I am going to explain that heel striking into the ground from an over

extended running stride 1000+ steps per mile can lead to joint pain in the
knee, hip, and/or back. If you are looking to extend the longevity of your
running career, you should take the time to try forefoot running.
The forefoot is designed to absorb the forces of impact created while
running.
When I refer to forefoot running, I am not referring to only using the
forefoot. The forefoot should come in contract with the ground first. As
the forefoot adjusts to the ground through gait the heel follows.
What I am saying:
1. The entire foot should be used for running and walking.
2. The forefoot and ankle are used to absorb impact through gait while
using muscles and tendons through proper function.
3. Proper foot and ankle function will require more energy.
What I am NOT saying:
1. Avoid heel contact with the ground.
2. Maintain a tip toe position while running.
3. Changing your run stride and contact points will be easy.
Re-evaluate your running stride and stop heel striking
By: Angelo Grinceri - www.intrinsicstrengthtraining.com
Sprinting is a perfect example of our Intrinsic Strength, it requires a
synergistic collaboration of every joint, every muscle, and every tendon to
produce an amazing amount of power. While sprinting, the heel does not
come in contact with the ground. The forefoot is able absorb the impact of
the body while simultaneously transferring all of the bodies energy into the
ground, this is quite an amazing thing that we take for granted! This
biomechanical masterpiece is designed to deliver force and absorb impact
while adapting to changing surfaces.
A question I like to ask: If the forefoot and ankle are capable and designed
to transfer force into the ground as well as absorb impact through
gait ...Why do we rely on our heel to absorb impact while running at a
slower pace and longer duration?
These same mechanical abilities carry over into a slower pace run, But so
many runners will over extend and heal strike with every stride. After some
deeper research I found out that its actually requires less muscle use - so it's
"easier". Heel striking is our most efficient way to walk when referring to
energy expenditure. Walking and running are two completely different
types of impact: Take into account the faster speeds, longer strides, and
becoming a fully airborne mass - Think about the amount of impact
that we are asking our heels to absorb while being
completely airborne. Remember, the heel is not designed to
absorb impact.
We can consciously move our foot through eversion and inversion while off
the ground. Those same actions happen subconsciously during any form of
Re-evaluate your running stride and stop heel striking
By: Angelo Grinceri - www.intrinsicstrengthtraining.com
gait at any speed. Lets picture the foot on a flat surface: When the knee
moves towards the outside of the foot it is considered eversion (The big toe
is moving farther away from the shin). When the knee moves inward over
and past the inside of the foot, it is considered inversion (the big toe will
move closer to the shin). When the foot is traveling through the swing
phase of gait (when it is airborne and moving forward), the foot goes
into eversion (well it should if it isn't gunked up). As the foot
subconsciously falls into eversion off of the ground, it becomes a very
malleable collection of bones and soft tissue to prepare itself for what ever
task you are about to ask of it. As the forefoot reaches the ground, the
process of inversion takes place. Throughout Inversion, the foot will:
Adapt to the shape and surface of the ground, while absorbing
the impact of your weight and momentum. As the foot reaches the
end range of inversion: it will become rigid and the heel will move towards
the ground. After the heel touches the ground, just before the heel raises
off of the ground again - the glute muscles will become fully engaged.
Allowing a strong transfer of energy through the big toe, Assisting
in propelling you forward.
The foot's 26 bones, incredibly strong tendons, and muscles have provided
the amazing ability to absorb impact and adapt over different terrains while
Re-evaluate your running stride and stop heel striking
By: Angelo Grinceri - www.intrinsicstrengthtraining.com
still being able to create a spring like mechanism (if we are strong enough
to use it).
Notice the ligament connection from the forefoot and arch to
the tibias muscles.
Re-evaluate your running stride and stop heel striking
By: Angelo Grinceri - www.intrinsicstrengthtraining.com
-Avoid over striding and heel striking just because its easier!
There was a paper published in the Journal of Experimental Biology, thatI
found interesting. These scientists cal-culated joint torque, mechanical
work performed, and muscle activity associated with initial contact points
at various speeds of walking and running (1). The results of this study con-
firmed that walking with a heel-first strike pattern reduced the metabolic
cost of walking by 53 percent. The study showed that it takes less
caloric energy to heel strike...Just because its easier, does not mean
its the safest way to run. It was also proven that heel strikers have less
muscular pain, but more pain in the knee (a joint that has no muscles
Re-evaluate your running stride and stop heel striking
By: Angelo Grinceri - www.intrinsicstrengthtraining.com
as well as an incredibly low ability to handle direct forces) It sounds like
heel strikers are relying on their joints to get them through their run
instead of owning their run.
The University of Massachusetts demonstrated that runners who strike the
ground with their forefoot absorb more force at the ankle and less at the
knee (2). While confirming the opposite is true for heel strikers. Heel
strikers have less muscular strain at the foot and ankle with
increased strain at the KNEE. Apparently allowing the knee to absorb
the force through heel impact is acceptable just because its "more energy
efficient"
Notice how the heel stops the forward momentum as the forefoot springs
the body forward. What joint receives jarring impact of heel striking- It
travels up to the knee. Do you still think its proper running form to heal
strike over and over again?
Start running like we were meant to, retrain and STRENGTHEN the
forefoot to absorb your own forces of impact. Allow the force to be
transferred through the foots joints, muscles, and tendons. You
know, the way we were designed to!
Re-evaluate your running stride and stop heel striking
By: Angelo Grinceri - www.intrinsicstrengthtraining.com
I am NOT not saying you have to run barefoot here, but look at how the
foot goes through a proper loading and propulsion phase, while avoiding
the forces of heel striking.
Here is a great example of the super fast Halie Gebrselassie running in
slow-motion while in shoes and bare feet, Notice that its the same type of
stride and foot strike.
Re-evaluate your running stride and stop heel striking
By: Angelo Grinceri - www.intrinsicstrengthtraining.com