23 Secular choral music – Love, desire and sorrow


More sample pages at www.helblingchoral.com
■ HI-C5941 – � 1,90
(from 20 copies: –15% / from 40 copies: –25%)
Minimum order: 10 copies
Audio sample at
www.helblingchoral.com
Friedrich Silcher (1789–1860)
Wohin mit der Freud‘
(What Use is Joy)
SATB a cappella
Friedrich Silcher is regarded as one of the forefathers of
the German Romantic choral movement. In addition to
countless folk-song arrangements from his pen, many
of his own compositions have also survived. Constantly
at pains to achieve a characteristic appealing folk-song
style while remaining skilful in his handling of detail,
Silcher composed true gems in a small strophic form.
We can see this, too, in his rousing piece Wohin mit
der Freud’ (What Use is Joy). The music fits like a glove
the joy of the lyrical self that Robert Reinick gives
exuberant expression to in his poem.
Lyrics in German only, English translation and English
preface included.
■ HI-C6730 – � 2,60
(from 20 copies: –15% / from 40 copies: –25%)
Minimum order: 10 copies
Audio sample at
www.helblingchoral.com
Robert Lucas Pearsall (1795–1856)
Great God of Love
SSAATTBB a cappella
Robert Lucas Pearsall, born near Bristol in England,
devoted himself to music relatively late in life. After
studying mostly in Germany, vocal music played a
central role in his œuvre. Besides Latin sacred choral
pieces, he composed numerous madrigals for the
Bristol Madrigal Society, which he was instrumental in
founding. Among these madrigals is the eight-voiced
Great God of Love, the text of which was penned by
the composer and which reflects the Victorian Age.
The complex, sonorous weave of voices reminds us of
the music of the 16
th
century, but is, at the same time,
filled with a Romantic spirit.

