10


More sample pages at www.helblingchoral.com
■ HI-C6716 – � 3,30
(from 20 copies: –15% / from 40 copies: –25%)
Minimum order: 10 copies
Audio sample at
www.helblingchoral.com
Luca Marenzio (1553–1599)
Scaldava il sol
(The Sun Heated)
SSATB a cappella
In Scaldava il sol (The Sun Heated) Luca Marenzio por-
trays an idyllic pastoral scene with the help of madri-
gal-like tone painting: in the scintillating midday heat a
shepherd lies sleeping in a grove with his flock of sheep.
The chirping of crickets, the slumber of the exhausted
shepherd, the deserted landscape – all of this is presen-
ted in a compositional technique and dynamics that are
rich in contrast. The text interpretation through musical
means is a central aspect of the 16
th
century madrigal,
the culmination of which Marenzio represents.
Lyrics in Italian only, English translation and English
preface included.

More sample pages at www.helblingchoral.com
Johannes Brahms (1833–1897)
Waldesnacht (op. 62/3)
(Woodland Night)
SATB a cappella
With his Waldesnacht (Woodland Night), Johannes
Brahms created without doubt one of the undisputed
masterpieces of Romantic choral literature. In this
sympathetic setting of Heyse’s text, Brahms’ personal
style reveals itself in all its mastery in the four-voice
a-cappella arrangement. He has created a multifaceted
musical portrayal, full of the most delicate nuances,
which impressively illustrates the contrast between the
peace and tranquillity of natural surroundings and the
turmoil of everyday life.
Lyrics in German only, English translation and English
preface included.
■ HI-C5943 – � 1,90
(from 20 copies: –15% / from 40 copies: –25%)
Minimum order: 10 copies
Audio sample at
www.helblingchoral.com
2
HI - C6716
Fotokopieren
grundsätzlich
gesetzlich
verboten
Photocopying
this copyright
material is
ILLEGAL
Luca Marenzio, Scaldava il sol • SSATB • © 2011 HELBLING
AUSTRIA: Kaplanstrasse 9, 6063 Rum/Innsbruck | GERMANY: P.O. Box 100754, 73707 Esslingen
Alle Rechte vorbehalten / All rights reserved
&
&
&
V
?
&
?
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
c
c
c
c
c
c
c
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
π
π

Œ
œ
. œ
J
œ
Scal da va il

œ œ
Scal da va il


œ œ
. œ
j
œ
œ œ

π
π
Œ œ
. œ
j
œ
Scal da va il
 Ó
sol,
w
sol,

œ œ
Scal da va il

œ œ
. œ
j
œ
w

œ œ
π
π
w
sol,
Œ
œ
. œ
J
œ
scal da va il
Œ
œ
. œ
j
œ
scal da va il
. œ œ œ 
sol,

œ œ
œ
.
.
œ
œ
j
œ
œ
. œ œ œ 
π
π
π
Œ œ
œ œ
scal da va il
 
sol di
 Œ
œ
sol, scal
Œ
œ
. œ
J
œ
scal da va il

œ œ
Scal da va il
œ œ
œ œ
œ
 
œ œ
. œ
j
œ
œ œ
- - - -
- - - - -
- - - -
- - - -
- -
&
&
&
V
?
&
?
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
π
5

