Wines of

Chile
By:
Wines of Chile
Varun Bakshi (H-1214)
Jahnvi Kanwar (H-1220)
DECLARA!"#
We declare that this project is a result of the researcher’s collective efforts and
that it conforms to the University, Departmental and course regulations regarding
cheating and plagiarism. No material contained within this project has been used
in any other submissions by authors for academic awards.
Varun a!shi "#$%&%'(
)ahnvi *anwar "#$%&&+(
a!shi V., *anwar ). 2
Wines of Chile
ACK#"$LED%E&E#
We ta!e this opportunity to than! ,hef -erard D’ .ou/a faculty 0ood and wine
#armony, 1nstitute of hotel management, for giving us this opportunity to learn
and research on a topic that we feel strongly about.
2ur sincere than!s to 3s 4upa 3athew for helping us and giving us the support
we needed in our research.
a!shi V., *anwar ). 3
Wines of Chile
a'() *+ C*n,)n,s
D5,6747812N.......................................................................................................%
7,*N2W65D-535N8.........................................................................................&
.ynopsis.................................................................................................................'
1ntroduction to Wines..............................................................................................9
1ntroduction to ,hile............................................................................................:
#istory of ,hilean wines......................................................................................;
,hilean Wines.......................................................................................................%&
,hilean Wine <roduction...................................................................................%=
,hilean Wine ,lassification...............................................................................%'
,hilean -rape Varieties....................................................................................%9
,hilean 4ed -rapes......................................................................................%9
,hilean White -rapes...................................................................................%>
1nfluences on the ,haracter of Wines...............................................................%:
,hilean Wine 4egions.......................................................................................%?
6imar@ Valley..................................................................................................%?
7concagua Valley..........................................................................................&+
,asablanca Valley.........................................................................................&&
.an 7ntonio Valley $ 6eyda............................................................................&=
AValle ,entralA appellation.............................................................................&'
.outhern regions...........................................................................................=+
,hilean Wine <roducers...................................................................................=&
7lmaviva........................................................................................................=&
7Buitania........................................................................................................==
,aliterra.........................................................................................................==
,asa 6apostolle.............................................................................................==
,oncha y 8oro................................................................................................='
,ono .ur........................................................................................................='
5rra/uri/........................................................................................................='
3ontes...........................................................................................................=9
a!shi V., *anwar ). 4
Wines of Chile
.an <edro......................................................................................................=9
3iguel 8orrres................................................................................................=>
,hilean Wine and 0ood <airing........................................................................=>
,hilean Wine 1ndustry.......................................................................................'+
6atest on ,hilean Wines...................................................................................''
io dynamics.................................................................................................''
8ourism trail...................................................................................................''
,hile’s outiBue Development......................................................................'9
5spiritu de ,hile $ 7 brand new wine concept...............................................'9
,onclusion............................................................................................................':
ibliography..........................................................................................................';
7nneCture..............................................................................................................9+
-yn*.sis
a!shi V., *anwar ). 5
Wines of Chile
8he authors have produced this project in order to educate readers about the
Wines of ,hile. ,hile is a new world wine region and its mar!et is increasing at a
very steady pace, in fact ,hilean Wines are becoming a serious threat to even
the established old world 0rench wines li!e the ordeauC. ,hile is the %&th
largest wine producing country in the world. ,hilean wines have caught the eyes
of 0rench and 7merican winema!ers and has invited collaborations from
producers li!e .painDs 3iguel 8orres, 0ranceDs aron de 4othschild and ,hateau
6afite, and the U...Ds 4obert 3ondavi among others, and today, with foreign
capital and joint ventures, ,hileDs wines are reaching an ever wider and more
demanding audience.
8his project, provided in detail, information about ,hile as a wine producing
country, its history, and traditional winema!ing process vis$a$vie the modern
techniBues used today. 0urther, it elaborates on the grape varieties that are
cultivated with !ey reference to the vineyard regions. 8he authors provide a
crucial insight on the characteristic of wines and the terroir it is grown in, with the
particular micro$climate of the region. 8he ,hilean wines are also food$friendly
and therefore pair well with cuisines all over the world. 8he authors showcase
some of the classic wines of ,hile with reference to the dishes that complement
them. 8owards the end, the Wine 1ndustry of ,hile is elaborated with indication to
its strengths and wea!nesses. 1n order to achieve this, the authors have referred
to a number of maga/ines, articles, and websites to gather as much published
data as possible 8o have a better understanding of ,hilean Wines the
researchers have time and again discussed various aspects of the ,hilean
Wines with various faculty members.
a!shi V., *anwar ). 6
Wines of Chile
!n,r*/u0,i*n ,* $in)s
AWine ma!es every meal an occasion, every table more elegant, every day more
civili/ed.A
$$$ 7ndrE .imon
8he first species of grapevine appeared siCty million years ago. 1t has, since
then, evolved as a beverage that infused elegance to the world of dinning and
established, by itself a strong bond with the culture and traditions of the region it
was grown in. 1f wine can pride itself on such historical and geographic
universality, this is above all because it comes from a plant with surprising
powers of adaptation. 8oday wine appreciation is not preserve of the elite. 1t is
affordable and available in almost all parts of the world.
8he world of wine has stepped into the New age, with 7ustralian wine, which was
a novelty in the late %?;+s, when masses dran! mostly 0rench, -erman and
1talian wine. ut now 7ustralia is number two in the mar!et, roaring past
-ermany and way ahead of 1taly. 8here’s a new world of wine out there, a world
without chateau or communes, where the grape variety rules, where the taste of
the fruit and the name of the grape are what matters the most.
a!shi V., *anwar ). 7
Wines of Chile
7rmed with the shiny new eBuipments and the latest ideas, New world
producers ma!e vibrant, juicy ripe wines, with the gape variety on the label. 1t’s a
language that everybody can now understand. 8here’s a huge amount of
scientific !now$how that goes into establishing a grape’s sugar levels, acid,
tannin, colour and flavour and the transformation of those grapes into wine.
.outh 7merica is stealing a march on everybody else in the New World, with its
juicy, fruity, good value wine. ,hile and 7rgentina lead the way.
!n,r*/u0,i*n ,* Chi()
,hile is a country of startling contrasts and eCtreme beauty. 1t lies in the western
coast of .outh 7merica, immediate neighbor to 7rgentina. 8he most obvious
factor in ,hileDs remar!able slenderness is the massive, virtually impassable wall
of the 7ndes, a mountain range that is still rising and that contains more than fifty
active volcanic pea!s. 8he western border is of course the <acific 2cean. 8o the
north the land rises and becomes more arid, until one reaches the forbidding
7tacama Desert, one of the most inhospitable regions on earth. 8o the south just
the opposite transformation ta!es placeF the land falls away, and the region
between mountains and ocean fades into the baffling arch pelagic ma/e that
terminates in ,hilean <atagonia. ,hileDs southern eCtremity is mar!ed by ,ape
#orn, a treacherous headland surrounded by almost continuously storm$tossed
seas and passable only through the foggy stillness of the .trait of 3agellan.