More sample pages at www.helblingchoral.com
Friedrich Silcher, Wohin mit der Freud’ • SATB • © 2011 HELBLING, Rum/Innsbruck • Esslingen HI - C5941 Friedrich Silcher, Wohin mit der Freud’ • SATB • © 2011 HELBLING, Rum/Innsbruck • Esslingen HI - C5941 Friedrich Silcher, Wohin mit der Freud’ • SATB • © 2011 HELBLING, Rum/Innsbruck • Esslingen HI - C5941
&
&
V
?
&
?
#
#
#
#
#
#
8
3
8
3
8
3
8
3
8
3
8
3
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
Bewegt, lebhaft
f
f
f
f
.
R
œ
R
Ô
œ
3. Und
2. Ach
1. Ach du
du
da
.
r
œ
r
K
œ
.
R
œ
R
Ô
œ
1. Ach
2. Ach
3. Und
du
du
da
.
R
œ
R
Ô
œ
.
. œ
œ
œ
œ
.
.
œ
œ
œ
œ
J
œ
.
j
œ
R
œ
klar
licht
seh'
blau
grü
ich
er
ne
mein
j
œ .
j
œ
r
œ
J
œ .
J
œ
R
œ
klar
licht
seh'
blau
grü
ich
er
ne
mein
J
œ
.
J
œ
R
œ
J
œ
œ .
.
j
œ
œ
r
œ
œ
J
œ
œ
.
.
J
œ œ
R
œ
j
œ
j
œ .
r
œ
r
K
œ
Him
Welt,
Lieb'
mel, und
und
un
wie
wie
term
j
œ
j
œ .
r
œ
r
K
œ
J
œ
J
œ .
R
œ
R
Ô
œ
Him
Welt,
Lieb'
mel, und
und
un
wie
wie
term
J
œ
J
œ
.
R
œ
R
Ô
œ
j
œ
œ
j
œ . œ œ
J
œ œ
J
œ
œ .
.
œ
œ
œ
œ
.
J
œ
>
R
œ
J
œ
schön
strahlst
Lin
bist
du
den
du
baum
voll
.
j
œ
>
r
œ
j
œ
.
J
œ
>
R
œ
J
œ
schön
strahlst
Lin
bist
du
den
du
voll
baum
.
J
œ
>
R
œ
J
œ
.
.
œ
œ
>
œ
œ
J
œ
œ
.
.
œ
œ
>
œ
œ
J
œ
œ
-
-
-
-
-
- - -
-
-
-
-
-
- - -
&
&
V
?
&
?
#
#
#
#
#
#
4
œ
R
œ
R
œ
heut!
Lust!
stehn,
Möcht'
Und
war
ans
ich
so
œ
r
œ
r
œ
œ
R
œ
r
œ
Lust!
stehn,
heut! Möcht'
Und
war
ans
ich
so
œ
R
œ
r
œ #
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ #
J
œ
J
œ
J
œ
Herz
möcht'
klar
mich
wie
gleich dich
gleich
der
j
œ
j
œ
j
œ
j
œ
J
œ
J
œ
Herz
möcht'
klar
gleich
mich
wie
dich
gleich
der
J
œ
J
œ
j
œ #
J
œ
œ
J
œ
œ
J
œ
œ œ
J
œ
œ
J
œ
œ
j
œ #
J
œ
J
œ
R
œ #
R
œ
drü
wer
Him
cken
fen
mel,
vor
dir
wie
vor
die
j
œ
j
œ
r
œ
r
œ
J
œ
J
œ
R
œ
R
œ
drü
wer
Him
cken
fen
mel,
vor
dir
wie
vor
die
J
œ
J
œ
R
œ
R
œ
J
œ
œ
œ
j
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
# œ
œ
J
œ
J
œ œ
œ
œ
œ
j
œ
.
J
œ
>
R
œ
Ju
Lieb'
Er
bel
an
de
und
die
so
j
œ
.
j
œ
>
r
œ
J
œ .
J
œ #
>
R
œ
Ju
Lieb'
Er
bel
an
de
und
die
so
J
œ
.
j
œ
>
r
œ
j
œ
œ
.
.
J
œ
œ
>
R
œ
œ
J
œ
œ
.
.
J
œ
œ
#
>
R
œ
œ
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Wohin mit der Freud'
SATB a cappella
............................. • HELBLING, Rum/Innsbruck • Esslingen
S
Musik: Friedrich Silcher (1789–1860),
Sechs vierstimmige Volkslieder, Heft I op. 60/1
A
T
B
Piano/Klavier
(for rehearsal)
Text: Robert Reinick (1805–1852)
Engl. Textübertragung: Christopher Inman
HI - Cxxxx
