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Mostly sunny

today. Highs
in the mid
70s. Mostly
clear tonight.
Lows in the
lower 50s. See page 2.
Thursday, September 25, 2014 Vol. 145 No. 73
DELPHOS
HERALD
The
75¢ daily Delphos, Ohio
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Spiny amaranth found near
Continental, p4

Stewart not to face charges,
p7
Upfront
Forecast
Obituaries 2
State/Local 3
Agribusiness 4
Community 5
Sports 6-7
Classifieds 8
Comics and Puzzles 9
Index
www.delphosherald.com
Tri-County sees
unemployment
drop in August
BY KIRK DOUGAL
DHI Media Group Publisher
news@delphosherald.com
The unemployment rates in Allen and Van Wert counties
and the surrounding area dropped in August, according to a
report released on Tuesday from the Ohio Department of Job
and Family Services and the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Unlike
some previous months, the lower percentages are due to more
people finding jobs.
The jobless rate in Allen County fell a full percent from 6.1
to 5.1 percent. In August, of the 48,700 labor force, 2,500 were
unemployed compared to 3,000 unemployed of 48,800 in July.
Past decreases in the jobless rate for area counties have
occurred because people had stopped their search for a job and
no longer counted in the labor force number. However, in Van
Wert County, the total number of people in the county labor
force remained the same from July to August (14,100), while
the employed number went up by 100 (to 13,400) and the
unemployed number fell by 100 (to 600). This resulted in the
jobless rate falling from 5.3 percent to 4.5 percent. The drop
broke a two-month streak of rising unemployment and equaled
the jobless rate from May of this year.
That same trend continued across all the neighboring coun-
ties from July to August of this year. Mercer (3.3% to 3.0%),
Paulding (5.2% to 4.5%), and Putnam (5.0% to 4.0%) counties
all showed dips in their respective unemployment rates that
were mirrored with increases in employed residents and stable
or growing labor force numbers.
See DROP, page 3
Buckeye Trail Assoc. to host canal trail clean-ups
BY STEPHANIE GROVES
DHI Media Staff Writer
sgroves@delphosherald.com
OTTOVILLE — On Saturday, volunteers around the
nation, including The Buckeye Trail Association’s trail work
crew, along with Ottoville and Delphos volunteers at Ohio
State Parks - Miami and Erie Canal Lands, will chip in to
help improve public treasured places and to celebrate National
Public Lands Day (NPLD), the largest, single-day volunteer
event for public lands in the country.
Buckeye Trail Association member Sam Bonifas spoke
with Ottoville Village Council members during Monday
night’s meeting and said work crews will be clearing the tow-
path on Saturday, Sunday and Monday.
“It’s the First Annual North Country National Scenic Trail
Day,” he said. “We will work on approximately one-half mile
of the trail picking up trash and pruning trees; basically clear-
ing the towpath for relocation of the trail.”
Bonifas said the objective is to relocate the stretch of the
Buckeye Trail/North Country National Scenic Trail from its
current on-road Road 25-P location to off-road at the north
edge of the Village of Ottoville.
“Specifically, the work will be moving the trail onto the
State of Ohio’s property of the Miami and Erie Canal Lands
and the village of Ottoville property of the Miami and Erie
Canal Lands,” Bonifas said. ”The towpath will be used as
much as possible.”
One of many scenic views from the canal towpath overlooking Ottoville’s
wildlife area of the old quarry. (Photo courtesy of Sam Bonifas) See TRAILS, page 3
Green Thumb Garden
Club members held their
monthly meeting in the
Delphos Public Library’s First
Edition building last week.
The presentation “From
Garden to Kitchen” was given
by Tricia Morris, who used a
food dehydrator to dry herbs
for a no-salt Garlic Herb Butter
with dill, basil, sage, garlic
and chives, dry sweet red pep-
pers and tomatoes with and
without basil, green apples
with cinnamon sprinkles
and sweet tasting pears.
Club President Judy
Jester shared her recipes and
samples of Rosemary, Lemon-
Lavender, Lemon-Thyme and
Mint shortbread cookies.
Senior center
open house
The Delphos Senior
Citizen Center will hold an
open house from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. Tuesday and Wednesday.
Visitors can sign up for
a Chamber Gift Certificate
and those who bring a friend
that has never been to the
center get an additional
chance for the gift certificate.
Seniors will also receive
a newsletter, free gift and
Senior Luncheon Cafe menu.
Punch and cookies
will also be served.
Blood drive
Wednesday
The American Red Cross
will hold a blood drive from 2-7
p.m. Wednesday at the Delphos
Knights of Columbus hall.
Donors must be at least
17 years of age, weigh at
least 110 pounds and be
in good general health.
To make an appointment,
call 1-800-RED CROSS, visit
redcrossblood.org and use the
sponsor code “kofcdel” or text
BLOODAPP to 090999.
Info meeting set
for 2015 trip
There will be an informa-
tional meeting at 7:30 p.m.
on Tuesday in the Delphos
Museum of Postal History,
399 N. Main Street, for those
interested in a 9-day excursion
to the New England states set
for prime fall color in 2015.
There will be a question
and answer session follow-
ing a brief presentation of the
itinerary and travel package
being offered. Light refresh-
ments will be served.
Reservations are appre-
ciated. For additional
information, contact Gary
Levitt at 419-303-5482.
Green Thumbs
enjoy garden
goodies
(DHI Media/Stephanie Groves)
Delphos and Fort Jennings firefighters work on water exercises alongside Putnam County Sheriff’s Office personnel in the
Auglaize River behind Fort Jennings Park Wednesday evening. (DHI Media/Nancy Spencer)
Delphos, Putnam pool resources for training
BY NANCY SPENCER
DHI Media Editor
nspencer@delphosherald.com
FORT JENNINGS — Area
fire and rescue personnel tested
a low head dam in the Auglaize
River Wednesday evening during
water rescue training. Delphos
and Fort Jennings fire depart-
ments and the Putnam County
Sheriff’s Office participated in
the evening of drills at one of
two dams behind Fort Jennings
Park.
“We are working on dam res-
cue and boat control near a dam
tonight,” Putnam County Sheriff
Mike Chandler said. “Right now
the water is down. If there was
another three or four feet in
there, you’d see the guys strug-
gling to keep that boat off the
dam and the water might even
take the front of the boat down
and put them in.”
See WATER, page 3
2 — The Herald Thursday, September 25, 2014
www.delphosherald.com
The Delphos
Herald
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary,
general manager
Delphos Herald, Inc.
Lori Goodwin Silette,
circulation manager
The Delphos Herald
(USPS 1525 8000) is published
daily except Sundays, Tuesdays
and Holidays.
The Delphos Herald is deliv-
ered by carrier in Delphos for
$1.82 per week. Same day
delivery outside of Delphos is
done through the post office
for Allen, Van Wert or Putnam
Counties. Delivery outside of
these counties is $117 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
Periodicals, postage paid at
Delphos, Ohio.

405 North Main St.
TELEPHONE 695-0015
Office Hours
8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes
to THE DELPHOS HERALD,
405 N. Main St.
Delphos, Ohio 45833
For The Record
OBITUARY
TODAY IN HISTORY
FROM THE ARCHIVES
WEATHER
FUNERALS
LOTTERY
LOCAL GRAINS
BIRTHS
CLEVELAND (AP) —
These Ohio lotteries were
drawn Wednesday:
Classic Lotto
0 6 - 1 8 - 2 3 - 2 9 - 3 2 - 4 3 ,
Kicker: 6-1-3-7-2-2
Est. jackpot: $5.5 million
Mega Millions
Est. jackpot: $93 million
Pick 3 Evening
2-9-2
Pick 3 Midday
6-9-8
Pick 4 Evening
0-8-6-6
Pick 4 Midday
5-7-4-3
Pick 5 Evening
8-3-3-0-3
Pick 5 Midday
1-9-9-3-2
Powerball
0 7 - 1 4 - 2 1 - 2 4 - 4 1 ,
Powerball: 26, Power Play: 4
Rolling Cash 5
06-08-34-35-36
Est. jackpot: $221,000
2
POND STOCKING
and SUPPLIES
Fish Pick-up Dates
Sept. 27, & Oct. 4, 11, 18
Amur, minnows, blue tilapia
& other varieties. Aeration
Systems, Windmills, Fountains.
Free Brochure
419-532-2335
remlingerfishfarm.com
West of Kalida on U.S. Route 224
0
0
1
0
1
5
8
1
Delphos Recreation Center Presents
Mel Westrich
Delphos Recreation Center
PBA 50 Tournament
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 26...7 P.M.
Delphos
Recreation Center
939 E. Fifth, Delphos 419-692-2695
www.delphosbowlingalley.com
Sept. 26-27-28
OPEN TO ADULTS • $40
COME BOWL WITH THE SENIOR PROS
Prices good 8am Saturday, September 12 to midnight Sunday, September 13, 2009 at all Chief & Rays Supermarket locations.
Save up to $2.00 lb.
FreshMarket
Sandwich Spread
$
1
99
12 pk.
lb.
lb.
lb.
Double Coupons Every Day • www.ChiefSupermarkets.com
Product of the United States
Save up to $3.00 lb.
Kretschmar
Virginia Brand
Honey Ham
$
3
99
Save up to $1.81
Arps or Dean’s
Cottage Cheese
selected varieties
$
1
68
Save $3.42 on 2
Seyfert’s
Potato Chips
Save up to $1.00
Angelfood
Cake
Iced or Lemon
Angelfood Cake
Save $2.11; select varieties
Super Dip
Ice Cream
Great food. Good neighbor.
$
2
99
8.5-9 oz. ea. 4 qt.
In the Bakery
Sale starts Saturday!
24 oz.
Save up to $5.00 lb.
USDA Choice
Boneless Beef
Ribeye Steak
Regular or Thick Cut
$
6
99
Save $7.96 on 4
All Varieties
Super Chill Soda
2/$
3
16 oz.
Save $1.80 on 3
Flavorite
White Bread
79
¢
Limit 3 - Additionals $1.29
Limit 4 - Additionals 2/$5
95% Fat Free, No MSG, Filler or Gluten
In the Deli
$
1
28
$
3
29
S $2 11 l t i ti
In the Deli
1102 Elida Ave., Delphos • 419-692-5921
www.ChiefSupermarkets.com
www.Facebook.com/ChiefSupermarket
Open: 24 Hours Monday-Friday
Saturday & Sunday: 7am-midnight
Trivia
Answers to Wednesday’s questions:
The closing line of “A Tale of Two Cities,” spoken
by Sydney Carton, is “It is a far, far better thing that
I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest
that I go to than I have ever known.
The three words in the English language that end
in gry are hungry, angry and gry, which is now an
obsolete unit of measure that is equal to 0.008 inch.
Today’s questions:
What is the difference between seraphim and
cherubim?
How do nonchlorine “fabric brighteners” make
clothes brighter?
Answers in Friday’s Herald.
WEATHER FORECAST
Tri-County
Associated Press
TODAY: Mostly sunny. Highs in the mid
70s. East winds around 10 mph.
TONIGHT: Mostly clear. Lows in the
lower 50s. East winds around 10 mph.
FRIDAY: Mostly sunny. Highs in the mid
70s. East winds around 10 mph.
FRIDAY NIGHT: Mostly clear. Lows
in the lower 50s. East winds around 10
mph.
SATURDAY AND SATURDAY NIGHT:
Mostly clear. Highs in the upper 70s. Lows in
the mid 50s.
SUNDAY THROUGH MONDAY: Partly
cloudy. Highs in the upper 70s. Lows in the
upper 50s.
MONDAY NIGHT: Mostly clear. Lows in
the mid 50s.
TUESDAY THROUGH WEDNESDAY:
Partly cloudy. Highs in the mid 70s. Lows in
the mid 50s.
Wheat $4.54
Corn $3.20
Soybeans $8.97
Betty Lou (Conrad)
Watkins
Feb. 8, 1928-Sept. 24, 2014
GOMER — Betty Lou
(Conrad) Watkins, 86, of
Gomer passed away at 5:12
a.m. on Wednesday at Lima
Memorial Health System.
She was born on February
8, 1928, in Monroe Township,
Allen County near Cairo to
Frank and Elva Mae (Long)
Conrad who preceded her in
death.
On Jan. 18, 1948, she was
united in marriage to Willard
D. Watkins., who died on Oct.
22, 2012.
She is survived by one
son, Willard Rodney (Nancy)
Watkins of Gomer; three
daughters, Diana Barnt of
Gomer, Mary Jane (Keaton)
Vandemark of Spring Hope,
North Carolina and Sue
(Jay) Grusenmeyer of Lima;
eight grandsons, Trevor
(Angie) Vandemark, Tyler
(Boots) Vandemark and Dean
(Christina) Vandemark, all
of Spring Home, Cory Barnt
and Jon Grusenmeyer of
Columbus, Tod Grusenmeyer
of New Orleans and Ethan
(Amberly) and Travis Watkins
of Gomer; five great-grand-
children; one step-great-
grandchild; and one special
niece, Donelda M. Conrad.
Betty was also preceded
in death by three brothers,
Delmar, Virgil and Donald
Conrad; and two sisters, Edna
Francis and Mabel Everett.
Betty was a graduate of
Columbus Grove High
School, class of 1946. She was
also a graduate of Fredericks
Beauty Academy, class of
1947. She served as a part-
time postal clerk for 32 years
at the post office in Gomer.
She was a member of Gomer
Congregational Church, serv-
ing as a Deaconess for two
terms and financial secretary
for one term. She served as
secretary of the Allen County
Chapter of the Genealogical
Society and was a holder of
three First Family of Allen
County certificates. Betty vol-
unteered at the Allen County
Museum Library. She enjoyed
doing genealogy, crossword
puzzles and country music.
Funeral services will
be held at 11 a.m. Saturday
at Gomer Congregational
Church, with calling hours
one hour prior to services.
Pastor Jeff Frantz will offici-
ate and burial will follow in
Tawelfan Cemetery.
Visitation will be from 4-8
p.m. on Friday at Harter &
Schier Funeral Home.