1n addition to uniBue terroir "the 0rench word for the combination of a specific
regionDs soil, climate and topography that influences a wineDs character(, ,hile’s
climatic characteristics distinguish it from other renowned wine$producing
countries.
a!shi V., *anwar ). 8
Wines of Chile
0irst, the well$defined seasons receive very little rain from November or
December all the way through harvest. 8his lac! of humidity allows the grapes to
fully ripen without danger of botrytis. 7dditionally, it also allows ,hile to avoid
what can happen in other countriesGtoo much precipitation before the harvest,
ruining the crop. 8his ability to properly ripen the grapes assures consistent
Buality from year to year. .econdly, the wide variation in daily temperaturesG
sometimes differing as much as &+ degrees between day and nightGallows the
concentration of aromatic components, especially in the grapes’ s!ins. 8his
improves the Buality of the grapes and is visible in the juice’s intense color.
His,*ry *+ Chi()an win)s
Wine was an uneCpected bounty for the .panish ,onBuistadors in ,hile. 1n the
mid$%9++s 3issionaries traveling with the conBuistadors brought cuttings of blac!
pais grape to produce sacramental wines from their native .pain to ,hile.
0inding the area around one of the first settlements, .antiago, to be close to their
own 3editerranean climate, and the valleys fertile, the missionaries planted the
first vines. .uperb wines and a particular way of life infused with tradition were
soon to sprout from that one simple act.

0armers joined the missionaries, and the first plantings gave fruit for more than
religious purposes. 8hese commercial wines proved to be popular and were
eCported to other countries. Winema!ers used primitive techniBues "wines were
often sweetened and stabili/ed with boiled must, for eCample( to produce rustic
wines for basic appetites. 1t was three centuries before any significant change
too! place in ,hilean wine production.
a!shi V., *anwar ). 9
Wines of Chile

1n %;++s, ,hile became independent of .panish rule, and a newly prosperous
upper class "often funded largely by mineral wealth( began to travel to 5urope,
where they came to appreciate 0rench wines.
1n %;=+, ,laudio -ay, a 0renchman, naturalist and scientist, persuaded the
government to establish an official plant nursery called the Huinta Normal for
botanical studies. 7 number of its first specimens were healthy 0rench vinifera
vines, with geographical isolation shielded from phylloCera and other 5uropean
ailments. ,hile vinified generous yields of ,abernet .auvignon, 3erlot and
,armenere "a lesser ordeauC varietal(.
1n the %;9+Ds, the 0rench, replaced the .paniards in the winema!ing business in
,hile, and brought still finer grapevine stoc! with them. 1ndustrialists of the
booming ,hilean economy li!e .ilvestre 2chagav@a began to introduce 0rench
vines commercially, initially in the 3aipo Valley. .everal of ,hileDs more traditional
vineyards began here and continue to produce wine here today. y this time, the
wines from ,hile were proving such a competition for .panish eCport wines that
the .panish crown ordered heavy taCes and restrictions followed by acres of
vineyards destroyed.
,hilean history is commemorated on some wine bottles. .anta 4ita ma!es a line
of wines called A%&+,A in honor of the %&+ soldiers who had fled with -eneral
ernardo 2D#iggins in a s!irmish with .panish forces. 8eaming up with an
7rgentinean general, 2D#iggins returned with the %&+ team, plus four or five
thousand more and were victorious in further battles with the .panish.
a!shi V., *anwar ). 10
Wines of Chile
1n the late %;++s, the <hylloCera pest wiped out grapevines throughout most of
the world $particularly in 5urope$however, did not affect ,hile, the original 0rench
grapevine stoc! still growing today without graft of any !ind. 1n fact, ,hilean
grapevines were used later to repopulate the 0rench vineyards.
5arly %?++s was a story of seclusion and distance from the world for ,hile.
Despite its turn$of$the$century success in wine, two World Wars and decades of
state protectionism forced the country down a solitary path that technologically
isolated it from the world for nearly 9+ years.
8he mid %?++s, 7grarian 6and 4eform too! its toll on ,hile’s wine industry, and
the country’s relative isolation from the increasingly globali/e, trade$oriented
world essentially !ept ,hile out of the wine trade for decades more.
8he country reversed its closed$door policies in %?;+’s, effectively giving rise to
the neCt wave in the history of ,hilean winema!ing. 8he part of ,hilean wine
history that most affects today’s consumer has ta!en place since the %?:+’s,
when complicated and restrictive domestic policies were repealed and political
interventionism was relaCed or eliminated. When democracy and stability were
restored in the %?;+Ds, large international producers were eager to invest in
,hileDs great agricultural potential. 8he wine world was ready for an economical
source of value$priced varietals, and ,hile was uniBuely prepared to satisfy this
niche. 1ts stable wor! force, tested climate, and proven record as a wine$
producing nation attracted corporations from 0rance, the United .tates, .pain,
7ustralia and )apan.
a!shi V., *anwar ). 11
Wines of Chile
8he new companies invested heavily in modern technology and revitali/ed and
replanted vineyards. 8wenty$five thousand acres of premium plantings,
particularly ,abernet .auvignon, 3erlot and ,hardonnay, were installed between
%?;:$%??=
8he ,hilean wine industry outfitted itself with modern machinery and eBuipment,
improved its planting and irrigation technology, incorporated stainless steel tan!s
and 0rench oa! barrels and began to utili/e better Buality cor!s and bottles.
3iguel 8orres, from .pain introduced modern technologies and stainless steel
tan!s that helped initiate this change.

etween %?;& and %?;= production reached its pea!, coinciding with a
significant reduction in domestic consumption. 7t the same time, the historic
trend of family$owned wineries was replaced by economic groups and
corporations, which included international participation, effectively moderni/ing
the business.
1n the %??+s, ,hilean wines consolidated their presence in the international wine
business. While some were not as good as others, the wines caught the eye of
many 0rench and 7merican winema!ers such as .painDs 3iguel 8orres, 0ranceDs
aron de 4othschild and ,hateau 6afite, and the U...Ds 4obert 3ondavi among
others, and today, with foreign capital and joint ventures, ,hileDs wines are
reaching an ever wider and more demanding audience.
8oday they are eCported to ?+ countries on 9 continents. 5Cports to 5urope, the
United .tates and particularly to 7sia have grown strongly each year, and today
register a total of more than U.I>++ million "&++&(. ,hile became !nown almost
overnight as the value wine capital of the world, 3illions of consumers now
a!shi V., *anwar ). 12
Wines of Chile
associate the countryDs name with cheap and cheerful varietal wines delicious for
immediate drin!ing.
Chi()an $in)s
,hilean wine country is a mosaic of flavours and styles as varied as the
geography, climate and the people themselves. 1t is the %&th largest wine
producing country in the world and is recogni/ed as a premium Buality wine
producer in .outh 7merica. 8here are approCimately &:%,+++ acres of vineyards
there.
,hile’s .panish roots and ancestry has conceived ,hile as primarily a red wine
country, with wines that are charming, with forward fruit and aromas and flavours
of red currants, strawberries, blac!berries and red plums. ,hile’s 3erlot and
,abernet .auvignon wines, eCtremely popular in the North 7merican eCport
mar!et, they are food friendly and usually approachable at an early age.
,hile’s white wines span the spectrum of styles from oCidi/ed wines heavy with
the local 4auli oa! flavours and little acidity and fruit, to delicate, fresh, hi$tech
wines made by cool fermentation. 8he modern wines use 4auli oa! only for
storage and utili/e 9> gallons 7lliers and 8roncais arriBues for ageing. 7 good
rule of thumb is to drin! ,hilean wines within two years of their vintage "oa! aged
chardonnay can last for three years(.
