15


More sample pages at www.helblingchoral.com
■ HI-C6725 – � 1,90
(from 20 copies: –15% / from 40 copies: –25%)
Minimum order: 10 copies
Audio sample at
www.helblingchoral.com

More sample pages at www.helblingchoral.com
Michael Aschauer (b. 1977)
Selig träumend - Wiegenlied
(Blissfully Dreaming – Lullaby)
SATB a cappella
A gently flowing lullaby. The short and slightly melan-
choly minor phrase in the middle section of the piece
is unable to dim the underlying mood of lyrical ten-
derness. And just as the dream sends the sleeper flying
up to the vault of the heavens to pluck the stars as if
they were flowers, so the melody soars euphorically
upwards, leaving behind an immaculate idyll of a kind
that can achieve reality only in our dreams.
Lyrics in German only, English translation and English
preface included.
■ HI-C6226 – € 2,60
(from 20 copies: –15% / from 40 copies: –25%)
Minimum order: 10 copies
Audio sample at
www.helblingchoral.com
Edward MacDowell (1860–1908)
Slumber Song (op. 43/2)
SATB a cappella
Edward MacDowell is considered to be the first Ameri-
can-born internationally renowned composer. Admired
greatly by Franz Liszt and close friends with Edvard
Grieg, he continued the European music tradition of
the 19
th
century, but still developed his own personal
style. Both Northern Songs op. 43 are his only a cap-
pella works for mixed voices and are jewels of finely
differentiated choral music.
In Slumber Song MacDowell musically traces, in a poig-
nant manner, how a child gently eases into a state of drea-
ming on an adult’s shoulder, while winter holds sway out-
side. In keeping with a lullaby, MacDowell has the lower
three voices hum throughout the entire piece and with
them builds up a fascinating harmonic foundation.
Edward MacDowell, Slumber Song • SATB • © 2011 HELBLING, Rum/Innsbruck • Esslingen HI - C6725 Edward MacDowell, Slumber Song • SATB • © 2011 HELBLING, Rum/Innsbruck • Esslingen HI - C6725 Edward MacDowell, Slumber Song • SATB • © 2011 HELBLING, Rum/Innsbruck • Esslingen HI - C6725
&
&
V
?
&
?
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
4
2
4
2
4
2
4
2
4
2
4
2
œ
œ
œ
œ #
œ
œ
œ
œ
Very slowly and softly
humming / summend
humming / summend
humming / summend
œ œ
Fro zen
œ œ
œ œ
œ œ
œ œ
œ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
j
œ
J
œ
.
j
œ
r
œ
is the ground, the
œ # œ n
œ œ #
œ œ
œ œ
. œ œ
œ # œ n
œ
œ
œ
œ
#
œ
œ
œ œ œ
3
stream's ice
œ œ
œ
œ
œ œ n
œ
œ
œ œ œ
3
œ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ n
œ
œ
bound,
 #
œ
œ
œ
œ œ
œ
œ
 #
œ
œ
œœ œ
œ
j
œ n
J
œ
soft ly the
œ œ
œ œ
œ œ
œ œ n œ
œ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
- -
&
&
V
?
&
?
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
6
.
j
œ
r
œ œ
north wind croons,
. œ
j
œ
œ œ
œ œ
. œ œ # œ
. œ
J
œ
œ
œ
# œ
œ
p
p
p
. œ
j
œ
soft ly
 #

œ #
œ
. œ
j
œ


#
œ #
œ

croons.


œ
œ


œ
œ
π
π
π
œ
œ
Drow sy

œ
œ

œ
œ

œ
œ

.
J
œ
r
œ # œ œ
sleep i ly

œ œ n
. œ
j
œ
. œ œ # œ œ

œ œ n
. œ
J
œ
œ
œ
œ
j
œ
falls the
. œ œ œ


œ
œ
œ œ . œ œ œ


œ n
œ
snow,
œ œ
œ
œ œ # œ

œ n
œ
œ œ
œ
œ œ # œ

- - - - -
Slumber Song
SATB a cappella
............................. • HELBLING, Rum/Innsbruck • Esslingen
S
Music: Edward MacDowell (1860–1908),
Two Northern Songs, op. 43/2
A
T
B
Piano/Klavier
(for rehearsal)
Lyrics: Edward MacDowell (1860–1908)
German translation: Constance Stöhs
HI - Cxxxx
Gefroren ist die Erde, der Bach ist zugefroren, weich der
Nordwind säuselt, weich säuselt er. Einschläfernd fällt der Schnee,
&
&
V
?
&
?
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
13
J
œ
j
œ
j
œ
j
œ
as the frost king
œ # œ
œ œ
œ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
# œ
œ
œ œ
J
œ
j
œ
œ
œ
carves his runes,
œ œ
œ œ œ n
œ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ œ n
œ œ
. œ
j
œ #
carves his
œ œ #


