You are on page 1of 43

Homicide Homicide

Homicide Homicide Homicide
andSuicide andSuicide
andSuicide andSuicide andSuicide
AmongNativeAmericans
1979–1992
ViolenceSurveillanceSummarySeries,No.2
L.J L.J L.J L.J L.J. .. ..DavidW DavidW DavidW DavidW DavidWallace,MSEH allace,MSEH allace,MSEH allace,MSEH allace,MSEH
AliceD AliceD AliceD AliceD AliceD.Calhoun,MD .Calhoun,MD .Calhoun,MD .Calhoun,MD .Calhoun,MD,MPH ,MPH ,MPH ,MPH ,MPH
K KK KKennethE.P ennethE.P ennethE.P ennethE.P ennethE.Powell,MD owell,MD owell,MD owell,MD owell,MD,MPH ,MPH ,MPH ,MPH ,MPH
JoannO JoannO JoannO JoannO JoannO’Neil,BS ’Neil,BS ’Neil,BS ’Neil,BS ’Neil,BS
StephenP StephenP StephenP StephenP StephenP.James,BS .James,BS .James,BS .James,BS .James,BS
NationalCenterforInjuryPreventionandControl NationalCenterforInjuryPreventionandControl NationalCenterforInjuryPreventionandControl NationalCenterforInjuryPreventionandControl NationalCenterforInjuryPreventionandControl
Atlanta,Georgia Atlanta,Georgia Atlanta,Georgia Atlanta,Georgia Atlanta,Georgia
1996 1996 1996 1996 1996
TheViolenceSurveillanceSummary Series is a publication of the National Center for 
Injury Prevention and Control of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 
David Satcher, MD, PhD, Director 
National Center for Injury Prevention and Control 
Mark L. Rosenberg, MD, MPP, Director 
Division of Violence Prevention 
James A. Mercy, PhD, Acting Director 
Production services were provided by staff of the Office of Health Communications, 
National Center for Injury Prevention and Control: 
Editing and Text Design 
Gwendolyn A. Ingraham 
Graphic Design 
Marilyn L. Kirk 
Mary Ann Braun 
Laura S. Dansbury 
Cover Design 
Mary Ann Braun 
Layout 
Sandra S. Emrich 
Suggested Citation:  Wallace LJD, Calhoun AD, Powell KE, O’Neil J, James SP. 
Homicide and suicide among Native Americans, 1979–1992. Atlanta, GA: Centers 
for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and 
Control, 1996. Violence Surveillance Summary Series, No. 2. 
ExecutiveSummary ExecutiveSummary ExecutiveSummary ExecutiveSummary ExecutiveSummary
From 1979–1992, 4,718 American Indians and Alaskan Natives 
(Native Americans) who resided on or near reservations died 
from violence—2,324 from homicides and 2,394 from suicide. 
During this 14-year period, overall homicide rates for Native 
Americans were about 2.0 times higher, and suicide rates 
were about 1.5 times higher, than U.S. national rates. Native 
Americans residing in the southwestern United States, northern 
Rocky Mountain and Plains states, and Alaska had the highest 
rates of homicide and suicide. 
Both homicides and suicides occurred disproportionately among 
young Native Americans, particularly males. From 1990–1992, 
homicide and suicide alternated between second and third 
rankings as leading causes of death for Native American males 
10–34 years of age. For Native American females aged 15–34 
years, homicide was the third leading cause of death. Almost 
two-thirds (63%) of male victims and three-quarters (75%) of 
female victims were killed by family members or acquaintances. 
Firearms were the predominant method used in both homicides 
and suicides. From 1979–1992, just over one-third of Native 
American homicide victims were killed with a firearm, with the 
firearm-related homicide rate among Native Americans increas-
ing 36% from 1985–1992. Firearms were used in nearly 60% of 
Native American suicides. 
Several distinctive characteristics of violent death among Native 
Americans emerged from this study: 
● The age distribution of suicide rates for Native Americans is 
quite unlike that for the general population, because of high 
rates among young adults and lower rates among the elderly. 
iii
● Although firearms are the predominate method for both 
homicides and suicides, Native Americans have a lower 
proportion of firearm-related homicides and suicides than 
is found in the U.S. population. 
● The proportion of homicides in which the victim and 
perpetrator were family members or acquaintances is 
somewhat greater for Native Americans than for the 
U.S. population at large.
● Patterns and rates of homicide and suicide among Native 
Americans differ greatly from region to region. 
There are many promising interventions to prevent violence, but 
because each Native American community is unique, prevention 
strategies should be planned with careful attention to local injury 
patterns and local practices and cultures. Given community 
differences and the multiple and complex causes of homicide and 
suicide, a simple and uniform approach is inappropriate. Success 
will come only through a variety of interventions, tailored to the 
specific local settings and problems. Also essential is continued 
surveillance and evaluation of the effectiveness of the prevention 
programs that are put into place. 
The information in this report should be useful to public health 
practitioners, researchers, and policy makers in addressing the 
problem of homicide and suicide among Native Americans. 
iv
Contents Contents Contents Contents Contents
ExecutiveSummary — iii
Introduction — 1
DataSources — 3
Results: Homicide — 7
Results: Suicide — 17
Discussion — 23
StudyLimitations — 23
CharacteristicsofViolenceamongNativeAmericans — 24
Prevention — 26
References — 29
Tables — 33
ForMoreInformation... — 51
F FF FFigures igures igures igures igures
F FF FFigure1.  igure1. igure1. igure1. igure1. IndianHealthServiceAreas 2
F FF FFigure2.  igure2. igure2. igure2. LeadingCausesofYearsofPotentialLifeLostbefore 8 igure2.