8he best wines of ,hile are the varietalJproprietary wines, with each producer
using different name and criteria for their high end products. 0or eCampleK .anta
4ita uses L3edalla realM while ,oncha y 8oro ",hile’s largest winery eCporting
?+N of their estate wines( uses both L3arBues de ,asa ,onchaM and LDon
3elchorM as Buality designation for their best varietal wines.
a!shi V., *anwar ). 13
Wines of Chile
Chi()an $in) 1r*/u0,i*n
.ince these vines do not need to be grafted to foreign rootstoc!, they can grow
by the acodo mugron system, which involves placing a branch from a growing
vine in the earth, thus starting a new plant. 7s the vine matures, it is served from
the parent vine. 8hese vines also provide the miCed blessing of higher yields, if
the producer desires them.

,hile underwent a rapid viticulture transformation in the %??+s. 8here was a
large$scale investment from overseas producers that helped this transformation.
<eople soon reali/ed that to produce outstanding, world$competing wines, more
was reBuired. 8he answer lay in improving the actual Buality of the fruit coming
into the wineries. <roducers needed, literally, to return to their roots. Decades of
neglect had left badly tended vines. ,oncepts, such as vineyard mapping,
canopy management and controlled irrigation, were rapidly put into practice.
0urthermore, up until recent times, ,hilean wine ma!ers had remained firmly
entrenched in following traditional 0rench methods of wine production. 1n the
%??+s, however, they started to Buestion and eCperiment, and from that moment
onward, ,hile’s wine industry blossomed.
8here has been much investment in ,hileDs wine industry over the past decade
or so, and a massive swing towards cleaner, new technology winema!ing.
8raditionally, ancient wooden vats were used for vinification, made from a local
wood called raul@, a species of evergreen beech. 1n general, standards of
winema!ing and hygiene were in decline through the middle of the last century,
but the old vats are now relegated to the poorest wines for cheap local
consumption. #igh$tech temples full of shining stainless steel and new 0rench or
7merican oa! have replaced them.
a!shi V., *anwar ). 14
Wines of Chile
Wine ma!ing countries in the southern hemisphere li!e ,hile, ra/il and
7rgentina in the .outh 7merica, 7ustralia, New Oealand and .outh 7frica have a
distinct advantage over those of the northern hemisphereK they can appear in the
mar!etplace siC months earlier, because harvest is in 0ebruary and 3arch
instead of .eptember and 2ctober. Until recently, southern hemisphere wines
have been thought of as abundant in Buantity but poor in Buality. #owever wine
ma!ers are moving away from fortified and jug wines towards premium, popular
varietals. Varietal labeling helps sell the wines of southern hemisphere to get a
good a mar!et share.
Chi()an $in) C(assi+i0a,i*n
1n %??9 ,hile established a :9 percent rule in a new wine appellation system.
8his law governs variety, vintage and eCact origin, allowing only &9 percent of a
bottleDs contents to vary from the specifications on its label. 8here is no particular
reBuirement regarding the production of 4eserva wines, but all wines displaying
the special designation of 4eserva, -ran 4eserva and 4eserva 5special must
indicate place of origin. ,hilean wine laws stipulate that eCport white wines must
attain a minimum alcohol level of %&N and the reds must attain %%.9N. while
L4eserva 5specialM ia a mar!eting term, the age reBuirement for 5special is two
years, 4eserva is four years, and -ran Vino is a siC years minimum. 0inas are
varietal label wines made from government recogni/ed grape types mostly
vinifera, such as cot "a clone of 3albec(.
a!shi V., *anwar ). 15
Wines of Chile
Chi()an %ra.) Vari),i)s
2ne of the most often Buoted facts about ,hilean viticulture is the remar!able
fact that <hylloCera has never reached these lands. 8he rampant louse that
stormed across 5urope in the %?th century, devastated ,alifornia over the past
%+ years and has altered wine growing practices throughout the world, simply
never made across the 7ndes or survived in the sandy coastal soils. 8herefore
,hileDs vineyards are planted with ungrafted rootstoc!F a rare phenomenon in
modern wine production. <ais is a ,hilean variety that is still very widely planted,
but has not earned a place in the international scene.
Chilean Red Grapes
,hile’s thriving wine industry was initially built upon the ,abernet .auvignon
grape although 3erlot is now becoming as important. 8oday, <inot Noir also is
prominent.
Cabernet Sauvignon
8he distinctive blac! currant flavor of the ,abernet .auvignon grape is often at
its most intense in ,hilean wines. .ome versions also have a hint of tobacco and
mint. Nowadays, ,abernet .auvignon is often blended with other varieties to
produce wines of Buite dramatic compleCity.
Merlot or Carmenère
1t is estimated that approCimately >+$?+N of ,hilean 3erlot is actually produced
from the traditional ordeauC grape, ,armenPre "sometimes referred to as
-rande Vidure(.
a!shi V., *anwar ). 16
Wines of Chile
1n fact, almost all the world’s surviving plantings of ,armenPre are in ,hile.
.tyles of 3erlotJ,armenPre vary from young, fruity Buaffing wines to more
substantial, rich, oa!$aged wines with compleC, earthy, smo!y flavors.
Pinot Noir
8his grape variety is now becoming increasingly widespread. <inot Noir produces
some eCceedingly sil!y wines with a smooth berry fruit flavor.
Other Reds
3any ,hilean producers are currently eCperimenting with .yrah, .angiovese,
,arignan, Oinfandel, 3albec, and ,abernet 0ranc with a focus on blending.
Chilean White Grapes
Sauvignon Blanc
7 proportion of ,hilean .auvignon is produced from .auvignonasse or
.auvignon Vert, which is a variety of lesser distinctionK the remainder is made
from the true .auvignon grape. 7ll ma!e for refreshing and /esty whites. 8he
best ,hilean sauvignon comes from the ,asablanca Valley. 8his grape variety
has a tangy, natural acidity.
Chardonnay
8he ,hardonnay grape produces uncomplicated wines with citrus and tropical
fruit flavors.
a!shi V., *anwar ). 17
Wines of Chile
Other Whites
-ewQr/traminer, either from ,asablanca or io$io, in the south is capable of
producing aromatic, crisp wines of outstanding Buality. .Emillon, Viognier, and
4iesling are also becoming more commonplace.

!n+(u)n0)s *n ,h) Chara0,)r *+ $in)s
8here are differences between a valley from the other for its climate, for within
this generality of temperate climate there eCist differences such as the currents of
air that come down from the 7ndes, or the entry of cool air coming from the sea,
specifically the #umboldt ,urrent. 1t is important to understand this
differentiation, since while searching for precisions, one or another grape is
planted in an ideal climate or soil and will have the adeBuate agricultural care,
can offer the world wines that are more special, differentiated by the concept of
8erroir.