as clear as the sky, as beautiful as the earth.
1. Oh, you clear, blue sky, how beautiful you are today!
And I would like to throw myself at once, full of love upon your breast.
2. Oh, you bright, green world, how radiant you are with joy!
3. And then I see my beloved, standing by the chestnut tree,
I would like to press you to my heart at once out of sheer elation and joy.
&
&
V
?
&
?
#
#
#
#
#
#
8
3
8
3
8
3
8
3
8
3
8
3
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
Bewegt, lebhaft
f
f
f
f
.
R
œ
R
Ô
œ
3. Und
2. Ach
1. Ach du
du
da
.
r
œ
r
K
œ
.
R
œ
R
Ô
œ
1. Ach
2. Ach
3. Und
du
du
da
.
R
œ
R
Ô
œ
.
. œ
œ
œ
œ
.
.
œ
œ
œ
œ
J
œ
.
j
œ
R
œ
klar
licht
seh'
blau
grü
ich
er
ne
mein
j
œ .
j
œ
r
œ
J
œ .
J
œ
R
œ
klar
licht
seh'
blau
grü
ich
er
ne
mein
J
œ
.
J
œ
R
œ
J
œ
œ .
.
j
œ
œ
r
œ
œ
J
œ
œ
.
.
J
œ œ
R
œ
j
œ
j
œ .
r
œ
r
K
œ
Him
Welt,
Lieb'
mel, und
und
un
wie
wie
term
j
œ
j
œ .
r
œ
r
K
œ
J
œ
J
œ .
R
œ
R
Ô
œ
Him
Welt,
Lieb'
mel, und
und
un
wie
wie
term
J
œ
J
œ
.
R
œ
R
Ô
œ
j
œ
œ
j
œ . œ œ
J
œ œ
J
œ
œ .
.
œ
œ
œ
œ
.
J
œ
>
R
œ
J
œ
schön
strahlst
Lin
bist
du
den
du
baum
voll
.
j
œ
>
r
œ
j
œ
.
J
œ
>
R
œ
J
œ
schön
strahlst
Lin
bist
du
den
du
voll
baum
.
J
œ
>
R
œ
J
œ
.
.
œ
œ
>
œ
œ
J
œ
œ
.
.
œ
œ
>
œ
œ
J
œ
œ
-
-
-
-
-
- - -
-
-
-
-
-
- - -
&
&
V
?
&
?
#
#
#
#
#
#
4
œ
R
œ
R
œ
heut!
Lust!
stehn,
Möcht'
Und
war
ans
ich
so
œ
r
œ
r
œ
œ
R
œ
r
œ
Lust!
stehn,
heut! Möcht'
Und
war
ans
ich
so
œ
R
œ
r
œ #
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ #
J
œ
J
œ
J
œ
Herz
möcht'
klar
mich
wie
gleich dich
gleich
der
j
œ
j
œ
j
œ
j
œ
J
œ
J
œ
Herz
möcht'
klar
gleich
mich
wie
dich
gleich
der
J
œ
J
œ
j
œ #
J
œ
œ
J
œ
œ
J
œ
œ œ
J
œ
œ
J
œ
œ
j
œ #
J
œ
J
œ
R
œ #
R
œ
drü
wer
Him
cken
fen
mel,
vor
dir
wie
vor
die
j
œ
j
œ
r
œ
r
œ
J
œ
J
œ
R
œ
R
œ
drü
wer
Him
cken
fen
mel,
vor
dir
wie
vor
die
J
œ
J
œ
R
œ
R
œ
J
œ
œ
œ
j
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
# œ
œ
J
œ
J
œ œ
œ
œ
œ
j
œ
.
J
œ
>
R
œ
Ju
Lieb'
Er
bel
an
de
und
die
so
j
œ
.
j
œ
>
r
œ
J
œ .
J
œ #
>
R
œ
Ju
Lieb'
Er
bel
an
de
und
die
so
J
œ
.
j
œ
>
r
œ
j
œ
œ
.
.
J
œ
œ
>
R
œ
œ
J
œ
œ
.
.
J
œ
œ
#
>
R
œ
œ
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Wohin mit der Freud'
SATB a cappella
............................. • HELBLING, Rum/Innsbruck • Esslingen
S
Musik: Friedrich Silcher (1789–1860),
Sechs vierstimmige Volkslieder, Heft I op. 60/1
A
T
B
Piano/Klavier
(for rehearsal)
Text: Robert Reinick (1805–1852)
Engl. Textübertragung: Christopher Inman
HI - Cxxxx