Memorial contributions
may be made to the Gomer
Welsh Society of Northwest
Ohio, c/o Mary Alger, 4430
Ridge Road, Elida, OH 45807
or Gomer Congregational
Church, 7350 Gomer Road,
Gomer, OH 45809.
To leave condolences, visit
harterandschier.com.
No injuries in
backing accident
INFORMATION
SUBMITTED
DELPHOS — No injuries
were reported in a two-vehicle
crash reported at 11:34 a.m.
Friday at 127 N. Main St.
Doris Brotherwood, 70, of
Delphos, was traveling west-
bound on East First Street and
was stopped for the traffic signal
at North Main Street when a
vehicle driven by Richard Mauk,
63, of Delphos, backed from a
parking space on First Street and
struck the Brotherwood vehicle.
Mauk was cited for
improper backing.
A boy, Colin William,
was born Sept. 22 at Lima
Memorial Health System to
Chad and Laura Knippen of
Ottoville.
He was welcomed home
by a big sister, Erica.
Grandparents are Don and
Eileen Hoying of Greenville,
Bill and Lynn Knippen of
Bellefontaine and Joyce and
Ted Wilson of Cridersville.
A boy, Caleb Michael, was
born Sept. 7 to Craig and Lisa
Drerup of Pickerington.
He weighed 7 pounds, 10
ounces.
Grandparents are Mark and
Debbie Yates of Pickerington
and Dave and Martha Drerup
of Delphos.
Great-grandmother is
Bernice Drerup of Delphos.
ST. RITA’S
A boy was born Sept. 22 to
Amanda and Luke Smith of
Venedocia.
A boy was born Sept. 23
to Stephanie Hosking and
Lemarr Petty of Delphos.
A girl was born Sept. 23 to
Tessa and Andrew Wehri of
Fort Jennings.
NORWOOD, Sarah
DeWitt, 49, of Detroit,
Michigan, and formerly of
Delphos, memorial service
will begin at 3 p.m. Sunday at
Christian Heritage Fellowship
Church, 10430 Elida Road.
Preferred memorials are to her
family and greatly appreciated
at c/o P.O. Box 443, Delphos
OH 45833.
GUY, Jacob E., 17, of
Ottoville, visitation will be
2-4 p.m. and 5-8 p.m. Friday
at Love-Heitmeyer Funeral
Home, Jackson Township,
16085 State Route 634, Fort
Jennings, and one hour prior
to the service at the church
on Saturday. Further arrange-
ments are under the direction
of Love-Heitmeyer Funeral
Home, Jackson Township.
Condolences can be expressed
at lovefuneralhome.com.
MCGUE, Mary Louise
(Mueller), her friends are
invited to share a celebra-
tion of Mary Lou’s life from
5-7 p.m. Oct. 16 at the Lima
Holiday Inn or at 4:30 p.m.
Oct. 18 in Traverse City,
Michigan, at the Unitarian
Universalist Congregation.
Memorials in her honor
should be directed to the
Grand Traverse County Com-
mission on Aging (520 W.
Front St., Suite B, Traverse
City, 49686).
One Year Ago
Adara Fuerst was the winner in the Junior
Division in the Canal Days Sidewalk Chalk
Art Contest. In the Mini Division, winners
were Charlie North, Grant North, Emma Kill
and Gwen Teman. Winners in the Senior
Division were Gabi Lehmkuhle, Ali and
Sydney Eley and Kylee Moenter.
25 Years Ago – 1989
Kevin Beckmann turned in a personal-best
performance Saturday to lead St. John’s cross
country team to its second straight win at the
Purple and Gold Invitational held at Defiance
College. Beckmann finished eighth overall in
17:24. The Blue Jays took first place in the
20-team field with 107 points edging Antwerp
with 113.
Catholic Daughters of the Americas
opened its new season recently with a potluck
dinner at the Knights of Columbus hall. Court
Delphos sent 28 friendship bags for project
“handclasp” to the San Diego, Calif., Naval
Base warehouse. A thank you letter was read
by Marilyn Wagner, recording secretary. Anna
Jean Bockey and Martha Bockey were intro-
duced as new members of the court.
Fort Jennings Elementary School students
welcomed grandparents and other important
visitors into their classrooms recently. The
day was informal with visitors able to observe
a typical day of instruction. More than 225
grandparents and other guests attended with
more than 141 eating lunch with their grand-
children. Lucille Wallenhorst and Alma Good
were visitors in Andy Bishop’s classroom.
50 Years Ago – 1964
Members of the Martha Circle, Trinity
Methodist Church, met Wednesday at the
home of Mrs. Paul Rozelle, South Franklin
Street, with Mrs. Don Allemeier and Pearl
Leininger serving as assistant hostess. Mrs.
Neil Leininger, circle leader, was in charge
of the meeting. Mrs. James Wiltsie presented
the lesson.
Landeck’s Town Tavern slo-pitch team
defeated Sidney Ready Mix, 7-6, in the cham-
pionship game of the slo-pitch tourney held
at Sidney. The Landeckers scored three runs
in the last of the seventh inning to clinch the
tourney title. Ted Keysor’s home run scored
two of the seven Landeck runs.
In the absence of president John Miller, the
senior vice president, Chester Ashby, presided
at a regular meeting of the Dads of Foreign
Service Veterans Post 201 held Sept. 20 in
the Veterans of Foreign Wars club rooms.
Dads F.S.V. Jr. national vice president, J. D.
McKinney, paid a surprise visit. He said that
former president Dwight D. Eisenhower and
Joseph Kennedy, father of the late President
Kennedy, had been made honorary life mem-
bers of the national organization.
75 Years Ago – 1939
This year’s prospective cage team at Fort
Jennings will go down in the annals of history
– perhaps not for their outstanding basketball
ability but due to the fact that this team is
the first Fort Jennings has ever had. Clarence
Specht, superintendent of the schools at Fort
Jennings, will coach the team. The gymna-
sium in the newly-erected school building is
regarded as one of the best in this section.
Mrs. Robert Wilkins was re-elected as
president of the Delphos Band Mothers at a
meeting of the organization held Monday eve-
ning at Jefferson School. Mrs. J. F. Weideman
was elected vice president, Mrs. York Powell
was named as the new secretary and Mrs.
John Lindeman was re-elected as treasurer.
Plans were completed for the annual rummage
sale which will be held Oct. 21 in the Heiss
Garage building on West Third Street.
Approximately 10 specialty numbers will
be presented by Wally Peters at the Harvest
Moon dance which will be given in St.
John’s auditorium Thursday evening under
the auspices of the CYO of St. John’s parish.
Peters is a talented dancing instructor and
has classes at Van Wert. Music for the danc-
ing will be provided by Norman Geier and
his orchestra.
Associated Press
Today is Thursday, Sept. 25, the
268th day of 2014. There are 97 days
left in the year.
Today’s Highlight in History:
On Sept. 25, 1789, the first United
States Congress adopted 12 amend-
ments to the Constitution and sent them
to the states for ratification. (Ten of the
amendments became the Bill of Rights.)
On this date:
In 1513, Spanish explorer Vasco
Nunez de Balboa crossed the Isthmus of
Panama and sighted the Pacific Ocean.
In 1690, one of the earliest American
newspapers, Publick Occurrences, pub-
lished its first — and last — edition in
Boston.
In 1775, American Revolutionary
War hero Ethan Allen was captured
by the British as he led an attack on
Montreal. (Allen was released by the
British in 1778.)
In 1904, a New York City police
officer ordered a female automobile
passenger on Fifth Avenue to stop smok-
ing a cigarette. (A male companion was
arrested and later fined $2 for “abusing”
the officer.)
In 1919, President Woodrow Wilson
collapsed after a speech in Pueblo,
Colorado, during a national speak-
ing tour in support of the Treaty of
Versailles.
In 1932, the Spanish region of
Catalonia received a Charter of
Autonomy (however, the Charter was
revoked by Francisco Franco at the end
of the Spanish Civil War).
In 1957, nine black students who’d
been forced to withdraw from Central
High School in Little Rock, Arkansas,
because of unruly white crowds were
escorted to class by members of the U.S.
Army’s 101st Airborne Division.
In 1964, the situation comedy
“Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.,” starring Jim
Nabors, premiered on CBS-TV.
In 1974, Los Angeles Dodgers pitch-
er Tommy John underwent an experi-
mental graft reconstruction of the ulnar
collateral ligament in the elbow of his
throwing arm to repair a career-ending
injury; the procedure, which proved suc-
cessful, is now referred to as “Tommy
John surgery.”
In 1978, 144 people were killed when
a Pacific Southwest Airlines Boeing 727
and a private plane collided over San
Diego.
In 1981, Sandra Day O’Connor was
sworn in as the first female justice on the
Supreme Court.
In 1994, Russian President Boris
Yeltsin began a five-day swing through
the United States as he arrived in New
York, hoping to encourage American
investment in his country’s struggling
economy.
Ten years ago: U.S. warplanes,
tanks and artillery repeatedly hit at Abu
Musab al-Zarqawi’s terror network in
the insurgent stronghold of Fallujah,
Iraq. Billionaire oilman, philanthropist
and onetime Fox studios owner Marvin
Davis died in Beverly Hills, California,
at age 79.
Five years ago: President Barack
Obama, British Prime Minister Gordon
Brown and French President Nicolas
Sarkozy, in Pittsburgh for a G-20
summit, accused Iran of constructing
a secret underground uranium enrich-
ment facility and hiding its existence
from international inspectors for years.
Former Democratic Party chairman Paul
G. Kirk Jr. stepped in as the temporary
replacement in the Senate for his long-
time friend, the late Edward Kennedy.
Classical pianist Alicia de Larrocha, 86,
died in Barcelona, Spain.
One year ago: Nearly a dozen of
Syria’s powerful rebel factions, includ-
ing one linked to al-Qaida, formally
broke with the main opposition group
in exile and called for Islamic law in
the country, dealing a severe blow to
the Western-backed coalition. Skipper
Jimmy Spithill and Oracle Team USA
won the America’s Cup with one of the
greatest comebacks in sports history,
speeding past Dean Barker and Emirates
Team New Zealand in the winner-take-
all Race 19 on San Francisco Bay.
Today’s Birthdays: Broadcast jour-
nalist Barbara Walters is 85. Folk sing-
er Ian Tyson is 81. Former Defense
Secretary Robert Gates is 71. Actor Josh
Taylor is 71. Actor Robert Walden is 71.
Actor-producer Michael Douglas is 70.
Model Cheryl Tiegs is 67. Actress Mimi
Kennedy is 65. Actor-director Anson
Williams is 65. Actor Mark Hamill is 63.
Basketball Hall of Famer Bob McAdoo
is 63. Polka bandleader Jimmy Sturr
is 63. Actor Colin Friels is 62. Actor
Michael Madsen is 56. Actress Heather
Locklear is 53. Actress Aida Turturro
is 52. Actor Tate Donovan is 51. TV
personality Keely Shaye Smith is 51.
Basketball Hall of Famer Scottie Pippen
is 49. Actor Jason Flemyng is 48. Actor
Will Smith is 46. Actor Hal Sparks is 45.
Actress Catherine Zeta-Jones is 45. Rock
musician Mike Luce (Drowning Pool) is
43. Actress Bridgette Wilson-Sampras
is 41. Actress Clea DuVall is 37. Actor
Robbie Jones is 37. Actor Joel David
Moore is 37. Actor Chris Owen is 34.
Rapper T. I. is 34. Actor Van Hansis is
33. Actor Lee Norris is 33. Actor/rapper
Donald Glover (AKA Childish Gambino)
is 31. Singer Diana Ortiz (Dream) is 29.
Actress Emmy Clarke is 23.
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The Area’s N
ew
est Buy H
ere, Pay H
ere Dealership
242 North Main St. Ph. 419-692-0921
Open evenings til 6:30; Sat. til 5
Delphos Hardware
New items: Large pumpkins
Mini pumpkins
Gourds • Indian Corn
Fall Bulbs
Great New Selection!
to plant now for spring blooms!
More DIFFERENT KINDS in stock
Thursday, September 25, 2014 The Herald –3
STATE/LOCAL
www.delphosherald.com
BRIEFS
Virus behind
respiratory
illness confirmed
COLUMBUS (AP) —
Health officials say two hos-
pitals in Ohio have confirmed
cases of an uncommon virus
causing severe respiratory ill-
ness for children in about two
dozen states.
Columbus Public Health
says the Centers for Disease
Control and Prevention con-
firmed the germ, entero-
virus 68, in samples from
Nationwide Children’s
Hospital.
An Ohio Public Health
spokeswoman also says at
least one sample from Akron
Children’s Hospital tested
positive for the germ.
The Ohio Department
of Health says the state has
seen increased respiratory ill-
ness cases, especially in chil-
dren. Samples also have been
sent to the CDC from hospi-
tals in Chillicothe, Cincinnati,
Cleveland, Coldwater, Dayton,
Gallipolis, Lima and Sandusky.
The virus can cause coldlike
symptoms. It’s an uncommon
strain of a common family of
viruses that typically hit from
summertime through the fall.
ODH: Avoid mosquito-
borne illnesses
INFORMATION SUBMITTED
COLUMBUS — While the risk of contracting
mosquito-borne illnesses may be low, the Ohio
Department of Health (ODH) is reminding Ohioans
about how to avoid mosquito bites and the pos-
sibility of such diseases. Cases of mosquito-borne
diseases in Ohio typically occur in late summer
and early fall when mosquitoes are most abundant.
Diseases that individuals can contract from
infected mosquitoes in Ohio include West Nile
virus (WNV), Eastern Equine Encephalitis (EEE),
La Crosse Encephalitis (LAC) and St. Louis
Encephalitis (SLE). Ohio currently has six con-
firmed cases of WNV, including one death. Three
horses in Ashtabula County and one in Trumbull
County recently tested positive for EEE – but
such infections in people are rare, and Ohio has
no confirmed human EEE cases. Two children in
Athens County are suspected to have contracted
LAC and are being treated while testing is under
way. Ohio has no confirmed cases of SLE.