8he soils are determinant in the final Buality of the wine, and today different
grapes are planted in diverse valleys in search of the ideal soil, even the same
valley may be divided in high, medium or low to precise its conditions of soil and
climate. ,hile presents, within the big ,entral Valley, soils of alluvial origin with
different teCtures and permeability. 7ll these differences of teCtures and
permeability of the soils lend singular characteristics of each wine. 1n general,
wherever there are less fertile soils and a better adaptation, there will be fruit with
aromas and flavors that are more concentrated. 8hus, in order to achieve a good
wine, there ought to be a well finished and careful study of the type of soil in
which one is wor!ing, with the purpose to obtain from it the best performance for
the grape planted.
a!shi V., *anwar ). 18
Wines of Chile
,limate within the central valley is 3editerranean, with maCimum summer
temperatures between 9? and ;> degrees 0 "%9 to =+ degrees ,(. 8hough
brea!s in the coastal range allow for variations and cooler sub$regions "such as
northerly ,asablanca, where marine influence reaches inland(, northern areas
are usually warmer and southern areas cooler. 8he eastern side of the central
valley near the base of the 7ndes has higher humidity and cooler nighttime
temperatures. 8he coastal mountains intercept most of the precipitation coming
from the <acific, causing it to fall on their western slopes. 1n the dry valley, rain is
a moderate %'$=%A per year, with the higher numbers occurring to the south and
west, the rain shadow of the coastal range. 7s it rains only in winter, about one$
half of ,hilean vineyards reBuire irrigationK but water is plentiful in the many
rivers that drain the 7ndes snow pac!.
8hough areas such as ,olchagua have begun to investigate the possibilities of
hillside vineyards and lower yields, most ,hilean Wines are planted on flat, fertile
land, where soils may be alluvial, loamy, clayey and muddy in the north and
gradually give way to tuffeau, volcanic, sand and sandy loam towards the south.
<oorly drained areas, mostly in the south, can be swampy.
Denomination of 2riginF 8he world’s finest wines are produced in the swath
between parallels =+R and 9+R in the Northern #emisphere and =+R and '+R in
the .outhern #emisphere. 1n ,hile, the wine producing area is located in what is
!nown as the ,entral Oone, eCactly between parallels =+R and '+R south latitude.
a!shi V., *anwar ). 19
Wines of Chile
Chi()an $in) R)2i*ns
0rom north to south, the wine regions designated by the %??9 law are 7concagua
"incorporating ,asablanca(, the ,entral Valley "including 3aipo, 4apel, ,urico
and 3aule(, and the .outhern 4egion "including 1tata and iobio. 8he 7tacama
and ,oBuimbo regions in the very hot area north of the central valley are also
identified, but the grapes they produce are primarily for spirits "<isco( and table
use.
Limarí Valley
Key Grae !ariety "rea #hectares$
,abernet .auvignon ?&+
3erlot &=?
,armenere %99
,hardonnay %':
.yrah %'+
Key Producers
• 0alernia
• 8abali
• ,asa 8amaya
• ,onch y 8oro
7lthough the 6imar@ Valley is associated with the production of pisco, it is now
being recogni/ed as an important wine$producing /one, and there are several
wineries in the /one that have ventured into the plantation of Vitis Vinifera.
a!shi V., *anwar ). 20
Wines of Chile

-eographically, the 6imar@ valley runs parallel to the river of the same name and
is located in a /one that is eminently warm, with rainfall that does not eCceed %++
mm annually and with a thermal range between %9 and &+R, "9? and >;R0(.
Best e%amle &rom the region
,oncha y 8oro 6ot '+> .yrah &++',
6imari
Notes of pepper, mocha and dar! berry fruit. 4ipe,concentrated and savoury
style$ nicely structured.
Aconcagua Valley
Key Grae !ariety "rea #hectares$
,abernet .auvignon '>>
3erlot %>9
.yrah :;
,armEnPre ''
,hardonnay &+
.angiovese %'
Key Producers
• 5rra/uri/
• Von .iebenthal
• .an 5steban
• ,orpora
a!shi V., *anwar ). 21
Wines of Chile
0ifty miles north of .antiago is the 7concagua Valley, the most northerly table
wine region and ,hileDs hottest and driest, speciali/ing in bright, full$bodied
,abernet .auvignon and other red wines. 8his region lies about %9+ miles due
west of 7rgentinaDs famous 3endo/a area. 8he 5rrS/uri/ estate is the areaDs
only really significant name, where ,alifornian wine ma!er 5d 0laherty is turning
out very serious ,hardonnays from hillside vineyards, as well as eCcellent reds.
1t is a transversal valley that follows the course of the 7concagua 4iver, has a
width of = to ' !m and is surrounded by hills that rise between %9++ and %;++
meters above sea level. ecause it is a transversal valley, it has conditions that
favor the development of fine wines. 8hese areF closeness to the <acific 2cean
because at this point both mountain ranges are at a distance that does not
eCceed =+ !mK and the influence of the #umboldt current, which brings freshness
to the valley.
2ther advantages are its relatively open land, with small plains that favor the
cultivation of grapes, and the drip irrigation that is fed form 6a <aloma dam, both
winter and summer, achieving a good management of the vineyard. 7ll these
conditions have given eCcellent results and have even permitted the planting of
white and red wine grapes within the same valley, ma!ing good use of the
differences in climate and soil within it. 8he most outstanding are the /ones of
<unitaBui, 8amaya and .otaBu@.
Best e%amle &rom the region

Von .iebenthal ,arabantes, .yrah &++=
.ome minty, herbal notes, but also intense blac! fruits on the nose. <alate is
pure and ripe with velvety tannins and a long finish.
a!shi V., *anwar ). 22
Wines of Chile

Casablanca Valley
Key Grae !ariety "rea #hectares$
,hardonnay %;%;
.auvignon lanc 9+:
<inot Noir '?>
3erlot =?>
Key Producers
• ,asas del osBue
• Vina ,asablanca
• Veramonte
• ,ono .ur
• *ingston
.outh of 7concagua and west of .antiago is the ,asablanca Valley. 8he origin of
,asablanca as a wine$producing valley is due to the talent of the enologist <ablo
3orandE who noted the similarities between this valley and the recogni/ed wine$
producing /one of ,arneros in ,alifornia. #e was conviced of its Bualities and
started ma!ing the first plantings bac! in the early ;+s.
8he cool maritime influence in the ,asablanca Valley promotes a long, slow
growing season similar to the ,arneros region at the southern tip of Napa and
.onoma counties in ,alifornia. 7s a result, ,asablanca produces crisp white
wines "particularly chardonnay and sauvignon blanc( with bright fruit and firm
acidity.
a!shi V., *anwar ). 23
Wines of Chile
Best e%amle &rom the region
,ono .ur &+ arrels
,hardonnay &++'
.mo!y, rich style with tropical fruits and a touch of minerality. 2n the palate,
lushness balanced by fresh, citrussy acidity.
San Antonio Valley - Leyda
Key Grae !ariety "rea #hectares$
,hardonnay %%>
<inot Noir ?;
.auvignon lanc 9=
3erlot >
Key Producers
• -arces .ilva
• ,asa 3arin
• 3atetic
• Vina 6eyda
,hileTs newest and smallest wine$producing /one wich, because of its
conditions, is suitable mainly for the ,hardonnay, .auvignon lanc and <inot
Noir varieties of grapes. 8he ,limate is warm, although the proCimity to the sea
permits the entry of fresh marine bree/es that cool the air, in summer it does not
rise above &9R,.8ype of soil is light clay, low fertility and adeBuate permeability.
a!shi V., *anwar ). 24
Wines of Chile
Best e%amle &rom the region
Vina 6eyda 6ot 9
,hardonnay Wild Ueasts &++'
4estrained and citrussy with good use of oa!. ,reamy, compleC$ great
mouthfeel$ with balanced acidity.
3atetic 5H
.yrah &++'
.avoury, meaty red. -rippy, but finely structured tannins with a pure core of fruit.