as clear as the sky, as beautiful as the earth.
1. Oh, you clear, blue sky, how beautiful you are today!
And I would like to throw myself at once, full of love upon your breast.
2. Oh, you bright, green world, how radiant you are with joy!
3. And then I see my beloved, standing by the chestnut tree,
I would like to press you to my heart at once out of sheer elation and joy.
&
&
V
?
&
?
#
#
#
#
#
#
p
p
p
p
8
œ
R
œ
R
œ
schön!
Brust.
Freud'. A
A
Und
ber
ber
wir
œ
r
œ
r
œ
œ
R
œ N
R
œ
Freud'.
Brust.
schön!
A
A
Und
ber
ber
wir
œ
R
œ
R
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
N œ
œ
rit.
rit.
J
œ N
J
œ œ
œ
's geht
's geht
küss
doch
doch
ten
nicht
nicht
uns
j
œ
j
œ
j
œ #
j
œ
j
œ œ #
œ
's geht
's geht
küss
doch
doch
ten
nicht
nicht
uns
J
œ
J
œ
J
œ
j
œ
œ
N
j
œ
œ
œ
J
œ #
œ
J
œ
œ
J
œ
œ
œ #
J
œ
œ
œ
.
r
œ
R
Ô
œ
an,
an,
beid',
denn
und
und
du
das
wir
œ .
r
œ
r
K
œ
œ
.
R
œ
R
Ô
œ
an,
an,
beid',
denn
und
und
du
das
wir
œ .
R
œ
R
Ô
œ
œ
œ
.
.
œ
œ
œ
œ N
œ
œ
.
.
œ
œ
œ
œ
cresc.
cresc.
cresc.
cresc.
J
œ .
J
œ
R
œ
bist
ist
san
mir
ja
gen
zu
mein
vor
J
œ .
j
œ
r
œ
j
œ .
j
œ
r
œ
bist
ist
san
mir
ja
gen
zu
mein
vor
J
œ .
J
œ
R
œ
J
œ
œ .
.
J
œ
œ
r
œ
œ
J
œ
œ
.
.
J
œ
œ
R
œ
œ
-
-
- -
-
-
- -
&
&
V
?
&
?
#
#
#
#
#
#
f
f
f
f
12
œ
>
R
œ
R
œ
weit,
Leid,
Lust,
und
und
und
mit
mit
da
œ
>
r
œ
r
œ
œ
>
R
œ
R
œ
weit,
Leid,
Lust,
und
und
und
mit
mit
da
œ #
>
R
œ
R
œ
œ
œ
>
œ œ œ œ
œ
œ #
>
œ
œ
œ
œ
a tempo
a tempo
J
œ
J
œ
J
œ
all
all
hab'
mei
mei
ich
ner
ner
ge
j
œ
j
œ
j
œ
J
œ
J
œ
J
œ
all
all
hab'
mei
mei
ich
ner
ner
ge
J
œ
J
œ N
j
œ
J
œ
œ
J
œ
œ
J
œ
œ
J
œ
œ
J
œ
œ N
J
œ
œ
F
F
F
F
. œ œ
J
œ
Freud',
Freud',
wusst:
was
was
wo
œ
j
œ
œ œ œ
Freud',
Freud',
wusst:
was
was
wo
œ
J
œ
. œ
œ
œ
j
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
J
œ
œ
rit.
rit.
dim.
dim.
dim.
dim.
( )
J
œ
j
œ œ
œ
fang
fang
hin
ich
ich
mit
doch
doch
der
j
œ
j
œ
j
œ
J
œ
J
œ
J
œ
fang
fang
hin
ich
ich
mit
doch
doch
der
J
œ
J
œ
J
œ
j
œ
œ
j
œ
œ
œ
J
œ
œ
J
œ
œ
J
œ
œ
J
œ
œ
œ
U
an?
an?
Freud'.
œ
U
œ
U
an?
an?
Freud'.
œ
U
œ
œ
U
œ
œ
U
-
-
- -
-
-
- -
and then I knew what to do with my joy!
But that is quite unattainable, for you are far beyond my reach,
But that is quite unattainable, and that is my sorrow,
And we kissed, and we sang full of happiness,
and with all my joy, what shall I do now?
and with all my joy, what shall I do now?
&
&
V
?
&
?
#
#
#
#
#
#
p
p
p
p
8
œ
R
œ
R
œ
schön!
Brust.
Freud'. A
A
Und
ber
ber
wir
œ
r
œ
r
œ
œ
R
œ N
R
œ
Freud'.
Brust.
schön!
A
A
Und
ber