Individuals may contract these diseases if bit-
ten by an infected mosquito. These diseases can-
not be transmitted from person-to-person, and
EEE cannot be transmitted from horse-to-person.
“While the risk of contracting these mosquito-
borne illnesses may be low, it’s a good idea to
take precautions to reduce the likelihood of get-
ting mosquito bites,” said Dr. Mary DiOrio, ODH
State Epidemiologist.
These precautions include:
— When outdoors, use insect repellent that
contains an EPA-registered active ingredient such
as DEET or picardin on exposed skin and on
clothing. On children, use insect repellents that
have no more than 10 percent DEET.
— Avoid being outside during dawn and dusk.
— Wear light-colored long sleeves, pants, and
socks.
— Eliminate all standing water from flower
pots, buckets, and barrels to prevent mosquitoes
from breeding in stagnant water.
— Change bird bath water weekly.
— Make sure all window and door screens are
in good repair.
— Keep gutters clean and free of debris.
Most people infected with mosquito-borne
viruses show no symptoms. However, some peo-
ple may have a mild fever, headache and muscle
aches that will last up to a week. A small number
of infected people may develop severe illness
requiring hospitalization, with symptoms includ-
ing confusion, weakness, stiff neck, tremors and
convulsions.
New cases of such diseases confrmed in
northeastern Ohio; Suspected in southeastern
Prepare for upcoming
Medicare open enrollment
INFORMATION SUBMITTED
COLUMBUS – A free Ohio Department
of Insurance educational program that helped
Ohioans with Medicare save a record $16.4
million last year is holding events across Ohio
now and through the Oct. 15 to Dec. 7 annual
open enrollment period, Lieutenant Governor
and Department of Insurance Director Mary
Taylor said. The events are intended to help
people better understand their Medicare cov-
erage options.
The Department’s Ohio Senior Health
Insurance Information Program (OSHIIP)
will visit Henry County to hold a presen-
tation-only Medicare Check-up Day event
on Tuesdayat 1 p.m. at the Henry County
Senior Center, located at 130 E. Clinton St.
in Napoleon.
“Our aggressive statewide efforts have begun
and we are excited to help Ohioans as they make
decisions about Medicare coverage,” Taylor
said. “We are doing Check-up Day events in
every county to make it easier for Ohioans to
access the information they need.”
OSHIIP is Medicare’s designated free and
impartial educational and enrollment assis-
tance program in the state for those utilizing
Medicare, family members and health care
professionals. At the Check-up Day event,
attendees can learn about recent Medicare
changes, such as the new deductibles, co-
pay, and coinsurance amounts, the Medicare
Advantage and Part D plan options (begin-
ning in October), and about financial assis-
tance programs, such as extra help with
prescription costs and for Part B premium
savings.
Taylor encourages Ohioans satisfied with
their current Medicare plan to still com-
parison shop coverage for 2015 because plan
costs and benefits can change. She said
people comparing Medicare coverage should
ensure a plan’s covered drugs include their
needed prescriptions and to consider the con-
venience of having pharmacies in network
near where they live. It’s also important to
consider all out-of-pocket expenses before
making a decision.
Ohioans should watch for high pressure,
and predatory sales practices, such as indi-
viduals claiming to be Medicare representa-
tives, Taylor said.
The non-profit Pro Seniors and its fraud-
fighting Ohio Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP)
will be present at the Check-Day events to
encourage people on Medicare to protect their
Medicare card, and explain how to detect
fraudulent behavior and report issues to the
SMP. If you suspect wrongdoing or have been
victimized, call the Department’s Fraud and
Enforcement hotline at 800-686-1527 or the
SMP at 800-488-6070.
Ohioans can visit www.medicare.gov to
enroll into Medicare coverage. A Check-up
Days schedule and other Medicare informa-
tion is available at www.insurance.ohio.gov.
Call the OSHIIP hotline at 800-686-1578 and
800-MEDICARE (800-633-4227) for assis-
tance. Ohioans can also find OSHIIP on
Facebook.
Free Medicare Check-
up Day event coming to
Henry County on Tuesday
(Continued from page 1)
Mercer County retains the
honor of the lowest jobless
rate in Ohio at 3.0 percent.
Putnam is now the sixth-
lowest, followed by Van Wert
(17), Paulding (20) and Allen
(45) out of the 88 counties in
the state. Despite a 1.5-percent
drop in their unemployment
rate, Monroe County main-
tained the worst employment
numbers with 10.7 percent of
the labor force out of work.
Following Monroe were
Meigs (8.1%), Pike (7.8%),
Scioto (7.6%) and Jefferson
(7.2%) counties.
The number of people in the
labor force total will remain
key in the movement of the
unemployment rate in the
future. For example, while the
August 2014 labor force in Van
Wert County equaled 14,100,
the number stood at 16,200 in
August 2009 at the height of
the recession, a difference of
2,100 potential workers.
Drop
(Continued from page 1)
Chandler said he’s seen
cases where an outboard
motor would just barely keep
a rescue boat stable near dam.
The men were working with a
rope and pulley system using
snap hooks.
Delphos Fire Chief Kevin
Streets and several of his crew
provided the boat and other
equipment for the exercise
with the counties on standby.
Delphos has had a water res-
cue unit for more than 20
years and it was put into action
five times in the last three
years — twice in Ottoville
and on one occasion each in
Willshire, Middle Point and
Putnam County during flood
situations.
Wednesday’s training
brings the number of person-
nel on the Delphos squad
equipped to deal with water
rescue to 80 percent. The unit
has four trained divers along-
side five in Putnam County.
Putnam County started the
first team in the area in the
1980s.
“We are getting to the point
now where we can cover all
three counties with water
rescue,” Streets said. “Allen
County has a unit as well.”
Captain Lee Ulm heads
the unit that is equipped with
a 21-foot trailer, a boat, dry
suits and other gear. He said
there are two things with
water rescue.
“The first thing you have
to look at is the risk versus
the benefit,” Lee began. “Is
it worth risking one of my
people to perform the rescue?
It is feasible. Can it work?”
He said the second is just
as hard to think about.
“You have to plan to fail.
Water rescue is the second
most dangerous job; dive res-
cue is the first,” he said. “You
have to go through a lot train-
ing and keep training. Water is
unforgiving.”
Water
(Continued from page 1)
Association members and local volunteers will meet at 8:30 a.m. Saturday at the vacant
grass lot north of the Fort Jennings State Bank at the corner of Main (US 224) and West Canal
Streets in Ottoville.
NLPD is coordinated by The National Environmental Education Foundation (NEEF) the
nation’s leading organization in lifelong environmental learning, connecting people to knowl-
edge they use to improve the quality of their lives and the health of the planet.
NLPD celebrates the work, play and learning that takes place on public lands each day and
brings together thousands of volunteers from coast to coast to improve and restore the lands
and facilities that Americans use for recreation, education, exercise and just plain enjoyment.
Eight federal agencies will participate along with more than 250 state, county, and city
partners and a host of nonprofit groups, including the Student Conservation Association, The
Corps Network, Boy Scouts of America, Girl Scouts of the USA. Toyota Motor Sales, USA,
Inc. is the event’s national corporate sponsor for the 16th consecutive year.
For more information, call Sam Bonifas at 419-236-6924 or visit delphos@buckeyetrail.org.
Trails
“Like” The
Delphos Herald
on Facebook
Do You Prepare
More for Family
Vacations Than
You Do for College?
For a free, personalized college cost report,
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expenses at more than 3,000 schools and then recommend a
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are great. But graduation ceremonies are even better.
www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
Corey Norton
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
Are your stock, bond or other certificates in a
safety deposit box, desk drawer or closet ... or
are you not sure at the moment?
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Call or visit your local Edward Jones
financial advisor today.
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OPR-1850-A Member SIPC
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
Corey Norton
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
Are your stock, bond or other certificates in a
safety deposit box, desk drawer or closet ... or
are you not sure at the moment?
A lost or destroyed certificate can mean
inconvenience and lost money for you and your
heirs. Let Edward Jones hold them for you.
You still retain ownership and make all the
decisions – while we handle all the paperwork.
We’ll automatically process dividend and interest
payments, mergers, splits, bond calls or maturi-
ties, and more. Even better, you’ll receive a
consolidated account statement and a single form
at tax time.
You Put Them In a Safe Place.
Now, Where Was That?
Call or visit your local Edward Jones
financial advisor today.
www.edwardjones.com
OPR-1850-A Member SIPC
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
Corey Norton
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC
Having More Retirement
Accounts is Not the Same
as Having More Money.
When it comes to the number of retirement
accounts you have, the saying “more is better” is
not necessarily true. In fact, if you hold multiple
accounts with various brokers, it can be difcult to
keep track of your investments and to see if you’re
properly diversified.* At the very least, multiple
accounts usually mean multiple fees.
Bringing your accounts to Edward Jones could
help solve all that. Plus, one statement can make it
easier to see if you’re moving toward your goals.
*Diversification does not guarantee a profit or protect against loss.
To learn why consolidating your
retirement accounts to Edward Jones
makes sense, call your local financial
advisor today.
IRT-1435B-A
Corey Norton
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
To learn more why consolidating our retirement accounts to
Edward Jones makes sense, call your local fnancial advisor today.
www.edwardjones.com
Member SIPC
Having More Retirement
Accounts is Not the Same
as Having More Money.
When it comes to the number of retirement
accounts you have, the saying “more is better” is
not necessarily true. In fact, if you hold multiple
accounts with various brokers, it can be difcult to
keep track of your investments and to see if you’re
properly diversified.* At the very least, multiple
accounts usually mean multiple fees.
Bringing your accounts to Edward Jones could
help solve all that. Plus, one statement can make it
easier to see if you’re moving toward your goals.
*Diversification does not guarantee a profit or protect against loss.
To learn why consolidating your
retirement accounts to Edward Jones
makes sense, call your local financial
advisor today.
IRT-1435B-A
Corey Norton
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
Andy North
Financial Advisor
.
1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
Adam has over 10 years of experience specializing
in Individual and Small Business Taxes.
Hellman
Nomina
CPA
HN
is proud to announce
Adam J. Kruse, CPA
has joined the staff.
419-692-3637
202 N. Main St. • Delphos
John Nomina • Steve Hellman • Adam Kruse
4 – The Herald Thursday, September 25, 2014 www.delphosherald.com
AGRIBUSINESS
Spiny amaranth found near Continental
BY JAMES HOORMAN
Putnam County Extension Ag Educator
news@delphosherald.com
A nasty noxious weed was discovered in
Putnam County last week near Continental
called Spiny amaranth.
It is a close relative of an even worse
weed called Palmer amaranth.
Spiny amaranth, sometimes called spiny
pigweed, is a troublesome weed of veg-
etables, row crops and pastures. Its sharp
spines, which deter grazing and interfere
with manual weeding and harvest, have
earned spiny amaranth designation as the
world’s 15th worst agricultural weed (Holm
et al., 1991).
Spiny amaranth is an erect, often bushy,
branched summer annual, growing to
heights of 2–5 feet. Stems and leaves are
smooth and hairless, sometimes shiny in
appearance. Each leaf node along the stem
bears a pair of rigid, sharp spines ~0.5 inch
long. Like other pigweeds, spiny amaranth
develops a strong taproot with a network
of fibrous feeder roots. The taproot may or
may not be distinctly reddish in color.
Spiny amaranth thrives in loamy soils
high in organic matter and nitrogen (N) and
can produce up to 235,000 seeds per plant
(Holm et al., 1991).
In cooler regions, spiny amaranth does
not grow as rapidly as other pigweeds. The
seeds of spiny amaranth are very small
(~0.03 inch diameter), which is smaller
than the seeds of some other pigweeds
(Uva et al., 1997).
Seeds may be carried by wind, water
or animal manure. Cottonseed meal pur-
chased from the South can be infested with
Palmer and or Spiny Amaranth seed. Spiny
amaranth is most likely to cause yield
losses in shorter crops that cannot shade
out the weed. Spiny amaranth is generally
glyphosate-resistant but herbicides such as
Dicamba (Banvel, Clarity), 2-4D, Liberty
and ALS herbicides (Classic, Pursuit,
Sceptor) have been found to be effective.
Spiny amaranth is bad but farmers
who find even one Palmer amaranth weed
in their farm fields need to pull up the
this damaging weed immediately, said Dr.
Mark Loux, Ohio State University’s Weed
Specialist. Palmer amaranth, a glyphosate-
resistant weed has already started show-
ing up in Ohio fields. Because of its fast
growth (3 inches per day), herbicide resis-
tance and ability to destroy entire crops,
Ohio growers are going to have to take a
zero tolerance approach to prevent Palmer
amaranth’s further spread across the state.
“We’ve already identified Palmer ama-
ranth in multiple sites in Ohio, ranging
from a few plants to one site that had
multiple plants on several fields,” Loux
said. “This weed has more potential to
impact the profitability of our corn and
soybean production than any of our other
resistance weed problems.”
At this point, Palmer amaranth has been
found in southern Ohio, near Portsmouth
and in Madison County, and in several
northeast Ohio counties. If growers take
aggressive action now, the weed’s spread
statewide can be lessened. If it takes hold,
Palmer amaranth could become even
harder to control than the glyphosate-
resistant weeds already in Ohio, Loux
said. The weed has caused entire cotton
and soybean fields to be mowed down in
some Southern states.
An Arkansas cotton field study where
20,000 Palmer seeds were planted the
first year infested 20 percent of the entire
area in the second growing season, Loux
said. By the third growing season, Palmer
amaranth had completely colonized the
fields, making cotton harvest impossible,
he said.
“Prevention requires that not even a
single plant be allowed to go to seed,”
he said.
Palmer amaranth, which can grow 3
inches a day, can release nearly a half-
million seeds per plant. And because
the weed is glyphosate-resistant, many
growers in Southern states, in addition to
spraying, have had to hire workers to go
into their fields to chop down the weeds
with hoes and pull them by hand, Loux
said.
The best thing farmers can do is scout
their fields before it produces seed and
pull them out. Growers with fields that
have been spread with manure from ani-
mal operations using cottonseed products
as a feed need to be particularly aware, as
this manure may contain Palmer amaranth
seed and/or Spiny Amaranth seed.