"Valle Central" appellation
8he ,entral Valley, which produces the vast majority of wines, is in turn,
composed of four main subregions, the 3aipo, 4apel, ,urico and 3aule Valleys,
each of which has rivers that run west from the 7ndes to the ocean
Maio !alley
Key Grae !ariety "rea #hectares$
,abernet 9?>>
3erlot %+?>
,hardonnay ?'?
,armenere '?%
Key Producers
• ,oncha y 8oro
• .anta 4ita
• <ere/ ,ru/
a!shi V., *anwar ). 25
Wines of Chile
• De 3artino
.outh of ,asablanca and southwest of .antiago is the 3aipo Valley. 1t comes
under the AValle ,entralA appellation and is a bit warmer. 3aipo, is small but
well$represented on eCport labelsK it produces white and red wines about eBually,
particularly .emillon and ,abernet .auvignon, the best of which have well$
developed fruit aromas, full body and barrel age.
8his is the oldest fully$developed traditional viticulture area in the country and the
best !nown internationally because this is where, toward the second half of the
V1V century, the first wineries were founded that gave ,hile its name as a wine$
producing country and that maintain their bodegas in this /one up to this day.
.ilvestre 2chagav@a, bac! in %;9%, brought new viniferous varieties from 0rance.
7t a later date he was imitated by various aristocratic families of that period who
saw in this activity a miCture of nobility and fine living, as it was considered the
Bueen of agrarian arts.
8he warm climate of this /one produces a better Buality grape, specially the red
wines and principally the ,abernet .auvignon, so that the letter have become the
emblem of ,hilean wines throughout the world.
Best e%amle &rom the region
De 3artino .ingle Vineyard
,armenere &++=
<ure, spicy blac! fruits, yet Buite restrained. Dense, structured and intenseon the
palate and good compleCity and length.
a!shi V., *anwar ). 26
Wines of Chile
Rael !alley
.outh of the 3aipo Valley "and ;+ miles south of .antiago( is the 4apel Valley,
also part of the AValle ,entralA designation. 8he region is named 4apel Valley, it
is made up of the valleys of ,achapoal and ,olchagua, both of which have
acBuired great importance as wine producers themselves, and have different
geographical characteristics, which give origin to wines that have their own style.
%. ,achapoal Valley
Key Grae !ariety "rea #hectares$
,abernet .auvignon '>?;
3erlot %:&;
.auvignon lanc 9:=
,armEnPre 9'9
,hardonnay ';'
Key Producers
• 7ltair
• 7na!ena
• 6a 4osa
• -racia
• 3isiones de 4engo
8his valley is becoming more and more important as a wine producer and today,
in an effort to ma!e its wines and their characteristics !nown to the publib, it is
implementing attractive tourist routes.
a!shi V., *anwar ). 27
Wines of Chile
Best e%amles &rom the region
.ideral &++=
.tylish plumy and perfumed nose with notes of toffee. 0inely balanced and
compleC palate with great concentration.
6a 4osa ,apitana
,armenere &++'
8eCtboo! ,armenere$herbaceous and peppery, but with ripe toffee and chocolate
notes. Nice intense well balanced palate.
&. ,olchagua Valley
Key Grae !ariety "rea #hectares$
,abernet .auvignon %+'%9
3erlot ==+=
,armEnPre %?>=
,hardonnay %%>:
.yrah ;%&
Key Producers
• ,ono .ur
• V25
• ,asa 6apostolle
• 3ontes
• ,asa .ilva
• 6uis 0elipe 5dwards
• 6os Vascos
a!shi V., *anwar ). 28
Wines of Chile
• 3ont-ras
7 well$regarded sub$region of 4apel is the ,olchagua Valley. oth 3erlot and
,abernet do well there.
Best e%amles &rom the region
3ontes <urple 7ngel
,armenere &++=
ig, rich, intense wine which retains its class. )uicey, ripe and chocolatey$ multi$
layered with some sweet oa!.
Curico !alley
Key Grae !ariety "rea #hectares$
,abernet >>+%
.auvignon lanc =''9
3erlot =%9>
,hardonnay %'%&
,armEnPre ;=>
Key Producers
• 8orres
• Valdivieso
• .an <edro
7lso in the AValle ,entralA area is the southerly ,urico Valley, an area where
3erlot and .auvignon lanc do well. 8he origin of the /one as a wine$producing
valley goes bac! to %;9%, when the ,orrea 7lbano family acBuired the lands that
a!shi V., *anwar ). 29
Wines of Chile
had been planted by their ancestors, and personally brought out fine varieties of
grapes from 0rance and -ermany, founding what today is the ViWa .an <edro.
8he ,urico valley sub$region ma!es dar!, full$fruit wines with plenty of tannin.
Best e%amles &rom the region
8orres Vendimia 8ardia 6ate #arvest
4iesling &++=
4ipe, honeyed sweet wine, with notes of marmalade. 5Ccellent balance$ lively
acidity, a clean finish.
'he Maule
Key Grae !ariety "rea #hectares$
,abernet .auvignon ;>9=
<ais ;>&9
3erlot &:%9
.auvignon lanc %&'&
,armEnPre %&++
,hardonnay %%:=
Key Producers
• 6a 4eserva de ,aliboro "5rasmo(
• -illmore
• ,asa Donosa
• ,alina
• Via
• otalcura
a!shi V., *anwar ). 30
Wines of Chile
8his valley has the largest wine$grape growing areas in all ,hile, and a long
history of wine producing. 8he .paniards planted vines at the end of the VV11
century and by %;=%, about 9+++ hectares were already planted, most of them of
the <a@s grape "3ission in the U...(. 3aule, with marine influences ma!es one of
the cooler and cloudier areas, still produces large amounts of the historic <ais
variety for domestic consumption, as well as ,abernet .auvignon, 3erlot,
.emillon, and .auvignon lanc for eCport.
Best e%amle &rom the region
Vina la 4eserva del ,aliboro
5rasmo &++%
3inty, blac!berry style, with hints of coffee and spice. -ood freshness and grip
on the palate with damson and chocolate flavours.
Southern regions
Key Grae !ariety "rea #hectares$
<inot Noir %;?
<ais %==&
7leCandria 3uscatel %>'
,abernet .auvignon ?&
,hardonnay ;:
Key Producers
• ,orpora "-racia, 7gustinos, <orta(
• ,oncha y 8oro
• ,ono .ur
a!shi V., *anwar ). 31
Wines of Chile
• Vina 7Buitania ".ol de .ol(
!alle del (tata and B)o*B)o+

.outhern ,hilean features the AValle del 1tata,A .ome %%,+++ acres of vineyards
are there. 8he region has been the home of rather ordinary grape varieties and
only today are a couple of firms starting to cultivate more noble grapes. )ust
south of 1tata is the Valle del @o$@o. 8his is a difficult viticultural area, it being
prone to spring frosts and early autumn precipitation. 5arly$ripening varieties
such as <inot Noir and 4iesling may have a future in @o$@o.
ioio the southernmost and largest wine area in ,hile, has >>,:++ acres of
wine grapes "%??%(, two$thirds of which are red, mostly the <ais grape. 6arge
amounts of 3oscatel 7lejandria, <ais white counterpart, are also produced here
for domestic consumption. 2wing to large areas of poorly drained swampland,
higher than average rainfall and fewer hours of sunshine, the area is currently
unsuited to fine wine varietals, though with proper management it may have
greater potential.