. œ #
j
œ #
œ œ #

 #

runes.

 #
œ œ n
œ

 #
œ œ n
œ
π
π
π
œ œ
Mist y
œ œ n
œ
œ
œ œ
œ œ
œ œ n
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ n œ
œ
dream land's
œ b œ
œ œ #
œ œ
œ n œ
œ œ b œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
#
œ
œ
œ œ œ
3
moon lit
œ œ
œ
œ
œ œ n
œ
œ
œ œ œ n
3
œ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ n
- - -
&
&
V
?
&
?
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
20
œ
j
œ
j
œ
strand a
 #
œ
œ
œ
œ œ
œ
œ œ
 #
œ
œ
œœ œ
œ
j
œ n
J
œ
waits the
œ œ
œ œ
œ œ
œ œ n œ
œ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
.
j
œ
r
œ œ
com ing guest,
. œ
j
œ
œ œ
œ œ
. œ œ # œ
. œ
J
œ
œ
œ
# œ
œ
p
p
p
. œ
j
œ
'waits the
 #

œ #
œ
. œ
j
œ


#
œ #
œ
. œ
j
œ
guest. The

. œ
J
œ
œ
œ œ n
. œ
j
œ
. œ
J
œ
œ
œ œ n
π
π
π
œ œ ‹ œ
pine logs
œ œ
œ n œ
œ # œ
œ œ ‹ œ œ
œ n
œ
œ
œ # œ
œ
j
œ
j
œ
smoul der, as
œ n . œ œ
œ n œ
œ n
œ n
œ œ
œ œ œ
œ
œ
n
n
. œ œ
œ
œ n
œ n
œ œ
- - -
Strand erwartet den kommenden Gast, erwartet den Gast. Fichtenscheite glimmen, als
während der Frostkönig seine Runen ritzt, seine Runen ritzt. Des verschleierten Traumlands mondheller
&
&
V
?
&
?
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
27
œ
j
œ
j
œ
soft on my
œ œ
œ œ
œ n œ œ
œ œ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ n
œ
œ œ
œ
J
œ
J
œ
shoul der a
œ b œ
. œ
j
œ
œ #
œ
œ œ œ
œ b œ
. œ
j
œ
œ #
œ
.
j
œ
r
œ œ
flax en head
œ œ
œ œ
œ œ
. œ œ œ
œ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
rit.
rit.
.
j
œ
r
œ œ
sinks to rest,
. œ
j
œ
œ œ
œ œ
. œ œ œ
. œ
J
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
π
π
π
. œ
j
œ #
sinks to
 #

œ #
œ
. œ
j
œ #


#
œ #
œ

rest.

 #
œ
œ n
œ

 #
œ
œ n
œ



œ œ
Mist y
œ œ n
œ
œ
œ œ
œ œ
œ œ n
œ
œ
œ
œ
- - -
&
&
V
?
&
?
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
34
œ n œ
œ
dream land's
œ b œ
œ œ
œ œ
œ n œ
œ œ b œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
softer and slower
softer and slower
softer and slower
rit.
. œ
j
œ
moon lit
. œ
j
œ
. œ
j
œ
. œ
j
œ
. œ
j
œ
.
. œ
œ
J
œ
œ
. œ
j
œ
. œ
j
œ
strand a
. œ
j
œ
. œ
j
œ
. œ
j
œ
. œ
j
œ
.
. œ
œ
J
œ
. œ
J
œ
œ

waits
œ
œ



œ
œ



the
œ œ #



œ œ #



guest.