The potential financial impact for
growers is a resistance weed problem
with high yield losses because the weed
couldn’t be controlled, Loux said, along
with permanently higher weed manage-
ment costs. Growers could find them-
selves in a position of having to pay an
additional $15 to $30 an acre to control
Palmer amaranth, and in some cases even
higher costs have been incurred, ranging
from $20 to $40 per acre.
See more at: agfax.com/2014/05/15/
ohi o- pr event i ng- spr ead- pal mer- ama-
r ant h- r equi r es - 0- t ol er ance/ #s t has h.
N0qHVe4R.dpuf.
State veterinarian: 4
horses die of virus
COLUMBUS (AP) — The
state veterinarian says four
horses in northeast Ohio have
died of eastern equine enceph-
alitis, a mosquito-borne illness
that also can affect humans.
Dr. Tony Forshey says the
horses were from Ashtabula
and Trumbull counties. He’s
urging horse owners to contact
their veterinarians to ensure
that animals’ EEE vaccines
and boosters are up to date.
The virus attacks an ani-
mal’s central nervous system.
Symptoms can include erratic
behavior, loss of coordination
and seizures. It can cause seri-
ous illness in other animals as
well as humans.
Ohio’s departments of agri-
culture and health say they are
monitoring the outbreak.
The state says there are no
confirmed human cases asso-
ciated with the illness in Ohio.
Officials are encouraging resi-
dents to protect themselves by
using mosquito repellant and
getting rid of standing water.
Spiny amaranth is often bushy, branched summer annual, growing to heights
of 2–5 feet. Stems and leaves are smooth and hairless, sometimes shiny in ap-
pearance. (Submitted photos)
Spiny amaranth develops a taproot with a network of fibrous feeder roots. The
taproot may or may not be distinctly reddish in color.
Agriculture fertilizer training course scheduled for Friday
INFORMATION SUBMITTED
COLUMBUS — State Representative Tony Burkley
(R-Payne) announced that the Ohio Department of
Agriculture (ODA) and The Ohio State University (OSU)
will hold a training course locally for the newly created
Agricultural Fertilizer Applicator Certification Program.
Meetings have already taken place in Hancock and Fulton
counties.
Senate Bill 150, which was signed into law in May of this
year, requires farmers with 50 or more acres to attend a course
on fertilizer application.
“I encourage farmers in the 82
nd
House District to
attend this informational and practical class on fertil-
izer application,” Rep. Burkley said. “We have the
opportunity to learn new and improved farming prac-
tices in order to limit costs and protect the environment.
By working together with experts, state officials and
fellow farmers, we can make changes that benefit Ohio
and its future.”
The training class, which is in conjunction with OSU
Extension, is scheduled from 8:30–11:30 a.m. Friday at the
OSU Extension Office, 503 Fairgrounds Drive, Paulding,
OH 45879.
For more information regarding these training class-
es, please visit www.agri.ohio.gov or call 614-728-
6200.
Ban sought on children working on tobacco farms
WASHINGTON (AP) — Thirty-five
House Democrats are urging the Obama
administration to prohibit children from
working on tobacco farms, citing con-
cerns about ill health effects.
The lawmakers, led by Reps. David
Cicilline, D-R.I., and Matt Cartwright,
D-Pa., made their plea in a letter to
Labor Secretary Thomas Perez. A
copy of the letter was obtained by The
Associated Press on Tuesday.
In 2012, the Labor Department with-
drew a proposed rule that would have
banned children under 16 from sev-
eral kinds of agriculture work, including
tobacco farms. In their letter, the law-
makers, all Democrats, urged a narrower
ban that would deal solely with children
on tobacco farms.
The letter doesn’t specify an age
limit, but a spokesman for Cicilline
said he and other lawmakers would
prefer the ban apply to children under
18. Cicilline has a bill in Congress that
would amend the Fair Labor Standards
Act of 1938 to ban kids under 18 from
jobs where they have direct contact with
tobacco plants or leaves.
The lawmakers cited a Human Rights
Watch report issued in May which said
nearly three-quarters of the children it
interviewed reported vomiting, nausea
and headaches while working on tobac-
co farms. Those symptoms are consis-
tent with nicotine poisoning often called
green tobacco sickness, which occurs
when workers absorb nicotine through
their skin while handling tobacco plants.
The report was based on interviews
with more than 140 children working
on farms in North Carolina, Kentucky,
Tennessee and Virginia, where a major-
ity of the country’s tobacco is grown.
“Children working in tobacco are
among the nation’s most vulnerable and
we must do more to protect them,”
wrote the lawmakers, who called the
Human Rights Watch report “deeply
troubling.”
The Labor Department declined
comment.
Thursday, September 25, 2014 The Herald – 5
COMMUNITY
LANDMARK
www.delphosherald.com
CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
Happy
Birthday
Delphos St. John
Elementary School
Kitchen
Press
Kitchen
Press
SENIOR LUNCHEON CAFE
THRIFT SHOP WORKERS
TODAY
9-11 a.m. — The Delphos
Canal Commission Museum,
241 N. Main St., is open.
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. — The
Delphos Museum of Postal
History, 339 N. Main St., is
open.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff St.
3-7 p.m. — The Interfaith
Thrift Store is open for shop-
ping.
7:30 p.m. — American
Legion Post 268, 415 N. State
St.
FRIDAY
7:30 a.m. — Delphos
Optimist Club, A&W Drive-
In, 924 E. Fifth St.
10 a.m. to 3 p.m. — The
Delphos Museum of Postal
History, 339 N. Main St., is
open.
11:30 a.m. — Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff St.
1-4 p.m. — Interfaith Thrift
Store is open for shopping.
Salsa Sensational
2 14-1/2 ounce cans Hunt’s
Choice-Cut Diced Tomatoes, 1 can
drained
1/4 cup sliced green onion (white
and green portions)
3 tablespoons chopped onion
2 tablespoons chopped fresh
cilantro (optional)
1 tablespoon diced green chiles
2 teaspoons diced canned or fresh
jalapeño peppers, seeds included
1 1/2 teaspoons sugar
1 teaspoon crushed fresh garlic
1/4 teaspoon each: salt, ground
cumin, and hot pepper sauce
Baked tortilla chips or cut fresh
vegetables
In medium bowl combine toma-
toes and next 10 ingredients, ending
with hot pepper sauce. Cover and
refrigerate at least 2 hours or over-
night. Remove a half hour before
serving. Stir once before serving
and serve with chips or vegetables.
San Antonio Squash Casserole
6 tablespoons butter, divided
1 medium onion, coarsely
chopped
1 small red pepper, coarsely
chopped
1 small green bell pepper, coarse-
ly chopped
2 jalapenos, seeded and finely
diced
2 pounds yellow squash, sliced,
steamed, drained and cooled
1 cup diced pasteurized prepared
cheese produce
1/2 cup shredded Cheddar cheese
1/2 cup shredded Monterey Jack
cheese
1 teaspoon kosher salt
1/2 teaspoon ground black pep-
per
2-1/2 cups crumbled round but-
tery crackers
Preheat oven to 325 degrees.
Spray a 2-quart baking dish with
nonstick cooking spray; set aside.
In a large pan, melt 3 table-
spoons butter over medium heat.
Add onion, red bell pepper and
green bell pepper; cook, stirring fre-
quently, until tender. Add jalapeno;
cook for 5 minutes. Stir in squash.
Fold in cheeses, salt and pepper.
Spoon squash mixture into pre-
pared baking dish; sprinkle with
crackers. Melt remaining 3 table-
spoons butter, and drizzle over
crackers. Bake for 20 minutes or
until hot and bubbly. Cool for 10
minutes before serving. Makes 8
servings.
If you enjoyed these recipes,
made changes or have one to share,
email kitchenpress@yahoo.com.
SEPT. 29-Oct. 3
MONDAY: Beef Manhattan,
mixed vegetables, fruit, coffee and 2
percent milk.
TUESDAY: Hamburger on bun,
sweet potato fries, broccoli-raisin
salad, brownie, coffee and 2 percent
milk.
WEDNESDAY: Baked chicken,
mashed potatoes, California-blend
veggies, bread, margarine, Mandarin
oranges, coffee and 2 percent milk.
THURSDAY: Turkey breast,
mashed potatoes, cauliflower, dinner
roll, margarine, dreamcicle dessert,
coffee and 2 percent milk.
FRIDAY: Ham salad sandwich,
pickled beets, fruit, coffee and 2
percent milk.
Sept. 25-27
THURSDAY: Sue Vasquez, Eloise Shumaker, Ruth Calvelage, Lyn
Rhoads and Diane Kimmett; Annex — Dolly Mesker and Sharon
Wannemacker.
FRIDAY: Eloise Shumaker, Joyce Feathers and Judy Kundert; Annex
— Lyn Rhoads and Sharon Wannemacker.
SATURDAY: Valeta Ditto, Norma Vonderembse, Mary Lou Schulte and
Irene Calvelage; Annex — Sandy Hahn and June Rode.
THRIFT SHOP HOURS: 3-7 p.m. Thursday; 1-4 p.m. Friday; and 9
a.m.-noon Saturday.
To volunteer, contact Volunteer Coordinator Barb Haggard at the Thrift
Shop at 419-692-2942 between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m.
September’s ending
with salsa and
squash casserole
SEPT. 26
Steve Peters
Nikki Taylor
Linda Martin
Darren Edinger
Sonya Roeder
Check us out online: delphosherald.com
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JIM METCALFE
Metcalfe’s
Musings
Golf Glance
See MUSINGS, page 7
Life’s hard lessons learned
By JIM METCALFE
DHI Media Sports Editor
jmetcalfe@delphosherald.com
Life has a way of getting our attention, doesn’t it?
I was going to write a whimsical column — musings,
get it? — but other things present themselves for further
exploration.
I didn’t know Jacob E. Guy, the Ottoville High School
student who lost his life Monday in an auto accident.
However, many others did and they have been in
mourning ever since — and likely will be for some time
to come.
The sports teams at Ottoville decided to not play their
games/matches that day in honor of his passing.
When it all is said and done, a sports event and a life
— especially of someone that is supposed to have their
whole lives in front of them — don’t even come close to
comparing as to their importance and that is one lesson
those youngsters had to learn the hard way.
Think about it: some of us adults still haven’t learned
that lesson in its entirety.
It isn’t always easy.
I realize my job is dependent on 15-, 16-, 17- and
18-year-olds playing a game to the best of their abilities
and hopefully playing it well.
I don’t have any children, so I can only imagine the pain
and hurt that his family is going through but I think I can
write that they are not alone in this; a whole community
— in a way, even a county — is behind you in your pain.
Associated Press
PGA OF AMERICA/EUROPEAN
TOUR
RYDER CUP
Site: Gleneagles, Scotland.
Schedule: Friday-Sunday.
Course: Gleneagles Resort, PGA
Centenary Course (7,243 yards, par 72).
Television: Golf Channel (Friday, 2:30
a.m.-1 p.m., 6 p.m.-midnight; Saturday,
3-11:30 a.m., 8 p.m.-1 a.m.; Sunday,
7-11:30 a.m., 7 p.m.-1 a.m.) and NBC
(Saturday, 4:37 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sunday, 7
a.m.-1 p.m.).
Format: Team match play. Friday-
Saturday, four morning fourball (better-
ball) matches, four afternoon foursomes
(alternate-shot) matches; Sunday, 12
singles matches.
United States (c-captain’s pick):
c-Keegan Bradley, Rickie Fowler, Jim
Furyk, Zach Johnson, Matt Kuchar,
c-Hunter Mahan, Phil Mickelson, Patrick
Reed, c-Webb Simpson, Jordan Spieth,
Jimmy Walker, Bubba Watson. Captain:
Tom Watson.
Europe: Thomas Bjorn, Denmark;
Jamie Donaldson, Wales; Victor
Dubuisson, France; c-Stephen Gallacher,
Scotland; Sergio Garcia, Spain; Martin
Kaymer, Germany; Graeme McDowell,
Northern Ireland; Rory McIlroy, Northern
Ireland; c-Ian Poulter, England; Justin
Rose, England; Henrik Stenson, Sweden;
c-Lee Westwood, England. Captain: Paul
McGinley, Ireland.
Last matches: Europe won 14 1/2-13
1/2 at Medinah in Illinois, overcoming a
10-6 deficit. Poulter led Europe with a 4-0
record and Kaymer won the point needed
to retain the cup, holing a 6-foot par putt
on the 18th hole to beat Steve Stricker.
See GOLF, page 7
A strength vs. a weakness in UC-OSU matchup
By RUSTY MILLER
Associated Press
COLUMBUS — It’s unlikely that anyone at Ohio State last
winter had ever heard of Gunner Kiel.
Now the unique moniker of the Cincinnati quarterback is
on every Buckeye’s lips.
“It’s one of those names,” linebacker Joshua Perry said. “It’s
like (with a name like) Gunner, he’ll throw the ball around.”
Kiel and his pass-happy Bearcats (2-0) come to
Ohio Stadium on Saturday night to provide a daunting
challenge for 22nd-ranked Ohio State and a defense
that has had troubles with throwing teams in the past
and is hoping to prove it has found a solution.
It’ll be an interesting matchup. The Buckeyes
(2-1) will try to get to Kiel before he can duplicate his
incredible numbers from his debut three weeks ago.
And Kiel will try to pick his spots against a young
Ohio State secondary that has yet to be really tested.
After surrendering 38.33 points and 380 passing yards per game
in the final three games a year ago, Ohio State replaced safeties
coach and co-defensive coordinator Everett Withers, who took
the head coaching job at James Madison, with Chris Ash, who
completely rethought and rebuilt the defensive philosophy. The
Buckeyes, supposedly, are more aggressive and less reactive on
defense, although that hasn’t been apparent in the first three games.
Now it’s time to find out whether the new approach works.
“This team is a real legitimate throwing team,” head coach
Urban Meyer said. “This will be a giant test for us.”