7s for ,hileDs future, the .outhern region, which includes the 1tata and io io
Valleys, offers a great deal of promise according to 2/ ,lar!e, author of A2/
,lar!eDs Wine 7tlas.A ecause ,hile is the reverse of the northern hemisphere,
this region becomes cooler with more rainfall as you go further south, loo!ing
much li!e 2regon and Washington. 8hus, pinot noir has a great future
"particularly in io io( as do riesling and gewurt/traminer.
a!shi V., *anwar ). 32
Wines of Chile
Best e%amle &rom the region
Vina 7Buitania .ol de .ol
,hardonnay &++=, 3alleco
4ich buttery, creamy nose with citrussy and mineral elements. road and creamy
but with good acidity and persistence.
Chi()an $in) 1r*/u0)rs
3ost eCporters call their eCport wines by the name of their grape varietyK
,abernet .auvignon, 3erlot, ,hardonnay and .auvignon lanc are the most
common. 1t is however becoming common for producers to bottle one or several
grape varieties at various price levels andJ or under several names.
Almaviva
7 0ranco$ ,hilean operation established in %?::, in which the 3outon
4othschilds and ,onch U 8oro, ,hile’s largest producers hold eBual shares. 8he
main contribution from the ,hilean partner was a small vineyard of about %++
acres located in the southern outs!irts of .antiago, which has been under
cultivation for a decade. 7lmaviva offers a single wine from the two ,abernet
varieties. ,urrent production of this ordeauC$ style wine, which li!es to ran!
itself among the classed growths, scarcely eCceeds=',+++ cases.
a!shi V., *anwar ). 33
Wines of Chile
Auitania
8he estate close to .antiago, established several years ago in Huebrada de
3acul, in the 3aipo Valley, belongs to runo <rats "who ran the ,hateau
d’5stournel in .aint$5stephe(, <aul <ontallier ",hateau 3arguaC( and 0elipe de
.olminihac "one of the best 2enologists in ,hile(.
Caliterra
8his ultra modern operation, set up in ,urico in %?;?, now belongs to the
,hadwic! family, the owner of 5rra/uri/, and 4obert 3ondavi, whose ambition is
to produce here the ,hilean eBuivalent of his 2pus one. 1t cultivates about 9:+
acres of vines in ,asablnca, 3aipo, 4apel and ,urico and produces around
>++,+++ cases of ,abernet .auvignon, 3erlot, ,hardonnay and .auvignon
lanc.
Casa Lapostolle
8he 0rench 3arnier$6apostolle -roup$ producer of -rand 3arnier, the famous
orange and cognac$based liBueur, owner of ,hateau de .ancerre$ wishing to
diversify into New World wines, enlisted the assistance of the oenologist 3icheal
4olland, acBuired a 9%N shareholding in a bodega in the 4apel region in the
%??', renamed the estate ,asa 6apostolle and fitted it out with the most up$to$
date eBuipment. 1n addition it bought :'+ acres of vinesK the ,asablanca
vineyard in the valley of the same name "mainly ,hardonnay and <inot Noir(, the
4eBuinoa vineyard ",abernet .auvignon and .auvignon lanc( and the 7palta
vineyard "old vines of the red ordeauC variety(. >+N of the grapes come from
these vineyards, the balance coming from wine growers wor!ing under contract.
a!shi V., *anwar ). 34
Wines of Chile
8hey currently produce %9+,+++ cases ranges coming under the ,asa
6apostolle ".auvignon, ,hardonnay, 3erlot and ,abernet .auvignon( and ,los
7palta "an upmarlet blend of 3erlot, ,armenere and ,abernet .auvignon(.
Concha y !oro
0ounded in %;;= in the 3aipo Valley, this bodega, which was moderni/ed in the
%?;+s, is ,hile’s largest producer with about %% million cases of wine, half of
which is eCported. 1t produces wines from traditional ordeauC grape varieties as
well as from <inot Noir and .yrah. 1ts wine labels are, in order of increasing
Buality, ,oncha y 8oro, 8rio or 5Cplorer, ,asillero del Diablo, 3arBues de ,asa
,oncha, 7melia "a barrel fermented and barrel aged ,hardonnay( and Don
3elchior "cabernet sauvignon(.
Cono Sur
7 company set up in %??= by ,onch y 8oro in ,hibarongo, in the ,olchagua
Valley originally calling on the assistance of the ,alifornian 5dward 0laherty to
produce wines eCclusively for eCport. ,ono .ur operates vineyards in
,asablanca, 4apel and ioio and produces some 9++,+++ cases of a wide
range of wines distributed under the ,ono .ur label.
"rra#uri#
8he 5rra/uri/ operation was established in %;:+ in <anBuehue, in the
7concagua Valley and 3aule Valley. .ince %?;= it has belonged to the ,hadwic!
family, who called on the assistance of the flying winema!er from New Oealand,
a!shi V., *anwar ). 35
Wines of Chile
rian ic!nell, and then ,alifornian 5dward 0laherty, to produce wines with
plenty of character.
8he company operates several vineyards totaling over ;>9 acres in the
7concagua, ,asablanca, 3aipo and ,urico valleys, cultivating mainly ,abernet
.auvignon, 3erlot, ,hardonnay and .auvignon lanc varieties, depending on
the soils.

$ontes
1n %?;;,four partners with a great deal of eCperience in the world of wine selling,
formed the Discovery Wine ,ompany$ which has since ta!en on the name on
their oenologist, 7urelio 3ontes$ to produce wines for eCport. 8he operation
located in the ,urico Valley has 99+ acres of vineyards and produces over
&9+,+++ cases of the usual varietiesK ,abernet .auvignon, .auvignon lanc and
,hardonnay under various brand names. 8hey also produce eCceptionally good
3erlots.
San %edro
.an <edro is an eCample of the recent revolution in the ,hilean Wine 1ndustry.
5stablished in %;>9, the company remained in the hands of the same family for
:9 years before being sold to the country’s largest brewer. <roduction continued
in a small scale, using dilapidated eBuipment, until the beginning of %??+s. 1n
less than ten years it has become the largest and most modern wine ma!ing
companies in 6atin 7merica. 1t has '?9+ acres of vineyards under its control,
stores its wine in an impressive array of huge stainless steel vats, produces the
best wines in thousands of small 0rench and 7merican oa! barrels and sells
some '++,+++ cases per annum. 7ssisted by the ordeauC oenologist, )acBues
6urton, .an <edro is mainly !nown for its wines under the -ato Negro and -ato
lanco labels, such as the prestige cuvees .anta #elena and ,astillo de 3olina.
a!shi V., *anwar ). 36
Wines of Chile
8he famous .an <edro name is reserved mainly for ,hardonnay and 3erlot
wines for eCport.
$iguel !orrres
8his highly innovate company was set up in %?:? when 3iguel 8orres, from the
famous .panish family of wine producers, bought an old vineyard in the ,urico
valley. Ultra$modern eBuipment was installed, allowing for the production of
%++,+++ cases per annum, which was then increased to %>:,+++. 8orres
introduced temperature controlled stainless steel vats, modern winepresses and
small 0rench oa! barrels into ,hile. 1n the vineyards, improved vine management
and controlled irrigation improved Buality and these methods have largely
inspired other producers. 1n its three main vineyards in ,urico and 3aule, 8orres
concentrates on the .auvignon lanc, ,hardonnay and ,abernet .auvignon
varieties while eCperimenting constantly with the ,arignan, .yrah and
-ewur/traminer. 8he company also produces a very dry spar!ling wine by the
traditional method, using ,hardonnay and <inot Noir grapes.