Age65(YPLL-65)—NativeAmericans,1990–1992
F FF FFigure3.  igure3. igure3. igure3. igure3. HomicideRates,byRaceandSex—NativeAmericans, 9
Blacks,Whites,1979–1992
F FF FFigure4.  igure4. igure4. igure4. igure4. HomicideRates,byAgeGroupandSex— 9
NativeAmericans,1979–1992
F FF FFigure5.  igure5. igure5. igure5. igure5. HomicideRates,byFirearmUse—NativeAmerican 10
MalesAged15–24Years,1979–1992
F FF FFigure6.  igure6. igure6. igure6. igure6. PercentageofHomicides,byWeaponUsedand 11
SexofVictim—NativeAmericans,1988–1991
F FF FFigure7.  igure7. igure7. igure7. igure7. PercentageofHomicides,byRelationshipbetweenVictim 12
andAssailant,andbySex—NativeAmericans,1988–1991
F FF FFigure8.  igure8. igure8. igure8. igure8. PercentageofHomicides,bySexofVictimandOffender— 13
NativeAmericans,1988–1991
F FF FFigure9.  igure9. igure9. igure9. igure9. PercentageofHomicides,byRaceofOffender— 13
NativeAmericans,1988–1991
F FF FFigure10.  igure10. igure10. igure10. igure10. VariationsinAge-AdjustedHomicideRates,byIHSServiceArea— 15
UnitedStates,1991–1992
F FF FFigure11.  igure11. igure11. igure11. igure11. SuicideRates,byRaceandSex—NativeAmericans, 18
Blacks,Whites,1979–1992
igure12.  SuicideRates,byAgeGroupandSex— 19
NativeAmericans,1979–1992
F FF FFigure12. igure12. igure12. igure12.
igure13.  SuicideRatesforPersonsAged65YearsandOlder— 20
NativeAmericansandAllU.S.Races,1979–1992
F FF FFigure13. igure13. igure13. igure13.
F FF FFigure14.  igure14. igure14. igure14. igure14. SuicideRates,byFirearmUse—NativeAmerican 20
MalesAged15–24Years,1979–1992
igure15.  PercentageofSuicides,byMethodandSexof 21
Victim—NativeAmericans,1979–1992
F FF FFigure15. igure15. igure15. igure15.
F FF FFigure16.  igure16. igure16. igure16. igure16. VariationsinAge-AdjustedSuicideRates,byIHSServiceArea— 22
UnitedStates,1991–1992
Introduction Introduction Introduction Introduction Introduction
Violence is a leading cause of death and disability for all 
Americans, but it is a particular threat to American Indians and 
Alaskan Natives (Native Americans).* Previous reports have 
shown that from 1979–1987, the age-adjusted homicide and 
suicide rates for Native Americans living on or near reservations 
were at or above the 90th percentile rates for all Americans.

From 1990–1992, homicide and suicide combined ranked as the 
fourth leading cause of death for Native Americans, exceeded 
only by heart disease, cancer, and unintentional injuries. For 
more than half of the 14-year study period (1979–1992), the 
annual number of suicides among Native Americans exceeded 
homicides, with most of the excess occurring since 1984. 
The Native American population for 1995 is projected at 
approximately 2.27 million.

Nearly half (1.37 million
3
) live in the 
geographic areas in which the Indian Health Service (IHS) has 
responsibilities (i.e., “on or near ”  federally recognized reserva-
tions) and are thus eligible for IHS services. For administrative 
purposes, IHS has grouped these areas, which comprise 571 
counties in 34 states, into 12 regions, or area offices:
4
 Aberdeen 
Area, Alaska Area, Albuquerque Area, Bemidji Area, Billings 
Area, California Area, Nashville Area, Navajo Area, Oklahoma 
Area, Phoenix Area, Portland Area, and Tucson Area (Figure 1). 
Each of these areas represents a unique combination of traditions 
and culture. There are also vast differences in government 
structure, economic level, population size, rurality, and the 
degree of acculturation. 
Vi ol ence i s a
l eadi ng cause of
deat h for al l
Ameri cans, but
i t i s a part i cul ar
t hreat t o Nat i ve
Ameri cans.
*Throughout this report, the term “ Native Americans”  is used to indicate American
 Indians and Alaskan Natives together. “American Indians”  is used to refer only to
 residents of the contiguous United States, and “Alaskan Natives,”  to refer only to
 those residing in Alaska. 
2   Introduction 
This surveillance summary looks at the problem of homicide 
and suicide among Native Americans in the IHS regions from 
1979–1992. It is the first CDC surveillance report to focus on 
Native Americans. Its purpose is to provide background infor-
mation for public health practitioners and policy makers to aid 
them in addressing violence in this vulnerable population. 
*
*
*
*
*
AK
CA
MT
WA
OR
ID
WY
ND
SD
NE
MN
IA
MI
WI
IN
KS
OK
TX
TN
NC
MS
AL SC
LA
FL
PA
NY
ME
MA
CT
RI
NV
UT
CO
AZ
NM
*
*
*
*
*
*

DataSources DataSources DataSources DataSources DataSources
The data on homicide and suicide were drawn from three sources: 
● detailed mortality tapes prepared by CDC ’s National Center 
for Health Statistics (NCHS) and based on data from state 
death certificates 
● these same NCHS mortality data, which IHS has categorized 
by area offices 
● data (homicide only) compiled from the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation’s Supplementary Homicide Report (FBI-SHR) 
The data derived from these sources are as follows: 
P PP PPopulationand opulationand opulationand opulationand opulationand
Source Source Source Source Source T TT TTypeofData ypeofData ypeofData ypeofData ypeofData Y YY YYearEncompassed earEncompassed earEncompassed earEncompassed earEncompassed
IHS  Mortality rates—all  IHS service areas
 Native Americans  1979–1992 
NCHS  Mortality data—all  Entire United States
 other races  1979–1992 
NCHS  YPLL-65*; 10 leading  All Native Americans
 causes of death  1990–1992 
FBI-SHR  Homicide—type of  All Native Americans
 firearm, relationship  1988–1991
 of victim and perpetrator 
Dat a for t hi s
st udy are from
t he Cent ers for
Di sease Cont rol
and Prevent i on,
t he I ndi an Heal t h
Ser vi ce, and t he
Federal Bureau
of I nvest i gat i on.
*Years of potential life lost before age 65 (see page 7 for description). 
4   Data Sources 
NCHSMortalityData NCHSMortalityData NCHSMortalityData NCHSMortalityData NCHSMortalityData
Information on NCHS mortality tapes is provided by the 50 
states and the District of Columbia and includes all persons 
reported as Native Americans. The data include age, race, sex, 
geographic information, and cause of death, coded according to 
the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical 
Modification.
5
 Homicides were identified using cause-of-death 
codes E960–E978,* and suicides, using codes E950–E959. 