There are good reasons why everyone is talking about
Kiel, a 6-4 sophomore out of Columbus, Indiana. He leads
the Football Bowl Subdivision in points responsible for per
game, 30 a contest. In his two career starts, he has completed
50-of-76 passes for 689 yards and 10 touchdowns, including a
glittering 25-of-37 for 418 yards and a school-record tying six
touchdowns in a 58-34 win over Toledo in his debut.
“He’s a guy who has a lot of confidence and looks through
all his reads,” said Ohio State cornerback Doran Grant, who’ll
likely see a lot of Kiel’s passes on Saturday. “He’s a
talented guy. He didn’t play much last year, so we’ll
see what he’s got.”
Safety Tyvis Powell added, “For the secondary,
this is big. Because this is the best quarterback with
the best wide-receiver group we’re going to see all
season. So this is the best time to show the fans that
the pass defense has improved.”
Of course, the Buckeyes are well aware it’s not just
the secondary that’s under the microscope. The line has to apply
some pressure and the linebackers must do their part, too.
“We’ve got to make him feel uncomfortable,” said tackle
Adolphus Washington, a Cincinnati native. “We’ve got to
make him move around a little bit so he can’t just stand there
and lock onto a target and get the ball down the field on us.”
Perry seconded that.
“We’ve got to put some pressure on him,” he added. “We’ll
have to find some new ways to maybe get after him a little
bit so they can’t throw the ball out to some of those receivers.
Hopefully, the stadium will be a little loud and get in his head.”
Bengals kickers divided on UC/OSU game
By JOE KAY
Associated Press
CINCINNATI — The Bengals’ kickers
have divided loyalties heading into their bye
weekend. One thing is known: Either
punter Kevin Huber or kicker Mike
Nugent is about to have an embar-
rassing photo posted the next time
they get together.
Huber went to the University of
Cincinnati. Nugent was the kicker
on Ohio State’s national champion-
ship team in 2002. There’s no way
that they were going to take the high
road with their schools playing on
Saturday in Columbus.
One of them is going to end up
looking bad. Publicly.
“Whoever loses, there’s going to
be something on Twitter,” Nugent
said. “That’s all I can say at this
point. I’ve got to leave some build-up
for you guys.
“We have a good Twitter bet going.
We didn’t want to do anything money-
wise, we want it to be more pride and
maybe have to do something to sup-
port the other team if you lose.”
The game will be front-and-center
this weekend with the Bengals (3-0)
on their bye week. Nugent will be
at a friend’s wedding and won’t get to
see the game but plans to keep up on it
through text updates from friends.
Their bet will be settled when they get
back together Monday in Cincinnati and begin
preparation for a Sunday night game in New
England.
It’ll be only the fifth time since 1931
that Ohio State (2-1) and Cincinnati (2-0)
have played in football but it’s a
game that has a lot riding on it.
The Buckeyes haven’t lost to an
in-state school since a 7-6 defeat
against Oberlin in 1921. They’ve
gone 44 games without such a loss.
Cincinnati came the closest to
ending the streak. Playing at the
Bengals’ Paul Brown Stadium in
2002, the Bearcats dropped two
passes in the end zone during the
closing minutes, allowing Ohio
State to hold on for a 23-19 win.
Ohio State went on to win the
national championship.
“Oh my gosh, I think it came
down to the last play five or six
games that season,” Nugent said.
“One of those things that we could
lose it here or we could win it
here and move on. That was at the
point in college where if you lose
one game, your chances of going
to the national championship are
pretty slim.”
Paul Brown Stadium was a
grass field back then, in only its
third season. There were so many
problems with the grass — it pulled
loose from a sandy base very easily — that it
was eventually replaced with artificial turf.
Haden looks to rebound after slow start
BEREA (AP) — For
the first time in his career,
Browns Pro Bowl cornerback
Joe Haden is facing questions
about his play on the field.
“I’m one of my biggest
critics and I know that I
haven’t been playing up to
my ability,” Haden said. “I’m
down, I feel like I could play
better. I know I could play
better.”
The latest example: In
Cleveland’s 23-21 loss on
Sunday to the Ravens, Haden
allowed a 32-yard catch by
veteran wide receiver Steve
Smith late in the fourth quar-
ter, setting up Baltimore’s
game-winning field goal.
“It was unfortunate that
it happened because we’re
in a bottom-line business,”
Browns coach Mike Pettine
said. “Joe, for the most part
throughout the game, played
very well.”
“That’s life in the NFL.”
And cornerback is one of
the most bottom-line posi-
tions in the sport.
Either you make the right
play or you make a wide
receiver look great.
“Being in man-to-man
press, you’ve got to be ready
for the ball to come at you at
all times,” Haden said. “You
can play linebacker
and miss a gap a
little bit. You can
play D-tackle and
get moved out of
your gap. You’re at
corner, every single
play matters.”
And when you’re
considered one of
the best corners in
the league, any mis-
takes you make are
amplified.
But Haden has already
faced some of the top receiv-
ers this season.
In addition to Smith’s
101-yard day last week, the
Steelers’ Antonio Brown had
116 yards and a score against
the Browns in Week 1. And
Saints tight end Jimmy
Graham scored on Haden in
Week 2.
If Haden, in his fifth sea-
son, is going to remain one of
the best corners in the league,
he’ll have to play his best in
the key moments of games.
“He’s played well at times
but as you can see,
at some inoppor-
tune times he’s
not played well,”
Pettine said. “I
think he’ll admit
that as well. That’s
what we talk
about. The great
ones are going to
make big plays
when it’s needed
and I think that’s
one area where Joe
will look to improve.”
Haden echoes his coach’s
sentiment,and trusts things
will turn around.
“I want to be great,” he
added. “I just need to keep
working hard and those plays
are going to come. It’s noth-
ing mysterious that I need to
do differently.”
Americans get perspective from Wounded Warriors
Associated Press
GLENEAGLES, Scotland — The
American team got a dose of perspec-
tive even before the Ryder Cup began.
Captain Tom Watson invited two
“Wounded Warriors” to speak to his
team Tuesday night, which he referred
to as a time filled with inspiration and
a reminder that no matter how great the
pressure will be at Gleneagles, it’s still
just golf.
“The players, they went up to them
and asked questions. They thanked
them,” Watson said. “But it was a very
sobering experience. In this cauldron of
pressure, it’s great to have that. We make
it a big deal but it’s not that big a deal. It
is the Ryder Cup. It is the event of golf.
Yeah, there’s pressure there. But you
look in perspective of what those men
did … they work for a living.
“There are people out there doing
work that very few other people will do
in the world.”
One of them was Noah Galloway of
Birmingham, Alabama, who was on the
front line of ground troops in 2003 in
Iraq. Galloway lost his left arm above
the elbow and left leg above the knee
from an IED attack in Iraq in 2005.
Unconscious for five days, he woke up
on Christmas Eve to find out he had lost
two of his limbs. Galloway rehabili-
tated and took part in the Marine Corps
Marathon two years ago.
The other was Josh Olson of
Spokane, Washington, who lost
his right leg in an ambush in
2003 in Iraq. Two years later, he
joined the Army Marksmanship
Unit as an international rifle
shooter and instructor and has
earned numerous shooting
accomplishments. In 2012,
Olson became the first active-
duty service member wounded in combat
to compete in the Paralympics. He com-
peted in two rifle events.
“Josh and Noah gave two of the best
speeches that we’ve had,” Phil Mickelson
said. “We’re playing a game and we are
trying to overcome challenges to succeed
in a game. These two gentlemen have
overcome some of the greatest chal-
lenges that any individual could deal
with in life. They’re dealing with loss of
limbs, they’re dealing with near-death
experiences, they’re dealing with life
challenges, and they’re overcoming those
challenges. So we, as players, found this
to be very inspirational.
“It makes the challenge of overcom-
ing an incredibly strong European Team
seem not as great a challenge.”
SENIOR PLAYER: European cap-
tain Paul McGinley referred to Sergio
Garcia as a “senior player.”
He was talking about the
Ryder Cup. Garcia is only 34.
But the Spaniard is play-
ing in his seventh Ryder Cup,
having made his debut as a
19-year-old at Brookline.
McGinley still remembers
how exuberant Garcia was in
2002.
“He played 36 holes and
he’d come back, and there was one TV
in the team room down in the corner,”
McGinley recalled. “He would get his
food, he’d go down and he’d sit with
his food on his lap and he’d watch the
highlights. And every time he would
come on, he’d stand up and he’d tell
everybody to watch the TV. ‘Watch this
shot I’m about to play, watch this, watch
this, what I did, watch the American,
watch what he did after I did this.
“That innocence is something that
will always remain with me and that’s
something that I feel such a connection
with Sergio, because he was so raw back
then. He still has that exuberance, not to
the same level, but he still has that exu-
berance, which I really like about him.”
Nugent
Huber
Haden
1
Thursday, September 25, 2014 The Herald — 7 www.delphosherald.com

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CVS Health Corporation 80.82 +0.83
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General Dynamics Corporation 126.98 +1.01
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EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS
Close of business September 24, 2014
Tony Stewart will not face charges in deadly crash
By JENNA FRYER and
CAROLYN THOMPSON
Associated Press
CANANDAIGUA, N.Y. — After
more than six weeks in limbo, NASCAR
star Tony Stewart finally got the news he
had been hoping for.
A grand jury that heard testimony
from more than two dozen witness-
es, including accident reconstruction
experts and drivers, and looked at photo-
graphs and video decided against bring-
ing criminal charges against Stewart for
the death of 20-year-old sprint car driver
Kevin Ward Jr. during an Aug. 9 race.
That doesn’t mean it’s over.
A few hours after Ontario County
District Attorney Michael Tantillo
announced the grand jury’s decision in
this upstate New York hamlet, the Ward
family indicated in a statement read over
the telephone by sister Kayla Herring
that they will seek civil damages in the
young driver’s death.
“Our son got out of his car during
caution when the race was suspend-
ed. All the other vehicles were reduc-
ing speed and not accelerating except
for Stewart, who intentionally tried to
intimidate Kevin by accelerating and
sliding his car toward him, causing the
tragedy,” the family added Wednesday.
“The focus should be on the actions of
Mr. Stewart. This matter is not at rest
and we will pursue all remedies in fair-
ness to Kevin.”
The family might have a dif-
ficult task: Tantillo disclosed
that Ward was under the influ-
ence of marijuana the night
he died and said two different
videos were enhanced, frames
were isolated and viewed at at
least three different speeds and
finally overlaid with grids and
data. Both showed Stewart
had done nothing wrong.
“The videos did not dem-
onstrate any aberrational driv-
ing by Tony Stewart until the
point of impact with Kevin Ward, at
which point his vehicle veered to the
right up the track as a result of the colli-
sion. Prior to that, his course was pretty
straight,” said Tantillo. “Toxicology evi-
dence from Ward’s autopsy indicates
that at the time of operation he was
under the influence of marijuana. The
levels determined were enough to impair
judgment.”
Stewart’s reaction was not one of cel-
ebration and his statement had the same
twinge of sadness that he’s carried since
he returned to NASCAR three weeks
ago following three weeks of seclusion
after Ward’s death.
The 43-year-old NASCAR superstar
acknowledged the investiga-
tion was “long and emotionally
difficult” but noted it allowed
time for all the facts to be pre-
sented.
“This has been the toughest
and most emotional experience
of my life and it will stay with
me forever. I’m very grateful
for all the support I’ve received
and continue to receive,” he
added. “While much of the
attention has been on me,
it’s important to remember a
young man lost his life. Kevin
Ward Jr.’s family and friends will always
be in my thoughts and prayers.”
David Weinstein, a former state and
federal prosecutor in Miami who is not
involved in the case, said the toxicology
evidence will make it difficult for the
Wards to win a lawsuit against Stewart,
noting the Ward statement showed the
family was “clearly upset and at a vul-
nerable point.”
“Hopefully, someone will explain to
them that Kevin will be dragged through
the mud during a civil trial,” he added.
Associated Press
AMERICAN CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Buffalo 2 1 0 .667 62 52
N England 2 1 0 .667 66 49
Miami 1 2 0 .333 58 83
N.Y. Jets 1 2 0 .333 62 72
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Houston 2 1 0 .667 64 50
Indianapolis 1 2 0 .333 95 78
Tennessee 1 2 0 .333 43 69
Jacksonville 0 3 0 .000 44 119
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Cincinnati 3 0 0 1.00 80 33
Baltimore 2 1 0 .667 65 50
Pittsburgh 2 1 0 .667 73 72
Cleveland 1 2 0 .333 74 77
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Denver 2 1 0 .667 75 67
San Diego 2 1 0 .667 69 49
Kansas City 1 2 0 .333 61 65
Oakland 0 3 0 .000 37 65
NATIONAL CONFERENCE
East
W L T Pct PF PA
Philadelphia 3 0 0 1.00 101 78
Dallas 2 1 0 .667 77 69
N.Y. Giants 1 2 0 .333 58 77
Washington 1 2 0 .333 81 64
South
W L T Pct PF PA
Atlanta 2 1 0 .667 103 72
Carolina 2 1 0 .667 63 58
N Orleans 1 2 0 .333 78 72
Tampa Bay 0 3 0 .000 45 95
North
W L T Pct PF PA
Detroit 2 1 0 .667 61 45
Chicago 2 1 0 .667 75 62
Minnesota 1 2 0 .333 50 56
Green Bay 1 2 0 .333 54 79
West
W L T Pct PF PA
Arizona 3 0 0 1.00 66 45
Seattle 2 1 0 .667 83 66
St. Louis 1 2 0 .333 56 85
San Fran 1 2 0 .333 62 68
___
Today’s Game
N.Y. Giants at Washington, 8:25 p.m.
Sunday’s Games
Green Bay at Chicago, 1 p.m.
Buffalo at Houston, 1 p.m.
Tennessee at Indianapolis, 1 p.m.
Carolina at Baltimore, 1 p.m.
Detroit at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m.
Tampa Bay at Pittsburgh, 1 p.m.
Miami vs. Oakland at London, 1 p.m.
Jacksonville at San Diego, 4:05 p.m.
Philadelphia at San Francisco, 4:25 p.m.
