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VOCAL ACCOMPANIMENT

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CHAPTER 1/ ITEM #2A
These are the root positions of the
chordal sequence we are investigating
111
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***Chapter and Menu item numbers directly correspond to the Menu***
V1
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11
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V
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1
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E-7
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A
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D-7
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G
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C
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In order to change the mood or feeling of a passage,
it may be desirable to change the V1 chord to a
minor chord or major chord depending on the situation.
111
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V1
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It is also possible to change the 11 chord
from major to minor and vice versa.
111
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V1
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11
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(DOMINANT)
V
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E-7
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A-7
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E-7
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A
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D7
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G7
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Moving the flatted 7th's one octave up or down
within a chord, also changes the color, mood, and
feeling of a chordal sequence.
111
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<
V1
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>
11
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<
<
V
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>
>
CH1/2B - It is also important to think of melody in
terms of voice leading--not only the top part, but
also as a link between chords in the middle harmony
parts
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111

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V1
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E-7
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A7
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D7
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G7
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E-7

A7
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BASIC INVERSIONS FOR AN A7 CHORD
Root position
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1st Inversion
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2nd Inversion
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3rd Inversion
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CH1/#2C - Notice how much more melodic the
passage is when the notes lead into each another

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Common tones from one chord to the next also
help chordal continuity and ease of movement

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E-7


A7

D-7

G7
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It is also possible to change the first chord of the sequence
from a minor chord to a major chord as illustrated.
#

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3
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E7


A7

D-7

G7
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One can also change the 11 chord of the sequence from
minor to major. In fact, any of the chords below
"Let's change it a little more..."
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# w
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#

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3
are interchangeable, except the dominant (g7), which
should generally be changed to minor only in specific
situations
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CH1/#3 - "Eventually
I might come up with..."
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E7
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A7
D7
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G7
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It's a good idea to sometimes throw caution to the
wind and let yopur fingers do the talking and analize
what you're doing later.
"What's that?...write it down... not knowing what it was
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Notes outside of the scale can be used to
create musical tension.
CH1/#4 - "We need something to
create some tension...
Suppose we do something like..."
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# #

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E7
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E7(#9)
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Those notes outside the chord lead into other sections.
It takes time to learn how to use these notes, but as
your technical skills improve, you will hear the difference
"Basically, how do we get to this..."
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#

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in your music. These raised 9ths, 5ths and so on have


come to be called alternate chords, substitutions,
chordal extensions and leading chords among others.

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b

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b

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"It's really important to know
how to set something up..."
E7(#9)

A7#9(b13)

D7
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G13#11(b9)
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#

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#

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"Now we could go even further out..."
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E7(#9)
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A7#9(b13)
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D13(#11)
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#
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Sometimes it's a good idea to leave certain intervals out
of a chord, depending on the effect you're trying to acheive.
Basic d7 chord-root position

5th left out

5th left out - 9th put in


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D7
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D7 D7
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This is a basic dominant 7th voicing that
can be used in almost any key and sound great.

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b
The last chord of an introduction is what
sets the featured artist up and leads
them into the song.
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D9

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Eb9

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E9

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F9

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F#-7
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Generally your voicings will sound more
transparent if you don't double notes.
Conversely, voicings will sound more dense
by doubling notes.

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Try moving notes around within the chord in various
combinations. You will gain a wealth of knowledge with
this practice. Let your ear be your guide

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B-7

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E9

A13
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CH1/#4C

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E7(#9)
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A7#9(#5)


D9

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3
G7#11(b9)b13

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^

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E7#9(#5)

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A7#9(#5)

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D7(#9)

#

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And here are examples of closed or compressed voicings and sounds. The
best thing to do is use a combination of both open and closed voicings

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E-7sus
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A7b5(b9)
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E6(9)/D

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#
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G7#11(b9)


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E7#9(#5) A13(b9)
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Practice this voicing in various keys

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E7(#9)

#

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Eb7(#9)

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D7(#9)

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b
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b .