IHSMortalityData IHSMortalityData IHSMortalityData IHSMortalityData IHSMortalityData
Each year, NCHS provides IHS with a multiple-cause-of-death 
mortality tape of all U.S. decedents. IHS categorizes these data 
by IHS area offices to create its own mortality data set. The IHS 
mortality data include those Native Americans who resided 
within an IHS area at the time of death and who were eligible for 
IHS services.

IHS mortality data represent the largely rural, reservation-based 
Native American population more closely than do NCHS data, 
which include all Native Americans residing in the United States. 
The IHS mortality data for 1979–1992 contained 74% of the 
homicides and 80% of the suicides reflected in the NCHS data 
for Native Americans. In this report, all homicide and suicide 
rates for Native Americans are from IHS mortality data. 
FBI- FBI- FBI- FBI- FBI-SHRHomicideData SHRHomicideData SHRHomicideData SHRHomicideData SHRHomicideData
The FBI-SHR compiles homicide data that have been submitted 
voluntarily by county, city, and state agencies; the Bureau of 
Indian Affairs; and Native American tribal law enforcement 
agencies throughout the United States. In 1988, approximately 
98% of the U.S. population was covered by this reporting 
system.
6
 In this data set, homicide is defined as murder and 
nonnegligent manslaughter (the willful killing of one human 
being by another), including justifiable homicides by private 
citizens (killing of someone who is in the act of committing a 
felony) and killing of a suspected felon by a law enforcement 
officer in the line of duty.

*Specific codes are “ homicide and injury purposely inflicted by other persons”
 (E960–E969) and “ legal interventions”  (E970–E978), which include legal 
executions and death from injury inflicted by law enforcement agents in the
 course of duty. Death resulting from legal interventions accounted for 2.1% of
 homicides involving Native Americans. 
5  Data Sources 
The FBI-SHR data are important because they include demo-
graphic information on the victim and assailant, the relationship 
between victim and assailant, and detailed information on the 
type of weapon used. The data are based solely on the reports of 
the investigating law enforcement officials.

We used FBI-SHR data for Native American homicide victims 
who died during 1988–1991. NCHS’s U.S. Vital Statistics data 
routinely report about 10% more homicides nationally per year 
than do FBI-SHR data.
7
 For 1988–1991, however, NCHS reported 
about 44% more homicides among Native Americans than did 
the FBI-SHR. This difference is thought to be largely due to the 
voluntary nature of the FBI-SHR reporting system and to 
misclassification of race. Also, four states did not report to the 
FBI-SHR: Florida, for 1988–1991; Maine, for 1991; Iowa, for 1991; 
and Kentucky, for 1988. Nonetheless, the data should be repre-
sentative of homicides of Native Americans on reservations 
because the FBI is routinely involved in those investigations 
(personal communication: Bennie Jeannotte, Assistant Chief, 
Law Enforcement Division, Bureau of Indian Affairs). 
Despite the apparent underreporting, we used FBI-SHR data 
because information about relationships between victims and 
offenders is available only from the FBI-SHR and because the 
type of firearm used is reported more completely in FBI-SHR 
data than in NCHS data. FBI-SHR data are used for all informa-
tion about offenders and type of firearm used. 
P PP PPopulationData opulationData opulationData opulationData opulationData
We calculated rates using estimates of the IHS service population 
for 1979–1992, based on the 1980 and revised 1990 census, as 
denominators. All rates specific to IHS areas, race, and sex were 
age-adjusted by the direct method using the 1940 U.S. popula-
tion as the standard. 
The 1990 census indicates that the Native American population 
residing in IHS service areas is younger than the U.S. population 
as a whole. Thirty-four percent of Native Americans are under 
15 years of age, and the median age is 24.2 years. Only 22% of 
the total U.S. population is under 15, and the median age is 
32.9 years.

Results:Homicide Results:Homicide Results:Homicide Results:Homicide Results:Homicide
OverallHomicideRatesandPrematureMortality OverallHomicideRatesandPrematureMortality OverallHomicideRatesandPrematureMortality OverallHomicideRatesandPrematureMortality OverallHomicideRatesandPrematureMortality
From 1979–1992, 2,324 Native Americans residing in the 12 IHS 
areas died from homicide. During this period, the total number 
of Native American homicides was essentially unchanged, with 
164 in 1979 and 168 in 1992. The rate of homicide for Native 
Americans, however, had a general downward trend, from a 
high of 23.7 per 100,000 in 1979 to a low of 13.2 per 100,000 in 
1990 (Table 1).* During the first half of the period, homicide 
rates for the United States as a whole also declined. However, 
during the last half of the period, when the rates for Native 
Americans were relatively stable, overall U.S. rates increased. 
During 1990–1992, homicide was the ninth leading cause of 
death for all Native Americans (Table 2). Despite these trends, 
the rates for Native Americans were approximately twice the 
U.S. rates throughout the first half of the period and continued
to exceed the U.S. rates during the later years. 
Years of potential life lost before the age of 65 (YPLL-65), which 
measures premature mortality, is another way of defining the 
scope of a public health problem.
8
 By calculating the years 
between the age at death and age 65, this technique weighs more 
heavily those conditions that kill children, teenagers, and young 
adults. For 1990–1992, homicide was the third leading cause of 
years of life lost before age 65 (Figure 2, Table 5). It accounted for 
7% of YPLL-65 among Native Americans and was exceeded only 
by unintentional injury and heart disease. YPLL-65 attributable 
to homicide increased by 13% for Native Americans from 
1979–1981 to 1990–1992. 
Al t hough homi ci de
rat es for Nat i ve
Ameri cans decl i ned
from 1979–1990,
t hey remai ned
hi gher t han U.S.
rat es.
*Tables are in a separate section at the back of the book. 
8   Results: Homicide
Race Race Race Race Race-andSex -andSex -andSex -andSex -andSex- -- --SpecificHomicideRates SpecificHomicideRates SpecificHomicideRates SpecificHomicideRates SpecificHomicideRates
During the study period, 1,759 Native American males and 
565 females were victims of homicide (Table 1). Throughout this 
period, homicide rates in the United States were highest for 
black males, followed by Native American males and then black 
females (Figure 3). Homicide rates for white males and Native 
American females were comparable and were higher than rates 
for white females. Homicide rates for Native Americans declined 
for both males and females during the earlier years of the study 
period, then remained stable for males and relatively stable for 
females. Homicide rates for Native Americans from 1979–1992 
were three times the rates for whites, but only half the rates for 
blacks. During the last half of the period, when the rates for 
Native Americans had stabilized, those for blacks increased. 