Atlanta at Minnesota, 4:25 p.m.
New Orleans at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.
Open: Arizona, Cincinnati, Cleveland,
Denver, Seattle, St. Louis
Monday’s Game
New England at Kansas City, 8:30 p.m.
Associated Press
(Subject to change)
Today’s Games
SOUTH
Appalachian St. (1-2) at Georgia
Southern (2-2), 7:30 p.m.
SOUTHWEST
Texas Tech (2-1) at Okla St. (2-1), 7:30 p.m.
FAR WEST
UCLA (3-0) at Arizona St. (3-0), 10 p.m.
___
Friday’s Games
SOUTH
Middle Tennessee (2-2) at Old
Dominion (3-1), 8 p.m.
FAR WEST
Fresno St. (1-3) at N. Mexico (1-2), 8 p.m.
___
Saturday’s Games
EAST
Tulane (1-3) at Rutgers (3-1), Noon
Georgetown (2-2) at Colgate (1-2), Noon
Northwestern (1-2) at Penn St. (4-0), Noon
Colorado St. (2-1) at Boston College
(3-1), 12:30 p.m.
Monmouth (NJ) (2-1) at Lehigh (0-3),
12:30 p.m.
San Diego (2-1) at Marist (0-4), 1 p.m.
Army (1-2) at Yale (1-0), 1 p.m.
Fordham (3-1) at Holy Cross (2-2), 1:05 p.m.
Akron (1-2) at Pittsburgh (3-1), 1:30 p.m.
Villanova (2-1) at Penn (0-1), 3 p.m.
Bowling Green (2-2) at UMass (0-4), 3 p.m.
Miami (Ohio) (0-4) at Buffalo (2-2), 3:30 p.m.
W. Kentucky (1-2) at Navy (2-2), 3:30 p.m.
Rhode Island (0-3) at CCSU (1-3), 4 p.m.
Va.-Lynchburg (0-3) at St. Francis, Pa.
(1-3), 4 p.m.
Temple (2-1) at UConn (1-3), 4 p.m.
Columbia (0-1) at Albany (NY) (3-0), 6 p.m.
Harvard (1-0) at Brown (0-1), 6 p.m.
Cornell (0-1) at Bucknell (3-0), 6 p.m.
Wagner (1-2) at Lafayette (1-2), 6 p.m.
Dartmouth (1-0) at New Hampshire
(2-1), 6 p.m.
Davidson (1-3) at Princeton (0-1), 6 p.m.
William & Mary (3-1) at Stony Brook
(1-3), 6 p.m.
Maine (1-2) at Towson (2-2), 7 p.m.
Notre Dame (3-0) vs. Syracuse (2-1) at
East Rutherford, N.J., 8 p.m.
SOUTH
Charleston Southern (4-0) at Charlotte
(3-1), Noon
Tennessee (2-1) at Georgia (2-1), Noon
Vanderbilt (1-3) at Kentucky (2-1), Noon
W. Michigan (2-1) at Virginia Tech (2-2),
12:30 p.m.
NC A&T (3-1) at Howard (1-3), 1 p.m.
Mercer (3-1) at VMI (1-3), 1:30 p.m.
SC State (2-2) at Hampton (1-3), 2 p.m.
W. Carolina (2-1) at Furman (2-2), 3:30
p.m.
Wake Forest (2-2) at Louisville (3-1),
3:30 p.m.
Florida St. (3-0) at NC State (4-0),
3:30 p.m.
FIU (1-3) at UAB (2-1), 3:30 p.m.
Kent St. (0-3) at Virginia (2-2), 3:30 p.m.
Louisiana Tech (2-2) at Auburn (3-0),
4 p.m.
Florida Tech (3-0) at Bethune-Cookman
(2-1), 4 p.m.
Delaware (2-1) at James Madison (2-2),
4 p.m.
Morgan St. (2-2) at Norfolk St. (0-4),
4 p.m.
Southern U. (2-2) at Alcorn St. (3-1),
5 p.m.
UTSA (1-2) at FAU (1-3), 5 p.m.
Alabama A&M (0-4) at MVSU (0-3),
5 p.m.
Texas Southern (4-0) at Alabama St.
(3-1), 6 p.m.
Valparaiso (1-2) at Campbell (0-3), 6
p.m.
Savannah St. (0-3) at Delaware St.
(0-4), 6 p.m.
Gardner-Webb (2-2) at The Citadel
(0-3), 6 p.m.
Samford (2-1) at Chattanooga (1-2),
7 p.m.
North Carolina (2-1) at Clemson (1-2),
7 p.m.
Elon (1-2) at Coastal Carolina (4-0),
7 p.m.
Troy (0-4) at Louisiana-Monroe (2-1), 7 p.m.
Ark. Tech (2-1) at McNeese St. (1-1), 7 p.m.
Jacksonville St. (2-1) at Murray St.
(1-2), 7 p.m.
Missouri (3-1) at S. Carolina (3-1), 7 p.m.
Rice (0-3) at Southern Miss. (2-2), 7 p.m.
Florida A&M (0-3) at Tennessee St.
(3-1), 7 p.m.
SE Missouri (2-2) at UT-Martin (1-3), 7 p.m.
Virginia-Wise (0-2) at Wofford (1-2), 7 p.m.
N Mexico St. (2-2) at LSU (3-1), 7:30 p.m.
Duke (4-0) at Miami (2-2), 7:30 p.m.
Memphis (2-1) at Mississippi (3-0), 7:30 p.m.
MIDWEST
Jacksonville (2-1) at Butler (2-1), Noon
UTEP (2-1) at Kansas St. (2-1), Noon
Wyoming (3-1) at Michigan St. (2-1),
Noon
Iowa (3-1) at Purdue (2-2), Noon
S Florida (2-2) at Wisconsin (2-1), Noon
Maryland (3-1) at Indiana (2-1), 1:30 p.m.
E. Illinois (1-3) at Ohio (2-2), 2 p.m.
Liberty (3-1) at Indiana St. (2-1), 3 p.m.
Minnesota (3-1) at Michigan (2-2), 3:30 p.m.
Texas (1-2) at Kansas (2-1), 4 p.m.
Tennessee Tech (1-2) at N. Iowa (1-2),
5 p.m.
Cincinnati (2-0) at Ohio St. (2-1), 6 p.m.
SE Louisiana (2-2) at Incarnate Word
(0-4), 7 p.m.
W. Illinois (2-2) at S. Illinois (3-1), 7 p.m.
Cent. Michigan (2-2) at Toledo (2-2), 7 p.m.
Austin Peay (0-3) at Illinois St. (2-0),
7:30 p.m.
Baylor (3-0) at Iowa St. (1-2), 8 p.m.
Illinois (3-1) at Nebraska (4-0), 9 p.m.
SOUTHWEST
TCU (2-0) at SMU (0-3), Noon
Arkansas (3-1) vs. Texas A&M (4-0) at
Arlington, Texas, 3:30 p.m.
Nicholls St. (0-4) at Cent. Arkansas
(1-3), 4 p.m.
Grambling St. (1-3) vs. Prairie View
(0-3) at Dallas, 5 p.m.
Jackson St. (2-2) at Ark.-Pine Bluff
(1-2), 7 p.m.
Abilene Christian (2-2) at Houston
Baptist (1-2), 8 p.m.
Sam Houston St. (1-3) at Lamar (3-1),
8 p.m.
Texas St. (1-2) at Tulsa (1-2), 8 p.m.
FAR WEST
N. Colorado (1-2) at Montana (2-2),
3:30 p.m.
Colorado (2-2) at California (2-1), 4
p.m.
Sacramento St. (3-1) at Idaho St. (1-2),
4:05 p.m.
North Dakota (2-2) at Montana St. (2-2),
4:05 p.m.
Stanford (2-1) at Washington (4-0),
4:15 p.m.
South Alabama (1-2) at Idaho (0-3),
5 p.m.
Boise St. (3-1) at Air Force (2-1), 7 p.m.
Cal Poly (1-2) at N. Arizona (2-2), 7
p.m.
UNLV (1-3) at San Diego St. (1-2),
8 p.m.
Washington St. (1-3) at Utah (3-0),
8 p.m.
Weber St. (0-4) at S. Utah (0-4), 8:05
p.m.
E. Washington (3-1) at UC Davis (1-2),
9 p.m.
Nevada (2-1) at San Jose St. (1-2),
10:30 p.m.
Oregon St. (3-0) at Southern Cal (2-1),
10:30 p.m.
NFL Glance
College Football Schedule
MLB Glance
Stewart
(Continued from page 6)
Notes: Europe needs 14 points to retain
the cup and the United States needs
14 1/2 to win. The United States leads
the series 25-12-2. Europe has won
five of the last six matches and seven
out of nine. The Americans last won in
2008 at Valhalla in Kentucky. The U.S.
is winless in Europe since 1993 at The
Belfry, the last time Tom Watson was
captain. … Poulter is 7-1 in the last two
events and 12-3 in four appearances. …
Mickelson has qualified for a U.S.-record
10 consecutive teams. … The team from
Britain and Ireland was expanded in
1979 to include all of Europe. … Jack
Nicklaus designed the course. … The
2016 matches will be played at Hazeltine
in Minnesota.
___
CHAMPIONS TOUR
FIRST TEE OPEN
Site: Pebble Beach, California.
Schedule: Friday-Sunday.
Courses: Pebble Beach Golf Links
(6,837 yards, par 72) and Del Monte Golf
Course (6,357 yards, par 72).
Purse: $1.9 million. Winner’s share:
$285,000.
Television: Golf Channel (Friday, 4-6
p.m.; Saturday, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., 4-6
p.m.; Sunday, 3-5 a.m., 11:30 a.m.-1
p.m., 4-7 p.m.).
Last year: Kirk Triplett successfully
defended his title, beating Doug Garwood
and Dan Forsman by two strokes.
Last week: Paul Goydos won the
Hawaii Championship in his fifth start
on the 50-and-over tour. Fred Funk and
Scott Dunlap tied for second, a stroke
back.
Notes: Davis Love III is making
his second Champions Tour start. The
20-time PGA Tour winner tied for 64th
last week in Hawaii. He won the PGA
Tour’s Pebble Beach event in 2001 and
2003. … Mark O’Meara won five PGA
Tour titles at Pebble Beach, the last in
1997. He also won the 1979 California
State Amateur at Pebble Beach. … Jeff
Sluman won in 2008, 2009 and 2011. …
The final round will be played at Pebble
Beach. … The tour is off next week. Play
will resume Oct. 10-12 with the SAS
Championship in Cary, North Carolina.
___
PGA TOUR
Next event: Frys.com Open, Oct.
9-12, Silverado Resort and Spa, Napa,
California.
Last event: Billy Horschel won the
season-ending Tour Championship on
Sept. 14 at East Lake in Atlanta to take
the FedEx Cup title and $10 million
bonus. He won the BMW Championship
the previous week in Colorado.
Online: http://www.pgatour.com
___
LPGA TOUR
Next event: Reignwood LPGA
Classic, Oct. 2-5, Reignwood Pine Valley
Golf Club, Beijing.
Last week: Mi Jung Hur won the
Yokohama Tire LPGA Classic in
Alabama. She had a tournament-record
21-under 267 total for a four-stroke vic-
tory over top-ranked Stacy Lewis.
Online: http://www.lpga.com
___
EUROPEAN TOUR
Next event: Alfred Dunhill Links
Championship, Oct. 2-5, St. Andrews,
Old Course; Carnoustie, Championship
Course; Kingsbarns Golf Links; St.
Andrews and Carnoustie, Scotland.
Last week: Dutchman Joost Luiten
won the Wales Open for his third
European Tour title. England’s Tommy
Fleetwood and Ireland’s Shane Lowry
tied for second, a stroke back.
Online: http://www.europeantour.com
Golf
(Continued from page 6)
There are the other three: Brandon J. Kimmet, Matthew
S. Niemeyer and Christopher J. Mohr; that were in the same
vehicle as Mr. Guy.
Their pain is also unique and I can only imagine that par-
ticular suffering.
Rest in Peace, Jacob.
————
These further thoughts aren’t quite the same as the
above but they are about endings.
The Hall-of-Fame career of Yankee shortstop Derek Jeter
is nearing its end.
The iconic pro will play — weather permitting — his
final game at Yankee Stadium tonight against the Baltimore
Orioles.
I am no Yankee fan but I don’t dislike them as I used to.
It’s always sad to see a Boy of Summer – or an NFL/NBA
star — decide to leave the field of play permanently.
Even his most ardent critics — and Yankee haters — have
to acknowledge that, love him or hate him, he was one of the
best shortstops to ever play the game.
His 3,461 hits definitely puts him up there and he was
pretty solid defensively.
Will I say he was THE greatest? No.
As I have written before, the game has changed so much
over the years — the Dead-ball Era; the great pitchers
of the 1950s, 60s and 70s; the Steroids Era; and now the
Post(hopefully)-Steroids Era — that it really is hard to quan-
tify things.
However, he is a future first-ballot HOFer and anyone that
doesn’t vote for him just so there is no unanimous pick should
no longer be allowed to vote.
He — and all the other lesser lights that will hang them up
after Sunday or the playoffs — will be missed, whether we
like it or not.
Musings
Indians keep playoff pulse going, beat Royals 6-4
By TOM WITHERS
Associated Press
CLEVELAND — Yan Gomes hit a
3-run homer, Michael Brantley got three
more hits and the Cleveland Indians
stayed in the AL wild-card chase for at
least one more day with a 6-4 win over
the Kansas City Royals on Wednesday
night.
A loss would have eliminated the
Indians but after blowing a 3-0 lead,
they rallied and moved within 3½ games
of Kansas City and Oakland in the wild-
card standings. There are four days left
in the regular season.
The Royals, who haven’t made the
playoffs since 1985, fell two games
behind first-place Detroit in the AL
Central.
Zach McAllister (4-7) pitched 2
1/3 scoreless innings and Cody Allen
worked the ninth for his 23rd save.
Brantley has hit safely in 15 straight
games and needs one more hit to be the
first Indians player with 200 in a season
since Kenny Lofton in 1996.