 #




 #












J
œ ‰ Œ
j
œ
‰ Œ
j
œ ‰ Œ
j
œ
œ
‰ Œ
j
œ ‰ Œ
J
œ
‰ Œ
j
œ
‰ Œ
J
œ
œ
‰ Œ
- - -
Traumlands mondheller Strand erwartet den Gast.
sich weich auf meiner Schulter ein flachsblondes Haupt zur Ruhe neigt, zur Ruhe neigt. Des verschleierten
C6725_Slumber Song SATB_6seitig.indd 2 22.07.11 13:31
4
M. Aschauer, Wiegenlied Selig träumend • SATB • © 2009 HELBLING, Rum/Innsbruck • Esslingen HI - C6226
&
&
V
?
&
?
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
4
3
4
3
4
3
4
3
4
3
4
3
P
P
P
P
Ruhig, aber mit Ausdruck (q = Ç64)
j
œ
j
œ
Hörst du,
j
œ
j
œ
Hörst du,
J
œ
J
œ
Hörst du,
J
œ
J
œ
Hörst du,
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ œ
J
œ
J
œ
wie die Brun nen
œ œ
j
œ
j
œ
wie die Brun nen
œ œ
J
œ
j
œ
wie die Brun nen
œ œ œ j
œ
j
œ
wie die Brun nen
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ œ œ j
œ
j
œ
rau schen? Hörst du,
œ œ
j
œ
j
œ
rau schen? Hörst du,
œ œ œ
j
œ
j
œ
rau schen? Hörst du,
œ œ
J
œ
J
œ
rau schen? Hörst du,
œ
œ
œ œ
œ
œ œ œ
œ
œ œ
œ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
-
-
-
-
-
-
- -
&
&
V
?
&
?
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
3
œ œ
J
œ
j
œ
wie die Gril le
œ œ
j
œ
j
œ
wie die Gril le
œ œ
J
œ
J
œ
wie die Gril le
œ œ œ
J
œ
J
œ
wie die Gril le
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
p
p
p
p
. œ

J
œ
J
œ
zirpt? Stil le,
. œ

j
œ
j
œ
zirpt? Stil le,
. œ ‰
J
œ
J
œ
zirpt? Stil le,
. œ

j
œ
j
œ
zirpt? Stil le,
.
.
œ
œ

œ
œ
œ
œ
.
.
œ
œ

œ
œ
œ
œ
. œ
J
œ
J
œ
J
œ
stil le lass uns
œ
j
œ
j
œ
j
œ
j
œ
stil le lass uns
. œ
j
œ
J
œ
j
œ
stil le lass uns
. œ
j
œ
j
œ
j
œ
stil le lass uns
. œ
j
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
J
œ
.
.
œ
œ
J
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ œ œ j
œ
j
œ
lau schen, se lig,
œ œ
œ
j
œ
j
œ
lau schen, se lig,
œ œ
œ
j
œ
j
œ
lau schen, se lig,
œ œ
œ
j
œ
j
œ
lau schen, se lig,
œ œ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
-
-
-
- - - -
- -
- -
- -
- -
- - - - -
Michael Aschauer, SELIG TRÄUMEND • © HELBLING, Rum/Innsbruck • Esslingen HI - C6226
Selig träumend
Wiegenlied für SATB a cappella
S
Musik: Michael Aschauer
A
T
B
Klavier
(für die Probe)
Text: Clemens Brentano (1778–1842),
Hörst du, wie die Brunnen rauschen
Engl. Textübertragung: Christopher Inman
Do you hear the murmur of the fountains? Do you hear
the chirping of the crickets? Hush, hush, let us listen, blessed
______________
• Das Hauptthema knüpft bewusst an das Lied „Weißt du, wieviel Sternlein stehen“ an. / Intentionally the main theme is based
on the song “Weißt du, wieviel Sternlein stehen” (Do you know, how many little stars there are on the blue canopy).
&
&
V
?
&
?
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
4
3
4
3
4
3
4
3
4
3
4
3
P
P
P
P
Ruhig, aber mit Ausdruck (q = Ç64)
j
œ
j
œ
Hörst du,
j
œ
j
œ
Hörst du,
J
œ
J
œ
Hörst du,
J
œ
J
œ
Hörst du,
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ œ
J
œ
J
œ
wie die Brun nen
œ œ
j
œ
j
œ
wie die Brun nen
œ œ
J
œ
j
œ
wie die Brun nen
œ œ œ j
œ
j
œ
wie die Brun nen
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ œ œ j
œ
j
œ
rau schen? Hörst du,
œ œ
j
œ
j
œ
rau schen? Hörst du,
œ œ œ
j
œ
j
œ
rau schen? Hörst du,
œ œ
J
œ
J
œ
rau schen? Hörst du,
œ
œ
œ œ
œ
œ œ œ
œ
œ œ
œ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
-
-
-
-
-
-
- -
&
&
V
?
&
?
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b
3
œ œ
J
œ
j
œ
wie die Gril le
œ œ
j
œ
j
œ
wie die Gril le
œ œ
J
œ
J
œ
wie die Gril le
œ œ œ
J
œ
J
œ
wie die Gril le
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
p
p
p
p
. œ