Œ
œ
sol di
œ œ 
mez zo gior
. œ
j
œ œ
œ
da va il sol di
 Ó
sol


sol di
. œ
J
œ œ œ
œ
œ œ 



œ œ 
mez zo gior
w
no
 
mez zo
Œ
œ œ œ
di mez zo
œ œ 
mez zo gior
œ œ 
 
w
œ
œ
œ
œ œ

œ œ n œ 

 
gior no
œ œ œ 
gior
w
no
œ œ n œ 
 
œ œ œ 
w
w
no
Ó œ œ œ œ
l'ar
œ œ œ œ œ œ
l'ar co,
w
no
œ œ œ œ œ
œ
l'ar co,
 œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ œ
œ œ œ œ œ
œ
- - - - - -
- - - - - - - -
- - - - - - - -
- - - - - -
- - - - - - -
Scaldava il sol
SSATB a cappella
............................. • HELBLING, Rum/Innsbruck • Esslingen
S1
Music: Luca Marenzio (1553–1599)
A
T
B
Piano/Klavier
(for rehearsal)
Lyrics: Luigi Alamanni (1495–1556)
German translation: Maria Teresa Granata, Walter Harm
English translation: Constance Stöhs
HI - Cxxxx
Die Mittagssonne strahlte am intensivsten,
The midday sun shone the brightest,
the midday sun shone the brightest in the constellation,
die Mittagssonne strahlte am intensivsten im Sternbild,
S2
C6716_Scaldava il Sol_SSATB.indd 2 22.07.11 12:12
Johannes Brahms, Waldesnacht • SATB • © 2011 HELBLING, Rum/Innsbruck • Esslingen HI - C5943 Johannes Brahms, Waldesnacht • SATB • © 2011 HELBLING, Rum/Innsbruck • Esslingen HI - C5943 Johannes Brahms, Waldesnacht • SATB • © 2011 HELBLING, Rum/Innsbruck • Esslingen HI - C5943
&
&
V
?
&
?
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
c
c
c
c
c
c
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
Etwas langsam
p
p
p
p
dolce
dolce
dolce
dolce
œ
œ
. œ
j
œ
2.  Fer
3.   In
1. Wal des
nes
den
nacht
Flö
heim
du
ten
lich
œ œ œ œ
1. Wal
2.  Fer
3.   In
des
nes
den
nacht
Flö
heim
du
ten
lich
œ œ . œ
j
œ
1. Wal
2.  Fer
3.   In
des
nes
den
Flö
heim
nacht du
ten
lich
œ
œ
œ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
. œ
œ œ
j
œ
œ
œ
. œ
œ œ
j
œ
œ œ ˙
wun
lied,
en
der
ver
gen
küh

Krei
œ œ
˙
wun
lied,
en
der
ver
gen
küh

Krei
œ
œ ˙ #
wun
lied,
en
der
ver
gen
küh

Krei
œ
œ ˙
œ
œ
œ
œ ˙
˙
œ
œ
œ
œ
˙
˙
#
œ
˙ œ
le,
ne,
sen
die
das
wird
ein
dir
ich
œ
Œ
œ œ
le,
ne,
sen
die
das
wird
ich
ein
dir
œ Œ œ œ
le,
ne,
sen
die
das
wird
ich
ein
dir
œ
Œ
. œ
J
œ
œ
œ Œ
˙
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
Œ
. œ
J
œ
œ œ
. œ
j
œ
tau
wei
wohl,
tes
du
send
Seh
wil
ma le
nen
des
œ œ œ œ
tau
wei
wohl,
send
tes
du
ma
Seh
wil
le
nen
des
œ œ œ œ
tau
wei
wohl,
send
tes
du
ma
Seh
wil
le
nen
des
œ œ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
. œ
œ œ
œ
j
œ
œ œ n œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
- - -
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
- -
-
-
&
&
V
?
&
?
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
5
. œ
‰ œ œ
rührt,
Herz,
grüß' nach
die
und
dem
Ge
ein
. œ