Age Age Age Age Age-andSex -andSex -andSex -andSex -andSex- -- --SpecificHomicideRates SpecificHomicideRates SpecificHomicideRates SpecificHomicideRates SpecificHomicideRates
For Native Americans, homicide is most common among young 
adults (Figure 4). During 1979–1992, the median age of Native 
American homicide victims was 28 years. Males aged 15–44 
accounted for 60% of all homicides of Native Americans. The 
Homi ci de i s t he
t hi rd l eadi ng
cause of years
of pot ent i al l i fe
l ost before age 65
for Nat i ve
Ameri cans.
Nat i ve Ameri can
mal es had t he
second hi ghest
homi ci de rat es
duri ng t he st udy
peri od.
9  Results: Homicide 
Young adul t s
had t he hi ghest
homi ci de rat es
among Nat i ve
Ameri cans.
10  Results: Homicide
group at highest risk was males aged 25–34 years (47.0 per 
100,000). From 1990–1992, homicide ranked sixth in overall 
leading causes of death among Native American males in the 
United States, but second among males aged 25–34 and third 
among males 1–4 and 10–24 years (Table 3). 
The pattern for Native American males aged 15–24 years, for 
both firearm-related homicides and homicides not involving a 
firearm, reflects the overall decline in homicide in this group 
from 1979–1992 (Figure 5). In contrast, among black males aged 
15–24 years, the total homicide rate mirrors a rise in rates of 
firearm-related homicide.

For Native American females, the 25- to 34-year age group was 
also at highest risk (13.8 per 100,000) (Figure 4). Although 
homicide was not one of the 10 leading causes of death overall 
for Native American females during 1990–1992, it was the second 
leading cause for girls aged 1–4 years and the third for females 
aged 15–34 (Table 4). 
Despi t e hi gh rat es,
homi ci des among
young Nat i ve
Ameri can mal es
decl i ned over t he
st udy peri od,
refl ect i ng a decrease
i n t he use of bot h
fi rearms and ot her
means.
Results: Homicide 11 
MethodsofHomicide MethodsofHomicide MethodsofHomicide MethodsofHomicide MethodsofHomicide
According to the FBI-SHR for 1988–1991, 44% of homicides of 
Native Americans involved firearms, with 64% of these involving 
a handgun (Table 6). Male victims were most likely to be killed by 
a firearm (48%), and female victims, by other methods (36%), 
such as blunt objects, bodily force, or strangulation (Figure 6). 
Cutting and stabbing accounted for a substantial number of 
deaths among both males (29%) and females (23%). 
Mal e vi ct i ms were
most l i kel y t o be
ki l l ed by a fi re-
arm, and femal e
vi ct i ms, by ot her
met hods, such as
bl unt obj ect s,
bodi l y force, or
st rangul at i on.
Although firearms are the predominant weapon used in Native 
American homicides, they are less likely to be used in this 
group (38%) than in the U.S. population as a whole (63%). From 
1979–1992, firearms were used in about 63% of homicides in the 
United States, but in 38% of homicides of Native Americans 
residing in IHS areas. 
The prevalence of firearm use varied across IHS areas, from 28% 
of homicides in the Aberdeen Area to 53% in the California Area 
(Table 7). Firearm use was also high in the Alaska Area (47%), the 
Nashville Area (48%), and the Oklahoma Area (50%). Despite the 
predominance of firearm use, cutting and stabbing was the lead-
ing method of homicide in three areas: Aberdeen, Albuquerque, 
and Navajo. 
12  Results: Homicide
RelationshipofV RelationshipofV RelationshipofV RelationshipofV RelationshipofVictimstoAssailants ictimstoAssailants ictimstoAssailants ictimstoAssailants ictimstoAssailants
From 1988–1991, two-thirds (66%) of Native American homicide 
victims were killed by persons they knew: 19% by family 
members and 47% by acquaintances. This proportion is larger 
than the proportion for the United States as a whole. 
Females were particularly at risk of being killed by someone they 
knew (75%), with almost one-third of female victims being killed 
by family members (Figure 7). Nationwide, about 65% of female 
victims were killed by someone they knew.
7
 During the study 
period, 63% of Native American male victims were killed by 
family members or acquaintances, in contrast with 50% 
nationwide. Two-thirds of all Native American homicide victims 
were males who were killed by males (Figure 8). 
Most Native Americans were killed by other Native Americans 
(51%) or by whites (39%) (Figure 9). Females were most likely 
(59%) to be killed by other Native Americans. 
Two-t hi rds of
Nat i ve Ameri can
homi ci de vi ct i ms
were ki l l ed by
someone t hey
knew.
Results: Homicide  13 
The maj ori t y of
t hese homi ci des
i nvol ved mal es
ki l l i ng mal es.
Most Nat i ve
Ameri can
homi ci de vi ct i ms
were ki l l ed by
ot her Nat i ve
Ameri cans.
14  Results: Homicide
GeographicP GeographicP GeographicP GeographicP GeographicPatternsofHomicide atternsofHomicide atternsofHomicide atternsofHomicide atternsofHomicide
During 1979–1992, homicide rates varied widely across the 
12 IHS areas, from a low of 10.6 per 100,000 in the Oklahoma 
Area to 27.8 per 100,000 in the Aberdeen Area (Table 8). The 
homicide rate in the Aberdeen Area was approximately six 
times greater than the rate for all South Dakota residents. 
Rates for all IHS areas were higher than the average U.S. rate 
(9.5 per 100,000) during the study period. The IHS areas with
the highest overall homicide rates and the highest rates for males 
were in the northern midwest (Aberdeen Area), the northern 
Rocky Mountain states (Billings Area), and the desert southwest 
(Tucson Area and Phoenix Area). For Native American females, 
homicide rates were highest in the northern-midwest (Aberdeen 
Area) and the desert southwest (Tucson Area and Phoenix Area) 
(Table 8). 