J
œ
J
œ
zirpt? Stil le,
. œ

j
œ
j
œ
zirpt? Stil le,
. œ ‰
J
œ
J
œ
zirpt? Stil le,
. œ

j
œ
j
œ
zirpt? Stil le,
.
.
œ
œ

œ
œ
œ
œ
.
.
œ
œ

œ
œ
œ
œ
. œ
J
œ
J
œ
J
œ
stil le lass uns
œ
j
œ
j
œ
j
œ
j
œ
stil le lass uns
. œ
j
œ
J
œ
j
œ
stil le lass uns
. œ
j
œ
j
œ
j
œ
stil le lass uns
. œ
j
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
J
œ
.
.
œ
œ
J
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ œ œ j
œ
j
œ
lau schen, se lig,
œ œ
œ
j
œ
j
œ
lau schen, se lig,
œ œ
œ
j
œ
j
œ
lau schen, se lig,
œ œ
œ
j
œ
j
œ
lau schen, se lig,
œ œ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
-
-
-
- - - -
- -
- -
- -
- -
- - - - -
Michael Aschauer, SELIG TRÄUMEND • © HELBLING, Rum/Innsbruck • Esslingen HI - C6226
Selig träumend
Wiegenlied für SATB a cappella
S
Musik: Michael Aschauer
A
T
B
Klavier
(für die Probe)
Text: Clemens Brentano (1778–1842),
Hörst du, wie die Brunnen rauschen
Engl. Textübertragung: Christopher Inman
Do you hear the murmur of the fountains? Do you hear
the chirping of the crickets? Hush, hush, let us listen, blessed
______________
• Das Hauptthema knüpft bewusst an das Lied „Weißt du, wieviel Sternlein stehen“ an. / Intentionally the main theme is based
on the song “Weißt du, wieviel Sternlein stehen” (Do you know, how many little stars there are on the blue canopy).
Selig träumend
Wiegenlied, SATB a cappel l a
C6226_Selig träumend_SATB.indd 4 21.04.2009 10:44:43 Uhr
mi xed choi r Gemischter Chor
SATB a cappella
HI -C6226
Selig
träumend
Wiegenlied
Text: Clemens Brentano (1778–1842),
„Hörst du, wie die Brunnen rauschen“
Michael Aschauer
C6226_Selig träumend_SATB.indd 1
21.04.2009 10:44:42 Uhr
MCM
M
ASTERWORKS OF CHORAL M
USIC
SATB a cappel l a
Two Northern Songs op. 43/2
Slumber Song
Edward MacDowell
HI -C6725
Edward MacDowell gilt als der erste in den USA ge- borene international renommierte Tonkünstler. Von Franz Liszt hochgeschätzt und mit Edvard Grieg befreundet, knüpfte er an die europäische Musik- tradition des 19. Jahrhunderts an, entwickelte aber einen ganz eigenen Stil. Die beiden Northern Songs op. 43 The Brook (Das Bächlein, Helbling HI-C6724) und Slumber Song (Schlafl ied) sind seine einzigen A-cappella-Werke für gemischte Stimmen und Juwelen fein differenzierter Chormusik. Im Slumber Song zeichnet MacDowell in beeindru- ckender, ergreifender Weise musikalisch nach, wie ein Kind auf der Schulter eines Erwachsenen sanft in den Traumzustand gleitet, während draußen der Winter herrscht. Einem Wiegenlied gemäß lässt MacDowell die drei unteren Stimmen über das ge- samte Stück hinweg summen und bildet mit ihnen ein faszinierendes harmonisches Fundament.
Edward MacDowell is considered to be the fi rst American-born internationally renowned composer. Admired greatly by Franz Liszt and close friends with Edvard Grieg, he continued the European music tradition of the 19th century, but still developed his own personal style. Both Northern Songs op. 43 The Brook (Helbling HI-C6724) and Slumber Song are his only a cappella works for mixed voices and are jewels of fi nely differentiated choral music. In Slumber Song MacDowell musically traces, in a poignant manner, how a child gently eases into a state of dreaming on an adult’s shoulder, while winter holds sway outside. In keeping with a lullaby, MacDowell has the lower three voices hum throughout the entire piece and with them builds up a fascinating harmonic foundation.
Edward MacDowell (~1860–1908)
Slumber Song Two Northern Songs op. 43/2
Vorwort
Preface
Edward MacDowell war nicht nur herausragender Pianist und ab
1896 hoch geachteter Professor für Musik an der Columbia University
in seiner Geburtsstadt New York, sondern wurde zu Lebzeiten auch
als bedeutendster Komponist der Vereinigten Staaten angesehen.