Chi()an $in) an/ 3**/ 1airin2
Wines and foods are a natural and inevitable match. ,hile’s 3erlot and ,abernet
.auvignon wines are considered to be food friendly wines.
3ontes 7lpha &++% ,olchagua Valley 7palta Vineyard ,abernet .auvignon
"I&+.??(
a!shi V., *anwar ). 37
Wines of Chile
Dar! ruby, with reddish$orange glints. lac!currant and blac!$cherry aromas
present a Afruit$forwardA aromatic melody over an appeti/ing bass line of dar!
chocolate. 0ull and ripe, juicy fruit flavors follow the nose, luscious AsweetA fruit
overrides gentle acidityK soft tannins are present but almost lost beheath the fruit.
#igh in alcohol at %' percent, and showing the spicy accents of time spent in
0rench oa!.
0ood matchF 0ine with dry$aged ribeye stea!, simply grilled medium$rare over
charcoal.
,asa 6apostolle &+++ A,uvEe 7leCandreA ,olchagua Valley 3erlot "I%?.??(
a!shi V., *anwar ). 38
Wines of Chile
Very dar! reddish$purple, bright reddish$violet at the edge. lac!berry and plum
aromas are pure and clean, elegant natural fruit. ,herry$berry fruit and lemon$
sBuirt acidity on the palate, well balanced over a distinct tannic core. 3uch more
AtraditionalA than the 3ontes 7lpha, A2ld WorldA in style, rather reminiscent of a
4ight an! ordeauC if not Buite so austere. 7lthough the wine sees %& months
in 0rench oa! barrels, the wood seems discreet and well integrated.
0ood matchF ,har$grilled, medium$rare dry$aged beer ribeye stea!s ma!e a
perfect accompaniment, ameliorating the wineDs youthful tannins and showcasing
its pure fruit.
.almon stea!s and asparagus in #ollandaise sauce
and
,asablanca .auvignon blanc %??;, ,asablanca Valley, ,hile
0resh and crisp, with lifted aromatic nose of gooseberries and freshly cut grass.
8his came from the cool %??; vintage that generally produced tighter, crisper
wines, and this one is o no eCception. 2n the palate it is bone dry, with bracing
acidity. 1t is refreshing, but perhaps a little sharp for casual sipping. old and
intense.
7sparagus in #ollandaise sauce
and
8he ,hilean sauvignon blanc wor!s best.
1tDs crisp, sharp acidity and powerful flavours cut through the rich sauce and
strongly flavoured asparagus nicely, complementing them well.
With the salmon and #ollandaise sauce
a!shi V., *anwar ). 39
Wines of Chile
and
8he ,hilean .auvignon wins out
1t cuts through the #ollandaise sauce beautifully. #owever, although not such a
useful casual sipping wine, it really comes into its own against this tric!y food
combination.
,hef )oel #arloff, 5Cecutive ,hef of 8he 6andmar! 4estaurant at 8he 3elrose
#otel, Dallas, has designed a siC$course menu featuring 3ontes and .anta 5ma
,hilean wines eCpertly complimented by the food served in the restaurant.
8he courses and wine parings are as followsF
.tarter
0ried -oat ,heese with acon, aby -reens and Whole -rain 3ustard
Vinaigrette
.anta 5ma 4egular .auvignon lanc, ,hile, &++=
.oup ,ourse
Wild 3ushroom .oup
3ontes 7lpha ,hardonnay, ,hile, &++=
7ppeti/er
3ote ,rusted .almon and 3ac!erel with 7vocado <urEe and a 8omato$2nion
.alad
.anta 5ma 4eserve ,armenere, ,hile, &++&
5ntrEe
a!shi V., *anwar ). 40
Wines of Chile
.pice 4oasted eef 8enderloin with <otato <udding, .autEed ,abbage and
,himichurri .auce
3elrose, Dallas ,hilean Wine Dinner X ;J+9
3ontes 4eserve ,abernet .auvignon, ,hile, &++=
Dessert
Wild #oney ,heese ,a!e with -inger$-raham ,rust
3ontes 6ate #arvest -ewur/traminer, &++&
,hile’s vast array of uniBue seafood combined with the climate’s natural
disposition towards supporting an immense amount of produce and vineyards,
influences menu selections. 8he ,armenere and blended red wines are young,
but very smooth in character, pairing eCceptionally well with the diverse cuisine of
,hile and it’s surrounding areas.
Chi()an $in) !n/us,ry
8he ,hilean winema!ing industry is undergoing a revolution as local and
international wine players see! to moderni/e their businesses. 1n the late %?;+s,
,hile gained visibility on the world wine stage with its award$winning 3erlot and
,abernet production. With increased eCposure came outside investment,
eCpertise and eBuipment to assist local growers in embracing international wine
standards. 8he ,hilean government adopted the Designation of 2rigin system in
%??9, prompting growers to identify parcels of land in micro$terroirs best suited
for growing each varietal. 1n %??;, ,hile became the third$largest source of U.
wine imports with over five million cases.

7mong the best varietals grown in ,hile are ,abernet .auvignon "ideally suited
to ,hile’s sandy soil(, ,hardonnay, 3erlot, .auvignon lanc, and the indigenous
a!shi V., *anwar ). 41
Wines of Chile
,armenEre. #aving both .panish and 0rench influences, ,hilean wines tend to
be ripe and fruit$forward in flavor, similar to their ,alifornian counterparts.
With significant economic advantages over ,alifornia, including lower land and
labor costs, the substantial investment toward moderni/ing ,hile has resulted in
wines of impeccable Buality and style.
,hilean wine has also become a billion dollar eCport industry. Wineries li!e
,oncha y 8oro have become !nown throughout the world and with ultramodern
facilities have become globally competitive. 1ndeed, ,hile will surpass .pain and
-ermany this year to become the third largest eCporter of wine to the United
.tates largely because ,hilean wine is considered to be of high Buality at
eCtremely reasonable prices. 7ll by itself ,oncha y 8oro will sell & million cases of
its win in the U... this year, up from %++,+++ cases just a decade ago. 4afael
-uillisastri, ,oncha y 8oro’s director of eCports, travels freBuently to 5urope,
7sia, and the United .tates
8he eyes of many worldwide wine industry investors and players are greatly on
this countryF
a!shi V., *anwar ). 42
Wines of Chile
0rom 0ranceDs Domaines arons de 4othschild "6afite( purchased a 9+$percent
eBuity share of Vina 6os Vascos in %?;;.
8he .eagramDs$owned spar!ling wine house, was the first to build a winery there
more than two years ago.
Napa ValleyDs 0ranciscan 5states has purchased 9++ acres for its new ,hilean
property, 7lto de ,asablanca.
4obert 3ondavi has established a I%& million joint venture with ,hileDs Vina
5rra/uri/
.ebastiani is buying ,hilean bul! wine to bottle for airline use under its
Vendange label, and 7merican vintners *endall$)ac!son, 0irestone and #ess
,ollection are currently scouting and courting potential partners.
With high Buality and low prices, more and more vintners worldwide are importing
,hilean wine juice for use in blending in their own labels.
