Sunday, 410,000 people converged on New York City for the People's Climate March in advance of

Ban Ki-moon's Climate Summit. It was the largest climate march in history. It was joined by the
Great March for Climate Action, the longest climate march ever (from Los Angeles to DC).
I marched halfway across Nebraska during July for a 16 day segment of the Great March for
Climate Action because I believe we need action, as you may well have concluded by my 350+
letters and 300+ emails to you during the past two and a half years. One of my fellow marchers
emailed his thoughts about the People's Climate March, which I believe you will appreciate:
On Friday night in NYC in her speech to the Convergence at St. Peters Church, a young native
American woman (a teenager I think) said something profound that summarizes why I am in this fight.
Maybe if we can keep this in mind we can find the strength to carry on. She said:
"WE ARE NOT PROTESTERS. WE ARE PROTECTORS."
Douglas Grandt <answerthecall@icloud.com>
To: Rex Tillerson <Rex.W.Tillerson@ExxonMobil.com>, David Rosenthal <David.S.Rosenthal@exxonmobil.com>
Bcc: Steven Norris <earthsun2@gmail.com>
"We are not protesters. We are Protectors." Honor the Earth

September 24, 2014 1:11 PM
2 Attachments, 1 MB
There's been much controversy lately about whether all the work that went into the Peoples Climate
March was worth it, and whether or not we should be supporting it. These are great and necessary
conversations and arguments. Thanks for all who participate. And PLEASE LET MORE VOICES JOIN
IN THESE DEBATES. It is out of this that our intelligence, creativity and courage will be forged and
reinforced.
Here's my take on this:
Toward the end of the Vietnam War (early70's) and toward the end of the struggles to bring nuclear
energy and nuclear weapons under control (80's), protests grew, and resistance to war and nuclear
power and weapons became more and more acceptable. A snowballing of dissent and sensibility
occurred. In 1973 a group of us went before the City Council in Middletown (middle of the road),
Connecticut and asked the councilors to condemn the bombings of North Vietnam. The City Councilors
did. At about the same time a guy in Western Massachusetts knocked down towers carrying
transmission lines from a nuclear power plant. He was arrested and tried, but a jury refused to convict
him. On Mayday, 1971 12,614 of us were arrested while blocking traffic in DC; eventually almost all of
the charges against were dropped. In NH (a conservative state if ever there was one, 1200 people were
arrested while occupying the site of the Seabrook nuclear power plant. The State of NH put them all in
jail but after a week had to let them go; NH could not afford to enforce its repressive laws.
A similar snowballing of dissent and sensibility is occurring right now. The Peoples Climate March this
weekend, and all the smaller actions that took place in cities and towns all over the country (e.g., 150
people in Iowa City, a good crowd in Asheville, NC, etc) demonstrates like nothing else could possibility
do that many many many people are paying attention and becoming activated. The fact that many
people in front line communities and elsewhere (in Alberta, Canada, in South Texas, in northern
Michigan, in the pet coke piles of South Chicago, and on Monday on Wall Street) - are actually putting
their bodies in the way of the machinery - this too is all part of this snowball we the people have created.
But it doesn't just stop there. As many know, a local DA in Massachusetts last week dropped charges
against two guys who used a lobster boat to block a ship delivering coal to a power plant. And later in
the week a DA in North Carolina, which is in 2014 the epicenter of right wing extremism - this DA
dropped charges against 900 Moral Monday protesters who sat in the state capitol building last year
protesting repsressive state policies.
The ruling class is cracking, slowly, but it is cracking under the enormous pressure which our dissents
have created. (Google just pulled out of ALEC.) We are also giving cover to conscientious government
officials and corporate leaders who have been scared to do the right thing, but who are waking up to the
fact that the right thing is now feasible for them, necessary for their political credibility, and essential to
the survival of the planet. And the Rockefeller Foundation, heirs to one of the largest fossil fuel empires
ever created, just announced it is divesting from fossil fuel investments.
Is all of this going fast enough? No. Is dissent big enough? No. Has Exxon come around? Clearly no.
And are we winning? Not yet.
But we are growing, and I think our continued growth now is guaranteed. And at the same time there is
much much much work still to be done. Can we do this fast enough to prevent out-of-control climate
chaos? I don't know. I really don't know, and I lie awake at night worried about it.
But one thing is clear to me. I cannot think of anything better or more important to do with my time and
energy than to work with you and people like you in our attempts to bring Goliath down. This life-and-
death struggle (make no mistake that's what it is) very often brings out the very best in people - their
courage, their creativity, their love, their compassion, their humor, you name it. I see this all the time.
This life-and-death struggle brings out the very best in people. . . you, me, and the stranger who may be
standing next to us waiting for the march to begin.
What a blessing to be part of this effort to protect this magical planet we live on.
Re-energize with clean carbon-free fuels — for life!
Re-invent ExxonMobil as an energy company, be more than an oil & gas company.
Re-direct capital investments from carbon-based infrastructure to carbon-free infrastructure.
Announce a retirement schedule for your refineries — let the end-game begin.
..
Your "leadership by example would usher in a new era...."
Please meet me for coffee — Let's talk about the urgency and deadline to protect all life from:
..
Extreme weather - Increasing death/damage from more heat waves, high winds & high water.
Hunger and thirst - Increasing drought/famine from natural & anthropogenic water shortages.
Disease and pestilence - Harmful critters, parasites and bacteria are already on the move.
Social unrest and economic upheaval - We have seen precursors — worse is yet to come.