œ œ n
grüß'
rührt,
Herz,
nach
die
und
dem
Ge
ein
. œ
‰ œ œ
grüß'
rührt,
Herz,
nach
die
und
dem
Ge
ein
. œ ‰
œ
œ
grüß'
rührt,
Herz,
nach
die
und
dem
Ge
ein
.
.
.
œ
œ
œ
‰ œ
œ
œ
œ n
. œ ‰
œ
œ
œ
p
p
p
p
. œ
j
œ œ œ
lau
dan
Frie
ten
ken
de
Welt
in
schwebt
ge
die
mit
œ œ œ n œ b
lau
dan
Frie
ten
ken
de
in
schwebt
Welt
die
mit
ge
œ
œ
œ œ
lau
dan
Frie
ten
ken
de
Welt
in
schwebt
ge
die
mit
. œ
J
œ œ
œ
lau
dan
Frie
ten
ken
de
Welt
in
schwebt
ge
die
mit
. œ
j
œ œ
œ n
œ
œ b œ œ
œ œ œ
œ
œ
œ
cresc.
cresc.
cresc.
cresc.
. œ
j
œ n œ œ
wüh
schö
lei
le,
ne,
sen
ach,
Flü
o, wie
miss
gel
œ œ
œ œ n
wüh
schö
lei
le, o, wie
œ
œ
œ œ
wüh
schö
lei
le,
ne,
sen
o,
ach,
Flü
wie
miss
gel
. œ
J
œ œ œ
wüh
schö
lei
le,
ne,
sen
o,
ach,
Flü
wie
miss
gel
. œ
j
œ n œ
œ œ
œ n
œ œ
œ œ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
. œ
j
œ œ # œ
ist
gönn
schlä
dein
te
gen
Rau
Fer
nie
schen
ne
der
œ
˙ œ
ist,
ne,
sen,
o,
in
schwebt
wie
die
mit
. œ
j
œ œ œ
ist
gönn
schlä
dein
te
gen
Rau
Fer
nie
schen
ne
der
. œ n
J
œ œ # œ
ist
gönn
schlä
dein
te
gen
Rau
Fer
nie
schen
ne
der
œ
˙
. œ
J
œ œ #
œ
œ
.
. œ
œ n
J
œ
œ
œ
œ #
œ
œ
-
-
- -
-
-
-
-
-
-
- -
-
-
-
-
- -
-
-
-
-
- - -
-
- -
-
-
-
-
-
-
- -
-
-
-
-
- - -
-
- -
-
-
-
-
-
-
- -
-
-
-
-
- - -
- - - - -
- - - - -
Waldesnacht
SATB a cappella
............................. • HELBLING, Rum/Innsbruck • Esslingen
S
Musik: Johannes Brahms (1833–1897),
Sieben Lieder op. 62/3
A
T
B
Klavier/Piano
(for rehearsal)
Text: Paul Heyse (1830–1914)
Engl. Textübertragung: Christopher Inman
HI - Cxxxx
after the raucous turbulence of the world, oh how sweet is your murmuring,
and leads my thoughts to beautiful and oh, so envied far-flung shores,
and a peace floats downwards on soft wingbeats,
1. Oh, woodland night, wondrously cool, I welcome you thousand times,
2. Die away, oh melody of that distant flute that stirs a far off yearning,
3. In the familiarity of close circles, my heart, you will feel at home again,
&
&
V
?
&
?
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
9
œ
˙ œ
wärts,
führt,
süß, o,
ach,
Frie
wie
miss
de
. œ
J
œ
œ # œ
ist
schö
lei
dein
ne,
sen
Rau
ach,
Flü
schen
miss
gel
˙
œ œ
süß,
führt,
wärts,
o,
ach,
Frie
wie
miss
de
˙ #
œ œ
führt,
wärts,
süß, o,
ach,
Frie
wie
miss
de
œ
˙
. œ
J
œ
œ #
œ
œ
˙
˙ #
œ
œ
œ
œ
f
f
f
f
. ˙
œ
ist
gönn
schwe
dein
te
bet
œ
œ
˙ N
süß,
gönn
schlä
dein
te
gen
Rau
Fer
nie
œ œ
˙
ist
gönn
schwe
dein
te
bet
Rau
Fer
nie
˙
˙
ist
gönn
schwe
dein
te
bet
. ˙
œ
œ
œ
˙
˙
N
œ œ
˙
˙
divisi
. ˙
œ n
Rau
Fer
nie
schen
ne
der
œ
œ
œ œ
schen
ne
der
œ
œ
œ œ
schen
ne
der
˙ n
˙
Rau
Fer
nie
schen
ne
der
˙ n
.
˙œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
n
˙ n
˙
˙ n
π
π
π
π
. œ
‰ . œ
j
œ
führt.
wärts.
süß! Träu
Lass
Sin
me
die
get,
. œ