ber
wir
œ
R
œ
R
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
N œ
œ
rit.
rit.
J
œ N
J
œ œ
œ
's geht
's geht
küss
doch
doch
ten
nicht
nicht
uns
j
œ
j
œ
j
œ #
j
œ
j
œ œ #
œ
's geht
's geht
küss
doch
doch
ten
nicht
nicht
uns
J
œ
J
œ
J
œ
j
œ
œ
N
j
œ
œ
œ
J
œ #
œ
J
œ
œ
J
œ
œ
œ #
J
œ
œ
œ
.
r
œ
R
Ô
œ
an,
an,
beid',
denn
und
und
du
das
wir
œ .
r
œ
r
K
œ
œ
.
R
œ
R
Ô
œ
an,
an,
beid',
denn
und
und
du
das
wir
œ .
R
œ
R
Ô
œ
œ
œ
.
.
œ
œ
œ
œ N
œ
œ
.
.
œ
œ
œ
œ
cresc.
cresc.
cresc.
cresc.
J
œ .
J
œ
R
œ
bist
ist
san
mir
ja
gen
zu
mein
vor
J
œ .
j
œ
r
œ
j
œ .
j
œ
r
œ
bist
ist
san
mir
ja
gen
zu
mein
vor
J
œ .
J
œ
R
œ
J
œ
œ .
.
J
œ
œ
r
œ
œ
J
œ
œ
.
.
J
œ
œ
R
œ
œ
-
-
- -
-
-
- -
&
&
V
?
&
?
#
#
#
#
#
#
f
f
f
f
12
œ
>
R
œ
R
œ
weit,
Leid,
Lust,
und
und
und
mit
mit
da
œ
>
r
œ
r
œ
œ
>
R
œ
R
œ
weit,
Leid,
Lust,
und
und
und
mit
mit
da
œ #
>
R
œ
R
œ
œ
œ
>
œ œ œ œ
œ
œ #
>
œ
œ
œ
œ
a tempo
a tempo
J
œ
J
œ
J
œ
all
all
hab'
mei
mei
ich
ner
ner
ge
j
œ
j
œ
j
œ
J
œ
J
œ
J
œ
all
all
hab'
mei
mei
ich
ner
ner
ge
J
œ
J
œ N
j
œ
J
œ
œ
J
œ
œ
J
œ
œ
J
œ
œ
J
œ
œ N
J
œ
œ
F
F
F
F
. œ œ
J
œ
Freud',
Freud',
wusst:
was
was
wo
œ
j
œ
œ œ œ
Freud',
Freud',
wusst:
was
was
wo
œ
J
œ
. œ
œ
œ
j
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
J
œ
œ
rit.
rit.
dim.
dim.
dim.
dim.
( )
J
œ
j
œ œ
œ
fang
fang
hin
ich
ich
mit
doch
doch
der
j
œ
j
œ
j
œ
J
œ
J
œ
J
œ
fang
fang
hin
ich
ich
mit
doch
doch
der
J
œ
J
œ
J
œ
j
œ
œ
j
œ
œ
œ
J
œ
œ
J
œ
œ
J
œ
œ
J
œ
œ
œ
U
an?
an?
Freud'.
œ
U
œ
U
an?
an?
Freud'.
œ
U
œ
œ
U
œ
œ
U
-
-
- -
-
-
- -
and then I knew what to do with my joy!
But that is quite unattainable, for you are far beyond my reach,
But that is quite unattainable, and that is my sorrow,
And we kissed, and we sang full of happiness,
and with all my joy, what shall I do now?
and with all my joy, what shall I do now?
© Mit freundlicher Genehmigung / By courtesy of Silcher-Museum des Schwäbischen Chorverbandes, Weinstadt.
Friedrich Silcher, Wohin mit der Freud’, Manuskript (Inv.-Nr. 90/1361)
C5941_Wohin mit der Freud_6seitig.indd 2 21.12.10 11:16
MCM
M
ASTERWORKS OF CHORAL M
USIC
SSAATTBB a cappel l a
Great God
of Love
HI -C6730
Robert Lucas Pearsall
C6730_Great God of Love.indd 1
21.07.11 11:29
3
Robert Lucas Pearsall, Great God of Love • SSAATTBB • © 2011 HELBLING, Rum/Innsbruck • Esslingen HI - C6730
&
&
V
?
&
?
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
C
C
C
C
C
C
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
œ
Slowly (h = 72) *)