Although the Aberdeen Area had consistently high rates, it did 
not have the highest rate after 1982. Instead, the highest rate 
usually occurred in the Tucson, Phoenix, or Billings areas. 
During 1991–1992, Tucson (24.9) had the highest rate, followed 
by Billings (23.9) and Phoenix (23.0) (Figure 10, Table 7). 
Nat i ve Ameri can
homi ci de rat es
were hi ghest i n
t he nort hern
mi dwest , t he
nort hern Rocky
Mount ai n st at es,
and t he desert
sout hwest .
Results: Homicide  15 
*
*
*
*
*
AK
CA
MT
WA
OR
ID
WY
ND
SD
NE
MN
IA
MI
WI
IN
KS
OK
TX
TN
NC
MS
AL SC
LA
FL
PA
NY
ME
MA
CT
RI
NV
UT
CO
AZ
NM
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
Results:Suicide Results:Suicide Results:Suicide Results:Suicide Results:Suicide
OverallSuicideRatesandPrematureMortality OverallSuicideRatesandPrematureMortality OverallSuicideRatesandPrematureMortality OverallSuicideRatesandPrematureMortality OverallSuicideRatesandPrematureMortality
From 1979–1992, 2,394 Native Americans residing in IHS service 
areas died from suicide. During this period, the number of 
suicides increased by 19%, from 162 in 1979 to 193 in 1992 
(Table 9). The suicide rate declined 26% during the first six years 
of the study period, from a high of 21.1 per 100,000 in 1979 to a 
low of 15.6 per 100,000 in 1984. From 1984–1985, there was an 
11% increase in suicide rates for Native Americans, after which 
the rates tended to stabilize. From 1990–1992, suicide was the 
eighth leading cause of death overall for Native Americans 
(Table 2) and the fourth leading cause of YPLL-65 (Figure 2 
[page 8], Table 5). YPLL-65 attributable to suicide among Native 
Americans increased by 18% from 1979–1981 to 1990–1992. 
In 1992, the suicide rate for Native Americans (16.2 per 100,000) 
was 1.5 times greater than the rate for all Americans (11.1 per 
100,000). It was 1.4 times higher than the rate for whites and 2.4 
times higher than the rate for blacks. 
Race Race Race Race Race-andSex -andSex -andSex -andSex -andSex- -- --SpecificSuicideRates SpecificSuicideRates SpecificSuicideRates SpecificSuicideRates SpecificSuicideRates
Native American males had the highest suicide rates in the 
country during the study period, followed by white males and 
then black males (Figure 11). Black females had the lowest 
suicide rates, and Native American females, the next lowest rates. 
The rates for white females were only slightly higher than those 
for Native American females. 
Sui ci de rat es for
Nat i ve Ameri cans
decl i ned overal l
duri ng t he st udy
peri od, but t hey
remai ned hi gher
t han U.S. rat es.
18  Results: Suicide
From 1979–1984, the suicide rate for Native American males 
declined 27%, but from 1984 to 1990 the rate increased 10%. The 
rate then declined in 1991 and remained virtually unchanged in 
1992 (Table 9). The rate for Native American females fluctuated 
throughout 1979–1992, with no overall decrease (Figure 11). 
Nat i ve Ameri can
mal es had t he
hi ghest sui ci de
rat es i n t he
count r y.
Age Age Age Age Age-andSex -andSex -andSex -andSex -andSex- -- --SpecificSuicideRates SpecificSuicideRates SpecificSuicideRates SpecificSuicideRates SpecificSuicideRates
Suicide among Native Americans, like homicide, is most com-
mon among young adults, particularly young males (Figure 12). 
During 1979–1992, the median age of a Native American suicide 
victim was 26 years. Males aged 15–34 years accounted for 64% 
of all suicides by Native Americans. Males and females aged 
15–24 years were at highest risk, with suicide rates of 62.0 per 
100,000 and 10.0 per 100,000, respectively. 
Mal es 15–34 years
ol d account ed for
64% of Nat i ve
Ameri can sui ci des.
Results: Suicide  19 
In keping with past trends, suicide rates were lowest for Native 
Americans over 65 years of age. This pattern is changing, how-
ever: rates for older Native Americans increased almost 200% 
from 1979–1981 to 1991–1992 (Figure 13). In contrast, although 
suicide rates in the United States overall are highest for persons 
over 65, the rates for this group increased only 15% during the 
same period. A large majority of older Native Americans who 
committed suicide were male (83%), and firearms were by far the 
leading method (74%). 
From 1990–1992, suicide was the fifth leading cause of death 
among Native American males in the United States and the 
second among males aged 10–24 years (Table 3). Suicide is 
not among the 10 leading causes of death overall for Native 
American females (Table 4). It is, however, the second leading 
cause for those aged 15–24 and the fifth for those aged 25–34. 
The decline from 1979–1984 in suicide rates for Native American 
males aged 15–24 years mirrors the decline in firearm-related 
suicides during that time (Figure 14). Since 1983, however, other 
means, such as hanging and poisoning, combined have been 
used almost as often as firearms in suicides by young Native 
American males. 
Of al l Nat i ve
Ameri cans,
young peopl e
were at hi ghest
ri sk for sui ci de.
20  Results: Suicide
Al t hough sui ci de
rat es for ol der
Nat i ve Ameri cans
are l ow, t hey are
on t he ri se.
Si nce 1983, ot her
means, such as
hangi ng and
poi soni ng, have
been used i n
sui ci des al most as
oft en as fi rearms.
Results: Suicide 21 
MethodsofSuicide MethodsofSuicide MethodsofSuicide MethodsofSuicide MethodsofSuicide
Firearms were used in the majority (57%) of suicides by Native 
Americans. The next most common methods were strangulation 
by hanging (29%) and poisoning (9%) (Table 10). Males were 
most likely to choose firearms (59%) and hanging (31%) 
(Figure 15). Females were most likely to use firearms (41%) and 
poisoning (35%). Native Americans were twice as likely as all 
U.S. residents to choose hanging as a method of suicide, but
only half as likely to use poisoning.

Methods of suicide varied across IHS areas. Firearm use ranged 
from 45% (Aberdeen Area) to 76% (Nashville Area). Hanging 
was the leading method of suicide in the Aberdeen Area from 
1985–1992. Poisoning was the second leading method in the 
Bemidji Area. 