Heute gilt er als der erste in den USA geborene international renom-
mierte Tonkünstler. 1876 wurde er in Paris als 16-Jähriger jüngster
Student des berühmten Conservatoire; entscheidend prägten seine
weitere Entwicklung aber die Jahre 1878–1888, die er in Deutschland
verbrachte. Dort lernte er auch Franz Liszt kennen, den MacDowells
Kompositionen nicht zuletzt aufgrund des individuellen Personalstils
faszinierten. Wieder zurück in den USA, ließ er sich als Pianist und
Klavierlehrer in Boston nieder, wo ihn ein reiches Musikleben erwar-
tete: Das 1881 gegründete Boston Symphony Orchestra etwa avan-
cierte in kurzer Zeit zum bedeutendsten Orchester der Staaten. MacDowell schuf mit Ausnahme der Oper Werke aller Gattun-
gen. Regelmäßig befasste er sich somit auch mit Vokalmusik, so-
wohl als Komponist wie auch als Dirigent, wie Gary P. Wilson über-
liefert: Bereits im zweiten Jahr seiner Anstellung an der Columbia
University rief er einen Universitätschor ins Leben, laut einer Anzei-
ge vom 3. 12. 1897 „for the purpose of singing not the ordinary
‘college songs’, but music of a high order“. Darüber hinaus leitete
er 1896–1898 den Mendelssohn Glee Club und hatte eigenen
Worten zufolge viel Freude daran: „The Mendelssohn Glee Club is
good fun and the men act well and work for me like demons.“
In dreimal zwei aufeinanderfolgenden Konzerten pro Jahr führte er
mit diesem Männerchor meist Werke zeitgenössischer europäischer
und ameri kanischer Komponisten auf und schrieb auch selbst eini-
ge Stü cke dafür. Wie er seinem Studenten John Erskine schilderte,
sollte der Chor „lyrical“ und „fl oating“ singen – ein Klangideal, das
auch als nützlicher Interpretationshinweis für die 1891 publizierten
Two Northern Songs op. 43 dient, MacDowells einzige Werke für
gemischten Chor a cappella. Sein Credo, dass „das Poetische
Inspiration für die Musik und diese wiederum Kommentar des
Poetischen sein solle“ (Marianne Betz), zeigt sich exemplarisch in
diesen beiden, auf eigene Texte komponierten Stücken The Brook
(Das Bächlein, Helbling HI-C6724) op. 43/1 und Slumber Song
(Schlafl ied) op. 43/2, mit denen ihm wahre Juwelen fein differen-
zierter, kunstvoll geschaffener Chormusik gelangen. Zur Bezeichnung Northern Songs animierten MacDowell viel-
leicht sein Faible für Norwegen und die Freundschaft mit Edvard
Grieg, dem Widmungsträger der letzten beiden seiner vier Klavier-
sonaten. Im Slumber Song entsprechen dieser Titulierung in erster
Linie inhaltliche Aspekte: Im ersten Abschnitt nämlich zeichnet er
ein Winterbild mit Kälte, Eis, Schneefall und leichtem Nordwind, das
aber nicht bedrohlich, sondern sanft-beruhigend erscheint. Deshalb
fällt es dem Kleinkind auch nicht schwer, auf der Schulter des Er-
wachsenen einzuschlafen und in ein Traumland zu gleiten, das den
neuen Gast schon erwartet. Nicht nur durch den oftmaligen un-
mittelbaren Wechsel von fi s-Moll und Fis-Dur, ein Charakteristikum
über das gesamte Stück hinweg bis in die Coda, sondern durch viele
weitere inspirierte Kunstgriffe gelingt es MacDowell, zugleich diesen
Übergang vom Wach- in den Traumzustand und auch die winterliche
Stimmung draußen in Töne zu fassen und so beides zu einem Gan-
zen zu verbinden: Passend für ein Wiegenlied, lässt er die drei un-
teren Stimmen durchgehend summen und nur den Sopran den Text
vortragen, wodurch in Verbindung mit der originellen Harmonik,
dem zentralen Gestaltungselement in diesem Stück, und mit dem
Verharren im leisen Bereich ein faszinierender Klanghintergrund ent-
steht. Einen die Winterlandschaft widerspiegelnden etwas herben
Eindruck hinterlassen wiederum die eindringlichen harmonischen
Fortschreitungen, die sich häufi g durch eine chromatische Bewe-