Ó 
p
Great

p
œ œ
Great God of
Ó

p
Great

p
œ œ
Great God of

p
œ œ
Great God of
Ó

œ œ




œ œ


Ó 
p
Great
.  œ
God of
 
love, some
 œ œ
God of
 
love, some
 
love, some


.  œ 
œ œ 





Ó

p
Great
 
God
 
love, some
 
pi ty


love, some


pi ty
.  œ
pi ty
 






.  œ
-
-
- - -
&
&
V
?
&
?
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
#
4
Ó

p
Great
 
God
œ œ œ œ
of


pi ty
w
show;


pi
w
show;
w
show;


œ

 œ œ œ


w
w

.  œ
God of
 
of
 œ œ
love, some
œ œ 
show; some

 


.  œ 

œ
œ
œ
œ
œ œ 
 
œ œ 
love, some pi
w
love
 
pi
 
pi ty

 
ty
w
great

œ œ 
w
 

w  
 
ty
w
.  œ
ty
w
show;
Ó

great
w
show;
 œ œ
God of
 œ œ
great God of
 
.  œ


œ
œ
œ
œ
w
- - - - - - - - - - - -
- - - -
- - - - - - -
- - - - -
Great God of Love
SSAATTBB a cappella
............................. • HELBLING, Rum/Innsbruck • Esslingen
S1
S2
Music: Robert Lucas Pearsall (1795–1856),
Madrigal (1839)
Piano/Klavier
(for rehearsal)
Lyrics: Robert Lucas Pearsall (1795–1856)
German translation: Constance Stöhs
HI - Cxxxx
B1
B2
T1
T2
A1
A2
großer Gott der Liebe, zeige etwas Mitleid, großer Gott der
Großer Gott der Liebe, zeige etwas Mitleid;
______________
*) see/vgl. Edgar Hunt, Robert Lucas Pearsall 1977, page/Seite 101.
C6730_Great God of Love.indd 3 21.07.11 11:29
MCM
M
ASTERWORKS OF CHORAL M
USIC
SATB a cappel l a
HI -C5941
Vorwort
Preface Der Komponist, Pädagoge, Volksliedsammler und Kir-
chenmusiker Friedrich Silcher, seit 1817 in Tübingen
1. Universitäts-Musikdirektor, setzte sich, liberal und de-
mokratisch gesinnt, für eine möglichst weiten Kreisen zu-
gängliche Bildung und für das Laienmusizieren ein. Als
geeignetes Mittel für die Förderung der Laienmusik sah er
das Volkslied an, und auch selbst komponierte er, oft erst
Jahre später die Urheberschaft preisgebend, zahlreiche Lieder
im Volkston, die bis heute in vielen Volksliedsammlungen zu
finden sind. Silcher war nicht nur Ehrenmitglied mehrerer
Gesangvereine, sondern gründete in Tübingen 1829 auch
die Akademische Liedertafel (Männerchor) und zehn Jahre
später den Oratorienverein (gemischter Chor). Gerade der
Chorgesang und die Hausmusik, das „Kleine“, „Geordnete“
und „geborgen in sich Ruhende“ – das, was mit dem Begriff
Biedermeier in Verbindung gebracht wird – bildete letztlich
eine treibende Kraft bei der Gestaltung des Musiklebens,
denn immer mehr Menschen befassten sich dadurch mit
Musik und bestimmten als Konsumenten den musikalischen
Markt. Aufgeschlossen auch gegenüber ganz anderen ästhe-
tischen Prinzipien folgenden Komponisten wie etwa Richard
Wagner, komponierte Silcher, genau abgestimmt auf seine
Vorstellungen, musikalisch qualitätvoll. Sehr energisch wand-
te er sich gegen die „Verstümmelung und geschmacklose
Bearbeitung“ seiner Chorsätze. Wohin mit der Freud’ ist ein typisches Beispiel für Silchers
Kompositionsstil. Formal ausgewogen, an volksliedartige
Melodik und Harmonik anknüpfend und dabei kunstvoll im
Detail, passt diese fast durchgängig unbeschwerte, mitrei-
ßende und charakteristisch zwischen punktierten und nicht
punktierten Auftakten wechselnde Musik zur Freude des
lyrischen Ich am klarblauen Himmel, an der lichtgrünen Welt
und nicht zuletzt am Liebchen wie angegossen. Zugleich aber
nimmt Silcher auf die leisen Zwischentöne des Textes Be-
zug; insgesamt stellt dieses kompakte 16-taktige Strophen-
lied mit seinen eingängigen Melodien in seiner „kunstfertigen
Schlichtheit“ durchaus ein Meisterwerk dar! Ganz regelmäßig gebaut, setzt es sich aus vier Viertakt-
gruppen zusammen. Den Melodiebogen der ersten vier Takte
prägt ein Oktavsprung, der die Verzückung des Protagonisten
über die Schönheit von Himmel und Welt offenbart. Sich in
reinem Dur bewegend, strahlt die Musik tatsächlich schön.
Die nächsten vier Takte, melodisch schwungvoll pendelnd,
stehen harmonisch intensiviert in D-Dur und entsprechen