Fi rearms were
t he predomi nant
met hod of sui ci de
for bot h mal es
and femal es.
GeographicP GeographicP GeographicP GeographicP GeographicPatternsofSuicide atternsofSuicide atternsofSuicide atternsofSuicide atternsofSuicide
As with homicide rates, suicide rates among Native Americans 
during 1979–1992 varied geographically, from a low of 7.5 per 
100,000 in the Oklahoma Area to a high of 29.6 per 100,000 in the 
Billings Area (Table 11). However, for the second half of the study 
period (1985–1992), suicide rates and firearm suicide rates were 
highest in Alaska (Table 12). The Alaska Area also had the greatest 
22  Results: Suicide
number of firearm suicides during the study period. During 
1991–1992, the highest suicide rates were in the Alaska Area 
(30.7), the Albuquerque Area (25.8), and the Aberdeen Area 
(24.9) (Figure 16). 
Three areas had male-to-female suicide ratios that were consider-
ably higher than the national ratio of 4.0. The suicide rate for 
males in the Albuquerque Area (54.0 per 100,000) was 17 times 
greater than that for females (3.2 per 100,000) (Table 11). The 
male-to-female suicide ratio was 9.8 in the Navajo Area and 8.5 
in the Billings Area. 
*
*
*
*
*
AK
CA
MT
WA
OR
ID
WY
ND
SD
NE
MN
IA
MI
WI
IN
KS
OK
TX
TN
NC
MS
AL SC
LA
FL
PA
NY
ME
MA
CT
RI
NV
UT
CO
AZ
NM
*
*
*
*
*
*

Sui ci de rat es
were hi ghest i n
Al aska, t he
Rocky Mount ai n
st at es, and part s
of t he mi dwest .
Discussion Discussion Discussion Discussion Discussion
StudyLimitations StudyLimitations StudyLimitations StudyLimitations StudyLimitations
Underreporting of Native American race on state death certifi-
cates is thought to be common in many regions of the United 
States.
4
 Undoubtedly, underreporting influences the numbers 
and rates of events in this report. IHS has long recognized this 
problem in the California, Oklahoma, and Portland areas.
4,10 
Consequently, rates presented for these three areas and for all 
areas combined should be considered conservative estimates. 
For Native Americans living outside of IHS service areas, mis-
classification of race on death certificates is likely to be an 
even greater problem, especially among those with Anglo- or 
Hispanic-sounding names. IHS estimates that misclassification 
of race leads to underestimates of death rates for American 
Indians in some regions of as much as 25%–35% (written com-
munication: Aaron Handler, Chief, Demographic Statistics 
Branch, IHS). Despite the probability that the rates in this study 
are underestimated, the results support previous work showing 
that homicide and suicide are more common among Native 
Americans than in the overall U.S. population.
1,11 
A second limitation concerns the number of suicides and homi-
cides among Alaskan Natives. During the study period, data 
from the Alaska Bureau of Vital Statistics consistently show 
about 70% more suicides and 40% more homicides than are 
included in the NCHS and IHS data tapes (written communi-
cation: Stephanie Walden, Alaska Department of Health and 
Social Services, Bureau of Vital Statistics). This discrepancy 
occurs, in part, because data are due each year at NCHS before 
the investigations of many suicides and homicides have been 
completed. When investigations are finalized, the deaths are 
recorded at the state level, but not at the federal level. 
The dat a i n t hi s
report support
previ ous work
showi ng t hat
homi ci de and
sui ci de are more
common among
Nat i ve Ameri cans
t han i n t he
Uni t ed St at es
overal l .
24  Discussion 
This situation applies to all deaths in Alaska, not just those for 
Alaskan Natives. NCHS and the Alaska Bureau of Vital Statistics 
are aware of the problem,
12
 and it is now thought to be corrected 
(personal communication: Harry Rosenberg, Chief, Mortality 
Statistics Branch, NCHS; Al Zangri, Chief, Bureau of Vital 
Statistics, Alaska Department of Health and Social Services). 
CharacteristicsofV CharacteristicsofV CharacteristicsofV CharacteristicsofV CharacteristicsofViolenceamongNativeAmericans iolenceamongNativeAmericans iolenceamongNativeAmericans iolenceamongNativeAmericans iolenceamongNativeAmericans
In addition to overall high rates, several distinctive characteristics 
of violent deaths among Native Americans emerged from the 
study: 
● an age distribution of suicide rates quite unlike that 
for the general population 
● a lower proportion of firearm-related homicides 
and suicides than in the general U.S. population 
● a somewhat greater proportion of homicides in 
which the victim and perpetrator were known to 
be family members or acquaintances 
● marked variation in patterns and rates among the 
IHS areas 
These observations, which are discussed below, have implica-
tions for the design and focus of preventive activities. 
Age di st ri but i on of Nat i ve Ameri can sui ci de rat es. For the United 
States as a whole, suicide rates increase during the teenage years, 
are relatively similar for all age groups from the early twenties 
through the late sixties, and then increase with age. In contrast, 
suicide rates among Native Americans aged 15–34 years were 
about five times greater during the study period than the rates 
for those 65 years and older and were over two times greater 
than national U.S. rates for the same age group. Therefore, 
while suicide among adolescents and young adults is a national 
concern affecting all Americans, young Native Americans, 
especially males, are at unusually high risk. It is noteworthy that 
the rates were highest for young adults beyond school age, an 
age group that tends to be neglected in many suicide prevention 
programs.
13 
Fi rearm-rel at ed homi ci des and sui ci des. Firearms were the pre-
dominant weapon used by Native Americans in both suicides 
and homicides. They are less likely to be used by this group, 
however, than by the overall U.S. population. From 1979–1992, 
Young Nat i ve
Ameri can mal es
are at unusual l y
hi gh ri sk for
sui ci de.
57% of suicides by Native Americans involved a firearm, com-
pared with about 59% for the United States as a whole. Despite 
this lower percentage overall, three IHS areas were well above 
the national percentage: Nashville Area (76%), Alaska Area 
(72%), and California Area (69%). 
Increases in homicides involving a firearm account for a large 
proportion (68%) of the increase in the total U.S. homicide rate 
since 1985. Nationally, firearm use in homicides increased 49% 
from 1985–1992, with the greatest increase occurring among 
blacks (63%).