. œ
j
œ
süß!
führt.
wärts.
Träu
Lass
Sin
me
die
get,
. œ ‰ Œ œ
wärts.
führt.
süß! Träu
Lass
Sin
. œ
‰ Œ
œ
wärts.
führt.
süß! Träu
Lass
Sin
. œ
.
. œ
œ
‰ .
. œ
œ
j
œ
œ
.
.
œ
œ
‰ Œ
œ
œ
-
- -
-
-
-
- -
-
-
-
- -
-
- - - -
- - - -
- - - - -
-
-
-
- - - -
- - -
- - -
- - -
- - - -
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
- - - -
- - - -
- - - - -
-
-
-
&
&
V
?
&
?
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
13
. œ
j
œ . œ a
J
œ
risch
Wal
hol
die
des
de

nacht

den
mich
gel
. œ
j
œ . œ
j
œ
risch
Wal
hol
die
des
de

nacht

den
mich
gel
J
œ
J
œ . œ
J
œ œ
me
die
get,
risch
Wal
hol
die
des
de

nacht

J
œ
J
œ . œ
J
œ œ
me
die
get,
risch
Wal
hol
die
des
de

nacht

.
. œ
œ
j
œ
œ .
.
œ
œ
a
j
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
.
. œ
œ
J
œ
œ œ
œ
˙
œ
Œ
Glie
wie
lie
der
gen,
der,
˙ œ
Œ
Glie
wie
lie
der
gen,
der,
J
œ
J
œ ˙
œ
den
mich
gel
Glie
wie
lie
der
gen,
der,
J
œ
J
œ ˙ œ
den
mich
gel
Glie
wie
lie
der
gen,
der,
˙
˙ œ
œ
Œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
˙
˙ œ
œ
. œ
j
œ
. œ
j
œ
mich
stil
berg' ich
len
in
weich
je
Schlum
ins
de
mer
. œ
j
œ . œ
j
œ
stil
mich
berg' ich
len
in
weich
je
Schlum
ins
de
mer
Œ
˙
œ
stil
mich
berg' ich
len
in
Œ
˙ œ
berg'
stil
mich
ich
len
in
.
.
œ
œ
j
œ
œ .
.
œ
œ
j
œ
œ
Œ
˙
˙ œ
œ
w
Moos,
Pein,
sacht!
. ˙ b œ
Moos,
Pein,
sacht!
œ œ ˙
weich
je
Schlum
ins
de
mer
Moos,
Pein,
sacht!
œ œ ˙
weich
je
Schlum
ins
de
mer
Moos,
Pein,
sacht!
w
œ œ ˙
. ˙ b œ
œ œ ˙
-
-
-
-
-
- -
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
- -
-
-
-
- -
-
-
-
-
-
- -
-
-
-
- -
-
-
-
-
-
- -
-
-
-
- -
-
oh how sweet is your murmuring! In pensive mood
and oh, so envied far-flung shores. Let the
a peace floats downwards. Sing me,
I stretch out my tired limbs in the moss
forest night cradle me and ease all suffering,
fair birdsongs, gently into sleep!
&
&
V
?
&
?
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
p
p
p
p
17
Ó
œ
œ
und
und
Ir
mir
ein
re
Ó
œ œ
und
und
Ir
mir
ein
re
Ó œ œ
und
und
Ir
mir
ein
re
Ó œ
œ
und
und
Ir
mir
ein
re
Ó
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
Ó œ
œ
. œ
j
œ œ
œ
ist,
se
Qua
als
li
len,
ges
löst
würd' ich
Ge
euch
. œ
j
œ n œ
œ
ist,
se
Qua
als
li
len,
würd'
ges
löst
ich
Ge
euch
. œ
J
œ # œ
œ
ist,
se
Qua
als
li
len,
würd'
ges
löst
ich
Ge
euch
œ œ
œ
œ
ist,
se
Qua
als
li
len,
würd'
ges
löst
ich
Ge
euch
.
. œ
œ
j
œ
œ œ # n
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ œ
œ
œ
. œ
j
œ
œ
œ
wie