gung in der Altstimme ergeben, die Überlagerungen unterschiedli-
cher Akkorde und verzögerte Tonfolgen in einzelnen Stimmen. Zu-
dem setzt MacDowell in expressiver Stimmführung in Takt 8 in der
Basslinie zwei Quartsprünge hintereinander und variiert diese Melo-
dielinie an allen melodisch ähnlichen Phrasenenden (T. 15f, T. 23f,
T. 31f) auf subtile Weise. In schöner Wirkung erniedrigt er beim letz-
ten Auftreten dieser Schlusswendung den zweiten Quart- zum Terz-
sprung, wodurch sich ein sanfterer D7-Akkord hin zum letztmaligen
Einsatz des Themenkopfes ergibt. Dies entspricht dem Text sinks to
rest an dieser Stelle ebenso wie davor (T. 29f) das milde harmonische
und melodische Pendeln in fi s-Moll (durch die Verdopplung der Moll-
terz a noch zusätzlich hervorgehoben) und die folgende plötzliche
Aufl ichtung in die gleichnamige Durtonart. Ferner hervorzuheben
sind das aufgrund vielfältiger rhythmischer Elemente (gewöhnliche
Achtel, Punktierung, Triole innerhalb von zwei Takten) und unerwar-
teter Wendungen im Melodieverlauf ausgesprochen einprägsame
Grundthema sowie die gewagte Modulation ab T. 25, die das Glim-
men der Fichtenscheite deutlich fühlbar macht und ebenso präzise
artikuliert werden soll wie die Harmoniewechsel in T. 13f, die die im
Sopran kreisende melodische Figur immer wieder neu beleuchten. Dr. Michael Aschauer
Edward MacDowell was not only an outstanding pianist and, from
1896 onwards, a highly regarded music professor at Columbia Uni-
versity in his native city of New York, but was also considered to be the
most distinguished composer of the United States in his own lifetime.
Today he is considered to be the fi rst American-born internationally
renowned composer. In 1876 he became the youngest student of the
famous Conservatoire at the age of 16; the years 1878–1888 that he
spent in Germany shaped his further development decisively. There
he made the acquaintance of Franz Liszt who was fascinated by Mac-
Dowell’s compositions not least due to the latter’s individual personal
style. Returning to the USA, he established himself as a pianist and
piano pedagogue in Boston where a rich musical life awaited him:
The Boston Symphony Orchestra, founded in 1881, advanced within
a short time to the most prominent orchestra of the United States. With the exception of opera, MacDowell composed works of
all genres. He became involved with vocal music on a regular basis,
both as a composer and as a conductor, like Gary P. Wilson reports:
already in the second year of his appointment at Columbia University
he started a university choir, according to an announcement from
December 3, 1897 “for the purpose of singing not the ordinary ‘col-
lege songs’, but music of a high order“. In addition, he conducted
the Mendelssohn Glee Club in 1896–1898 and he was very pleased
with it in his own words: “The Mendelssohn Glee Club is good fun
and the men act well and work for me like demons.“ In three times
two successive concerts per year he performed with this men’s choir
mostly works by contemporary European and American composers
and wrote a number of pieces for it as well. As he described to his
student John Erskine, the choir should sing in a “lyrical” and “fl oat-
ing” manner – a sound ideal that serves as a helpful reference in the
interpretation of the Two Northern Songs op. 43, published in 1891
and MacDowell’s only pieces for mixed choir a cappella. His credo
that “the poetic should be inspiration for the music and the music,
on the other hand, should be a commentary for the poetic” (Mari-
anne Betz) shows exemplarily in these two songs The Brook (Helbling
HI-C6724) op. 43/1 and Slumber Song op. 43/2, composed on their
own texts; with these he succeeded in composing true jewels of fi ne-