somit der inhaltlichen Steigerung in allen Strophen: Wurde
davor in den ersten beiden Strophen die äußere Umgebung
beschrieben, geht es nun um die überschwängliche innere
Emotion des lyrischen Ich, und in der dritten Strophe wird
mein Lieb’ zur herrlichen Natur in Beziehung gesetzt. In den
dritten vier Takten nimmt Silcher die Spannung zunächst kurz
zurück, um sie dann bis hin zum verminderten Septakkord,
mit dem er das allzu Weite, das Leid, aber auch die Lust
expressiv musikalisch nachzeichnet, sogleich wieder aufzu-
bauen. Davor moduliert er nach G-Dur zurück und verharrt
harmonisch auf dem D7-Akkord, lediglich unterbrochen
durch eine etwas schmerzliche Wechselnote, womit das
leicht Zweifelnde dieser Textpassage gut zum Ausdruck
kommt. In den letzten vier Takten springt die Melodie quasi
beflügelt zum g hinauf und erinnert dabei an die Takte 2
und 3 – durch die Harmonisierung mit einem e-Moll-Akkord
sowie den folgenden Trugschluss und die „offene“ Endung in
Terzlage wird trotz all meiner Freud’ das Fragende der ersten
beiden Strophen deutlich. Zupackend interpretiert, wird der
„offene“ Terzschluss auch der dritten Strophe gerecht – die
Freud’ dauert über das Liedende hinaus an. Dr. Michael Aschauer Quelle (Notentext) / Source (Score): • Sechs vierstimmige Volkslieder für Sopran, Alt, Tenor und Bass (ohne
Begleitung im Chor oder Quartett zu singen). Hrsg. von Friedrich
Silcher. Heft I. op. 60/1. 1853. Inv.-Nr. 90/1466 • Manuskript von Friedrich Silcher, Inv.-Nr. 90/1361 © Mit freundlicher Genehmigung / By courtesy of Silcher-Museum
des Schwäbischen Chorverbandes, Weinstadt.
The composer, teacher, collector of folk songs and church
musician Friedrich Silcher, from 1817 First Musical Director
of the University of Tübingen, was a man of liberal and
democratic convictions who fought for the establishment
of a system of education accessible to as many sections of
society as possible, and also for amateur music-making. In his
view, a suitable means for the promotion of amateur music
was the folk song, and he himself also composed numerous
songs in folk style (frequently only years later revealing
himself as their composer), which are to be found in many
collections of folk songs to the present day. Silcher was not
only an honorary member of several choral societies, but also
founded the male-voice choir the Academic Choral Society
in Tübingen in 1829, followed ten years later by a mixed
choir, the Oratorio Society. It was especially choral singing
and music-making within the family, everything “small”,
“ordered” and “secure and at peace within itself” – all that
is associated with the concept of Biedermeier – that in the
final analysis constituted one of the driving forces in the
shaping of musical life, as this led to a constantly increasing
number of people taking an interest in music, who then, as
consumers, determined the musical market. Open-minded,
too, in respect of composers who worked according to
completely different aesthetic principles, like, for example,
Richard Wagner, Silcher composed in precise accordance with
his ideas work of high musical quality. He vigorously opposed
anything he saw as “mutilation and tasteless arrangement”
of his choral works. Wohin mit der Freud’ (What Use is Joy) is a typical
example of Silcher’s compositional style. Balanced in its form,
picking up on folk style melody and harmonics, and artistic
in its treatment of detail, this almost completely carefree and
rousing music, which characteristically alternates between
dotted and undotted openings, fits like a glove the joy of
the lyrical self in the klarblauen Himmel (clear, blue sky), the
lichtgrünen Welt (bright green world) and not least in the
beloved. At the same time, however, Silcher makes reference