Db7(#9)

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C7(#9)

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#
B7(#9)

b
Bb7(#9)

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CH1/#4D - The top not leading from "B" to "C" and then
"B" to "B " helps to create continuity between chords

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you can move 1/2 step up

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you can move 1/2 step down

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E7(#9)

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A7#5(#9)

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E7(#9)

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A13(b9)

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CH2/#5 - 4th chords, or chords based on the
interval of a 4th, when not locked in with the 3rd,
can lead to almost any key, which consequently
makes them good to use when you're lost (smile).

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Here is the same intro we have been studying
using a 4th interval chord on the E-7
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C

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E-7sus4
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A7#5(#9)

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Here are four variations on a chord
progreesion of increasing complexity
E-7 to a7 with no voice leading
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E-7 to A7 with top voice leading from D to E,
the 7th to the 5th of each respective chord
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E-7
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A7
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E-7
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A7
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more advanced voice leading based on the same progression
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E7(#9)
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A7#9(#5)
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E-7sus4 A13(b9)
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D7(#9)

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THE HREBIE HANCOCK EXAMPLE

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HERE ARE A FEW EXAMPLES OF VOICINGS FOR THE
DOMINANT CHORD AT THE END OF AN INTRODUC-
TION. REMEMBER TO EXPERIMENT WITH MOVING
THE MIDDLE NOTES FROM ONE OCTAVE TO ANOTHER,
AND PRACTICE USING HARMONY NOTES AS LEADING
TONES.
CH2/#6
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G13
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G13(b9)
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CM9/6
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THE FOLLOWING CHORDS, USED CORRECTLY, CAN
MAKE YOUR MUSIC MORE INTERESTING. EXPERI-
MENT STACKING TRIADS ON TOP OF EACH OTHER
IN VARIOUS KEYS, AND USING BASS NOTES OUT-
SIDE THE SUGGESTED TONAL CENTER
(E TRIAD)
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(B TRIAD)
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#
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G13(b9)
(G7)
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(C TRIAD)
B/C
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102
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YOU'VE CHANGED
CH2/#9 - THIS IS A TRANSCRIPTION OF THE INTRO I PLAYED TO "YOU'VE CHANGED"
WITH ANITA BAKER, FROM THE VIDEO AT THE MONTREUX JAZZ FESTIVAL

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D-7

Db13(#11)

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C-9

F13(b9)
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105
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D-7/G

Db13(#11)

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C-7

F13(b9)

BbM9


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108
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CH2/#10 - Here are some alternate ways of playing the same set of
changes. Investigate the voicings and alterations of the dominant chord
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D-7
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G7#9(b13) C-11
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F13#11(b9)
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Think melody and how to best get from one chord to another, not just a set of chords with no relationship!
CH2/#11


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3 3
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D-7


G7#9(b13)


C-11


F13#11


114
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D-7


D-7/F

G7#9(b13)
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C-11

Gb13

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F9sus4

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F13#11(b9)

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CH2/#12 - Another chord substitution that works
well in standard turnarounds is the upper neighbor to
the dominant substitution

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for the 11 chord. Below are several ways
to approach structuring that chord.

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D-7
? ?
G7
? ?
GbM9
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F7(b9)

D-7
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G7
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Gb13

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D/F7

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120
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If you want to get more daring, try substituting
the upper neighbor to the root for the 11 chord,
or third chord of the progression.

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D-7
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G7
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B9sus4-----3
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CH2/#13 A & B - This is a transcription of the piano
part to "I Got It Bad," which I played with Dianne Reeves.
Studying this will help
I GOT IT BAD
RUBATO

you see how an accompanist should sometimes follow,
sometimes lead, sometimes be still, sometimes decorate
and when to do each.
COLLA VOCE
#



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3


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E-7
? ?
A7#9(#5)
? ?
D9
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G13(b9)
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CM9

F13(#11)

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GM9

A7(b9)
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A7#9(#5) D13

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128
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D9sus



D13#11(b9)




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D-9
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Bb13

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Eb/A7

#
Ab13

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G7#11(b9)

E-7
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A7#9(#5)
? ?

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D9(#11)
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Db7(#11)
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C


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135
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CH2/#13C - Below, is a more advanced approach
to playing the same changes we've been studying.
RUBATO

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#

Here, I've extended the melody and the chords,


pushing the bounderies of the standard 6-5-2-1-
turnaround format.



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E-11alt


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Ab9sus4
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G7alt

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