14
 Homicides among Native Americans have 
generally involved other means, such as knives and blunt 
trauma, but this may be changing. From 1985–1992, the firearm-
related homicide rate among Native Americans increased 36%. 
It is important to continue to monitor firearm use in this group, 
because if it continues to increase, homicide rates can be 
expected to increase as well. 
Homi ci des i nvol vi ng fami l y members or acquai nt ances. The large 
proportion of homicides not involving firearms and the high 
incidence of perpetration by family and acquaintances may 
indicate high rates of alcohol-related violence among Native 
Americans. Studies have shown that, for many Native American 
communities, alcohol plays a substantial role in premature 
mortality, including deaths due to violence.
15–17 
Researchers have 
estimated that in New Mexico and other reservation states, 75% 
of American Indian suicides and 80% of homicides are alcohol-
related.
15,17,18
 These proportions are much higher than those for 
all New Mexico residents: 42% of suicides and 54% of homi-
cides.
15
 Objective surveillance of alcohol-related injury, alcohol 
screening of injury patients, and referral to appropriate sources 
of help for persons with substance abuse problems are necessary 
components in reducing this risk. Although alcohol appears to 
be an important risk factor for violent death among Native 
Americans, a substantial proportion of the population, especially 
older adults, do not drink.
17
 It should also be noted that just as 
tribal cultures differ, so do experiences with alcohol and alcohol 
policies. Consequently, some tribes have serious substance abuse 
problems, while others do not.
19 
Vari at i ons i n pat t erns and rat es of homi ci de and sui ci de.
In general, IHS areas with high homicide rates also had high 
suicide rates. Homicide and suicide rates in the Aberdeen, 
Alaska, Billings, Phoenix, and Tucson areas were more than 
twice the U.S. national rate. These same areas also had the 
highest firearm-related death rates, with Alaska ranking first.

Discussion  25 
Al t hough fi re-
arms are t he
predomi nant
weapon i n
Nat i ve Ameri can
homi ci des and
sui ci des, t hey
are used l ess
oft en t han i n t he
U.S. popul at i on
overal l .
The hi gh
i nci dence of
homi ci de
perpet rat ed by
fami l y and
acquai nt ances
may i ndi cat e
hi gh rat es of
al cohol -rel at ed
vi ol ence, at
l east i n some
I HS areas.
26  Discussion
 The rate of gun ownership in these areas, especially in Alaska, 
could play a role in these high rates. Information on firearm 
ownership, storage methods, and attitudes about firearms would 
be valuable for planning interventions. 
Prevention Prevention Prevention Prevention Prevention
Given the multiple and complex causes of homicide and suicide 
and the variations in tribal culture, simple and uniform preven-
tion recommendations are inappropriate. Interventions tailored 
to specific local settings and problems will be necessary. Never-
theless, some common approaches to preventing suicide and 
homicide can be suggested. 
First, educational programs can encourage changes in behavior 
that may help reduce homicide. Examples are mentoring pro-
grams, training in parenting skills for young parents, and cam-
paigns to raise awareness about the adverse effects of alcohol 
misuse, the risks and benefits of firearm possession, and the safe 
use and storage of firearms. To be successful, however, these 
programs must be designed with the culture of each tribe in 
mind. Second, legislative measures, such as regulating the use of, 
and access to, alcohol in a community and enforcing laws that 
restrict access to firearms by groups that should not have them, 
like felons and children, are of value. Third, providing or im-
proving services such as special recreational programs for youth, 
home visitation programs for high-risk young mothers, and 
shelters for battered women and their children could help 
reduce violence.
20,21 
Suicide prevention activities should be linked with professional 
mental health resources in the community. Programs could 
include several of the following promising strategies:
13 
● training school gatekeepers, such as teachers, counselors, 
and coaches 
● training community gatekeepers, such as clergy, elders, 
police, medical staff, merchants, and recreation staff 
● educating the community 
● screening for suicide in schools and clinics 
● developing peer support projects 
● establishing crisis centers and hotlines 
● restricting access to lethal means 
● providing special services to friends and families 
of suicide victims 
I n general , I HS areas
wi t h hi gh homi ci de
rat es al so had hi gh
sui ci de rat es. These
same areas had t he
hi ghest fi rear m-
rel at ed deat h rat es.
Educat i onal
programs may
hel p reduce
homi ci de, but
t hey must be
t ai l ored t o l ocal
set t i ngs and
probl ems.
Restricting access to lethal means for those considered at risk 
may be the most effective, yet underused, strategy for prevent-
ing suicide. Friends and relatives of persons at risk for suicide, 
and the public at large, should be made aware of findings 
indicating that having a firearm in the home is associated with 
approximately a five-fold increase in the risk of suicide among 
household residents.
22
 Restricting access to lethal means, 
promoting locked storage of firearms and ammunition, and 
raising public awareness of the risk of  having a firearm in the 
home could be especially important to Native Americans in 
the Alaska, Albuquerque, Billings, and Phoenix areas, since 
easy access to firearms may contribute to their high rates of 
firearm suicide. 
Since 1986, a team in IHS’s Mental Health Programs Branch has 
been responding to the widespread concern of both Native 
American communities and the IHS regarding violence. This 
group, the Family Violence Prevention Team,* offers crisis 
consultation, community assessment, program planning, and 
program development to help prevent violence among Native 
Americans.
23
 The team is available to consult with communities, 
tribal organizations, and IHS staff on crisis intervention and 
prevention strategies. They have worked with several 
community-based violence prevention programs, including 
those in New Mexico, Arizona, Wyoming, and Minnesota. 
Many promising interventions to prevent violence have been 
developed. Because each Native American community is unique, 
however, careful assessments of local patterns of violence and 
considerations of local practices and cultures need to be 
addressed for interventions to be successful. Continued 
surveillance of violence in Native American communities and 
evaluation of the effectiveness of prevention programs are 
greatly needed. In addressing the problem of violence in their 
communities, local public health practitioners should examine 
the causes of violence and work to develop, implement, and 
evaluate multifaceted intervention programs to reduce the 
burden of injury and death caused by violence. 