The Indians took the lead in the
fifth off rookie Brandon Finnegan
(0-1) on Carlos Santana’s RBI
groundout. Cleveland added a run
in the sixth on pinch-hitter David
Murphy’s sacrifice fly.
Cleveland entered the unusual series
— the teams completed a suspended
game on Monday — 3½ games behind
the Royals and the Indians ended in the
same place. Unfortunately for them,
they wasted a chance to pull closer and
now have to win their final three games
and hope for help from other teams to
play in the postseason.
Billy Butler had three RBIs for
Kansas City, which can lock up one of
the two wild cards by winning one of
four games in Chicago against the White
Sox starting today.
Their flimsy playoff hopes fad-
ing, the Indians scored twice in the
fifth to take a 5-4 lead.
Jason Vargas hit Michael Bourn
with a pitch to open the inning and
Royals manager Ned Yost pulled the
left-hander, who has just one win in
his last seven starts.
Jose Ramirez doubled off the wall
and the speedy Bourn, waved around by
third-base coach Mike Sarbaugh, scored
the tying run on a headfirst dive into
the plate, reaching in with his left hand
to avoid catcher Salvador Perez’s tag.
Ramirez moved up on a fielder’s choice
and scored on Santana’s grounder.
Lohse throws 2-hitter, Brewers beat Reds 5-0
By JOE KAY
Associated Press
CINCINNATI — Kyle Lohse made the most of another
wasteful day for Milwaukee’s offense, throwing a 2-hitter and
driving in a run on Wednesday night for a 5-0 victory that
forestalled elimination from the playoffs a bit longer.
Milwaukee will be eliminated from the wild card race
with a loss or a win by San Francisco, which played later
Wednesday at Los Angeles. Pittsburgh clinched at least
the other wild card spot on Tuesday night.
The Brewers led the NL Central for 150 days but fell
apart at the end. Since June 28th, they’ve gone 30-45.
The offense has unraveled, scoring two or fewer runs in
each of the previous six games.
Lohse (13-9) gave up a pair of singles by Jack Hannahan in
his second shutout of the season. Lohse was 2-1 in five starts
against the Reds this season with a 2.13 ERA. He also had a
sacrifice fly during Milwaukee’s 3-run eighth inning, which
was highlighted by Jean Segura’s 2-run double.
Rickie Weeks had a pair of singles and drove in a run and
Carlos Gomez had an RBI double off Daniel Corcino (0-2),
who made his third start in the majors.
The Brewers got a run in the fourth but even that came with
a misplay. Aramis Ramirez doubled, advanced on a groundout
and scored on Weeks’ single. Weeks was thrown out by more
than 10 feet as he tried to stretch it to a double.
Gomez doubled home a run in the fifth, when the Brewers
left the bases loaded. The Brewers loaded the bases again in
the seventh with two outs but Ramirez grounded out, keeping
it 2-0.
Billy Hamilton made the game’s best play. He
stretched above the fence in center to steal a home run
away from Ryan Braun in the third inning, slamming
the right side of his head hard against the fence. He
held the side of his head as he left the field and came
out of the game in the fifth with a mild concussion.
TRAINER’S ROOM: Reds: Right-handed starter Mat
Latos is slowly recovering from a bruised right elbow that has
sidelined him since Sept. 12. “He’s been able to throw but not
completely pain-free,” manager Bryan Price said.
ON DECK
Brewers: Milwaukee plays its final road game today.
Yovani Gallardo (8-10) is 0-4 in his last six starts.
Associated Press
National League
East Division
W L Pct GB
x-Wash 92 64 .590 —
Atlanta 77 81 .487 16
New York 76 81 .484 16½
Miami 75 82 .478 17½
Philadelphia 72 86 .456 21
Central Division
W L Pct GB
z-St. Louis 88 70 .557 —
z-Pittsburgh 86 72 .544 2
Milwaukee 81 77 .513 7
Cincinnati 73 85 .462 15
Chicago 70 88 .443 18
West Division
W L Pct GB
z-L Angeles 90 68 .570 —
San Fran 85 72 .541 4½
San Diego 75 82 .478 14½
Colorado 66 92 .418 24
Arizona 63 96 .396 27½
z-clinched playoff berth
x-clinched division
___
Wednesday’s Results
Minnesota 2, Arizona 1
N.Y. Mets at Washington, ppd., rain
Milwaukee 5, Cincinnati 0
Philadelphia 2, Miami 1
Atlanta 6, Pittsburgh 2
St. Louis at Chicago Cubs, 8:05 p.m.
Colorado at San Diego, 9:10 p.m.
San Francisco at L.A. Dodgers, 10:10
p.m.
Today’s Games
Milwaukee (Gallardo 8-10) at Cincinnati
(Holmberg 1-2), 12:35 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Gee 7-8) at Washington
(Treinen 2-3), 1:05 p.m., 1st game
Philadelphia (D.Buchanan 6-8) at Miami
(Koehler 9-10), 4:10 p.m.
N.Y. Mets (Za.Wheeler 11-10) at
Washington (G.Gonzalez 9-10), 7:05
p.m., 2nd game
Pittsburgh (Volquez 12-7) at Atlanta
(Hale 4-4), 7:10 p.m.
San Diego (Cashner 5-7) at San
Francisco (Y.Petit 5-5), 10:15 p.m.
————————
American League
East Division
W L Pct GB
x-Baltimore 95 63 .601 —
New York 81 77 .513 14
Toronto 81 77 .513 14
Tampa Bay 76 81 .484 18½
Boston 68 89 .433 26½
Central Division
W L Pct GB
z-Detroit 88 70 .557 —
Kansas City 86 72 .544 2
Cleveland 83 76 .522 5½
Chicago 72 86 .456 16
Minnesota 68 90 .430 20
West Division
W L Pct GB
x-L Angeles 98 61 .616 —
Oakland 86 72 .544 11½
Seattle 83 75 .525 14½
Houston 69 89 .437 28½
Texas 64 93 .408 33
z-clinched playoff berth
x-clinched division
___
Wednesday’s Results
Baltimore 9, N.Y. Yankees 5
Detroit 6, Chicago White Sox 1
Minnesota 2, Arizona 1
L.A. Angels 5, Oakland 4
Toronto 1, Seattle 0
Cleveland 6, Kansas City 4
Tampa Bay at Boston, 7:10 p.m.
Houston at Texas, 8:05 p.m.
Today’s Games
Seattle (Wilhelmsen 3-2) at Toronto (Da.
Norris 0-0), 4:07 p.m.
Baltimore (Gausman 7-7) at N.Y. Yankees
(Kuroda 11-9), 7:05 p.m.
Minnesota (May 3-5) at Detroit (Scherzer
17-5), 7:08 p.m.
Tampa Bay (Hellickson 1-4) at Boston
(Webster 4-3), 7:10 p.m.
Oakland (Hammel 2-6) at Texas (Lewis
10-14), 8:05 p.m.
Kansas City (Shields 14-8) at Chicago
White Sox (Quintana 9-10), 8:10 p.m.
8 – The Herald Thursday, September 25, 2014 www.delphosherald.com
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890 Trucks
895 Vans/Minivans
899 Want To Buy
925 Legal Notices
950 Seasonal
953 Free & Low Priced
670 Miscellaneous
COMMUNITY
SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES
NEWER FACILITY
419-692-0032
Across from Arby’s
GESSNER’S
PRODUCE
CHRYSANTHEMUM’S
ASTERS, PUMPKINS,
GOURDS, STRAW
AND INDIAN CORN
AVAILABLE NOW!
APPLES COMING
THIS WEEK!
9:00 AM-6:00 PM DAILY, SUNDAY 11A-4PM
9557 St. Rt. 66, Delphos, OH 45833
419-692-5749 • 419-234-6566
C
a
r
d
e
r’s Custom
C
a
r
t
s
Specializing in Stock and
Custom Golf Carts
Tim Carder
567-204-3055
Delphos, Ohio
665
Lawn, Garden,
Landscaping
L.L.C.
• Trimming & Removal
• Stump Grinding
• 24 Hour Service • Fully Insured
KEVIN M. MOORE
(419) 235-8051
TEMAN’S
OUR TREE
SERVICE
Bill Teman 419-302-2981
Ernie Teman 419-230-4890
Since 1973
419-692-7261
• Trimming • Topping • Thinning
• Deadwooding
Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal
DAY’S PROPERTY
MAINTENANCE
LLC
Brent Day
567-204-8488
• Mowing
• Landscaping
• Lawn Seeding
www.dayspropertymaintenance.com
419-203-8202
bjpmueller@gmail.com
Fully insured
Mueller Tree
Service
Tree Trimming,
Topping & Removal,
Brush Removal
655
Home Repair
and Remodel
Quality Home
Improvements
• Roofing &
siding
• Seamless
gutters
• Decks
• Windows &
doors
• Electrical
• Complete
remodeling
No job too small!
419.302.0882
A local business
610 Automotive
Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
• automatic transmission
• standard transmission
• differentials
• transfer case
• brakes & tune up
625 Construction
POHLMAN
BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES • SIDING • ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential
& Commercial
• Agricultural Needs
• All Concrete Work
SAFE &
SOUND
Security Fence
DELPHOS
SELF-STORAGE
•Pass Code •Lighted Lot
•Affordable •2 Locations
Why settle for less?
419-692-6336
Check
The
Service
Directory
to Find A
Repairman
You Need!
AT YOUR
S
ervice
Is It
Broken?
Find A
Repairman
To Fix It
Check The
Service
Directory
In
The
Delphos
Herald
HIRING
FULL & PART TIME
DRIVERS
with 5+ OTR experience.
LTL loads are 99% no-touch freight.
Home on weekends & occasionally mid-week.
Pay ave. $0.50/mile,
$50,000-$60,000 per year, holiday pay
& benefts package available.
Call 419-222-1630
Monday-Friday 8am to 5pm
105 Announcements
TEXAS HOLD!EM
every Monday evening
at the COA.
Play starts at 6 pm
$15 buy in.
220 Fox Rd, VW
419-238-5011
235 Help Wanted
BREESE FARMS LLC
Class A-CDL
Drivers Needed
Local company with
openings for OTR driver
running van loads &
regional driver running
hopper loads in Ohio,
Michigan & Indiana.
Please call
Dave @ 419-203-2745
Missy @ 419-203-1376
CLASS A CDL Truck
Drivers wanted for local
work. One full-time, one
part-time position avail-
able. Home daily, round
trip runs. Ottoville and
Columbus Grove loca-
tions preferred. Excellent
pay. Call 419-707-0537.
HELP WANTED. Auto-
mot i ve/ Heavy Dut y
Truck Technician for lo-
cal car dealership. Com-
petitive pay, paid vaca-
tion and medical/dental
insurance plan. Apply at:
Knippen Chrysler, 800
We s t 5 t h St . ,
Delphos,OH 45833.
*HOME DAILY*
CDL A
$800-$900 WKLY
Allen County Pallet Co. is
looking to hire
class A CDL drivers.
All shifts are home daily
with full benefts, 401 K
plans, paid vacations,
paid holidays.
All routes are 90% drop
and hook which are
compensated and
100% no touch.
Stop in at
700 E. Hanthorn Rd.
Monday-Friday
8am to 4 pm to apply.
OTR, CLASS A CDL
SEMI-DRIVER. Home
most evenings, includes
benefits. Send resume to
AWC Trucki ng, 835
Skinner St., Delphos,
OH 45833 or to
ulmsinc@bizwoh.rr.com,
419-692-3951
235 Help Wanted
PART-TIME HELP
wanted Mornings and af-
ternoons. Drug Screen
Contingent upon hiring.
Good work history re-
quired. Apply at Pats Do-
nuts, 662 Elida Ave, Del-
phos
305
Apartment/
Duplex For Rent
NEWLY REMODELED
2-bedroom apartment,
234 N. Cass St . ,
$400/mo. No pets. Call
419- 615- 5798 or
419-488-3685
320 House For Rent
SEVERAL MOBI LE
Homes/House for rent.
View homes online at
www.ulmshomes.com or
inquire at 419-692-3951
405
Acreage and
Lots For Sale
22+ ACRES of tillable
land for sale East of Del-
phos. Price in line with
current appraisal. If inter-
ested call 419-236-4264,
11am-8pm.
425 Houses For Sale
BY OWNER. Updated
4BR, 2BA home w/base-
ment and heated, at -
tached two-car garage.
Located in Landeck. For
a p p o i n t me n t c a l l
419-234-2231.
515 Auctions
VISA
MC
DISCOVER
PUBLIC
AUCTION
Every Saturday
at 6pm
Large Variety of
Merchandise
Everyone Welcome
Porter Auction
19326 CO. Rd. 60
Grover Hill, OH
For info call
(419) 587-3770
555
Garage Sales/
Yard Sales
717 W. 3rd St. Thursday,
2pm- 6pm, Fr i day,
9am-5pm. Housewares,
Disney movies, many
collectibles and an-
tiques, lots of new Hal-
loween and Christmas
decorations.
555
Garage Sales/
Yard Sales
MOVING SALE 1331
Rose Anna Drive, Fri-
day, 9/26, 9am-4pm.
Twin bed, coffee & end
tables, standing jewelry
box, curio, bar stools,
lots of misc.
MULTI-FAMILY, COR-
NER North St. and Elm St.
9/25-9/27, Thurs-Sat,
8am- 8pm. Ant i ques,
books, kids’ items, furni-
ture, kitchenware, toys,
2-8’ wood tables, drafting
table, quilting items.
577 Miscellaneous
LAMP REPAIR, table or
floor. Come to our store.
Ho h e n b r i n k TV.
419-695-1229
SEARS EXERCI SE
bike, like new, $10. Col-
l ect or dol l s, $35.
419-695-8751
583
Pets and
Supplies
FREE KITTENS to good
homes. 419-692-4525
MALTESE, SHIH Tzus,
Pomapoos, Shi hpoos,
Shihtese. Garwick's the
Pet Peopl e. Puppi es
reduced: Terrier mix $99.
Morkie $299.
419- 795-5711.
garwicksthepetpeople.com
.