ly differentiated, artistically created pieces. Perhaps MacDowell was inspired to title his pieces Northern
Songs by his partiality for Norway and his friendship with Edvard
Grieg to whom the last two of his four piano sonatas are dedicated.
The designation of the title Slumber Song relates fi rst and foremost
to aspects with regard to the contents: That is to say, in the fi rst
part he paints a winter impression with cold, ice, snowfall and a
light northerly wind which enters, not in a menacing way, but rather
in a gently soothing manner. For this reason it is not diffi cult at all
for the young child to fall asleep on the adult’s shoulder and to slip
into a dreamland that is already waiting for the new guest. Not
only through the frequent, immediate alternation between F-sharp
Major and F-sharp minor – a characteristic throughout the entire
piece up to the coda – but also through the use of many more
distinctly inspired techniques, MacDowell succeeds in molding this
transition from awaking to a dreamy state and, at the same time,
assembling the wintery scene outside into sounds, thereby creat-
ing a new entity. Fitting to a lullaby, he has the three lower voices
hum throughout the song and only the soprano performs the text,
whereby a fascinating sound background arises in the blending
with the original harmony – the central compositional feature in this
piece – and the continuance in the muted sphere. The insistent har-
monic progressions which are frequently the result of the chromatic
movement in the alto voice, the superimposition of various chords
and delayed tone progressions in the individual voices, on the other
hand, leave behind a somewhat austere impression that mirrors the
winter landscape. In addition, in expressive voice leading in bar 8 in
the bass line, MacDowell sets two fourth leaps in succession and in
a subtle way varies this melody line on all melodically similar phrase
endings (bar 15f, bar 23f, bar 31f). In a fi ne execution he decreases
the second fourth leap to a third in the last appearance in this fi nal
phrase, which results in a gentler D7 chord at the last entrance of
the principal theme. This corresponds to the text sinks to rest at this
point as well as the previous (bar 29f) mild harmonic and melodic
swaying to F-sharp minor (additionally emphasised by the doubling
of the minor third a) and the subsequent sudden brightening into
the corresponding major key. Furthermore, to be emphasized – as
a result of the multifaceted rhythmic elements (common eighths,
dotted rhythms, triplets within two bars) and unexpected twists
and turns in the melody – is the remarkably catchy principal theme
as well as the bold modulation starting at bar 25; this makes the
smouldering of the pine logs palpable and likewise should be pre-
cisely articulated just as the harmonic change in bar 13f, which time
and again illuminates the circling melodic fi gure in the soprano. Dr. Michael Aschauer English translation: Constance Stöhs
HI - C6725
Fotokopieren grundsätzlich gesetzlich verboten
Photocopying this copyright material is ILLEGAL Edward MacDowell, Slumber Song • SATB • © 2011 HELBLING
AUSTRIA: Kaplanstrasse 9, 6063 Rum/Innsbruck | GERMANY: P.O. Box 100754, 73707 Esslingen
Alle Rechte vorbehalten / All rights reserved
www.helblingchor.com
www.helblingchoral.com
9 7905 02 024802
ISMN M-50202-480-2
Quelle (Notentext) / Source (Score): Two Northern Songs. No. 2. Slumber Song. Arthur P. Schmidt 1891 (APS.2248-1)
© Mit freundlicher Genehmigung / By courtesy of ILL-DD/IRRC • University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 784.3 M14S
C6725_Slumber Song SATB_6seitig.indd 1
22.07.11 13:31
Secular choral music – Nature, seasons and times of day