Discussion  27 
Rest ri ct i ng
access t o l et hal
means for t hose
consi dered at
ri sk may be t he
most effect i ve,
yet under used,
st rat egy for
prevent i ng
sui ci de.
The need t o
consi der t he
uni queness of
each Nat i ve
Ameri can
communi t y
when pl anni ng
i nt ervent i ons
cannot be
overemphasi zed.
*For more information about the Family Violence Prevention Team or to
  request assistance, contact the Family Violence  Prevention Team, IHS Mental
  Health/Social Services Programs Branch, 5300  Homestead Road, NE,
 Albuquerque, NM 87110. 
References References References References References
1. National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. Injury 
mortality atlas of Indian Health Service areas, 1979–1987. 
Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1993. 
2. Indian Health Service. Projected American Indian and Alaska 
Native population for the United States, 1990–2005. Rockville, 
MD: Indian Health Service, 1994. 
3. Indian Health Service. Projected American Indian and Alaska 
Native IHS service population by area, 1990–2005. Rockville, 
MD: Indian Health Service, 1994. 
4. Indian Health Service. Trends in Indian health, 1994.
Rockville, MD: U.S. Public Health Service, 1994.
5. Public Health Service. International classification of diseases: 
9th revision, clinical modification. Washington, DC: U.S. 
Department of Health and Human Services, 1989. Report No. 
DHHS-PHS-89–1260. 
6. Federal Bureau of Investigation. Crime in the United States:
uniform crime reports, 1988. Washington, DC: U.S.
Department of Justice, 1988.
7. National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. Homicide 
surveillance, 1979–1988. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease 
Control, 1992. 
8. Gardner JW, Sanborn JS. Years of potential life lost (YPLL):
what does it measure? Epidemiology 1990;1(4):322–9.
30  References 
9. Kachur SP, Potter LB, James, SP, Powell KE. Suicide in the United 
States, 1980–1992. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, 
1995. Violence Surveillance Summary Series, No. 1. 
10. Sugarman JR, Soderberg R, Gordon JE, Rivara FP. Racial 
misclassification of American Indians: its effect on injury 
rates in Oregon, 1989–1990. Am J Public Health 1993;83:681–4. 
11. Baker SP, O’Neill B, Ginsburg MJ, Li G. The injury fact book. 
2nd ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 1992. 
12. National Center for Health Statistics. Technical appendix. 
In: Vital statistics of the United States, 1990. Volume II. 
Hyattsville, MD: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 
1994:19. 
13. National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. Youth 
suicide prevention programs: a resource guide. Atlanta, GA: 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1992. 
14. National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. Injury 
mortality: national summary of injury mortality data, 
1985–1992. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention, 1995. 
15. Becker TM, Samet JM, Wiggins CL, Key CR. Violent death in the 
West: suicide and homicide in New Mexico, 1958–1987. 
Suicide Life Threat Behav 1990;20(4):324–34. 
16. Gallaher MM, Fleming DW, Berger LR, Sewell CM. Pedestrian 
and hypothermia deaths among Native Americans in New 
Mexico: between bar and home. JAMA 1992;267:1345–8. 
17. May PA. Alcohol abuse and alcoholism among American 
Indians: an overview. In: Watts TD, Wright R, editors. 
Alcoholism in minority populations. Springfield, IL: 
Charles C. Thomas, 1989. 
18. May PA. The epidemiology of alcohol abuse among American 
Indians: the mythical and real properties. Am Indian Culture 
Res J 1994;18(2):121–43. 
19. Lujan CC. Alcohol-related deaths of American Indians: 
stereotypes and strategies. JAMA 1992;267:1384. 
References   31 
20. National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. The 
prevention of youth violence: a framework for community 
action. Atlanta, GA: Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention, 1993. 
21. National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. Deaths 
resulting from firearm and motor-vehicle-related injuries— 
United States, 1968–1991. MMWR 1994;43:37–42. 
22. Kellerman AL, Rivara FP, Somes G, et al. Suicide in the home in 
relation to gun ownership. N Engl J Med 1992;327:467–72. 
23. DeBruyn L, Wilkins B. Family violence prevention team of the 
IHS Mental Health/Social Services Programs Branch. IHS Prim 
Care Provider 1994;19:83. 
T TT TTables ables ables ables ables
T TT TTable1.  able1. able1. able1. able1. NumbersandRatesofHomicide,bySexofVictim 35
andYearofDeath—NativeAmericans,1979–1992
T TT TTable2.  able2. able2. able2. able2. TenLeadingCausesofDeath,byAgeGroup— 36
NativeAmericans,1990–1992
T TT TTable3.  able3. able3. able3. able3. TenLeadingCausesofDeath,byAgeGroup— 37
NativeAmericanMales,1990–1992
T TT TTable4.  able4. able4. able4. able4. TenLeadingCausesofDeath,byAgeGroup— 38
NativeAmericanFemales,1990–1992
able5.  T TT TTable able able able TenLeadingCausesofYearsofPotentialLifeLostbefore 39
Age65(YPLL-65)—NativeAmericans,1990–1992
T TT TTable6.  able6. able6. able6. able6. PercentagesofHomicide,bySexandMethod— 40
NativeAmericans,1989–1991
T TT TTable7.  able7. able7. able7. able7. NumbersandRatesofHomicide,byIHSAreaand 41
LeadingMethods;andPercentagesofFirearmUse—
NativeAmericans,1979–1992
T TT TTable8.  able8. able8. able8. able8. NumbersandRatesofHomicide,bySexofVictimand 44
IHSArea;andNativeAmerican-to-U.S.RateRatios,1979–1992
T TT TTable9.  able9. able9. able9. able9. NumbersandRatesofSuicide,bySexandYearofDeath— 45
NativeAmericans,1979–1992
T TT TTable10.  able10. able10. able10. able10. NumbersandPercentagesofSuicide,bySexandMethod— 45
NativeAmericans,1989–1991
T TT TTable11.  able11. able11. able11. NumbersandRatesofSuicide,bySexandIHSArea; 46 able11.
andNativeAmerican-to-U.S.RateRatios,1979–1992
T TT TTable12.  able12. able12. able12. NumbersandRatesofSuicide,byIHSAreaand 47 able12.
LeadingMethods;andPercentagesofFirearmUse—
NativeAmericans,1979–1992