8he U* and the U. account for a fifth each of eCports, so about '+N of the total
eCports, followed by ,anada, 1reland and -ermany, along with the rest of the
mainland 5urope. .o, the first thing was to open and reopen, the U* offices.
8he most eCiting developments have come from the ordeauC varieties of
,abernet .auvignon and 3erlot, especially when blended. ,hilean reds are
blooming, not least because -lasgow University declared their health giving
potential in a report published a couple of years ago. 8here are newcomers too
such as .yrah and <inot Noir which are causing a stir. 7nd the whites, while not
yet world class, are becoming much more diverse$ ,hardonnay particularly so$
and not just diverse because of diverse use of oa!, but because of the
distinctions between the soils and the microclimate. 8he differences between say,
a!shi V., *anwar ). 43
Wines of Chile
,hardonnay and io io in the far south and ,asablanca near the coast are fast
being reali/ed.
.auvignon lanc is ,hile’s second white hope. ,hile produces about &:N of the
world’s .auvignon lanc, even though much of it is not .auvignon at all but
.auvignonasse$ not nearly such a noble variety.
,hileDs industry to change course almost overnight. 1t has gone from producing
the most generic red and white table wines to the lofty ambition of mastering
refined 0rench varietals.
8he U* trade has become used to seeing ,hile increasing its mar!et share$ not
in the astonishing way that 7ustralia did in %??+s, or li!e the current boom from
,alifornia, but slowly and steadily. ,ompared to the situation five years ago, the
trade and those consumers who ma!e it their business to now about these things
are well versed in strides ,hile has made in arrears such as site selection, cool
climate viticulture, clonal material and vinification of varities such as <inot noir
and .auvignon lanc. ,hile’s main problems are Buite simple. 1t’s a case of
currency, costs and competition.
7gainst all$important currencies, sterling, the euro and the dollar, peso has been
strong. 8hat has had a dramatic impact on the margin. 8he soaring peso driven
by booming copper eCports has had such a strong impact on the bottom line.
When it comes to costs, alongside the fact that ,hilean wineries are paid in
dollars but incur costs in pesos "so eBuipments such as barrels become more
eCpensive(, grape prices have risen.
,hile unli!e many of its competitors is broadly in supply$demand balance. 7s
more companies loo! for premium cool climate areas such as .an 7ntonio,
6eyda and ,asablanca$ to find the fruit needed for the fresher styles demanded
a!shi V., *anwar ). 44
Wines of Chile
by the modern consumers, particularly of ,hardonnay and .auvignon lanc,
competition for resources have increased.
7nother problem faced by the ,hilean wines in the U* is the promotional deals
by 7ustralia "driven by its wine glut( and ,alifornia "on the bac! of handful of its
super brand(. With about ;+Nof the promotional deals coming from these two
countries, its simply the case of the rest of the mar!et pic!ing up the pieces.
La,)s, *n Chi()an $in)s
&io dynamics
1t is often said that ,hile’s warm, dry climate ma!es it perfectly suited to organic
viticulture. While many of the bigger producers, including ,ono .ur, ,armen and
Valdivieso, have certified organic vineyards, few have gone as far down the path
a sustainable viticulture as Vinedos 5miliana. 1t has moved beyond simple
organice viticulture into biodynamics$ a practice that promotes biodiversity in the
vineyard and view the soil as living organism. 1t is related to good management
of the farm.
!ourism trail
8ourism is becoming increasingly important in ,hile and wine routes are
becoming ever more evident throughout ,hile’s wine ma!ing regions. ,olchagua
was one of the first regions to actively establish its tourist trail.
,achapoal and 3aule following the suit. #owever, its between Valparaiso and
.antiago that the greatest opportunities eCists. ,hristian Wylie, eCport director of
.anta ,arolina, estimates that some '+,+++ cruise ship passengers land in
a!shi V., *anwar ). 45
Wines of Chile
Valparaiso and ma!e their way inland to .antiago and they pass right through
,asablanca.
Chile's &outiue (evelopment
8he ,hilean wine seen has been getting increasingly crowded, with mid$si/ed
wineries finding it ever harder to compete. Ultimately, this means that the new
wineries coming onto the scene will have to differentiate themselves from the
masses producing the varietal standard reds and whites.
8his has in turn, given rise to a band of growing outiBue producers pioneering
new regions and /ones, focusing on different grape varieties. Nowhere is this
more evident than in .an 7ntonio, where all wineries could be considered
outiBue.
"spiritu de Chile - A brand ne) )ine concept
7 joint venture by 4ac!e and 7resti
5spiritu de ,hile, the new wine range launched by german based wine group
4ac!e 1nternational and ,hilean winery 7resti, is an idea that was borne in the
south 7frican vineyards. 1t is the latest manifestation of that vision$ a range of
wine that embodies the perfect vine growing conditions and passionate wine
ma!ing of ,hile, given life by the mar!eting and bran building and 5uropean
distribution eCpertise of 4ac!e.
8his is a true partnership, where the wines are produced by 7resti from the family
owned company’s own vineyards with 7resti also handling the sales in .outh
7merica. 4ac!e , meanwhile, will be in charge of all over and below the line
a!shi V., *anwar ). 46
Wines of Chile
activities from the band as well as its eCclusive importer and distributor in most
mainland 5uropean and many other countries.
7lready, 5spiritu de ,hile has enjoyed a highly successful world <remier during
-ermany’s most important trade fair and an international showcase of the world’s
wine. 1t will surely not be long before it is enjoying the plaudits on the global
stage as we
a!shi V., *anwar ). 47
C*n0(usi*n
8oday the focus in ,hile has shifted to Buality. <remium vineyards are located in
cooler areas with challenging soil conditions and reduced water supplies that
stress the vines. 7 sunny climate produces sweet fruit with ripe tannins without
sacrificing structure and ageability. 7ggressive pruning and longer hang times
further reduce the yield while magnifying and concentrating the flavors. 7ncient
redwood aging vats have been replaced by smaller, top$Buality 0rench and
7merican oa! barrels. ,omputeri/ed stainless$steel fermenting tan!s control
temperature to preserve the intense natural character of the grapes. 7nd
refrigerated containers are now used to introduce fine ,hilean wines to mar!ets
around the world.
#owever, it remains to be seen whether ,hile can ta!e advantage of its
distinctive terroir to produce ordeauC varietals as distinguished as their 0rench
forbears, and whether the world mar!et will be open to an eCpansion of the
,hilean identity. ,hilean wines uniBuely apart for their eCcellent Buality and
unrivalled value. 8hey are clearly on a path to greatness where the hori/ons
have no limit.
Bi'(i*2ra.hy
B**ks
• 5Cploring WinesK *olpan.. , .mith. , 3icheal 7. Weiss, 4.Nostrand K
<g. No. %:9$%;%.
• #arpers .upplement 3ay &++> ,hileK Weathering the .tormK ). #ibberd.
• ,hilean wine, Y7 ,hallenge from the New World’K .. asra.
• 8he history of wines$ 7 short history of wineK 4. <hillips.
• Wine and .pirit 1nternational, ,hile .upplement
• New World Wines, 8he ,omplete -uideK ). 7r!ell, W. 6oc!K %???
• Discovering WineK ). .imonK %??'.
$)'si,)s
• httpFJJwww.conchaytorro.com
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7ugust %;, &++> 0riday %'%>hrs.
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• httpFJJwww.foodandwine.comJarticlesJwhat$defines$a$great$chilean$wineK
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