592 Wanted to Buy
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
Dear Abby
Illusion of perfect marriage is
shattered by man’s discovery
DEAR ABBY: I always
thought that “Lana,” my wife of
14 years, and I had the perfect
marriage. When I discovered she
was having an affair, it hit me
like a train wreck. After many
weeks of trying to discover who
she really is, I found out she has
had several affairs throughout our
marriage.
I still love my wife and feel
I could forgive her and regain
my trust in her. The problem is,
she says she is trying to recover
from her actions, so she can no
longer hear about my problems or
respond to any of my questions.
Lana is now saying I need to
see someone to discuss our issues
with. We are already seeing a
marriage counselor, but I suspect
he is too connected to us as a
couple. What do you think? --
LOST IN LIMBO
DEAR IN LIMBO: I think
the marriage counselor should
have made clear to you and your
wife that in order for trust to be
rebuilt it takes LOTS of dialogue
and listening on the part of both
spouses. And painful as it may
be for Lana, she owes you the
answers to your questions.
That said, I think she is correct
in suggesting you talk to someone
individually. With the help of
a licensed psychotherapist --
someone who is there JUST
FOR YOU -- you may be able
to rationally decide whether
your wife is capable of being the
person you assumed she was, and
if staying married to her is the best
thing for you.
DEAR ABBY: My mother died
a few years ago after a prolonged
illness. My father has found a new
lady (“Colette”) to share his life,
and they are now engaged.
My problem is my sisters. We
are all adults with families of our
own. They don’t like Colette at all.
They are rude to her and behave
like spoiled children. Colette is
very different from Mom, but
our family has always been open-
minded and taken pride in our
conviction that “normal” is just a
setting on the dryer.
Colette isn’t after Dad’s money,
nor is she forcing her way into
our lives. She’s also not trying
to replace Mom. It appears she
genuinely cares for our dad,
which I can understand. He’s a
good man, smart, attractive and
fun to be with.
Dad is happy as a clam. He’s
enjoying life and has lots more
life to live. The only thing that
mars his happiness is my sisters’
attitudes. What can I do to help
them? I don’t want to be too harsh
because I know they are still
grieving, but I hate to see them
drive a wedge into what remains
of our family. -- JOY IN TEXAS
DEAR JOY: Please accept
my sympathy for the loss of
your mother. Perhaps you should
remind your sisters how grateful
they should be that your father
has been able to find happiness
after losing your mother. Not
all widowers are able to do that.
Stress that his desire to remarry is
a tribute to the relationship he had
with your mother, because men
who had unfulfilling marriages
usually don’t want to commit
again.
Point out that they have nothing
to gain by alienating Colette and
a lot to lose, because the more
they treat her with disrespect, the
farther away they will drive her --
and your dad. Then suggest that if
they can’t resolve their grief, they
join a support group or consult a
therapist for help.
Dear Abby is written by Abigail
Van Buren, also known as Jeanne
Phillips, and was founded by her
mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact
Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com
or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles,
CA 90069.
COPYRIGHT 2014 UNIVERSAL
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your CDL? 3 wk training
available! Don’t wait,
call today to get started!
1-866-203-8445
Phone: 419-695-1006 • Phone: 419-879-1006
103 N. Main St. Delphos, OH
Don’t make a
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View all our listings at
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7:00-8:00 p.m.
320 Cass Street Delphos Chuck Peters $59,000
www.DickClarkRealEstate.com
D
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Twilight Tour!
1 OPEN HOUSE
THURSDAY, SEPT. 25, 2014
. .
DEAR DOCTOR
K: You’ve written
about “superfoods”
that deliver a lot
of nutritional bang
for their buck. Do
you have a list of
superfoods for heart
health?
DEAR READER:
Many foods -- from
the everyday to the
exotic -- are rich in
nutrients that help
keep heart disease
at bay. That’s good
news, and it’s been
documented in many
scientific studies.
My colleagues
in nutrition science
at the Harvard
School of Public
Health and Harvard
Medical School
have published the
following list of heart-
healthy superfoods.
They and I use the
word “superfoods”
advisedly. Obviously,
no food offers
anything like perfect
protection against
any illness. But many
foods, when they are
regularly consumed
as part of your diet,
improve your odds
of escaping heart
disease.
Since heart disease
is the No. 1 cause of
premature death, I’d
call foods that reduce
that risk “super.”
I might even call
them “super-duper.”
Here’s a list:
-- OATMEAL.
Oats help lower
cholesterol. They
also keep blood sugar
steady, reducing the
risk of obesity and
diabetes, both linked
to heart disease.
-- ORANGES are
rich in cholesterol-
reducing soluble
fiber; in potassium,
which helps control
blood pressure; and
in vitamin C.
-- BEANS provide
hearty doses of
protein, fiber and
minerals. They
can help lower
cholesterol and blood
pressure, and keep
your blood sugar
from spiking.
-- SPINACH
AND KALE. These
dark, leafy greens
are packed with
vitamins, minerals
and fiber, and contain
omega-3 fatty acids.
They deliver a lot of
nutrients without a
lot of calories.
-- AVOCADOS
are a rich source
of heart-healthy
monouns at ur at ed
fat. They contain
substantial amounts
of fiber, potassium,
several vitamins and
compounds that help
lower cholesterol.
-- EXTRA-
VIRGIN OLIVE
OIL is rich in LDL
cholesterol-lowering
monounsaturated fat.
It discourages blood
from clotting and
helps steady blood
sugar levels.
-- NUTS are an
excellent source of
fiber, healthy fats,
vitamins, minerals
and phytochemicals,
all known to protect
heart health. Nuts
lower harmful LDL
cholesterol, raise
protective HDL
cholesterol and lower
blood pressure.
-- SALMON. Fatty
fish such as salmon
are a great source of
omega-3 fatty acids.
People who eat more
fish have a lower risk
of dying from heart
disease.
-- BERRIES
are packed full of
substances that
help block plaque
from forming inside
arteries.
-- QUINOA
(KEEN-wah) is an
excellent plant-based
source of protein. It
also contains plenty
of fiber, vitamins and
minerals.
-- DARK
CHOCOLATE (70
percent cocoa or
higher) is rich in
flavonols, which may
help lower blood
pressure.
I first began
hearing about healthy
eating from my
kindergarten teacher.
I wondered how she
knew what foods
improved your health.
In fact, at that time
nutrition science was
in its infancy. Today,
studies of the eating
habits of millions
of people, and of
their subsequent
health, have given us
information we can
confidently use to
protect our hearts.
(Dr. Komaroff
is a physician and
professor at Harvard
Medical School. To
send questions, go
to AskDoctorK.com,
or write: Ask Doctor
K, 10 Shattuck
St., Second Floor,
Boston, MA 02115.)

DI S T R I B UT E D
BY UNIVERSAL
UCLICK FOR UFS
‘Superfoods’ offer heart-
healthy protection
Dr. Anthony L.
Komaroff, M.D.
Ask Doctor K
Take It On the Run.
Get the news anytime,
anywhere with an
eEdition subscription.
www.delphosherald.com
419-695-0015
The Delphos
Herald
eEdition
THURSDAY, SEPT. 25, 2014
This year will be a dynamic
one if you are prepared to
take on new challenges. Your
talents will go to waste if you
are too casual in presenting
what you have to offer. Strive
to get ahead by honing your
skills and mastering the arts of
promotion and networking.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
23) -- You have the ability to
infuence others to do things
your way. Once you have
determined what you need,
initiate a discussion with
people in a position to help you
out.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) -- You will waste time if
you are bouncing back and
forth between different tasks.
Formulate a concrete plan and
cross off each step as you move
along. Organization will lead
to success.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-
Dec. 21) -- An unusual pathway
will reveal itself via a new
acquaintance. You will reap
the benefts from something
you’ve been working on for a
long time. Minor health issues
will cause a setback.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-
Jan. 19) -- There will be tension
in your personal relationships.
Rather than try to infuence
those around you, let them
do their own thing. Occupy
yourself with a personal project
instead.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-
Feb. 19) -- A partnership
with someone you admire
will produce lucrative results.
Be ready to act when the
opportunity arises. Engage in
projects that you can do with
someone you love. Romance
looks promising.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) -- Practical matters will
keep you busy. Save yourself
some anguish by clearing up
health or legal issues as soon
as they crop up. A renovation
venture will bring favorable
results.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) -- If you feel something
needs to be said, speak up.
Your frankness may catch
a colleague off-guard, but
most people will admire your
honesty.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) -- Be optimistic, and leave
the past behind. Focus on the
positive people and activities
in your life, and reject negative
thoughts and people who bring
you down.
GEMINI (May 21-June
20) -- Take a pleasure trip.
Unfamiliar surroundings will
spark your creative imagination
and infuence your way of
thinking. A novel direction
appears to be possible. Embrace
new beginnings.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) -- Don’t rush into a delicate
situation. Remain in control
and try to fnd an arrangement
that will be agreeable and fair
to everyone concerned. Your
candor will be appreciated.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22)
-- You’ll be distressed about
business deals, fnancial issues
or health matters. Don’t confde
in a close friend when going
to an experienced source for
advice is what’s required.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22) -- If you investigate an
interesting career possibility,
you could fnd a way to instigate
some forward motion. It’s up to
you to make things happen.
COPYRIGHT 2014 United
Feature Syndicate, Inc.
DISTRIBUTED BY
UNIVERSAL UCLICK FOR
UFS
Zits
Blondie
For Better or Worse
Beetle Bailey
Pickles
Marmaduke
Garfeld
Born Loser
Hagar the Horrible
The Family Circus
®
By Bil Keane
Comics & Puzzles
Barney Google & Snuffy Smith
Hi and Lois
Today’s
Horoscope
By Eugenia Last
Answer to Sudoku
Crossword Puzzle
4 Poor Rich-
ard’s book
5 Like a good
cake
6 One, in Bonn
7 Uppity one
8 Raising a
ruckus
9 Do the trick
10 Party hearty
11 Spiral mol-
ecule
16 Kind of
hygiene
20 Self-image
22 Held offce
24 Beer barrel
25 “Pulp Fiction”
name
26 -- a ride
28 Lillie or
Arthur
31 Comics
caveman
33 Roswell
crasher
34 Mae West
role
35 TV network
37 As a group (2
wds.)
ACROSS
1 Take a bite
4 Iowa col-
lege town
8 Barbecue
site
12 Team cheer
13 Pork selec-
tion
14 Smooth
15 Trigger,
actually
17 Fluid rock
18 Diva’s
performances
19 Contradict
21 Formic acid
producers
23 Fish lung
24 -- Khan
27 Black
29 Nonfying
bird
30 Pear throw-
away
32 Big swallow
36 Poker, e.g.
38 Elongated
circle
40 Small lie
41 Collar site
43 Rock stars,
say
45 Sugar cane
products
47 -- Arnaz
49 Not relevant
51 Addison’s
partner
55 Suet et al.
56 Leopard
spots
58 Bluesman
-- Redding
59 Vivacity
60 Edge a
doily
61 Hay unit
62 Islets
63 Collected
sayings
DOWN
1 Inputter’s
slip
2 Swing a
sickle
3 Harvard foe
Yesterday’s answers
39 Is sympa-
thetic
42 Nile
snake
44 Reduce
calories
45 Gaucho’s
rope
46 No later
than
48 Term
paper
50 Long hike
52 Singer --
James
53 Slant
54 Is, to
Pedro
55 Pocket
watch chain
57 Bullring
shout
Thursday, September 25, 2014 The Herald — 9 www.delphosherald.com
2
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News
419-695-0015 Ext. 134
nspencer@delphosherald.com
Fax: 419-692-7704
405 N. Main Street Delphos, OH 45833-1598
visit our website at: www.delphosherald.com
Advertising:
Don Hemple 419-695-0015 ext. 138 • dhemple@delphosherald.com
Marilyn Hoffman 419-695-0015 ext. 131 • mhoffman@delphosherald.com
Stacy Prine 419-695-0015 ext. 129 • sprine@delphosherald.com
Jamie Shade 419-695-0015 ext. 128 • jshade@delphosherald.com
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
PITSENBARGER
AUTO SUPPLY
BELL AUTO SUPPLY
Aero Printing
Celebrations
Delphos Eagles
Delphos Tent & Awning
Edward Jones Investments
First Financial Bank
H.G. Violet
Kiwanis Club
ERIE SPONSORS
Lima/Allen County CVB
McDonalds
Mohr Smiles, Inc.
Northwest Physical Therapy
Optimist Club of Delphos
Peterson Construction
Raabe Ford
Raymond James/Clara Hanf
Rustic Cafe
Shenk & Clark
Sound Quest DJ Service
Sound Systems Solution
Union Bank Company
Unverferth Manufacturing
Baked to Perfection
Best One Tire
Cabo Mexican Restaurant
Chik-N-House
Cooking Country Classic’s
D.A.A.G.
Dancer by Gina
Delpha Chevrolet
Delphos Public Library
Delphos Rotary Club
Ft. Jennings Communications
Jubilee Winery
Lion Clothing
Lock Sixteen Catering
Northwest Physical Therapy
Pizza Hut
The Fort
Topp Chalet
Trista Christine Photography
Vanamatic
VFW Post 3035
Westrich Furniture
A & J Woodworking
All Purpose Contracting
Arby’s
Crop Production Services
Dana Sterling Welding
Delphos Bass Club
Delphos Canal Commission
Delphos Vision Care
Dickman Insurance
Dodie Sellers/ State Farm Ins
Elite Naturescapes
Elite Weddings
Flowers on Fifth
Ivy Hutch
K & K Builders
Kathy Ann’s Boutique
Knippen Chrysler
Kohart Recycling
Kreative Learning
Lavish Salon
Odenweller/ Jauman Ins
Rogers Rangers
Roselawn Manor
Sara Jane Living Center
Schmit Massa Ins
Jessica Merschman/Schrader Realty
Shear Brilliance
So Chic Salon
Taco Bell
Tom Ahl Chrysler Dodge
Touch of Nature
Wendy’s
10 – The Herald Thursday, September 25, 2014
www.delphosherald.com