wie
der
gen
der, wil
all
saug'
der
ich
des
. œ #
j
œ œ n
œ
wie

wie
der
gen
der,
all
saug'
wil
der
ich
des
. œ
J
œ œ
œ
wie

wie
der
gen
der,
all
saug'
wil
der
ich
des
œ œ
œ
œ
wie

wie
der
gen
der,
all
saug'
wil
der
ich
des
.
.
.
œ
œ
œ
#
j
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
n
œ
œ
œ œ
œ œ
œ
f
f
f
f
. œ
j
œ . œ
j
œ
ir
mit
Herz,
ren
den
nun
Qua
Düf
gu
len
ten
te
. œ
j
œ . œ
j
œ
ir
mit
Herz,
ren
den
nun
Qua
Düf
gu
len
ten
te
œ
œ N œ œ
ir
mit
Herz,
ren
den
nun
Qua
Düf
gu
len
ten
te
œ
œ
œ
œ
ir
mit
Herz,
ren
den
nun
Qua
Düf
gu
len
ten
te
.
.
œ
œ
j
œ
œ
.
.
œ
œ
j
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
N œ
œ
œ
œ
-
- -
-
-
-
- -
-
-
-
-
- -
-
-
- -
-
-
- -
-
-
- -
-
-
-
- -
-
-
- -
- -
-
-
-
-
-
- -
-
-
- -
- -
-
-
&
&
V
?
&
?
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
f
21
œ
˙ n
œ
los,
ein,
Nacht, wil
all
saug'
der
ich
des
œ #
Œ Ó
los,
ein,
Nacht,
œ n Œ Ó
los,
ein,
Nacht,
œ
Œ Ó
los,
ein,
Nacht,
œ
œ #
˙ n
œ
œ
œ
n
Œ Ó
divisi
. ˙ œ
ir
mit
Herz,
Œ
˙ # œ
all
wil
saug'
der
ich
des
Œ ˙ n œ
all
saug'
wil
der
ich
des
Ó
˙
der
den
nun
Ó
˙
. ˙ œ
Œ
˙ ˙ # n
œ
œ
Ó
˙
˙
p
p
p
p
œ œ ˙
ren
den
nun
Qua
Düf
gu
œ ˙ N œ
ir
mit
Herz,
ren
den
nun
œ b œ œ #
œ n
ir
mit
Herz,
ren
den
nun
w
Qua
Düf
gu
˙
œ
œ #
œ
œ œ b
œ
œ
N œ
œ #
œ
œ n
w
˙
œ N
œ #
˙ ˙
len
ten
te
˙
˙
Qua
Düf
gu
len
ten
te
. ˙ œ N
Qua
Düf
gu
len
ten
te
œ œ ˙
len
ten
te
˙ ˙
˙ ˙
˙ . ˙ œ N
œ œ ˙
˙ ˙
˙
U
Ó
los.
ein.
Nacht.
˙
U
Ó
los.
ein.
Nacht.
˙
U
Ó
los.
ein.
Nacht.
˙
U
Ó
los.
ein.
Nacht.
˙
Ó
˙
˙
˙
U
Ó
˙
˙
U
Ó
- - - - - -
- - - - - -
- - - - - -
- - - -
- - -
- - - -
-
- - - - - - - - -
- - - -
- - - -
-
- - - -
-
-
and it is as if I were rid again of all the maddening torments,
and in a joyful contentment I will breathe with its fragrances,
Let maddening torments melt away, wild heart, and now goodnight,
of all the maddening torments.
I will breath with its fragrances.
wild heart, and now goodnight.
C5943_Waldesnacht SATB_6seitig.indd 2 20.12.10 16:07
MCM
M
ASTERWORKS OF CHORAL M
USIC
SATB a cappel l a
Sieben Lieder op. 62/3
Waldesnacht
Johannes Brahms
HI -C5943
Mit der Waldesnacht schuf Johannes Brahms zweifellos eines der unbestrittenen Meisterwerke romantischer Chorliteratur. In dieser kongenialen Vertonung des Heyse-Textes manifestiert sich der Brahms’sche Personalstil im vierstimmigen A-cappella-Satz in seiner höchsten Meisterschaft. Es entsteht ein facettenreiches musikalisches Ge- mälde feinster Nuancen, das den Kontrast zwischen der friedlichen Stille in der Natur und dem hekti- schen Alltagsleben eindrucksvoll nachzeichnet.
With his Waldesnacht (Woodland Night), Johannes Brahms created without doubt one of the undispu- ted masterpieces of Romantic choral literature. In this sympathetic setting of Heyse’s text, Brahms’ personal style reveals itself in all its mastery in the four-voice a-cappella arrangement. He has created a multifaceted musical portrayal, full of the most delicate nuances, which impressively illustrates the contrast between the peace and tranquillity of natu- ral surroundings and the turmoil of everyday life.
ISMN M-50022-791-5
Johannes Brahms (1833–1897)
Waldesnacht
Sieben Lieder op. 62/3
Vorwort
Preface Zeit seines Lebens lag Johannes Brahms die Chormusik
sehr am Herzen. Bereits als 15-Jähriger leitete er einen
Schullehrer-Chor, 1857–1859 dann den Chor des
Fürstenhofes Detmold und 1859–1861 den Hamburger
Frauenchor, von dem er seiner Vertrauten Clara Schumann
mehrfach mit Begeisterung berichtete. 1863/64 wirkte
Brahms als Chormeister der Wiener Singakademie, und
von Dezember 1871 bis 1874 stand er als Leiter der Konzerte
der Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde Wien auch an der Spitze