to the gentle nuances of the text. Taken overall, this compact,
16-bar strophic song with its captivating melodies and its
“skilful simplicity” represents a true masterpiece! Completely regular in its structure, the piece comprises
four groups of four bars each. The melodic span of the first
four bars is shaped by an octave leap, which reveals the
rapture of the protagonist at the beauty of the heavens
and the world. Moving within a natural major scale, the
music, like the world of the text, truly radiates beauty. The
next four bars, in which the melody swings energetically
back and forth, are, harmonically intensified, in D major,
and so remain in keeping with the content, which inten-
sifies from verse to verse. If up to now the first two verses
have described the external surroundings, we now turn to
the exuberant inner emotions of the lyrical self, and in the
third verse, mein Lieb’ (my beloved) is associated with the
loveliness of Nature. In the third group of four bars, Silcher
initially and briefly diminishes the tension, only to build it
up again immediately to the diminished seventh chord with
which he creates an expressive musical image of the all too
great expanse of space and the Leid (sorrow), but also of
the Lust (happiness). Before this, he modulates back to G
major and lingers on the D7 chord, interrupted only by a
somewhat anguished appoggiatura, which gives successful
expression to the slightly doubting tone of this passage of
the text. In the final four bars, the melody leaps, on wings,
as it were, up to the g, recalling bars 2 and 3 – through the
harmonisation with an E minor chord combined with the
subsequent false cadence and the “open” ending in the
third, the questioning tone of the first two verses comes
clearly through, despite all meiner Freud’ (all my joy). Given
a vigorous interpretation, the “open” third ending does
justice to the third verse too – the joy endures beyond the
end of the song.
Dr. Michael Aschauer English translation: Christopher Inman
Wohin mit der
Freud’
Friedrich Silcher
ISMN M-50022-789-2
HI - C5941
Fotokopieren grundsätzlich gesetzlich verboten
Photocopying this copyright material is ILLEGAL Friedrich Silcher, Wohin mit der Freud’ • SATB • © 2011 HELBLING
AUSTRIA: Kaplanstrasse 9, 6063 Rum/Innsbruck | GERMANY: P.O. Box 100754, 73707 Esslingen
Alle Rechte vorbehalten / All rights reserved
Friedrich Silcher gilt als einer der Urväter der deut- schen Chorbewegung im 19. Jahrhundert. Neben ungezählten Volksliedbearbeitungen aus seiner Feder haben sich auch viele eigene Kompositionen erhalten. Immer bemüht um einen eingängigen, volksliedhaften Duktus und dabei kunstfertig im De- tail, sind wahre Kleinode einer liedhaften Kleinform entstanden. Dies zeigt sich auch im mitreißenden Strophenlied Wohin mit der Freud’. Wie angegos- sen passt die Musik zur Freude des lyrischen Ich, die Robert Reinick in seinem Gedicht überschwäng- lich zum Ausdruck bringt.
Friedrich Silcher is regarded as one of the fore- fathers of the German choral movement in the 19th century. In addition to countless folk-song arrange- ments from his pen, many of his own compositions have also survived. Constantly at pains to achieve a characteristic appealing folk-song style while re- maining skilful in his handling of detail, Silcher composed true gems in a small songlike form. We can see this, too, in his rousing strophic song Wohin mit der Freud’ (What Use is Joy). The music fits like a glove the joy of the lyrical self that Robert Reinick gives exuberant expression to in his poem.
Friedrich Silcher (1789–1860)
Wohin mit der Freud’ Sechs vierstimmige Volkslieder, Heft I op. 60/1
Sechs vierstimmige Volkslieder, Heft I op. 60/1
www.helblingchor.com International: www.helblingchoral.com
C5941_Wohin mit der Freud_6seitig.indd 1
21.12.10 11:16