasan Group targets near Aleppo
in northwestern Syria, Pentagon
officials said.
It’s not clear yet whether the
group’s leader, identified by U.S.
officials as Muhsin al-Fadhli, was
killed in the strikes. He is a Kuwaiti
who spent time in Iran and has long
been identified as a significant figure in al-Qaida.

City

But regardless of the impact, the
need for such an operation against
the Khorasan Group dealt a blow to
the notion, oft-repeated by Obama
administration officials, that core alQaida has been significantly diminished as a threat to the United States.
The Khorasan Group, after all, is
made up of core al-Qaida veterans.
“There are remnants of core alQaida still left that are still a very
potent threat,” said Rep. Adam
Schiff, D-Calif., a member of the
House Intelligence Committee.
“What this shows is that al-Qaida
has not been decimated,” said Seth
Jones, a counterterrorism analyst at
the Rand Corp. “This is a network
that spans multiple countries.”
The attacks add Syria to a long
list of nations in which the Obama
administration has taken lethal
action against al-Qaida militants,
including Afghanistan, Pakistan,
Iraq, Yemen and Somalia.
The Islamic State has broken
with al-Qaida, and, for all its brutality, is not believed to be plotting
attacks against the West.
In contrast, the Khorasan Group
is a cell of al-Qaida veterans of wars
in Afghanistan and Pakistan who
traveled to Syria to link up with
the Nusra Front, the al-Qaida affiliate there. U.S. intelligence officials
say the group has been working
with bomb makers from al-Qaida’s
Yemen affiliate to perfect explosives that can fool Western airport
security measures, including, one
official said, a bomb in a toothpaste
tube.
The FBI and Homeland Security

(Continued from page 1)

A letter concerning the application for renewal of
the liquor license for Pizza Hut of Van Wert for the
Delphos restaurant was read. Safety Service Director
Shane Coleman said he had no objection to the application.
Council also met the two German cultural exchange
students who are currently attending St. John’s High
School. Nicole Kinner is staying with Phil and Lynn
Odenweller and said she is enjoying her stay.
“I have enjoyed very much my time here so far. I didn’t
everyone to be so nice and so helpful,” Kinner said.”I am
looking forward to Thanksgiving as we don’t celebrate that

Department issued a security bulletin Tuesday that said there was no
indication of advanced al-Qaida or
Islamic State group terror plotting
inside the U.S., but the airstrikes
in Syria may have temporarily disrupted attack planning against U.S.
or Western targets.
And in an interview with Yahoo
News, Attorney General Eric Holder
said, “We hit them last night out of a
concern that they were getting close
to an execution date of some of the
plans that we have seen. And the
hitting that we did last night, I think,
will probably continue until we are
at a stage where we think we have
degraded their ability to get at our
allies or to the homeland.”
Because of intelligence about the
collaboration among the Khorasan
Group, al-Qaida’s Yemeni bombmakers and Western extremists,
U.S. officials say, the Transportation
Security Administration in July
decided to ban uncharged mobile
phones and laptops from flights to
the U.S. that originated in Europe
and the Middle East.
Holder said those enhanced
security measures were “based on
concerns we had about what the
Khorasan Group was planning to
do.”
Obama presided over a dramatic expansion of secret CIA drone
strikes in Pakistan that dealt significant blows to al-Qaida’s leadership, and he ordered the raid
that killed Osama bin Laden. He
expanded the drone campaign to
Yemen and Somalia, all under a
veil of secrecy.

in my country.”
Nuria Willinghoefer is staying with Larry and Heather
Bonifas.
“I have already improved my English skills and learned
much about American culture,” Willinghoefer said. “I am
looking forward to the next few months even though I
know they will go too fast.”
The pair arrived in the United States on July 26 and will
return to Germany in December.
The next meeting will begin at 7 p.m. Oct. 6. There will
be a special meeting at 7 p.m. Oct. 8 to discuss options
for the wastewater treatment plant. A Public Properties
Committee meeting will be held at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 20.

School

(Continued from page 1)

It’s time to feel
good again.

Start with a visit to a St. Rita’s primary
care physician. You’ll get more than a
doctor. You’ll get a partner who can
help you be your healthy best.

Find the right doctor for you

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stritas.org

Andy North, Financial
Advisor from Edward Jones,
said it is a way to present reallife applications.
Prior to the in-class financial session with North, students did some research on the
college of their choice including a yearly cost for tuition.
North used a program to plug
in the numbers and offered a
report to each student including generated values for the
costs of a 4-year college.
Students used the data to calculate the overall cost of the
school loan including interest
rate charges.
“Inflation over time continues to increase,” North
explained. “Inflation rises
2.42 percent each year and
education costs increase 5.63
percent.”
Mr. North and Edward
Jones are partnering with
Delphos Jefferson through
their new School Business
Partnership program. Delphos
businesses have always been
eager to collaborate with our
teachers to enhance students’
learning experiences. The new
School Business Partnership
program is a more formal
way to recognize and thank
those that do so much for our
school system while encouraging new connections and
opportunities that benefit both
the business and the school.
Delphos City Schools is currently working with the Ohio
State University to develop an
App where speaking arrangements, internships, job shadowing experiences, etc. can
be scheduled easily between
teachers and business professionals. Once completed,
individuals and businesses will earn school mascot
badges that can be shared on
social media to publicize their
involvement and time given
to help schools. Additional
details about the program can
be found on the www.delphoscityschools.org website.

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