des zuvor von Johann von Herbeck überaus erfolgreich
dirigierten Singvereins. Nach einer eher kühlen Aufnahme
konnte sich Brahms rasch durchsetzen, führte aber im
Gegensatz zu Herbeck meist ernste, tiefgründige Chorwerke
auf, darunter auch kaum Bekanntes von Komponisten des
16. Jahrhunderts wie Leonhard Lechner oder Johannes
Eccard. Dies veranlasste den Dichter Salomon Mosenthal
zum Bonmot: „Wenn Brahms einmal recht lustig ist, singt
er: ‚Das Grab ist meine Freude’.“ Allein die musikalische
Qualität eines Stückes war für den Komponisten das
entscheidende Auswahlkriterium. Wie Therese Gugler, ein
Mitglied des Singvereins, überlieferte, arbeitete der Chor
„sehr gerne unter Brahms’ Leitung und hatte schon damals,
wo der noch bartlose, jugendlich blonde Brahms wohl
schon berühmt, aber erst im vollen Aufstieg begriffen war,
den zwingenden Eindruck, einer großen Persönlichkeit,
keinem alltäglichen Chordirigenten gegenüberzustehen.
Auch er ließ die Werke von den Sängern durchlesen,
studierte zunächst auf die Grundlage des Ganzen hin und
ging erst dann auf dynamische und rhythmische Ausarbeitung
ein. […] Von tiefstem Ernst beim Studieren, dabei von
größter Geduld und Freundlichkeit, niemals barsch oder
grob“, setzte Brahms wenige, aber klare Akzente und
dirigierte ausgesprochen präzise. Am 8. November 1874 und ein weiteres Mal am 20.
März 1875 führte Brahms mit dem Singverein seine
Waldesnacht op. 62/3 sehr erfolgreich auf. Die Sehnsucht
nach innerer Ruhe, nach Abstand vom lauten Weltgewühle
– differenziert von Paul Heyse in Worte gefasst und von
Brahms in Musik umgesetzt – hatten wohl bereits damals
viele Menschen in sich; heutzutage erscheint dieses Thema
aktueller denn je. Inneren Frieden widerspiegelnd, bewegt
sich die erste Melodiephrase in reinem Dur und endet mit
demselben Akkord wie zu Beginn, heimlich eng kreisend
entsprechend der dritten Textstrophe. Das weite Sehnen
der zweiten Strophe ist außerdem genau am Höhepunkt
dieser Phrase angesiedelt – kunstvoll zeichnet Brahms
zugleich alle drei Strophen musikalisch nach. Die kommende
Sequenz beschreibt mit Vorhalten und Mollwendungen
das Weltgewühle ebenso wie die schöne, aber missgönn-
te Ferne, die subtile Imitation zwischen Frauen- und
Männerstimmen in den Takten 12–14 macht das träumerisch
Verwobene und das Wiegende deutlich, und der Ruhe in
der Natur entspricht die folgende Generalpause. Im letzten
Aufschwung hin zum verminderten Septakkord (Takt 21)
stehen die irren Qualen im Zentrum. Mit einer bezeichnend
langen, mit einigen Vorhalten und Durchgangsdissonanzen
versehenen Kadenzwendung beschließt Brahms dieses
Chorstück – es scheint fast unmöglich, das hektische Treiben
des alltäglichen Lebens zu vergessen.
Dr. Michael Aschauer Quelle (Notentext) / Source (Score): Johannes Brahms, Mehrstimmige Gesänge ohne Begleitung,
hrsg. von Eusebius Mandyczewski (= Sämtliche Werke. Bd. 21.),
Wien 1926.
Throughout his life, choir music held a special place in
Johannes Brahms’ heart. As early as his fifteenth year, he
directed a choir of schoolteachers, then from 1857 to 1859
the choir at the court of the Prince of Lippe-Detmold and
subsequently, from 1859 to 1861, the Hamburg Women’s
Choir, the subject of many enthusiastic reports which he
sent to his close friend Clara Schumann. From 1863 to 1864,
Brahms directed the choir of the Vienna Choral Academy,
and from 1871 to 1874 as Concert Director of the Vienna
Society of Music Lovers he found himself at the head of a
choral society which, prior to his arrival, had been conducted
with great success by Johann von Herbeck. Despite his
initially somewhat cool reception, Brahms was rapidly able
to assert his position, although in contrast to Herbeck he
performed mainly solemn and profound choral works,
including barely known pieces by 16th century composers
such as Leonhard Lechner and Johannes Eccard. This led
the poet Salomon Mosenthal to produce the bon mot:
“When Brahms is in a really cheerful mood, he sings ‘The
grave is my delight’.” For the composer himself, however,
it was the musical quality of a piece which was the decisive
criterion in making his choice. According to a quotation
which has come down to us from Therese Gugler, a member
of the choral society, the choir “very much enjoyed working
under Brahms’ direction, and had, even at that early stage,
when Brahms, still beardless and youthfully fair-haired,
while already well-known was still very much at the
beginning of his career, the compelling impression that
they were confronted with a great personality and no
ordinary choral conductor. He too had the singers read
through the works and rehearsed initially on the basis of
the whole piece before going into the dynamic and rhythmic
detail. […] Deeply serious in rehearsal, but with the greatest
patience and friendliness, and never brusque or offensive,”
Brahms restricted himself to a few clear points of emphasis
and conducted with exceptional precision. On 8 November 1874, and again on 20 March 1875
Brahms performed his Waldesnacht (Woodland Night) op.
62/3 with the choral society with great success. A yearning
for inner peace, for a respite from the lauten Weltgewühle
(the raucous turbulence of the world) – expressed with
subtle differentiation in words by Paul Heyse and rendered
into music by Brahms – is something which at that time
many people probably harboured within themselves.
Nowadays, that is a theme that appears more relevant
than ever before. Reflecting inner peace, the first melodic
phrase moves entirely within the major and closes with
the same chord with which it began, completing the secret,
close circle as in the lyrics of the third verse. In addition,
the vast yearning of the second verse is positioned precisely
at the climax of this phrase – in this creative manner, Brahms
produces a musical portrayal of all three verses at the same
time. The sequence which then comes describes, with
suspensions and minor patterns, both the Weltgewühle
and the beautiful but begrudged distance; the subtle
imitation between the female and male voices in bars 12
to 14 clearly brings out the wistfully interwoven and the
cradling, and the subsequent general pause mirrors the
peace of nature. At the centre of the final, soaring upturn
to the diminished seventh chord (bar 21) are the irren
Qualen (maddening torments). Brahms brings this choral
piece to an end with a characteristically long cadence
pattern which includes a number of suspensions and
passing dissonances – it seems that it is almost impossible
to forget the hectic turmoil of everyday life. Dr. Michael Aschauer English translation: Christopher Inman
HI - C5943
Fotokopieren grundsätzlich gesetzlich verboten
Photocopying this copyright material is ILLEGAL Johannes Brahms, Waldesnacht • SATB • © 2011 HELBLING
AUSTRIA: Kaplanstrasse 9, 6063 Rum/Innsbruck | GERMANY: P.O. Box 100754, 73707 Esslingen
Alle Rechte vorbehalten / All rights reserved
www.helblingchor.com International: www.helblingchoral.com
C5943_Waldesnacht SATB_6seitig.indd 1
20.12.10 16:07
MCM
M
ASTERWORKS OF CHORAL M
USIC
SSATB a cappel l a
Scaldava il sol
HI-C6716
Luca Marenzio
Terzo libro de madrigali a cinque voci 1582
C6716_Scaldava il Sol_SSATB.indd 1
22.07.11 12:12
Secular choral music – Nature, seasons and times of day